OCR Interpretation


The Saint Paul globe. (St. Paul, Minn.) 1896-1905, November 03, 1902, Image 1

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn90059523/1902-11-03/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

VOL. XXV.—NO. 307.
Jhe Globe Office Jfs in the Germahia - Bank Building, fifth and Wabasha
DEMOCRATS
SHOULD WIN
Denial of Idea That They
Should Leave Congress
Republican
THEORY IS SOPHISTICAL
Ben T. Cable Tells Why the Demo
crats Ought to
Control
WOULD BE ABLE TO
PREVENT BAD LEGISLATION
Fallacious Impression That the Con
gressional Elections Should Be Al
lowed to Go by Default for Fear That
Coming Financial Trouble Would Be
Laid to the Democrats.
Special to The Globe.
CHICAGO, Nov. 2. —"The chances are
very bright for the Democrats having
a majority in the next house," said Ben
T. Cable today, in sounding a warning
to Democrats not to let control of the
house go by default on the theory that
it is better to leave the Republicans
entirely in the saddle for two years
more and so make them entirely re
sponsible for what may happen be
tween now and 1904. Mr. Cable is
chairman of the Democratic national
congressional executive committee. He
continued:
"My opinion is not based on a com
plete poll of the districts which have
been regarded by both parties as fair
fighting ground. The committee had
no money to make such a poll, but our
information comes from an enormous
amount of correspondence from those
doubtful districts and warrants the be
lief that the Democratic nominees will
be elected in a majority of the con
gressional districts. This correspond
ence, which expresses the exact situa
tion in the minds of the writers, indi
cates the existence of a revulsion of
feeling against the present party in
power.
An Insidious Theory.
"The danger which the Democratic
party has to fear in the election Tues
day is the insidious theory sent abroad
Continued on Third Page.
r-j\ V oftj, (ilf f ""^ *&^ ml^^^^ iai -- ■ ; | | -'« —
few light Biscuit light Pastry light Cab*
& Light Work light Cost- SURE and
m m Th* HOrS22}Cmaaf* :^y: Quick-a^a-wnk!
The St. Paul Globe
DAY'S NEWS SUMMARIZED
Weather for St. Paul and Vicinity-
Fair and warmer today and Tuesday.
POLITICAL— -
State canvassed by counties gives Ros
ing plurality of 9,264.
Deal to deliver the union labor vote to
Van Sant is closed by his appointees.
Ben T. Cable, chairman of the Demo
cratic national executive committee, ex
plains the fallacy gf the argument that
the Democrats would gain nothing by ob
taining control of congress.
DOMESTIC—
A Kentucky man Is charged with killing
his little son in a most barbarous manner.
Fourteen-year-old boy Commits suicide
near Pipestone, Minn., by burning him
self in a straw pile.
St. Pierre, Miquelon, is nearly destroyed
by fire. „.....■ . . .
Four young men are killed by the cars
at Algonquin, 111. i
Ladrones behead; the - presidente of ar
town in the Philippines, murder his wife'
and abduct his children. '.'•'"
President Roosevelt examines the bat
tlefield of Cedar Mountain, in Virginia.
Representatives of four, organizations
of railroad men meet at Springfield, Mass.
A Chicago man blows up a house with
a dynamite bomb, killing ,or wounding
the whole family.
A rich gold discovery in Idaho creates
a furious stampede.
LOCAL—
Leaders of organized labor throughout
the state heartily approve of Leonard A.
Rosing's attitude on the question of con
vict labor.
Women of the Foreign Missionary con
ference, in session in Minneapolis, occupy
pulpits in this city.
Eila N. Knott, Christian Scientist, in
an address delivered at the Grand opera
house, says that disease is not real.
Notorious thug tries to shoot Patrol
man Andy Call.
Patrolman Matheson receives a reward
of ?100 for capture of a desperado wanted
in Nicollet county.
MINNEAPOLIS—
Mayor Ames, of Minneapolis, will be
brought back from West Baden and tried
on three indictments, if his health will
permit.
MOVEMENTS OF STEAMSHIPS.
Port. Arrived. Sailed.
Moville Bavarian Columbia-
New York....La Champagne.
Gibraltar Trave.
Naples ;.. .Vancouver.
Queenstown Umbria.
New York Ndfcrdam.
Liverpool Cevic.
BOY KILLS HIMSELF
BY HORRIBLE MEANS
Fourteen-Year-Old Sets Fire to a
Straw.Pifeand Throws Himself
Into tjjf, F James.
Special to The Globe.
PIPESTONE, Minn., Nov. 2.—The
fourteen-year-old son of William Zahr
enhusen, a farmer living ten miles
southeast of this city, committed sui
cide last night by setting fire to a
straw pile and throwing himself into
the flames.
It is alleged that inhuman treatment
on the part of the parents caused the
boy to take his own life.
VAN SANT ALSO RAN.
MONDAY MORNIN3, NOVEMBER 3, 1902.
BARTER LABOR VOTE
SELF - CONSTITUTED LEADERS
AGREE TO DELIVER UNION
MEN IN VAN SANT CAMP
GOVERNOR'S APPOINTEES
STAR FACTORS IN DEAL
Lott Ceases Publicly Cursing Political
Independence of Men Who Made
Him, and With Hammond, Douglas,
Goss et al. Agrees to Control Them
at Polls—F. B. Doran, Labor Man
ager.
The union labor vote is to be deliv
ered solidly to Van Sant, according to
the terms of the contract undertaken
by the secret council of twelve, which
closed up its negotiations late Satur
day night in room 55, Windsor hotel.
The job undertaken by the secret
council is the delivery of the union
labor vote of the state. The execu
tion of the contract the members of
the council evidently consider a com
paratively small matter, as they did
not get the funds until Saturday night,
or rather Sunday morning—two days
before election.
The rjlan to manipulate the labor
vote is "a good one if it works. But
union labor men are prone to exercise
their intelligence, and the right to at
least vote for themselves. The swag
placed in the hands of the leaders of
the twelve Saturday may not accom
plish the desired object.
Meet at Windsor.
The council held several meetings
in room 55, the Windsor. At a Monday
night meeting, the first held, there
were present Deputy Labor Commis
sioner W. A. Hammond, Deputy Com
missioner E. B. i,ott, Janitor Douglas,
of the capitol staff; Michael Goss, sup
posed to represent the engineers, con
ductors and trainmen, and Frank B.
Doran, as representative of the plain
people, and exponent of the rights of
union labor, with a record.
Lott, who had for more than a
month been vigorously cursing his fel
low labor men, whom he claimed had
urged him into the race for the Repub
lican nomination for sheriff and then
knifed him, was prepared to listen to
reason and a general plan was out
lined. The members of the council
were to perfect an organization, and
then, in the guise of official repre
sentatives of union labor, inaugurate
a scheme to handle the entire union
vote of the state. Labor leaders at
Brainerd, Duluth, Winona and other
union strongholds were to be notified
that union labor had taken part in the
campaign, and calling upon the union
men to rally to the support of Van
Sant, who was to be exploited as the
champion of the eight-hour law.
Money Arrived Saturday.
Another meeting was held Thurs
day, but it, like the Monday meeting,
resulted in little more than talk. The
dough had not arrived. Saturday
night the needful came, and after%T)s
car Hallam conferred with some of
the leaders present the preliminaries
Continued on Third Page.
VAN SANVS OATH THAT HE - -||§
OWNS NO STEAMBOAT STOCK
, t Gives Lie to His Own Assertion in Letter Demanding
Retraction Which Was Not Made.
v In a blustering 'letter -to the editor of the St. Paul Globe,
I dated Oct. 27, 1902f Samuel &. Van Sant, Republican candi- .'.;';>
date for governVr;£preten ded to be outraged by statement •; .V:
that he is a "tax dodger"—and demanded retraction. The re- ";"-?w
- '--' traction waj. never Anade. ' ■ •-..-,: i : --.-' }:f~^
In that letter Van Sant declared he did-not own a steam- '
- boat or any part of -a': steamboat. Then he continued: •■".'
>-^ "I Da HOWEVER, OWN SHARES OF STOCK IN
V THE VAN SANT & MUSSER TOWING AND TRANSPOR
. TATION COMPAN _ '>F MUSCATINE, IOWA." ;
Following is, a certified copy of.; Van Sant's 'list of personal
property for the year 1901. which he signed and swore to as
. being true and correct: --; ' .; . - '
; It Contains! No Shares of stock in the company mentioned
in his letter, and hence he swore he owned no such stock. '..,,
>=?. ,;• The list: .■'-,'■ V^' "_J. „-.:; t-;; '-^ ' V'V. ' \.. ''.-■'■- ■-' ' "
V A SCHEDULE of the numbers and amounts ,of all personal
property? in the possession or under the control of S. R. 'Van Sant, '■'■;■■
. -':: -' belonging to same, on the first day of May, 1901, listed by self ,;;
; of the :;;.;.;•■ "- of V ";,;' in the : COUNTY •OP WINONA;> and M
. the State of • Minnesota, as required" by section : sixteen of -thev^-K
General Tax Law. . " .; : : i - £'■ \ ■-■ ■- -.■'■ -,•;..-;■"-"."
-■■ '. ■ ■'■-■■. -;7- '■■- --■■-.- ■-'■; ---•..; '■ . '-:■ % - „ - • .' :'• -.. '"" Assessor's ,;_:
ITEMS OF PROPERTY. No. Valuation •
"■-' ■.'•.•■'-.•■ ■'-'■■ .:"'.v, \;:-v... '-:. :- '-':■-: "" Dollars. .;;
Horses A j One year .old . ................... ..."............r
Mules : B | Two years old ,■.....%..;..:...;...;. .......;......-;.
;" -; Asses .. C: I Three years old and over ......;...;. . .■.......:.. *
A I One year '. old .. .../.:..7..;..... .r;r;. ............
: - B ] Two years old ...'. ;.........................
Cattle .c; | Cows-v... .....:..".■.: ::;....... ............ c:
D I Working Oxen ..-'..:..'...:.. ..../....'..•.......
-^ . - EI AH other ; Cattle three years old and . »•■'•",■ .
over .vv.■';■;'.....: ..... .. '.'■■■ .. ...-.:.......... .. ... ...r. .... -:^
Sheep of all ages ............:; ............
Hogs of all ages*..;;.. ...:.... ....J..V. ..............; :
"„ Wagons, Carriage. Bicycles and Sleighs ........ 1 J $10 ,
SEWING AND KNITTING MACH1NE5........ : =.. ............
_ WATCHES, AND CLOCKS V....... ..... ........ „. ............
. Melodeons and organs ..."■..- ................... .. ............
. Pianofortes .yi.V..:.../...V...;. ........ .V.i 1 100 .
» Household 5 and; Office; Furniture ..:■........ ........ 700
Agricultural ..Tools,: Implements and Machinery .. T...... ...'...
. Gold and 1 Silver Plate and Plated Ware .:..'.... .. ............
' Diamonds Jewe1ry......~.^: '..;.....".."......-.. 100
Franchises, Annuities, Royalties ;■. and Patent ; -;
.--."' ■'-■■ r: :':< ;• Rights •':.l\^:\.;'. ;.v;.~*:~.-:'........ .:...... ..........'..,■;
; Steamboat's, Sailing Vessels, Barges or other Wa- : -
■■■• -•"■■. r^ter l J3raft"-.r.;..v; ? .,.-..L ..V...\V.;..-..'...- ..:............'.
Goods and Merchandise. ~J'.".'. .V..'..... ."■'•'.;•. .".."•> '.'
I . Material and Manufactured Articles and Manu- .. . V
./•""fae'tures.-.'i'JT.''."-. .77.."'- :.'..;?..!.. ...-...'.'.. J.^......... ■
Manufacturers' . Tools, Implements and • Machin- - ;
:Jv cry, including Engines and 80ijpr5"..........-.. ............ -
;■_".. ■-' Moneys of Unincorporated Banks, TSankers, Bro- . 5 v ;:".; . :':-/. ■-'■
; kers or ; ; Etqok Jobbers ,t?Wtfc'.i^V....::.. ;. „...^.V.^.'.v^"
Credits of "iy.niiicorpora.ted Banks, Bankers, Bro- ' ■.•
• kers o" ock Jobbers '.7 .■/. T. :.V.r..l .\ ':*.-..". '.........••-•;..
Moneys other th;>n •of Banks, Bankers, : Brokers .- ' '„> ; ~v* | '
.... or Stock^ Job'ierss;'^ /V; V.7 .r^ivritV:;^; .'•. '.'•rrrtf;'»."..; .■.'..■...'.-;:
'■.Credits"othfcr.; i.an oi Banks, Bankers, 1; Brokers •>-' ~ - '~ ■ "-•'
L .;' -or Stock Jobbers rr.T r'.r.V;*.'^".."... ...'.■..•. ,:. ' ;- 5,250 .
• ■"- BONDS AND STOCKS, OTHER - THAN BANK
v,,STOCK»;::..^a :....;:.. ..-.:.:...;.•.w... -;.-'.i.......iv..v
" Shares of Bank Stock (including State and Na- * " . :^;
" \ ■:'■:■ : tional) j . i:. .*;.'!.:.:..".:...-?: r.v.-.-*;..:. r.'.'.. .......^.... .
SHARES OF BTOCK OF COMPANIES AND
ASSOCIATIONS NOT INCORPORATED
; : BYTHIS STATE ;;...^::v.:....:...:.. .:.;;...
Stock and • Furniture of Sample Rooms, Saloons, ' _' -
{' , and Eating, Houses (including billiard,
:- bagatelle and similar tables} v......':.'.'..'.. ..:..:..'.'. ..
The vahie of all-other articles of personal proper- j • . "
"■■..■ '>•'■ : .. ty net included ;in the preceding 26 items ..............'."--•.'';
The value of Elev;itors, Warehouses ,'. and Im- "
- . : -'. provements on Lands (the file of which , ".
.'; . is vested in any railroad company) ....
. The value of 'all Improvements on Lands held
". under . the Laws of the United States .'. '. ...;.:. ..I .....\
•Total value ■of thirty items as / determined ■-.-■- - -
'-■' ,-i. - by the Assessor .....: ..; 2. .. $6,160 -
STATE OF MINNESOTA, County of - Winona— ->_ ...
. I, . ' ' ..."—^ — ; ...'. ;^ do solemnly swear that I have, ; ac- .;
cording to the best of iriy knowledge and belief, 'listed in the •
above schedule AL.L;THE PERSONAL PROPERTY owned or :
- held by me, subject to taxation under the general tax law „of -..-,.-■
• this State; • and that I have listed for taxation property that
I am required .byUaw to list as :-\ guardian, parent, v husband,
trustee, executor, administrator, receiver, accounting T: officer,
agent,, attorney or factor. —; i-~ • . - , ■■■, ;•-.- ... , ;
■■■■: ■• ■ Subscribed; and : sworn to before me this sth day of July, '
. 1901. ;- v--:' ■'-:<■ ;•:;-';-■"■:-"-- ■''■ '> '■■"■'"" . ■■ • ■■'--.■:...[■■.•. :■ :- •. -.-. ■-"
.-• --v ... :.; (Signed) ;. V:" r;S. R. VAN SANT. ■
John Rose, Assessor. .;'._-. " : ~-.~- _„"» ■ ::
; ,-t: •Note — 16 of the General Tax makes It the duty £
- ". of the Assessor •to \ determine ':] the • value of ' all property listed,
and to enter the amount of each; item in the proper column.' •,
-';■ In 1902, at. his request, the same return was made by the • ■
• assessor. /•:-; > ;.i:;^- .■\. :" ■'--■■■ ;:.: : _— • ■■■_ \ '.. - ':■'■ ■.-..- • \-' -,• '--
tW^t Did Van Sant lie when he wrote the letter, or commit per
jury when he ; made the list of property? ; " -'-■.'
FOUR YOUNG MEN
KILLED BY A TRAIN
Their Carriage Is Struck at a Crossing
and Three Die in
stantly.
ALGONQUIN, 111., Nov. 2. —Frank
and Louis Schuette and Charles and
James Woodrich were killed here early
today. An express train on_ the Chi
cago & North-Western railway struck
their carriage on the crossing of the
main street of the village. All were
killed instantly exept Louis Schutte,
who died at a hospital. All lived at
Algonquin except James Woodrich,
whose home was at Kilbourne City,
Wis.
The young men had started to drive
to Dundee before daylight and did not
see the train on account of the dark
ness and the cover of their buggy.
WOMAN NOMINATED
"FOR OFFICE IN UTAH
Miss Bain Antagonizes a Mormon
Bishop for Recorder of
Summit County.
Special to The Globe.
PARK CITY, Utah, Nov. 2.—Miss
Lillian Bain, an Indiana woman, has
been nominated by the Republicans for
recorder of Summit county. Miss Bain
came to Park City two years ago to
take a position in the city schools. The
nomination came to her unexpectedly
and was given unanimously by the
convention.
Miss Bain Is the first woman to re
ceive a nomination for that office in
Utah. Her opponent on the Demo
cratic ticket is a Mormon bishop. Miss
Bain is the daughter of W. G. Bain, of
Martinsville, Ind.
PRICE ..■ TWO CEXT3—{ five ; CBHTS. '
MISS WASHINGTON
OUT OF WELLESLEY
Daughter of the Colored Educator Fails
to Pass for Her Sec
ond Year.
Special to The Globe.
BOSTON, Mass., Nov. 2.—After vain
efforts to keep it quiet, the fact has at
last been learned that Miss Portia
Washington, daughter of Booker T.
Washington, the colored educator, has
failed to pass her examinations for her
second year at Wellesley college and is
now a student at Bradford academy.
The faculty at Wellesley will have
nothing to say about the matter be
yond the mere fact that Miss Wash
ington was not proficient in her mu
sic, but among the girls opinions are
expressed plentifully.
Despite a deal of newspaper talk to
the effect that Miss Washington was
heartily welcome by her co-students
and made much of, the fact is the col
lege was divided into two factions over
her. Southern girls, of whom there
are a good many at Wellesley, abso
lutely refused to associate with her
and were upheld by many others. A
good many Northern girls, however,
"took up" Miss Washington, invited
her to all their little sociables, called
on her and were friendly with her in
every way.
Miss Washington proved a thorn in
the flesh to the faculty, however, on
account of the newspaper notoriety
which she gained. Articles signed by
her and interviews on her reception at
the college did not meet with the ap
proval of her teachers. The faculty in
sist that the question of color had
nothing to do with the failure of the
young woman to enter Wellesley for a
second term.
WORK FOR VERY
MODEST SALARIES
Mayor Gets Fifty Cents and Aldermen
Twenty-Five Cents Per
Annum.
Special to The Globe.
HOOPESTON, HI., Itfov. 2.—This
town boasts the most economical mu
nicipal government in*the world. The
city has a population of 4,500 and the
mayor receives an annual salary of 50
cents. The aldermen receive 25 cents
a year. These officials work as faith
fully and untiringly as if their of
fices afforded them their livings. The
duties of the mayor are fully as exact-
Ing and numerous as those of incum
bents of the same office in other cities
of similar size where the mayor is paid
$2,000 or $3,000 yearly.
To be mayor of Hoopeston, however,
is regarded as an honor which the office
carries in few other towns in Illinois.
He who attains to this dignity must
furnish ample proof before his election
of his attachment to the cause of tem
perance, for the mayor of Hoopeston
must be a sworn foe to the whisky
traffic.
HEROICALLY KNOCKS
AN ACTRESS DOWN
Melbourne McDowell and Florence
Stone Separate in a
Quarrel.
Special to The Globe.
KANSAS CITY, Mo., Nov. 2.—As the
result of a trivial difficulty with Flor
ence Stone, with whom he had been
starring for some time, Melbourne Mc-
Dowell, the well known romantic actor,
former husband of Fannie Davenport
and leading man with her and with
Blanche Walsh, today knocked Miss
Stone down twice at his room at the
hotel.
The result of the quarrel was the
separation of the two stars. McDow
ell went to New Orleans to fill an en
gagement there and Miss Stone to her
home in Cincinnati. They had been
playing as stock stars with the Wood
ward Stock company. McDowell's son,
George,, whose home is in Cincinnati,
tried to protect Miss Stone and was
ejected from the room by his father.
Chinese Students Coming Here.
VICTORIA, B. C, Nov. 2.—An informal
decree issued by the Chinese government
provides for the dispatch of a number of
Chinese students to the seats of learning
in the United States for educational pur
poses. The students will be sent at gov
ernment expense to take post graduate
courses and upon their return those suc
cessful in examinations will be appointed
to government positions.
GIVES ROSING
LEAD OF 9,264
Canvass of State by Counties
Shows Comfortable Dem
ocratic Plurality
BASED ON HEAVY VOTE
Estimated Total of 272,000 Is Consider*
ed Too Strong for an
Off Year
FALLING OFF WILL CUT
REPUBLICANS DEEPEST
If Whole Poll Does Not Exceed 250,000
as Claimed By Prominent Political
Prophets Van Sant's Defeat Will Be
Accomplished by a Proportionately
Larger Balance.
Leonard A. Rosing will have a plural
ity of nearly 10,000 out of a probable to
tal vote of 272,000. A conservative esti
mate of the vote based on a canvass
by counties gives Mr. Rosing 135,714 as
against 126,450 for "Van Sant. Tfae
Socialist, Populist and Prohibition vote
on the head of the ticket is estimated
at approximately 10,000, giving a prob
able total vote of 272,000.
This estimate is favorable to Van
Sant rather than Rosing in that It con
templates a total vote from 10,000 to
25,000 heavier than conceded by sever
al of the most astute political forecast
ers In Minnesota, two of them noted
Republicans who have held an accu-:
rate measure on the voting public for
a decade. The lighter the vote the
slimmer are Van Sant's percentages
of chance. The following estimate by
counties show a decrease of 44,000
from the vote of 1900 and an increase,
of 20,000 over the vote of 1898. If the
total falls much below this estimate
Mr. Rosing*s plurality may reasonably,
be expected to increase in proportion:'
Comparison by Counties.
Estimated.
1900. 1902.
V.Sant.Lind.V.Sant.Rosing.
Aitkin 797 461 450 550
Anoka 1,269 835 900 700
Becker 1,438 1,201 1,250 1,150
Beltrami 1,004 1,017 900 1,100
Benton 732 813 700 800
Big Stone 864 878 800 750
Blue Earth .. 3,136 2,817 2,500 2,200
Brown 1,287 1,966 1,300 1,500
Carlton 888 670 800 TOO
Carver 1,478 1,406 1,200 1,400
Cass 849 640 650 850
Chippewa .... 1,067 1,142 1,100 900
Chisago 1,941 812 1,600 700
Clay 1,439 1.719 1,100 1,800
Cook 64 84 75 100
Cottonwood ..1,079 872 950 750
Crow Wing .. 1,481 1,080 1,100 1,250
Dakota 1,563 2,286 1,150 1,950
Dodge 1,390 893 1,050 750
Douglas 1,468 1,697 1,200 1,250
Faribault 2,617 1,364 2,000 1,400
Fillmore 3,247 1,806 2,300 1,800;
Freeborn 2,386 1,383 1,800 1,400
Goodhue 4,160 1,915 2,700 2,300 '
tirant 700 850 600 900-
Hennepin 21,115 20,558 18,600 21,500!
Houston 1,556 971 1,250 850.
Hubbard 825 630 700 625!
Isanti 1,083 1,033 900 1,000,
Itasca 599 521 450 550
Jackson 1,433 1,302 1,150 1,050
Kanabec 478 396 450 400
Kandiyohl ... 1,822 1,755 1,600 1,400
Kittson 671 930 550 1,000
Lac gui Parle. 1,383 1,280- 1,100 1,025
Lake 423 545 350 600
Le Sueur 1,783 1,947 1,400 1,850
Lincoln 648 773 500 650
Lyon 1,466 1,308 1,200 1,150:
Me Leod , 1,429 1,736 1,000 1,500
Marshall 977 1,485 700 1,350
Martin 1,381 1,767 1.100 1,600
Meeker 1,520 1,822 1,500 1,650.
Mille Lacs ... 816 678 650 600
Morrison 1,649 2,003 1,500 2,050
Mower 2,589 1,576 2,200 1,460
Murray 1,030 1,178 950 1,000.
Nicollet • 1,352 1,225 1.000 1,250
Nobles 1,369 1,311 1,160 1,100
Normin 1,141 1,452 950 1,050
Olmsted ...... 2,491 1,867 2,000 1,800
Otter Tail ... 2,776 3,066 2,375 2,525
Pine 844 983 800 950
Pipestone 933 840 850 700
Polk 2,115 2,361 1,950 2,950
Pope 1,424 894 1.275 700.
Ramsey 11,984 13,899 9,100 11,900
Red Lake 654 1,535 500 1,275
Redwood 1,722 1,338 1,440 1,080
Renville 2,179 2,003 1,650 1.550
Rice 2,402 2,166 1,950 1,750
Rock 1,075 696 875 525
Roseau 467 722 400 760
St. Louis 6,978 6,044 5,100 4,900
Scott 918 1,613 725 1,425
Sherburne ... 797 490 700 425
Slbley 1,385 1,658 864 1,330
Steams 2,190 4,552 1,625 4,100
Steele 1,617 1,295 1,375 1,029'
Stevens 842 902 750 850
Swift .... 1,089 1,411 950 1,150
Todd 1,882 1,854 1,560 1,475
Traverse 584 948 450 725
Wabasha .... 1,820 1,666 1,650 1,550
Wadena 868 561 750 675
W/useca 1,414 1,447 1,150 1,225
Washington .. 2,109 2,097 1,950 1,860
Watonwan ... 1,127 893" 950 660
Wilkln 628 897 625 700
Continued on Second Page.

xml | txt