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The Saint Paul globe. (St. Paul, Minn.) 1896-1905, August 19, 1903, Image 5

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

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ALLEMANG'S STUDY
M LANDS GIE
Fi KELLEV II
Louisville's Star Twirler Tom
Walker Works for Colonels
but Saints Play Fast In the
Field and on the Bases and
* Win the Battle.
STANDING OF THE CLUBS.
Played. Won. Lost. P.C.
St. Paul 105 71 34 .676
Milwaukee 102 62 40 .608
Louisville 103 58 45 .563
Indianapolis 104 65 49 .529
Kansas City 99 47 52 .475
Columbus 106 43 63 .406
Minneapolis 105 41 64 .390
Toledo 194 37 67 .356
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS.
St. Paul 6. Louisville 2.
Milwaukee 2. Toledo "0.
Indianapolis 9,. Minneapolis 5.
Columbus 5, 11, Kansas City 4, 3.
BY BILLY" MAC
Thanks to that- forty some-odd slug
of lead now stalled somewhere in the
southern section of Harold Allemang's
shapely frame, the Saints were able to
hand G. Tebeau's troopers from Ken
tucky theirs without difficulty. Score,
:6 to 2. Thomas Walker, who is to be
called to the biff league on account of
his flinging ability, was sent in to dis
appoint the 2,051 present, but with
■ Allemang carrying weight there was
nothing to it.
Harry's friends felt real bad about it
■when the daring safe-cracker pumped
-Allemang's system full of solder, but
las it now turns out it was all for the
Ibest. The melted section of water pipe
did spend some time in Harry's pitch
ing wing and spoiled his chance to
spend money in Cincinnati, but later it
•moved down toward his paddles and
appears to be anchored there,
j It was still there yesterday, and its
presence saved - much trouble. With
his feet weighted, Harry refused to let
go the ground when Ranny Kerwin
cracked open the battle with a clout
that dropped near a tramp sleeping in
Central park, and firm on the dirt,
stopped all contemplated beltfests and
held the Colonels safe. HurrahT
i Hearty, robust clouts and real frisky
■work on the paths mostly put Tommy
[Walker to the bad. Passes handed out
at improper moment helped some. For
a time Willie Schriver saw bases being
:stolen ro rnpidly_that he found It im
jAjjssibk- lo keepTiis bonnet on and
track of the sprinters at the same
time. Belonging to the same union,
Jawn Sullivan kindly loaned the Looie
ville youngster his cap, and after fit
ting it to his block, Willie enjoyed some
success in stopping the daring ones.
! Thanks to Mr. Hickey's contempt for
-Monday ball games, the local schedule
1 for ladies' days has become thorough
[ly balled up. Anxious to allow the
more fortunate fanatics two chances a
}:week to escort the women folks
.through the gate without extra ex
j.pense. the local management has been
iiising a Tuesday every time a Monday
iiwaa maltreated by Mr. Hickey.
t Not having heard that the Saints
.•walloped the lobster champions day
iibefore yesterday, a number of the sex
afraid of mice turned out and called C.
Huggins a big, mean brute. One en
thusiastic dame approached the gate
'■with her finger inserted between the
(pages of Tim Sullivan's history of the
ball game.
| "Isn't this ladies' day?" she asked
•■when the polite Mr. Huggins extended
his mitt.
i "No, ma'am; yesterday was ladies'
'day."
i "Well, I don't care much, I was just
walking by and thought I would drop
in and read this book while the match
was being played. It makes the story
so realistic."
Kerwin's Home Run Drive.
The baseball fever is sure spreading
Bhis burg,
nother recruit for the large army
that, according to reports from Mil
waukee and other smoke towns, is to
!go up to the big leagues, was discov
ered yesterday in the person of Danny
Kerwin. Mr. Kerwin will do his spring
training with the Reds, o* Cincinnati,
and may remain with Mr. Hermann
Fearing that one of Mr. Hermann's
agents might be concealed in the
stands Danny refused to take chances
and cracked open the game with his
home run belt. Not having heard any
calls for the Hart family Jimmie Hart
went out from Allemang to Wheeler.
R. Brashear beat a bunt and went to
second when Allemang in his hurry
heaved over Wheeler's head. With one
in and Hart on second it looked bad
but the lead began to work and Brash
ear was still waiting when S. Sullivan
made the third out.
P. Geier started the Saints' part of
the inning with a two-sacker against
the right field fence. Shannon beat .
punk hit and Jackson moved Geier and
Shannon along with a sacrifice. Schae
fer hit to S. Sullivan and Geier was
stopped at the plate. Schaefer stole
second before Hug-gins had drawn his
pass and with the bases filled Walker
handed four wide ones to Flournoy and
Shannon walked in with the run that
knotted it.
The Saints untied the knot in the
third when Middle Schaefer doubled
and scored on Huggins' single.
There was nothing more doirg in the
tally line until the seventh when, with
Geier down, Shannon si^gledJ Jackson
lammed out another one-baser and
then the two worked a double steal
while Willie Schriver was busy catching
Schaefer's third strike. Huggins rap
ped one to right field fence and Shan
non and Jackson tallied. Huggins
lifted second when Schriver tried to
get him at first and scored on Flour
noy's long drive to the score board.
R3C
BEERS
Guaranteed Pure«
None So Good.
Qpier from
J ■ , _y. H. Qrlemahn, : St. Paul.
Wheeler forced Flournoy at second for
the third out.
Schaefer's error gave Odwell a life
in the Colonel's part of the eighth,
and after stealing second the center
fielder scored on Schrlver's single.
Allemang got the run back in the
Saints' end of the round. Bullets open
ed with a drive over the infield and
moved along on Geier's single. He
scored when Shannon forced Qeler at
second. " Flournoy hit for two sacks
but Schaefer went out The score:
St. Paul. AB. R. H. PO. A. E.
Geier, 3b 4 0 2 1 4 1
Shannon, cf 4 2 2 1 0 0
Jackson, rf 4 1 2 1 0 0
Schaefer, ss 5 1 1 2 0 1
Huggins, 2b 3 1 2 2 6 0
Flournoy, If ..-. .2 0 1 2 0 0
Wheeler, lb 4 0 0 13 0 0
Sullivan, c 4 0 0 5 0 0
Allemang. p 4 1 2 0 3 1
Totals 34 6 12 27 13 3
Louisville. AB. R. H. PO. A. E.
Kerwin, rf 5 1 1 0 0 0
Hart, If 4 0 2 1 0 0
Brashear, 2b 5 0 1 5 2. 1
Odwell. cf 4 1 0 3 0 0
S. Sullivan, 3b 4 0 0 1 & 0
Schriver, c 4 0 2 4 i 0
White, lb 4 0 1 10 6 0
Quinlan ss 4 0 0 0 5 0
Walker, p 4 0 2 0 3 0
Totals 38 2 9 24 17 1
St. Paul 1 0 1 0 0 0 3 1 •—6
Louisville 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 2
Earned runs, St. Paul 3. Louisville 1;
two-base hits, Geier, Huggins, Jackson,
White; home run, Kerwin; sacrifice hit,
Jackson; stolen bases, Schae'fer 3, Shan
non 2, Jackson, Huggins, Odwell; bases
on balls, off Walker 4, off Allemang 1;
struck out, by Walker, J. Sullivan, Geier,
Schaefer, Allemang, by Allemang, Bras
hear, Odwell, Kerwin, S. Sullivan 2; left
on bases, St. Paul 10, Louisville 10; time
of game, 2:05; attendance, 2,054; umpire,
Haskell. *
Blues Lose Double-header.
KANSAS CITY. Mo., Aug. 18.—Kan
sas City and Columbus played a double
header today, the visitors winning both.
In the first game Durham shut out Co
lumbus for six innings, but was knocked
out in the seventh. Kansas City played
wretchedly all around in the second
game. Scores:
First Game—
K. C. H| P AIE Col |H P AjE
Rotfus lb 014 1 0 Arndt If.. 1 1 0 0
Gear If . 2 3 1 0 Smith rf.. 13 0 0
Nance 2b 1 1 3 1 Clngmn ss 1 0 3 0
Grady 3b. 2 0 1 0 Raymer 2b 1 2 4 0
Hill cf .0101 Bannon cf 1 1 0 0
Butler c. 0 5 1 1 Turner 3b 1 2 0 1
Lewee ss. 1 2 3 1 Mellor lb. 211 1 0
Frantz rf 2 0 0 0 Fox c ... 1610
Durham p 1 1 3 0 Dorner p. 0 1 4 0
Gibson p. 0010
Totals '. 9|27 13 1
Totals -1 9127J141 4|
Kansas City..O 0 3 0 10 0 0 o—4
Columbus 0 0000060 o—s0 —5
Two-base hits, Nance, Grady 2. Ban
non; three-base hits. Gear, Mellor; sacri
fice hits, Grady, Turner; stolen bases,
Mellor, Smith, Raymer; double play, Gear
to Nance to Lewee; bases on balls, off
Durham 3, off Dorner 4; struck out, by
Durham 2, by Gibson 4, by Dorner 6;
hit by pitched ball, by Durham 1; in
nings pitched by Durham 6%, by Gib
son 2%; hits off Durham 8,. off Gibson 1;
left on bases. Kansas City 9, Columbus
10; time, 1:45; umpire, Cunningham; at
tendance, 1,200.
Second Game—
K. C. H P A|E CoL |H P A|E
Rotfus lb 1 5 0 0 Arndt If .11 0 0 0
Gear If . 1 4 1 0 Smith rf.. 2 3 0 0
Nance 2b. 1 3 3 OJClngmn ss 3 4 2 0
Grady 3b 0 2 1 01 Raymer 2b 1 2 7 0
Hill cf .14 0 0 Bannon cf 3 4 0 0
Butler c. 1 8 0 0 Turner 3b 1 3 1 0
Lewee ss. 0 1 1 2 Mellor lb. 2 9 0 0
Frantz rf 2 0 0 1 Roach c . 1 2 0 0
Coons p . 0 0 2 © Berger p. 2 0 10
Gibson p. 1 0 1 0 MMakin p 0 0 1 0
*Knoll ..I 01 0 1 OJ
I—l—l 1 Totals .. 16 27 12 0
Totals -I 8127|101 3) '
Kansas City 72 0 0 0 0 6 I 0 0 3
Columbus ...1 2 0 0 3 3 10 1 11
•Batted for Gibson in ninth.
Two-base hits, Nance, Rothfuss, Smith
Bannon, Mellor, Berger; three-base hit,
Arndt; home run. Turner; sacrifice hit,
Raymer; stolen bases, Rothfuss, Roach.
Arndt; bases on balls, off Coons 5 off
Berger 4; struck out, by Coons 2, by
Gibson 4; hit by pitched ball, by Berger
1; Innings pitched, by Coons 414, by Gib
son, 4%, by Berger 8%. by McMakin %;
hits off Coons 10, off Gibson 6, off Ber
ger 7 off McMakin 1; left on bases. Kan
sas City 8. Columbus 10; time, 2:03; um
pire, Cunningham; attendance, 1,200.
Orphans Play Ragged Game.
MINNEAPOLIS, Minn., Aug. 18.—In
dianapolis defeated Minneapolis 9 to 5 in
a game characterized by ragged playing
on the part of the home team. The vis
itors scored eight runs in the first three
innings off three hits and numerous mis
plays. After that Dick Williams held
them safe, while the Millers batted T.
Williams freely. The score:
Mpls. H PAlE~l£d: H PAfE
Oyler ss.. 10 3 0 Kihm lb.. 010 0 0
Lally 1f... 2 3 1 0 Fox 2b ... 0 4 1 1
Maloney c 3 7 0 0 Hogrivr rf 2 0 0 0
Yeager rf. 0 2 0 0 Heydon c. 1 4 0 0
Thomas rf 0 0 0 0 Wodruff If 0 2 1 0
Mlntyr 3b 2 1 5 1 Coulter cf. 2 3 0 0
Spooner lb 1 9 0 1 Marcan ss. 1 0 2 0
R.Wms p. 1 0 1 2 Tamset 3b 2 4 6 0
Martin 2b. 1 2 2 2 T.Wms p. 1 0 5 0
MDonld cf2210
= Totals .. 927 15 1
♦Totals 13 26 13] t ,
Minneapolis ..10022000 o—s0 —5
Indianapolis ..21500000 I—9
*Fox out on bunt strikes.
Earned runs, Minneapolis 3; two-base
hits, Martin, McDonald, Mclntyre; bases
on balls, off R. Williams 4, off T» Wil
liams 4; struck out, by R. Williams 5,
by T. Williams 3; sacrifice hits, Marcan,
Tamsett; stolen bases, Hogriever 3. Hey
don, Woodruff, Coulter; wild pitch, Wil
liams 1; left on bases. Minneapolis 10,
Indianapolis •9; scratch hits,-Hogriever 2;
umpire, Foreman; time, 2 hours; attend
ance, 1,250.
Mud Hens Get Goose Eggs.
MILWAUKEE, Wi&, Aug. 18.—El
liott's pitching and great support shut
out Toledo today by a score of 2 to 0.
Donahue's batting was the feature.
Score:
Totals . 7 27112} 1 Bernrd cf| 01 41 01 0
Mil. HPA|B Owen 1f... II 1] 0 0
Schfley 2b 0 1 3 0 Smith rf... 1 1 0 1
Donahu lb 310 0 0 Childs 2b. 0 2 0 0
Wood 3b". .0240 Kleinow c. 2 6 3 0
Speer c... 0 9 0 0 Schaub 3b 2 2 2 0
Ganley rf. 2 10 0 Turner lb. 1 7 0 0
Dunlevy If 0 1 0 1 Bald ss... 0 1 2 0
Hemphl cf 2 1 1 0 McGill p.. 1 0 2 1
Viox ss... 0 23 0
Elliott p.. 0 0 10 Totals .. 824 9 2
Toledo. |H1 PjA| E
Milwaukee ...0 0010100 ♦—2
Toledo -.0 0-0 0 0 0 0 0 o—o0 —0
Earned run, Milwaukee; two-base hits,
Donahue, Hemphill, Ganley; three-base
hit, Donahue; stolen bases, Smith, Klei
now, Ganley 1; bases on balls, off Mc-
Gill 2; sacrifice hit. Turner; struck out,
by Elliott 6. by MeGill 7; left on. bases,
Milwaukee 6, Toledo 7; umpire, Mullane;
attendance. 600; time. 1:35.
AMERICAN LEAGUE.
STANDING OF THE CLUBS.
Played. Won. Lost. P.C.
Boston 100 36 .640
Philadelphia 102 ,8 44 .569
Cleveland 101 55 46 .545
New York 96 49 47 .510
Detroit 9S 49 49 .500
St. Louis 98 45 53 .459
Chicago 101 46 55 .455
Washington 100 32 68 .320
' YESTERDAY'S RESULTS.
Chicago 3, Washington L.
Boston 10, Cleveland 2.
Philadelphia 5, St. Louis 3-
New York 1, 8. Detroit 0, 1.
Highlanders 4Vln Two Games.
DETROIT, Mich., Aug. 18.—Detroit lost
the double-header to New York today,
giving the visitors fourth place. The first
game was sharply played and honestly
won. Chesbro and Donovan had a duel,
and Chesbro wan by shutting out the
THE ST. PAUI, GLOBE, WEDNESDAY AUGUST 19, 1903.
visitors. Ganzel's two-bagger and Wil
liams' single scored the only run. Craw
ford made a sensational running catch off
Ganzel. The second game was a snap for
New York. Detroit used three pitchers
and could not hit Tannehill. The locals
were beaten from the start and never
had a chance. Scores:
First Game—
Det. H P A|E N. V.. ?H P A|E
Barrett cf 2 2 1 0 Conroy Jb 1 1 0| 0
Lush If . 0 1 1 0 Keeler rf. 2 2 0 0
Craford rf 1 1 0 0 Elberfld ss 0 1 2 1
Carr lb . 0 7 4 0 Ganzel lb. 112 1 0
McAllr ss 2 3 0 1 Wilams 2b 1 3 5 0
Buelow c 0 8 1 1 Fultz cf .0 0 0 0
Cortny 3b 1 2 1 0 Davis If . 0 2 0 0
Long lb . 12 1 OMcFd lf-cf 2 10 0
Donvan p 0 0 4 0 O'Connor c 0 5 1 0
•♦MGuire 0 0 0 0 Chesbro p. 1 0 4 0
'Totals 726 13|2| Totals .. 827 13 1
New York ..0 0010000 o—l
Detroit 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 o—o
♦•Batted for Buelow in ninth. *Conroy
out, hit by batted ball.
Earned run. New York 1; two-base hits,
Ganzel, Chesbro; sacrifice hit, Donovan;
stolen bases, Conroy, Keeler; bases on
balls, off Donovan 1; first base on errors,
Detroit 1; left on bases, Detroit 6, New
York 7; struck out, by Donovan 6, by
Chesbro 1; double plays, Williams to
Ganzel. Donovan to Long to Carr; pass
ed ball, Buelow 1; time, 1:30; umpire,
O'Laughlin.
Second Game—
Det. H P A|Bl N. Y. H P A|E
Barrett cf 1 1 0 0| Conroy 3b 2 2 2 1
Lush If . 1 3 0 1 Keeler rf. 3 3 0 0
Craford rf 1 1 0 1 Elberfld ss 3 1 4 0
Carr lb . 010 2 OjGanzel lb o|lo 1 1
McAllr ss 1 4 4 l[Davis If.. 0 5 0 0
MGuire c 0 4 1 0 Wiliams 2b 1 1 3 0
Cortny 3b 1 1 1 0 MFarld cf 0 2 0 0
Long 2b . 0 2 1 0 O'Connor c 3 3 1 0
Kisnger p 0 0 0 0 Tannhill p 0 0 1 0
Skopek p Of 0 1 0 —|
Mullen p. 1| 1 3 o| Totals .]12|27|12| 2
Totals . 6[27|13 _3J
New York ..2 3 6 I I 0 0 1 O^SJ
Detroit 1 0 Q p 0 0 0 0 o—l
Earned run. New York 1; two-base hits,
Conroy, Williams; sacrifice hits. Lush,
Davis; stolen bases. Conroy, Keeler Mc
•Farland; bases on balls, off Skopek'2. off
Mullen 3, off Tannehill 1; hit by pitcher,
by Tannehill 1; first base on errors De
troit 2, New York 2; left on bases De
troit 6, New York 9; struck out. by Mul
len 3, by Tannehill 2; double plays,
McAllister unaided, O'Connor to Ganzel to
Conroy. Williams to Elberfeld to Gan
zel; time, 2:00; umpire, O'Laughlin; at
tendance, 3,931.
Sox Bunch Hits on Wilson.
CHICAGO, Aug. 18.—Timely hitting
won for the locals today. The visitors
hit the ball hard, but in three different
innings with men on bases lined straight
to Tannehill, resulting in three double
plays. Attendance, j^OO. Score:
Chi. HF A ~ET~Was¥; H~PATe
Holmes If. 2 1 0 0 Moran ss.. 0 1 2 0
Isbell lb.. 0 6 0 0 Robson rf. 12 0 0
Jones cf.. 2 2 0 0 Ryan cf... 0 1 0 0
Green rf.. 1 1 0 0 Clarke lb. 014 0 2
Callahn 3b 2 0 1 1 Selbach If. 2 10 0
Magoon 2b 0 6 1 1 Coghlin 3b 0 2 21 0
Tanhill ss. 1 6 4 0 MCrmk 2b 0 3 5 0
S!attery c. 0 5 0 0 Kitridge c 0 0 2 0
Paterson p 0 0 0 0 Wilson p.. 1 0 4 0
Totals . 827 61 21 Totals .. 424 15 2
Chicago 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 •—3
Washington -.00000100 o—l
Left on bases, Chicago 5, Washington
3; -two-base hits. Holmes, Selbach Wil
son; sacrifice hits. Isbell 2. Magoon,
Tannehill; stolen bases, Callaban, Rob
inson; double, plays, Tannehill unassist
ed, Tannehill to Isbell. Tannehill to Ma
goon; struck out, by Patterson 3; bases
on balls, ofE Patterson 2, off Wilson 1;
time, 2:15; umpire, Connolly. .
Blues' Winning Streak Broken.
CLEVELAND, Ohio, Aug. 18.—Cleve
land's winning streak was broken by
Boston today. Young was a puzzle with
men on bases, while Donahue was hit
hard. Score:
Clev. H PA|E| Bost. H PA[E
Flick rf... 2 1 0 1 Doherty If 2 1 0 0
Bay cf ... 0 5 1 1 Collins 3b. 1 1 3 0
Bradley 3b 1 2 2 OC. Stahl cf 3 3 0 0
Lajoie 2b. 2 2 4 1 Freemn rf 2 4 0 0
Hckmn lb 0 9 0 1 Parent ss.. 2 2 2 0
MCarty If 2 4 1 0 Lachnce lb 1 10 1 0
Bemisc... 0 2 0 0 Ferris 2b.. 0 2 4 0
Goehnr ss. 0 2 2 0 Farreil c. 0 4 1 0
Donahu p. 0 0 1 0 Young p.. 3 0 11
Totals . 727 11 4| Totala .. 14 27 12 1
Cleveland ...0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 I—2
Boston 2 1 0 0 2 0 0 3 2—lft
Earned runs, Boston 7; first base on
errors, Boston 1; two-base hits, Bradley,
Freeman, Parent, Dougherty, C. Stahl;
three-base hits, Lajoie, Flick, Parent;
sacrifice hits, Farreil, Collins, Dougherty;
double plays, McCarthy to Lajoie, Ferris
to Lachance; first base on balls, by Don
ahue 1, by Young 1; left on bases, Cleve
land 5, Boston 4; struck out, by Donahue
1, by Young 3; time, 1:40; umpire, Sheri
dan; attendance, 8,924, .
NATIONAL LEAGUE. '
STANDING OF THE CLUBS.
Played. Won. Lost. P.C.
Pittsburg 101 66 36 .653
New York 101 61 40 .604
Chicago 102 61 41 .598
Cincinnati 10& 54 46 .540
Brooklyn 100 49 51 .490
Boston 96 41 55 .427
St. Louis 106 36 70 .340
Philadelphia 92 31 61 .337
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS.
Cincinnati 7, New York 0.
Pfttsburg 3, Boston 0.
St. Louis 8. Brooklyn 6.
Reds Blank the Giants.
NEW YORK, Aug. 18.—The last game of
the series between New York and Cincin
nati todaj resulted in another victory for
the visitors and in a wonderful pitching
feat on the part of Ewing. He not only
shut out his opponents, but allowed them
only one hit. The home team played bril
liantly in the field, but could do nothing in
the face of such pitching. McGinnity was
knocked out of the box in the eighth and
Cronin took his place. Score*
~~N. Y. |HP A|E] CiiT HPA |E
Browne rf 0 4 0 OiKelley If.. 1 1 0 0
Brsnhn cf 0 2 0 QJSymour cf 4 4 0 0
M'Gann lb 0 6 2 o|Dola n rf.. 4 0 0 0
Mertes If. 0 3 1 OJBeckley lb 214 0 1
Babb ss.. 0 2 2 0 Stnfldt 3b. 0 0 3 2
Lauder 3b 0 1 0 0 Daly 2b... 2 1 6 0
Dunn 2b.. 13 2 0 Corcrn ss. 1 2 0 0
Bwrmn c. 0 5 2 0 Peitz c 2 5 0 0
McGnty p 0 1 0 0 Ewing p.. 0 0 4 0
Cronin p.. 0010
I—i Totals .. 16 27 13 3
Totals ■ 127 10| 0|
New York 0 0000000 o—o
Cincinnati 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 5 o—7
Earned runs, Cincinnati 6; left on bases,
New York 3, Cincinnati 6; two-base hits,
Kelley, Dolan, Beckley, Daly, Corcoran;
sacrifice hit, Steinfeldt; stolen base, Lau
der; first on errors, New York 2; bases on
balls, by McGinnity, lf*struck out, by Mc-
Ginnity 3, by Cronin 1, by Ewing 5; time,
1:40; umpires, Emslie and Moran; attend
ance, 4,747.
Leever Shuts Out Boston.
BOSTON, Mass., Aug. 18.—By superb
pitching Leever shut out Boston today.
Willis kept Pittsburgh hits fairly well
scattered and both pitchers were well sup
ported. Score:
Boston. |H P A fEI Pitts. |H P A|E
Dexter cf. 0 2 1 0 Baumnt cf 1 1 0 0
Tenney lb 1 7 fr o|Clarke If.. 2 10 0
Cooley If. 0 4 W o|Leach 3b.. 0 15 1
Carney rf. 0 2 0 0i Wagner ss 1 0 4 0
Moran c. 0 7 1 OJBmsfld lb 113 1 0
Abtcho 2b 0 1 3 1 Ritcney 2b 0 2 3 0
Grmngr 3b I 1 0 0 Sebring rf. 1 1 0 0
Aubrey ss 0 3 3 1 Phelps c... 3 7 10
Willis p.. 1 0 3 o|Leever p.. 0 12 0
Totals . 327 11 2] Totals ..| 9 2716 1
Boston 0 0 0 0 0 0 0-* o—o
Pittsburg 6ft00,2»01 Q—3
Ea-ned runs, Pittsburg 2; two-base hits"
Beaumont, Clarke, Wagner. Greminger;
Greminger; three-base hits, Sebring,
Phelps; stolen base, Carney; double plays.
Dexter to Moran, Wagner to Ritchey to
Bransfield; bases on balls, off Willis 1. off
Leever 1; struck out. by Willis 4. by Lee
ver 3; passed ball, Phelps; time, 1:38; um
pire, Johnstone; attendance, 2,245.
Cardinals Finally Win One.
BROOKLYN, N. V.. Axis. 18.—St.
Louis finally won a.ganie."iliere;.today, de
feating * the " Brooklyn^ ■ by ' the score iof
8v to 6. Although 'batted *z hard, Jones
would - have "won his'game but ■; for the r.
poor fielding :of >;Mc<S?eery-: v Brown ; also
was hit hard, but was lucky. Manager |
Donovan was too ill to play and Rhoades
was ;in his place in right field. Attend
ance, 1.500. Score: 5;;:-; ": ', >:;".-::
St. L. H P"AI Ej _Brqok. |H| PAIE
Farreil 2b. I 2 7|. OiStrarig 3b. 4 3 0! 0
Rhoads rrf ; 0 :3 01 OJSneekrd If 1 1 0 0
Smoot ef.. 2 2 0 ; 0!Dobb8? cf .- *2 7 0 0 •
Dunlevy'lf 10 .0 a Doyle lb.. 17 0 0
Burke 3b.~. 3. ;2 2.oDahien c ss. 10 3 0
Brain 53.. 0 5 &[ >0 MCrery ;rf .110 1
Hacket lb 111-0 :0 Jordan. 2b. 3 2 3 2
Ryan c... 0 2 11 ORitter c... 0 5 2 0
Brown p.. 2 0.1 o; Jones p... 1 1; 3 .0
Totala . 110127 16 l! Totals T. 14 27 11 3r
St. Louis ...11003003 o—B
Brooklyn -v:: 0 10 0r" 110 0 3—6
Earned runs, St. Louis 1. Brooklyn 1;
left: on bases, St. " Louis "6. Brooklyn 11;
two-base hits, -Hacfcetr,- Smooth Dobbs,'
Strang; ■:- three-base""■' hit. Brown; stolen
base, Dobbs; double play^Brain to Hack
ett; first on errors,-' St. Louis 2, Brook
lyn- 1; bases .'* on \ ; balls,- off Jones -2, off .
Brown 4; sacrifice hits, Farreil, Rhoades,.
Burke, 'Jordan; struck out, by Jones 5,' by
Brown 2;" wild pitch, Jones; time, 1:56;
umpire. Hurst. .;-"- :-.-.,•.■♦-. •
Champs Trim + Browns Again. ' .
ST. LOUIS, Mo., Aug. 18.—St. Louis
lost the final game of : the- series with
Philadelphia. Waddell pitched for the
visitors, and. ,while bit freely, he was ef
fective with men on. bases/-. A , triple • play
was the ' feature./,. Attendance, 2,100. !
Score: " ''_ *■■ ■'■■''_•-"'•; '■^•■.\- ';■..--''-,- ■/-:.>■ •- :
St L. .■ H Al El "Phil. ':' " H PA|E
Burkett If : 2 if 0 o]Hartsel If. 0 0 0 0
Martin rf. :1 ' 3 0 D|Piclcring cf !1 1 0 0
Hill 3b../. 1 2 1 o|L.Cross 3bj 1 1 0 0
Andsrn.lb -211 0 OiSeybold lb 2 7 10
Wallace ss 12 4 OlMurphy 2b 2 0 2 0 j
Heidrk cf. 0 10 QlM.Crjqss ss .1 2-11 ;
Friel 2b... o'o li OiHoffnvui rf 12 3 0 0 .
Sugden c. 2 6| Of lfsfcHreek :c. 012 1 0
Wright p. 1 -1 6 OlWaMell p. 2 1 3 0 .
■-. •:•.-;-•:,.. ——I—\—f ■:+!;■* -:;------ —— —— ■ :
.-Totals * 10 27 12! lj Totals .. 11 37 _I_l j
St. Louis .....1 0 0-2 06 o=o 0 o—30 —3
Philadelphia .0 , 1 0 ft iQ 10 .S, o—s
Earned runs, St. L^ufs 2. Philadelphia
4; two -base hits, Anderson 2, Seybold,
Murphy; sacrifice ' hits, Hftl 2, Heidrick;'
double play, Wright toCWaJlace to Ander
son;' triple play, Wr jghjt;,-to Wallace to
Anderson; passed ba11,,. Sichreck; , stolen
bases, Burkett. Hart^ei; . wjld . pitch, by
Wright 2; bases on balls, on* Wright 4, off
Waddell 3; struck out. *bY Wright 5, by
Waddell 12; : left lon fcfeefe: St. Louis 11. i
Philadelphia. 7; time, <L:ss>. umpire, Pears. ;
■;■ ■■■:■■; ';:'. '.:-.'■.'■•■.—— :j rii. ,: ■ . \v
j NORTHERN LEAGUE.
Special to The Globe. *-~"n -:
-■ GRAND FORKS, N. D.. Aug. 18.—Ten
hits off Slette " and another off Cox, who
was substituted for him in the eighth, and
five errors by the v home team netted Du
luth nine runs today, „to two for Grand !
Forks.. The gams was a very ragged one,
and little interest was developed. ' i
■j. ■;. ■ ■:'..*.- ■ ■ . ■'. ■ •-v i-- R. H. E.
Grand Forks i.. 0 0100010 '■ — 6 5
Duluth ...2:1'2 010 0 2 1— 11 1
Batteries, Grand -Forks, Slette, - Cox,
Mullan; Duluth, Nolden, Crippen, -- V- <
Special to The Globe. ' " ri" " '""'
: CROOKSTON, J Minn., ' Aug. ;" 18.—
Crooks ton won the second game '■■ in the ,
series from Superior today by a score of
4 ito 2. . Batteries ¥ ; rScbulte, ■■- Freeman- j and i
EQwkrUii'v.for Crookston. and Hall and
Howard • for Superior. The game was '. very
interesting, though "•no}: exciting. A field
er for Crookston while at' bat was hit by
pitched \* ball v and rendek^fjj. unconscious.
Schulte.' pitching for -Croakaton, was put
. out of the game -by attempting )to \ stop - a
red hot ball. Freeman took, his place and,
pitched the : rest of tHe ' game. : Score l^r
innings: -/;^" '" :''.' : a . ■ .... ■■■•-"■■^'■:'■■ -
Crookston ;;. .2 >o^' 0-* 0" 0' 0 0 2"■ Q— i
Superior ..:..! 1 0 0:0 0 0 0 o—2
Special to The -Globe. ■'± I --t* <r*p»I»'-
--.••; WINNIPEG, Man., Aug. 13.-^Winnipeg j
won "both, games }n~ the double-header :
from : Fargo ( today. - The first game was i
never in doubt. Lynch being batted hard !
and -Cbrbett holding the- enemy safe at :
all stages, v. The feature was ■> the *• fast
work of Kelly and Annis around the sec- :
ond bag for the locals.". Score: . ■•'. '<■ ~ ■'■>.
"'-•„--- - >- :. *■.-■■ ' --*' *■. '..:•■ '. T* W E_
Fargo .........0 0010000 I—2 - i 4
Winnipeg ..;v.:i 0 20-0 6 0 *—10 11 0
: Batteries: - Fargo, Lynch, Abbott and
Bonthion; Winnipeg, j Corbett and' Rogers. !
, In the second game 3 there was ; plenty
of excitement. Both pitchers were rather
wild, but effective. Bemiss won his own
game in the • last of the ninth after Brad-.
1 ley had singled and stolen to second by a
two-bagger. Graeger. =' of - Fargo, made
one of the longest hi-tar'for a home run
ever seen on the home grounds. : Score: ; ! .
-■ ■ • ■-■.■'." i^"\- ■ - ■ -R.H. E.
Fargo .....:. r...0 00-1101 o—3 6 4
Winnipeg . .".'..1 002" 0 6 6 0 — 9 11 - 0
Batteries: Fargo, Burns, Bonthion and
Lynch; Winnipeg, Bemiss and Rogers.
EASTERN TINIS ;
CHAMPIONS .DOWNED
Collins and Waidner Win
; Straight Set Victory Over
Ward and Ware.
NEWPORT, R. 1., Aug. 18.—Kreigh
Collins and L. H. Waidner, the Western
double champions, furnished the 1 sensa
tion of the first day of the . national lawn
tennis tournament on the Casino courts
today 1 by winning |a ■ straight set victory
over- Holcombe Ward - and Leo E. Ware,!
the Eastern champions. !}* Great credit ia
due to Collins , for his brilliant ,"-work, ; he
making many more places ' than any. of
: the others, without making ,more,errors,:
■ One of the strongest factors in the vie- :
tory ' was Collins' service, which he wen
every time throughout the match. •. Waic:
ner was steadier, than -was J expected, \ and
backed ': up Collins „-' in > excellent i shape.
Ward and Ware, on. the other "hand,-did
not j play | the [ game shown - earlier in : the
season. : ? Except in the third set. when
they got ' the lead four games to one. they,
did ; not "' exhibit ; the ;; form displayed at
Lorgwood. . Ware was " particularly un
steady, m the opening set, but improved '
later in the match. Ward played a fairly.
; even game, but ; lacked force in ; all .:. bis
strokes, and >. particularly in his . service.
The feature in the singles; .was . the match
between W. J. Clothier, and B. C. Wrigtt,
which ' went to " the Pbiladelphian, ending
in a runaway. ; Wright .was clearly off- i
his game and never Ghee"' showed up at
his best. Except in the first set, which
he won, 6-4, he did ' not make fa' credita
ble ■ stand, and 2in .the r> last set he ; was
outpointed two to ' one^ winning .only,*- a
single game. :; - ■ ;.r -_ii_. _.* • -
r The question of which of the Doherty's
would ' default - was settled * today, ••: and
R. F. Doherty will not piay at all in the
singles- iHe - was scratched in favor of
B. F. Merrill today. J-.^:, ,^ ;.-.. ;::. '.' '■•
•i :■. Through ... a ■ mistake ■ fn i connection ' with
the drawings : one ? entry was ! drawn: twice
; and the name H. S. : Mahoney, the British
player, • omitted. The ; error ; was rectified
Mahony was placed %in the top ! half i and
will « meet H. L. - r Doherty in the fourth
round. -■:-";- ;: ,$\ r<>t»:.-"/ ""■'>:.:':-.': ~~■*•<:'
\ The doubles opened rather tamely and
with '■ a pocfr showing jby Ward and , Ware
The Westerners .took • the * first game, - 4-0.
The Eastern men : rallied;, 5 however, and,
, took - the f next two. '; The -. fourth "s. went jto
the Westerners and fifth was another love
set for 1 Collins 7 and r Waidner. Ward ; and ;
Ware : then- made lit % three-all -- or' games,
but iit i was their i last rally, 1 the Western
pair ; taking • the , next three without diffi
culty - and i the set, f 6-3. The points were:
Collins -- and Waidner. 4-2, 3-4, 4-2, 4-6 1.
Total, 33; games, 6. .? , » „
- Ward ; and Ware. v 4-5, 2-0, v 4-2, '■■ 4-2—o.'
TotaL 25: games, 3. ■ ■■'■■:*M ":; ;*-j^": ';?-• ■ -
CHALLENGER GIVEN
TIME ALLOWANCE OF
MORE THAN MITE
Figures of Official Measurer
Show Reliance to Have Near
ly Two Thousand More
Square Feet of Sail Than
Shamrock 111.
NEW YORK, Aug. 18. —Reliance and
Shamrock 111. were measured today in
the Erie" basyi by C. E. Mower, official
measurer of the New York Yacht club.
It was announced tonight that Reli
ance would allow the challenger one
minute and forty-five seconds over a
thirty-mile course.
It was found that Shamrock 111. was
slightly longer on the water line than
the American boat, but the latter
proved to have nearly '2,000 more
square feet of sail area than the chal
lenger, and it was this that taxed the
American boat so heavily in the mat
ter of time allowance.
The announcement of the time al
lowance in favor of the challenger
caused little surprise at the yadit club,
as it was the very general belief that
the Reliance would prove considerably
larger all around than her opponent.
The following are the official figures:
.Reliance. Shamrock in.
Feet. Feet.
Water line .< 89.66 89.81
Base line 201.75 187.54
Foreaide of mast 84.29 81.40
Spinnaker boom 83.75 81.40
Main gaff :... 71.90 65.75
Topmast 72.00 69.15
♦Sail area 16.169.93 14.337.45
Sailing length 108.41 104.77
Men on board 64 56
♦Square feet.
Reliance and Shamrock IIL swung at
their moorings inside Sandy Hook to
night, ready for the international con
test for the America's cup, the first
race of which will be sailed on Thurs
day.
The cleaning of the underbodies of
both was completed this morning, and
Charles D. Mower, the official meas
urer of the New York Yacht club,
measured both boats. As one result
eight inches of the end of the spin
naker boom of Shamrock 111. was
sawed off, owing to the fact that it was
estimated to be that much longer than
the base of the forward triangle, which
covers the headsails of* the yacht,
which would mean penalization, if al
lowed to stand.
Sir Thomas Llpton, Mr. Iselin, De
signer Herreshoff and Designer Fife
were interested spectators of the work
of Mr. Mower. The measuring being
completed, both yachts were towed to
Sandy Hook, arriving there about sun-
Whether either the cup defender or
the challenger will take a spin tomor
row depends entirely on the weather.
Should there be a fine dry air, of not
too much strength, it is quite probable
that a final sail-stretching spin will be
taken, otherwise the yachts will re
main at their moorings all day.
DANNY KERWIN TO JOIN
THE CINCINNATI REDS
Tebeau Announces Trade That Will Put
the Right Fislder In the Big League.
Danny Kerwtn, the right fielder of the
Louisville team, is another of the stars
of the American association who will
move up to the big league when the sea
son closes. Kerwin, according to George
Tebeau, the Louisville club owner, will
join the Cincinnati team when the Col
onels disband. Tebeau announces that
he ha& traded Kerwin to Cincinnati for
another strong player, whose name will
not be given out until later.
In dh'ctissing the report that Billy
Clymer, the manager of the Colonels, has
been released. Tebeau said last night that
Clymer has not and will not be released.
To make his statement more strong, the
$33.60 New Yorklm
$41.60 Bo stonlSH
To leave August 20-21-22. Re
turn limit 30 days, on the
Chicago, Milwaukee &.
St. Paul Railway.
Good on the Pioneer Limited
and three other fast trains
Tickets: 366 Robert St.,
ST. PAUL.
W B DIXON Northwestern Passenger Agent,
GBvery bottle o£
Pabst
"D 1 X> *L.l_
JDlueKibbon
is backed by sixty years
ofpractieal.brewing ex
perience. Perfect
brewing and perfect bot
tling nave built tke kigK
reputation of Pabst
Beer, and given it en
viable prestige wherev
er beer is used* Pabst
Deer is a/ways pure.
Orders filled by
Pabst St. Paul Branch, Telephone Main 94.
Louisville club owner said that he In
tends to sign Clymer as manager for his
next season's team.
EGAN ANXIOUS FOR
ANOTHER TRY AT HUNTER
Collegiate Golf Champion Will Again Play
His English Conqueror.
CHICAGO, Aug. 18.—President F. S.
James, of the Glenview Golf club, today
flew the Union Jack below Old Glory in
honor of the visit of the Oxford-Cam
bridge Golfing society team to the pic
turesque links. Capt. Low, of the Eng
lishmen, advocated a study of the score
card of the course and then the British
ers went out to learn the links.* The vis
itors praised the topography and physical
features of the Glenview links.
Capt. Waller, of the all-Chicago team,
met Capt. Low after practice and ar
ranged the pairs for tomorrow's match.
By request of the collegiate Champion H.
C. Egan, Norman Hunter, his conqueror
at Wheaton, with the record-breaking
score of 71, was again pitted against him.
The draw follows:
Louis N. James, Glenview, vs. J. A. T.
Bramston, Oxford.
H. C- Egan, Exmoor, vs. Norman Hun
ter, Cambridge.
Walter E. Egan, Exmoor, vs. T. Mans
field Hunter, Oxford.
R. F. Mundy, Riverside, vs. H. Q. B.
Ellis, Oxford.
B. D. Smith, Onwentsia, vs. G. A.
Barae, Oxford.
J. M. Sellers, Glenview. vs. J. L. Low,
Cambridge.
Charles Zublin, Midlothian, va. D. F.
Ransom, Cambridge.
R. H. McElwee, Exmoor, vs. H. W.
Beveridge. Oxford. _
B. F. Cummins, Exmoor, vs. P. W.
Leathart, Cambridge.
W. I. Osborne, Glenview, va. C. H.
Allison, Oxford. . „
William Waller, Onwentsia, vs. C. N.
Day, Oxford.
5
ST. CLOUD WOULD PLAY SAINTS.
Flushed With Victory Independent Team
Wants Game With Kelley's Men.
Special to The Globe.
ST. CLOUD, Minn., Aug. 18.—The St.
Cloud base ball team arrived home today
from a victorious trip over the northern
and western part of the state with the
fast Glencoe team. In a series of games,
St. Cloud won ten and tied one. Of the
games lost, one was forfeited at Whea
ton. The team played fifty games so far
this season, winning forty-one of them,
giving them a percentage of 820. Both the
Winnipeg and Grand Forks teams of the
Northern league have been defeated and
the boys are looking for fresh worlds to
conquer. In Wilson, the colored pitcher,
who last year played with Waseca, they
undoubtedly has as fast a pitcher as
plays in any of the big leagues. The fans
are desirous that games be arranged with
the St. Paul league team, and there is
plenty of money here to back them as the
winners.
MISS ANTHONY MAKES BEST SCORE.
Western Golf Champion Turns In 93 In
the Qualifying Round.
CHICAGO, Aug. 18.—Miss Bessie An
thony, Western champion, turned In a 93
In the qualifying round of the eighth
annual women's tournament of the On
won«sia club, which started today. This
was the best score of the fifty-four wom
en who made the eighteen-hole journey,
and accordingly the champion was gi^en
the medal for top score. In last years
Onwentsia tourney Miss Anthony made an
89 in the qualifying round. Second best
score was made today by Miss Johnnie
Carpenter, who covered the distance with
99 strokes. Mrs. A. T. Bower was third
with an even 100. The tournament will
la3t rive days and the indications are that
It will be a great success, as all the best
women golfers in the vicinity of Chicago
are entered.

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