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The Saint Paul globe. (St. Paul, Minn.) 1896-1905, September 19, 1903, Image 5

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn90059523/1903-09-19/ed-1/seq-5/

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THE WORLD OF SPORT 1
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SAINTS TRIMMED
BY GANTILLON MEN
Kelley Men hail to Hit Meredith
and Barely Escape Shut
out.
STANDING OF THE CLUBS.
_. Played. Won. Lost. P. C.
St. Paul t3O 87 43 .669
Mflwauk«* 134 76 58 .567
IncKanapol's 137 75 62 .547
Kansas City 130 64 6'i 492
Columbus 138 56 82 .406
Minneapolis IS4 49 85 .366
Toledo IS 1; 47 89 .350
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS.
Milwaukee 12. 3t. Paul 1.
Louisville 7. Columbus 4
Minm-api li>- 12. Kansas City 9.
Kaii .is City i», M.nneapolis 3.
Special to The Globe.
MILWAUKEE, Wis., Sept. 18. —
There were less than 300 baseball fans
at Athletic park this afternoon to
watch the Brewers play rings around
the pennant-winning Saints. Among
the number were thirty players of the
Denver and Milwaukee teams, of the
Western league, owing to the sudden
demise of that organization.
The Brewers won by a score of 12 to
1. due to the excellent pitching of El
mer Meredith, who allowed the Saints
just three scattered hits.
The Saints were mixed as badly as a
Chinese puzzle. The infield was chang
ed around so that even Manager Kelley
would not recognize it. Jackson played
second base, Wheeler played first, Geier
covered third, and Sehaefer was in his
correct position at short. -
Catcher Sullivan played first base for
a time until he tired of it and changed
•with Jackson. Errors were numerous
on the part of the Saints and they
made mistakes which are not recorded
In the score. They did not give the
young pitcher, Freeman, any support
to speak of, and that youth, "no doubt,
w i.shed he had one of the Northern
league teams back of him.
Freeman was effective at times, but
he was wild and gave six bases on
balls, hit two men and threw into the
grand stand when men were on bases.
There was a great deal of kicking at
Umpire Mullane, who made several
very dose and questionable decisions.
<'apt. Schaefer was on his dignity and
kicked every chance he had.
The lielding of Dunleavy was a fea
ture of the game. He made a couple of
swell catches. Shannon played the
In'st hall Cor the Saints.
The Brewers scored twice in the
third on two hits and errors. In the
fifth four runs came in on one hit, two
gifts and errors.. Three were made in
the sixth on two hits, two bases on
balls and errors. Three hits and a gift
scored three in the eighth. The Saints
scored their only run in the seventh
on Unglaub's throw into the bleachers
and Fiouinoy's hit. The score:
Milwaukee. AB. R. H. PO. A. E.
Ganley. rf 4 3 2 1 0 0
Donahue, li) 5 1 1 6 2 o
Wood, c 4 1 2 5 0 0
t'nglaub, 3b 4 0 2 1 1 l
Hemphill, cf 2 0 0 3 0 0
Dunleavy, If 1 l 0 4 0 0
Vi'ix. Be S 0 0 2 3 0
Schlafley, 2b 2 3 1 3 1 0
Meredith, p 2 3 1 2 3 0
Totals 27 12 9 27 9 1
St. Paul AB. R. H. PO. A. E.
Geier, 3b 4 0 0 1 0 0
Shannon, cf 4 0 0 2 0 o
Jackson, rf and 2b. 4 0 0 12 0
Schaefer. ss 4 1 0 l 3 0
Pelrce, c 4 0 0 2 6 1
Flournoy, if 3 0 1 2 0 0
Wheeler, 2b and lb.. 3 0 0 5 4 1
Sullivan, lb and if .. 2 o l 10 l l
Freeman, p 3 0 1 0 2 2
Totals 31 1 3 24 18 5
Milwaukee ..00204303 •—l2
St. Paul 0 0000010 o—l
Earned run, Milwaukee 1; three-base
hit, Meredith: bases on balls, off Meredith
1. off Freeman 6; hit by pitched balls.
Hemphill. Ganley; wild pitch, Freeman;
struck out. by Meredith 5, by Freeman 2;
double play, Wheeler to Sullivan to
Peirce; left on bases, Milwaukee 4. St.
Paul 4; umpire, Mullane; time, 1:15; at
tendance. :!00.
Orphans and Blues Break Even.
KANSAS CITY Mo., Sept. 18.—Minne
apolis won tho first game today by bunch
ing hits in the fifth and sixth innings.
Coons' excellent pitchfng won the second
game for Kansas City. Attendance, 600.
Score:
First Game —
K. C. iHTP!A| El Mpls. IHP A| E
Rothfs lbl lils[ II ljSullivn cf. 1 2 0 0
Hill cf 21 1 0 o'Maloney rf 3 1 0 0
Nance 2b. 0 2 4 o|Oyler ss... 1 3 2 1
Grady c... 4 4 1 o|Mlntyr 3b 2 0 1 1
Gear rf... 2 0 0 OiDally 1f... 1 1 0 0
Hall 3b... 2 0 4 o|Yeager c. 1 8 3 1
Knoll 1f... 1 2 0 OlSpooner lb 3 9 0 0
Lewo ss. 2 2 5 1 Martin 2b. 12 3 0
Alloway p 1 1 4 llMcDonld p 1 1 2 2
•Butler ..0000 —|
Gibson p.. 0 0 0 0 Totals ..14 27 11 5
Totals . 15 27 19 3!
Kansas City .2 0131002 o—9
Minneapolis .00005601 o—l2
•Batted for AJloway in eighth.
Two-base hits, Rothfuss, Hill, Hall,
Knoll. Lewee, Maloney, Mclntyre, Lally,
Spooner; home runs. Mclntyre. McDonald;
sacrifice hits, Alloway, Hill. Maloney, Oy
ler; stolen bases. Hill, Butler, Maloney 2;
double plays, Lewee to Nance to Rothfuss,
Brady to Lewee. Yeager to Oyler; bases
on balls, off Alloway 3. off McDonald 6;
struck out, by Alloway 2, by Gibson 1, by
McDonald 6; time, 2:10; umpire, Fore
man.
Second Game—
K. C. |H!PAjE: Mpls. IH! PAI E
Rothfs lb. 211 0! QiSullivan If. 0| 1 0] 0
Hill cf 1 2 0 OlMaloney rf 1 1 0 1
Nance 2b. 1 3 4 o|Oyler ss... 1 4 1 0
Butler c 1 6 1 OlMlntyre 3b 0 1 2 1
Gear rf-lf. 12 0 OlLally cf... 1 2 1 0
Hall 3b... 2 0 0 llYeager c. 0 3 3 0
Knoll lf-rf 10 0 OiSpooner lb 1 9 1 0
Lewee ss. 2 3 4 llMartin 2b. 1 2 4 2
Coons p... 10 3 0 Converse p 0 1 4| 0
Totals .12 27 12 2J Totals .. 524 is] 4
Kansas City ..0 01 02222 • —9
Minneapolis ..0 0002100 o—3
Two-base hits. Coons, Spooner; home
run. Gear; sacrifice hits. Coons 2. Lewee,
Butler; stolen bases, Butler, Rothfuss,
Hill, Maloney, Oyler; double plays, But
ler to Nance, Lewee to Rothfuss; bases
on balls, off Coons 1, off Converse 5;
struck out, by Coons 5, by Converse 1;
hit by pitched ball, by Coons 1; left on
bases, Kansas City 9, Minneapolis 3; time,
2 hours; umpire. Foreman.
Timely Hitting Wins for Colonels.
COLUMBUS, Ohio, Sept. 18.—Louisville
defeated Columbus today by timely hit-
ABC-veers
Guaranteed Pure. None So Good.
Order from H. Orlcmann, St. Paul. '
ting, aided by Dorner's wlldness. Attend
ance. 590. Score:
Col. IH P A!K! Louis. |H P A|E
Gleasn 2b! 1 5 41 1 Kerwin rf.l 110 0
Arndt If . [ 2 2 0 0 Hart lb .| 2 9 0 0
Turner 3b 1 1 2| Olßrasher 2b 0 2 3 0
Bannon of 1 2 (II OlOdwell cf. 2 6 0 0
Clngmn ss 0 3! 2 0 Sulivan 3b 1 2 3 0
Mellor lb. 1 10| 01 O.Clymer If. 1 1 0 0
Wagner rf 1 2 0 OQulnlan ss 1 1 3 0
Fox c ... 2 2 1 Oißerry c .. 16 10
Dorner p. 1 0 5 0 Walker p. 0 0 1 0
•MMakin 0000
—! Totals .. 927 11 0
Totals lj _
Columbus 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 I— l
Louisville 1 0 0 3 0 0 2 0 I—71 —7
♦Batted for Dormr In ninth.
Stolen bases. Bannon, Korwin, Sullivan,
Odwell; two-base hits, Mellor, Clymer,
Quinlan. Sullivan; three-base hit. Hart;
double play, Clingman to Gleaaon to Mel
lor; struck out, by Dorner 2. by Walker 5;
bases on balls, off Dorner 6; hit by pitch
er, Clymer; lime, I:4<J; umpire. Haskdl.
Toledo Team Is Delayed.
TOLEDO. Ohio. Sept. 18.—The baseball
game scheduled with Indianapolis was
postponed today on account of the non
arrival of the Toledo team from Louisville.
AMERICAN LEAGUE.
STANDING OF THE CLUBS.
Played. Won. Lost. P. C.
lias ton 128 86 43 .6«4
Cleveland 131 72 59 .549
Philadelphia 125 67 58 .538
New York 122 64 58 .525
Detroit 126 61 65 .484
St. Louis 127 61 66 .480
Chicago 128 57 71 .445
Washington 128 41 87 .320
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS.
New York 7. Chicago 1.
New York 6. Chicago 3.
Philadelphia 7. St. Louis {..
St. Louis 9. Philadelphia 2.
Boston 7. Cleveland 6.
Washington 4. Detroit 0.
Washington 6, Detroit 5.
Senators Win Double-Header.
WASHINGTON. D. C, Sept. 18.—Wash
ington won both games today. Dunkle's
pitching was too much for the visitors In
the iir.st game. Detroit gave a local am
ateur a trial at short and his work cost
Detroit the second game. Score:
First Game —
Wash. IH! P!A! El Det. HIPAI E
Rohson of! l! 2 0' 0 Barrett cf 0 3 01 0
Hendks rfl o! 2 ol o'Lush 1f.... 14 0 0
Moran 88.1 2 2 3 OlCrawfd rf. 1 3 1 0
S<?lb:Jh If 0 2 0 OCarr 1b.... 1 7 2 0
Clarke lb. 1 6 1 0 Yeager 3b. 1 1 0 1
Coghlin 3bl 2 0 II 0 Long 2b... | 0 1 2 0
MCrmk 2b! 1 2 2 0 Nichols ss. 2 2 1 1
Kitrdge c.| 111 1 0 McGuire c 1 2 1 0
Wilson p.. 0 0 0 0 Kissingr p 0 1 3 0
Dunkle p. 1000
1 Totals .. 724 10 2
Totals ■ 9!27| 8 0
Washington ..00110200 •—4
Detroit .00000000 o—o
Two-base hits. Lush, McGuire; three
baso hits, Robinson, Kittredge; stolen
bases. Coughlin, McCormick. Jarrett; sac
rifice hits. Dendricks. Long; bases on balls,
of Dunkle 4. off Kissing 2; struck out,
by Dunkle 9, by Kissinger 1; left on bases,
Washington 8, Detroit 9; time, 1:45; um
pire, Connolly.
Second Game —
Wash. IH! P|A| E! Det. iH P|A| E
Hendks rf 01 0 0 Ojßarrett cf. 1 0 01 0
Osteen ss. 1 1 5 0 Lush If 3 2 0 0
Selbach If. 1 2 0 0 Crawfd rf. 1 3 0 0
Clarke lb. 113 1 OCarr 1b... 210 1 0
Coghlin 3b| 2 1 5 0 1 Yeager 3b. 0 2 3 1
Le e cf «0 1 0 l|Long 2b... 0 2 0 0
MCrmk 2bi 1 3 4 o'Nlchols ss 1 2 2 3
Drill c 2 4 1 o]Buelow c. 1 3 3 0
Patten p.. 1 2 2 0 Kitson p.. 0 0 2 0
Totals .] 9?7|18| 11 Totals ..| 9 24 11 ~4
Washington ..0 0101310 * —G
Detroit 0 ft 1 0 1 0 3 0 o—s
Two-base hits, Drill 2. Coughlin, Craw
ford; three-base hits, McCormick. Carr;
home run. Lush; first base on balls, off
Patton G. off Kitson 1; hit by pitched
balls. Clarke. Yeager; struck out, by Pat
ten 2, by Kitson 5; left on bases, Wash
ington 7, Detroit 8; time, 1:45; umpire,
Connolly; attendance, 1,740.
Mack's Team Breaks Even.
PHILADELPHIA, Pa., Sept. 18.—Phil
adelphia and St. Louis broke even. The
visitors started off like winners in each
game, but by good hitting in the first
contest the home team won. St. Louis
won the second game through the poor
work of Philadelphia's pitchers. At
tendance. 4,475. Scores:
First Game—
Phil H ~P~A|E| St. L. |H P A|K
Hartsel If 3 1 0 o|Burkett If 1 1 0 0
Pckrng cf 0 2 0 0 Sander rf. 1 1 1 0
Davis lb. 0 9 1 1 Hedrlck cf 1 5 0 0
LCross 3b 1 3 0 0 Andesn lb 111 1 0
Seybold rf 1 0 0 o|Wallace ss 2 4 1 0
Murpy 2b 0 1 2 o|Hill 3b .. 0 13 0
MCross ss 0 2 2 Olßucock 2b 1 2 0 0
Schreck c 1 8 2 o|Sugden c. 0 1 0 0 '
Bonder p. 0 0 0 OlSudhoff p. 0 0 0 0
Plank p.. f 3 1 6| o|Morgan p. 0 1 1 0
I—l—l—!—l*Kahoe .. 0 0 0 0
Totals .| 9|27|13| 1|
Totals .1 7|27| 7| 0
Philadelphia ..0 0~~ 3 0 1 0 3 0 • —7
St. Louis 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 o—s
•Batted for Sudhoff in fourth Inning.
Two-base hits, Boucock, Hartsell;
three-base hit, Wallace; double play, Wal
lace to Anderson; left on bases. St. Louis
3. Philadelphia 5; first base on balls, off
Morgan 1. off Bender 1, off Plank 1; hit
by pitched balls, by Sudhoff 1, by Morgan
2; struck out, by Morgan 1, by Bender 1,
by Plank 5; bassed ball. Sudgen; wild
pitch, Morgan; time, 1:30; umpires,
Adams.
Second Game—
„ Pb»- H ~P~AJE St. L. ,HP A|B
Hartsel If 2 2 0 0 Burltett If 1 3 0 0
Pckrng cf 1 3 0 OjSander rf. 2 1 0 0
Davis lb. 1 8 2 o|Heidrck cf 2 1 0 0
LCross 3b 1 0 1 0 Andesn lb 0 9 0 0
Seybold rf 0 0 0 0 Wallace ss 2 5 2 0
Muphy 2b 0 4 4 0 Hill 3b .. 1 4 2 0
MCross ss 0 3 2 0 Bucock 2b 3 1 3 0
Schreck c 1 5 0 0 Sugden c. 1 3 1 0_
Henley p. 0 0 0 0 Powell p.. 2 0 2,V
Bender p. 0 0 0 0] f_
Barbnks p 0 2 4 0| Totals .|l4|27|lo| 0
•Hoffman 0 0 0 0
Totals . 627 13 0
Philadelphia ..0 ~"0 2 0 0 0 0 0 o^2
St. Louis 7 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 o—9
•Batted for Fairbanks in ninthl
Two-base hits, Sudgen, Hartsel. Davis.
Schreck; home run. Hartsel; sacrifice hit,
Boucock; double play. M. Cross to Murphy |
to Davis; left on bases, St. Louis 14,
Philadelphia 8; first base on balls, off
Powell 4, off Henley 3, off Bender 1, off
Fairbanks G; struck out, by Powell 2;
wild pitches, Fairbanks 2; time, 1:40; /.um
pire, Adams.
Highlanders Take Two.
NEW YORK. Sept. 18.—New York took
both games from the Chicagos today.
Scores:
First Game—
N. Y. H"PA|E| Chi. HPAIE
Conroy 3b 2 4 3 1 Jones cf... 0 2 0 0
Fultz cf.. 1 1 0 OlCallahan If 1 1 0 0
Keeler rf. 4 0 0 OlClark 3b.. 0 2 11
Davis rf.. 0 3 0 o'Green rf... 4 0 0 0
hlbrfld ss 1 2 3 liTanhill ss 0 1 4 4
Willms 2b 1 5 2 o'lsbell 1b... 211 0 0
Ganzel lb. 0 8 2 OiMagoon 2b 0 1 1 0
McFrlnd If 12 0 O'Sulllvan c. 1 6 0 0
Beville c. 1 2 0 0 White p... 10 3 0
Wolfe p... 0 0 3 0 J J
_ _ , Totals .. 924 9 5
Totals . 11127113 2
New York 0 0 2 0 I 4 0 6" •^t
Chicago Q Q Q Q p p i 0 () _ 1
Left on bases. New York 8, Chicago 9-
Two-base hits. Green. White; three-base
hit. Keeler; sacrifice hits, Fultz White
stolen bases. Keeler, Fultz, Elberfeld'
£?,whan> Jones: double play, Wolfe to
Williams to Ganzel; bases on bails off
THE ST. PAUr, GLOBE, SATURDAY SEPTEMBER 19, 1903.
Wolfe 1, off White 2; first on errors.
New York 3, Chicago 2; hit by pitched
ball, by Wolfe 1. by White 1; struck out.
by Wolfe 1, by White 5; time, 1:35; um
pire, Sheridan.
Second Game —
N. Y. |H| PA] El Chi. |H| P!AI E
Conroy 3b. 2 4 II o'Jones cf.. 1 2 1 0
Fultz cf.. 0 2 0 llCallahan If 0 1 0 0
Kecler rf. 2 2 0 OlClark 3b.. 3 0 3 0
Elbrfld ss 1 2 4 OlGreen rf.. 0 0 0 0
Wilams 2b 0 3 2 OlTanhill ss 1 0 3 1
Ganzel lb. 2 5 1 OUsbell lb.. 212 1 0
McKrlnd If 0 1 0 OlMagoon 2b 0 1 3 1
Seville c. 18 0 OlSlattery c. 0 7 1 0
Howell p. 1 0 3 OJOwen p... 0 1 5 0
Totals .19 27111 1! Totals ■■ 7|24 171 2
New York 0 0010131 •—6
Chicago 0 0 l 0 0 0 0 2 o—3
Left on bases. New York ti. Chicago. 9;
two-base hits, Keeler. Elberfeld, Beville,
Jones. Isbell; three-base hits. Ganzel,
Conroy, Howell, Clark: Sacrifice hits.
Keeler. Howell 2, Tannehill; stolen bases.
Conroy. Fultz 2, Elberfeld. Clark: double
play, "Howell to Elberfeld to Williams;
first on balls, off Howell 5. off Owen 3;
first on errors. New York 2, Chicago 1;
hit by pitched ball, by Owen- 1; struck out,
by Howell 5, by Owen 3; time. 1:40; um
pire, Sheridan; attendance, 5,042.
Leaders Beat Blues Again.
BOSTON. Mass., Sept. 18.—Boston won
its third straight victory over Cleveland
today in an exciting finish. Parent knock
ing a home run in the ninth with a man
on bases. Score:
Boston. H P A|E . Cleve. |H P A|E
Doghrty If 0 4 0 0 Flick rf . | 2 2 0 0
Collins 3b 2 4 1 0 Bay If ... 43 1 0
Stahl cf.. 3 1 0 0 Bradley 3b 0 2 1 1
Freemn rf 0 3 0 0 Lajoie 2b. 0 4 0 0
Parent ss 2 1 2 0 Bern is lb.. 1 4 1 0
Lachne lb 0 9 1| O|lott cf ... 1 5 0 1
Ferris 2b. 113 OlAbbott c..| 0 4 2 1
Farrell c. 2 2 1 OGochnr ss. 0 1 2 1
Dineen p. 0 2 2 0 Klllian p.. 11 0 1
Totals ■102710 _0 »Totals . 9|26 7| S
Boston 0 0 0 0 3 0 1 1 2—7'
Cleveland 2 3 0 0 1 00 0 o—6
•Two out when winning run was made.
Two-base hits. Flick, Stahl; three-base
hits. Bay, Parent; home run. Parent;
stolen bases. Flick, Bay 2. Dougherty,
Stahl; double play. Bradley to Bemis;
first base on balls, off Dineen 1, off Kil
lian 4; hit by pitched ball, by Killlan, La
chance; struck out. by Killian 2. by
Dineen 2; time. 1:40; umpire, O'Loughlin;
attendance, 4,710.
NATIONAL LEAGUE.
STANDING OF THE CLUBS.
Played. Won. Lost. P. C.
Pittsburg 132 89 43 .674
New York 132 80 52 .606
Chicago 131 78 53 .5<J6
Cincinnati 127 69 58 .543
Brooklyn 127 64 63 .504
Boston 132 54 78 .409
Philadelphia 124 42 82 .339
St. Louis 130 42 88 .323
YESTERDAY'S RESULT*
Pittsburg 7. Boston 6.
Pittsburg C. Boston 5.
N< w Yoik 7. Cincinnati 5.
Chicago 6. Philadelphia 5.
Philadelphia 10, Chicago 0.
Champs Win Third Pennant.
PITTSBURG, Pa.. Sept. 18.—Pittsburg
■won the penant for the third time today
by winning two games from Boston. Both
games- were won in the ninth inning by
hard hitting. Attendance. 3,104. Score:
First Game — . ■ .. ■ . •
Pitts. HPA| E| Bost. HPAI E
Beaumt cf 1 2 0 o'Dexter rf.. 1 2 0 0
Clarke If.. 2 0 0 OjTenney lb 212 1 0
Sebring rf. 110 0 Abtchio 2b 0 1 3 0
Wagnr ss. 2 3 0 1 Cooley If.. 0 3 0 0
Branfd lb. 112 0 0 Gremgr •3b 0 2 2 0
Ritchey 2b 2 1 1 1 MCrery cf 0 1 0 1
Kruger.3b 116 0 Moran c... 12 1 0
Phelps c. 2 6 1 0 Aubrey ss. 2 3-4 0
Leeverp.. 0 14 0 Malarky p. 2 0 2 0
Totals .1227 12 2 *Totals . 826 13 1
Plttsburg 0 0 0 0 10 3 0 3—7
Boston 1 0 0 00 2 2 1 o—6
•Two out when winning run scored.
Two-base hits, Wagner, Ritchey, Kru
ger, Dexter, Moran, Aubrey; sacrifice
hits, Phelps, Dexter, Abbaticchio, Cooley;
stolen bases, Sebring, Wagner, Ritchey,
Abbaticchio, Greminger; double plays,
Malarkey to Tenney, Abbatlcchio to Mor
an; first base on balls, off. Leever 4, off
Malarkey 4; struck out, by Leever 2, by
Malarkey 1; passed balls. Phelps, Moran;
time, 2 hours; umpire. Hurst.
Second Game —
Pitts. H PA| Bost. |H P A|
Beaumt cf 1 1 0 0 Dexter rf.. 10 0 0
Clarke If.. 3 2 0 1 Tenney lb 0 5 0 0
Sebring rf 2 2 0 0 Crny lb-lf 110 1
Wegnr ss. 1 4 5 0 Abtchio 2b 2 4 2 0
Branfd lb. 2 9 1 1 Coley If-lb 3 4 0 0
Ritchey 2b 0 1 2 0 Jremgr 3b 1 0 4 0
Kruger 3b 1 2 0 0 VlCrery cf | 2 4 0 0
Smith c... 15 1 0 Koran c..| 2| 3| 0
Thomsn p 1 1 2 0 Aubrey ss. 0 4 3 0
Pittingr p. 0 0 2 1
Totals . 12 27 11 2
*Totals .112|24|141 2
Pittsburg 10001102 I—6
Boston 0 0 0 1 0 2 0 0 2—5
•None out when winning run was
scored.
Two-base hit. Moran; three-base hits,
Clarke, Kruger. Carney, Abbaticchio; sac
rifice hit, Bransfield; stolen .bases,
Ritchey, Dexter, Abbaticchio, Cooley,
Moran; double plays, Wagner to Brans
field, Moran to Aubrey, Aubrey to Ab
baticchio; first base on balls, off Thomp
son 3. off Pittinger 4; hit by pitched balls,
Ritchey, Thompson; struck out, by
Thompson 5, by Plttinger 1; passed ball,
Moran; time, 2 hours; umpire. Hurst.
No Hit Game for Fraser.
CHICAGO. Sept. 18.—Both games were
loosely played today. The locals won the
first by a margin of one, a single, a pass
and two errors giving 'them the winning
run. "Chick" Fraser pitched a remark
able game in the second, shutting Chicago
out without a run or hit. while his team
found both the locals' new pitchers for
fourteen hits and ten scores. Attend
ance, 1,200. Scores:
Fir3t Game
Chi. |H P El Phila. |H|PA|E
Slagle cf. 2 2 0 0 Thomas cf 0 3 0 0
McCrthy If 2 0 0 0 Hallmn 2b 0 2 3 0
Chance lb 215 0 0 Wlvrtn 3b 2 0 3 0
Jones rf.. 00 0 0 Barry If.. 1 2 1 0
Tinker ss. 1 3 4 2 Titus rf... 2 3 0 0
Kling c. 16 3 1 Douglas lb 1 8 0 0
Evers 2b. 1 1 4 OiHulswitt ss 2 2 3 2
Casey 3b.. 0 0 2 0;Dooln c... 1 4 2 2
Wicker p.. 1 0 1 0 Sparks p.. 0 0 0 0
: fßoth .... 0 0 0 0
" Totals . 10 27 14 31 < - _
Totals .. 9 24 12 4
Chicago 3 1 0 0 00 1 I »H6
Philadelphia ..001210 0 0 1 5
•Batted for Sparks in ninth] ~~~~~
Left on bases, Chicago 5, Philadelphia
4; two-base hits. Slagle 2, Kling; three
base hits. Sparks. Casey. Hulswitt; stolen
bases, Slagle, McCarthy, Evers; double
play. Tinker to Evers to Chance; struck
out. by Wicker 7, by Sparks 2; bases on
balls, off Wicker 1, off Sparks 3; time,
1:45; umpires, Moran and Emslie.
Second Game—
" Chi. - |H PA E! Phila. HPA E
Slagle cf. 0 0 0 1 Thomas cf 14 0 0
McCrthy If 0 1 0 1 Hallmn 2b 1 2 3 1
Chance lb 012 0 0 Wlvrtn 3b 2 1 2 0
Jones rf.. 0 0 0 0 Barry 1f... 1 3 10 0
Tinker ss. 0 2 5 OJTltus rf . . . 2 1 0 0
Kling c... 0 5 5 UDouglas lb 313 0 0
Evers 2b.. 0 5 5 OlHulswltt S3 1 1 5 3
Casey 3b.. 0 2 3 OjZimmer c. 1 4 1 0
Graham p 0 0 3 0 Fraser p.. 0 0 2 0
Currie p.. 0010
_| Totals • ..14 27 13 4
- Totals ■ 0127 22 3
Chicago 0 0 0 0 6 6" 6~~~0 0 0
Philadelphia .40002010 3—lo
. Left on bases, Chicago 7. Philadelphia
7; two-base hits. Zlmmer, Barry; sacrifice
hit, Titus; stolen bases. Chance 2; double
plays, Kling to Casey to Zimmer to Wol
verton, Fraser to Hulswitt to Douglas
struck out. by Graham 4, by Fraser 4
base on balls, off Graham 3, off Fraser s
hit with ball, Wolverton; time, 1:40; um
pires, Emslie and Moran.
Reds' Boots Cost the Game.
CINCINNATI. Ohio, Sept. 18.—Cincin
nati gave the- last game of the series to
New York today by numerous errors at
critical stages. Attendance. 1,966 Mc-
Graw was ordered off the field for back
talk to O'Day. Score:
_-Ci,- ]H|P!A|E| N. Y. Jill PI AIE
Donlln lf.| 4 1| .o|,o|lsrowne rf| 2| if o|-0
Seymor cf 21 71 0 Ofßri&han cf 21 21 1 1
Dolan rf . 0| 0 0 l!MGahn lb. 0 6 0 0
Beckly lb 3 7 2 o|Mort»s If. 0 2 0 0
Steinfd 3b 0 3 1 HBabi* ss . 3 4 3 0
Daly 2b . 1 2 4 0 Lautjer 3b 1 2 2 0
Corcrn ss 3 4 3 1 [Gilbert 2b. 0 3 4 0
Peitz c .. 2 2 0 ljWarner c. 3 5 3 o
Sutthoff p| 1 1| 31 o)TaVfpr p.. 0 13 1
I—l— iMfcttSon p| 0| II 01 0
Totals .16 27!13| 4| ' — I—l
'Totals .. 11|27|16 2
Cincinnati 1 1 d~« 0 3 0 0 o—s
New York ... .0 0 tt I' 0 3 1 1 l_7
Two-base hits, Bresnahan, Peitz, Cor
coran, Lauder; three-base hits, Daly
Beckley; triple play. Gilbert to Babb to
Lauder; stolen bases., Browne. Babb
double plays. Steinfeldt to Corcoran,
Sutthoff to Corcoran to Beckley; first base
on balls, off Taylor 2. off Matthewson 1
off Sutthoff 2; hit by pitched ball. Mc-
Gann; struck out, by Taylor 2, by Sutthoff
1; sacrifice hits, McGann; passed balls.
Peitz 2; left on bases. Cincinnati 9, New
York 6; wild pitch, Sutthoff; time, 1:55;
umpire, O'Day.
WINNIPEGGERS TO PLAY
AT NEW PARK TODAY
Champions of Northern League to Meet
Algona Colored Team.
This afternoon the crack Winnipeg
team, the winners of the Northern league
pennant, will play the first of a two
game series with the all-colored Atgona
team at the new downtown ball park.
As a feature of the afternoon's battle
Manager Egan, of the Winnipeg team, will
PITCHER SHAW.
present young Shaw, the twirler who has
won a reputation as the smallest profes
sional pitcher of the world. Shaw started
the season with the Milwaukee American
association team and was farmed to Du
luth. In the town at the head of tho lakes
he was one of the mainstays of the team.
Shaw is but live feet tall and only weighs
115 pounds.
The game this afternoon attracts the
attention of the local fans, as the Win
nipeg team is to play two games with
the St. Paul club for the championship
of the Northwest at the close of the
American association season, and all in
terested are anxious to secure a line on
the work of the Canadians.
MILWAUKEE TEAM WINS
PENNANT OF WESTERN
Sexton's Early Closing ■ Announcement
Gives Creams the Championship.
& 3
MILWAUKEE, Wis./Sept. Milwau
kee has at last won a baseball pennant.
This was made a certainty by President
Sexton's announcement,., at Peoria, 111.,
last evening: that the Western league
season had ended. Even had the season
finished the Creams. wpuld have won the
flag, as the double defeat sustained by
Colorado Springs at. Pebria settled the
question. • '.. •;
The announcement of trie wind-up of
I the playing season of the! league was re
ceived by Business Manager Higby. of the
Milwaukee club, and the game scheduled
for today was Immediately declared off.
Hugh Duffy, presidents and manager of
the club, said that he had been Informed
of the disbanding by Mr."' Higby.
| O'Rourke In the Hole.
OMAHA, Neb.. Sept. 18.—Manager
Rourke, of the Omaha team, lost $9,000
on the season's business. Last year the
average. attendance . was 2,000, with a
total of 42,000. This season's average was
800. The salary list has been $3,200 a
■month. Home games paid expenses, but
games on the road were losses. Omaha 13
the best paying city on the circuit.
Money Is Lost In Kansas City.
KANSAS CITY. Mo.. Sept. 18.—It has
been a wonder how the Western league
has existed in Kansas City even this long.
Last year, with Van Brunt financing it,
the team was a heavy loser and a cheaper
team was procured this season, but the
expenses have been far in excess of the
revenue.
AMERICAN LEADERS TO
CLASH WITH PITTSBURG
Champions of Big Leagues Will Play for
Leadership of World.
BOSTON, Mass.. Sept 18.—Manager
Collins, of the Boston: American league
team, was advised today by the owner
of the club. Henry Killlleav of Milwaukee,
that a series of nine . games for the
world's championship between Boston,
champions of the American league, and
Plttsburg, champions of the National
league, be arranged.
The series will begin in Boston about
Oct. 1. and will consist of four games in
each city, with a ninth game In Boston or
Pittsburg, In case a tie results.
MAJOR DELMAR FAILS.
Gelding Unable to Better His 2:00' 4 Rec
ord Made at Syracuse.
PHILADELPHIA. Pfc., Sept. 18.—Major
Delmar this afternoon, driven by A P
McDonald, at the Philadelphia Driving
Park, endeavored to lower his trotting
record of 2:00>4. rocently made at Syra
cuse, and failed. The gelding, carrying
its driver and sulky with, the combined
weight of 181 pounds, covered the mile in
2:06%.
Reagan to Fight Neal.
SAN FRANCISCO. Sept. 18—Frank
Neal. bantam weight champion, and John
nie Reagan, of Brooklyn, were matched
tonight to fight twenty rounds before the
Century Athletic club, in Los Angeles, on
Oct. 16, for the championship.
vwm Cigar Smoker's Protection K|
r^S\ The Largest Selling Brand of Cigars in the World. SbsSCh
Vlliii! THC BAND IS THE SMOKER'S PROTECTION. \^sfc^A
GOPHERS ARE READY
Greater Northrop Field Will Be
Dedicated Today.
The members of the University of Min
nesota football squad will make their
formal debut of the season on Northrop
field this afternoon, when the new field
is to be dedicated with appropriate cere
monies, followed by the first practice
game !.-etwt-en the Gophers and the teams
representing the Minneapolis and St. Paul
Central high schools.
The exercises are to commence at 2:45
With speeches by Guv. Van Sant, President
Northrop, of the university; Mayor
Haynes nnd Mayor Smith, of St. Paul.
Fred B. Snydc-r. president of the Alumni
association, will preside.
In view of the fact that the occasion
will mark the opening of Minnesota's
spit ndid athletic Held, the finest in the
West, it Is expected that the attendance
will exceed by far that at last year's in
itial game and every effort has been made
to get the stands In readiness for the
turnout.
The huge grandstand on the south side
of the field i:; completed and only requires
a few finishing touches. The turf gridiron
has been rolled until it has become firm
enough to stand the hardest kind of wear
and tnar, and. while the field will be a
bit slow, the players will be enabled to
perform »it their best.
The field was marked off yesterday aft
ernoon and for the first time the rooters
got an Idea of what it would look like
after having the lime applied. The crowd
watching the practice fairly marveled at
the beauty of the new battle ground.
While today's game is regarded as only
a "warming up" for the Gophers, every
man Who will be given an opportunity to
participate in the two halves will be seen
at his best, as the showing made in Ithls
contest will in a great measure decide the
future of the different players. The "try
out" will take in practically all the
members of the first and second teams,
and the rooteca w.il be given a chance to
get a line on the most prominent material
on hand.
Coach Williams has been at work with
his men for nearly a month and every
day has brought improvement in the play
ing of his pupils. Many of the men were
green, and those who have followed the
practice see in the 1903 Gophers a formid
able aggregation.
The Minneapolis Central and St. Paul
Central teams, who are to compose the
opposition today, have been practicing for
some time, and no doubt will give the
Gophers a good run. Coach Merrill, of the
Minneapolis Central, has a large quan
tity of promising material, and is flue to
line up a fast bunch against the big fel
lows. St. Paul Central will come up de
termined to give Dr. Williams' men a hard
tussle. Minneapolis Central will probably
line up for the first half, while the St.
Paul boys will draw the final period.
The 'varsity practice last night was
again light, but that was the result of a
misunderstanding on the part of the
scrubs, the latter going in before the
'varsity had finished signal practice. As
It was a little punting and light work, such
as picking up the ball, was done. AH the
work was of good quality, and with the
exception of Thorpe, all are in fine condi
tion for the game today.
MILWAUKEE WESTERN
LEAGUE TEAM HEDGES
Will Only Pay Players Up to Date of Or-
ganization's Explosion.
MILWAUKEE, Wis., Sept. 18.—Porter
Higby. business manager of the Milwau
kee Western league baseball team, an
nounced tonight that he would pay his
players only up to the time when the sea
son prematurely closed, notwithstanding
the fact that the players have contracts
running to the close of the schedule,
which calls for games up to Sept. 27.
I'nder Mr. Higby's ruling it Is asserted
that some of the players will make con
tracts for next year with whom they
please.
AFTER DAN PATCH'S RECORD.
Prince Alert Will Try to Lower Pacing
Mark on Empire City Track.
NEW YORK, Sept. 18.—Mart Demerest
will turn the great gelding Prince Alert,
pacer, 2:00%, loose at the Empire City
track here next Wednesday and will start
against the world's record of 1:59, held
by Dan Patch.
Prince Alert is in a class by himself as
a race horse, having been beaten only
twice in three seasons. He is in great
shape, having paced a mile in 2:03% over
the half-mile track at Bethlehem, Pa.,
last week.
He will be sent another fast mile at
Lexington next month. Wearing hopplen,
he cannot race over the Kentucky track,
but the management has engaged him to
go against the record.
Liston Sells Shamrock 11.
NEW YORK, Sept. 18.—It is stated in
connection with reports from Chicago that
Capt. Miller, who was skipper of the
yacht Columbia during the summer, and
Capt. Barr's assistant on the Reliance
during the cup races, has bought from Sir
Thomas Lipton the old cup challenger
Shamrock 11. The price paid for the hull
is not known, but it is believed it was
not far from $7,000. The yacht has been
on the shore at Erie basin for nearly two
years, and while being protected from the
weather as far as practicable, has be
come less and less valuable by corrosion.
The purchasers will braak her up for the
value of the material.
Chicago Bookmakers Indicted.
CHICAGO, Sept. 18.—Indictments were
today returned against thirty-three book
makers doing business on the local race
tracks. The charge against them was
made under the general law against
gambling. Some evidence was offered
against the officials of the racing associa
tions, but no bills were returned against
them.
Additional Sporting on Seventh Page.
Strictly Nautical.
'What will the cupseekers be that fol
low Shamrock III.?"
"They'll be IV.-and-aftere, of course."
—Cleveland Plain Dealer.
DESERTS HIS WIFE AND
PREACHES THE GOSPEL
Rev. Hylton Returns After 27 Years
and Persuades His Son to Follow Him.
ROANOKE. Va., Sept. 18.—A most
romantic affair became known here
today when Samuel Hylton, accompa
nied by his father. M. W. Hylton. aged
sixty-two, his wife and three small
children, left for Arkansas.
About twenty-seven years ago the
elder Hylton married Miss Sallie Mill
er, then eighteen years old. Three
weeks after their marriage Hylton loft
home. Mrs. Hylton would never assign
any reason for the mysterious disap
pearance of her husband. From the
union a son was born, and he married
and has three children.
The father in the meantime was ac
cumulating a snug fortune on an Ar
kansas ranch, and after seven years he
obtained a divorce from his deserted
wife. He was married to a second
woman and nine children were born to
them. His former wife never married
again, although many sprighliv farm
ers had offered her a share of their
homes.
Some years ago the elder Hylton be
came one of the most successful Bap
tist preachers in Arkansas. Two
months ago he wrote to the postmas
ter of Isent Mountain for Information
regarding Mrs. Hylton No. 1, and re
ceived a letter stating that she was
still alive and the mother of a hand
some son twenty-seven yean old, who
was a leading young citizen of the
community and the father of three lit
tle girls. He then cume to Virginia to
visit his son, and together they went
to^isit the wife and mother, where the
elder Hylton was received only as a
friend. The great inducements offered
the son to locate in the West caused
him to go with his father, and today
he and his family bade ttie mother a
fond adieu.
He Won Her.
The chronic bachelor finally turned to
the ffiffiSffi Wh° had take" "° I>art In
"Would you sir." he said, "marry the
best woman In tho world?"
"I did," was the reply.—Judge.
YOUNG MEN
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5
LUXURY ON WHEELS
Railroad Car of King George
of Greece Is a Palace.
BERLIN. Sept. If.—Court gOMlp Is
busy with admiring expressions about
the new private car of King George of
Greece, who Is now at ICarlenbad. Tha
car, which is forty-four feet long, cost
m >-„ than $100,000. it has been com
pleted in Paris, where a Greek commis
sion has arrived to take charge of it.
Entrance to the car is at the side,
about the middle. Prom the vestibule
<>p> n out the reception and private
apartments of the king. These in
clude btd, toilet and bath rooms, and
a library on the left, while on the
right are the grand salon and dining
room.
There are blue silk hangings and
polished walnut furniture in the kind's
bed room, and the toilet room is a
great achievement in artistic taste. The
library, which is In the Renaissance
style, is furnished in polished walnut,
and the ornaments are of broasa. Mom
grren cloth, with line embroidery work,
covers the walls.
The snlon is hung with crushed
stiawberry-colored silk, and the fur
niture is in mahogany. Every color
from orange to violet is blended In the
celling; from the center of which hangs
a great buttercup electric lamp. Prom
the salon to the dining room Is a st-p
through mirrored doors. This room Is
hung with slat.-colored cloth, em
broidered with silk, and the furniture
is in polished walnut.
Repartee at the Bosphorus.
Is H true, ' avked tin- sultan anxiously
that th.- American vice consul was shot
at Beirut?"
"No." responded the grand rlsler who
t:ik"- the American comic weeklies "but
I think tii.- man that ui.-,i it was balf
shot."
ih.it calla fora highball," rejoined the
Bultan. Ami they proceeded to hit th«
bull s-eye several times, which put his
majesty in such good humor thai he or
dered another massacre in Macedonia -
Indianapolis Journal,

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