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The Saint Paul globe. (St. Paul, Minn.) 1896-1905, June 26, 1904, Image 11

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THE WEATHER
For St. Paul and Vicinity— Fair.
For Minnesota —Fair Sunday, warm
er In west portion. Monday fair,
warmer.
VOL. XXVII.—NO. 178
WISCONSIN QUARREL MAY
SPLIT REPUBLICAN PARTY
It Bids Fair to Assume National Scope and Gov. La
Follette Believes a New Alignment of Political Par
ties Will Result—He Declares That the Republican
Organization Is Dominated by Corporations
Special to The Globe
MADISON, Wis.. June 25.—The La
Follette campaign in Wisconsin against
the regular party organization and the
Democrats will be conducted in the
contemplation of Gov. La Follette that
it will be the opening wedge for a new
alignment of the political parties of
the United States. The campaign is
already on, but the formal opening gun
will not be fired for several weeks. At
present the administration is prepar
ing literature to be used in the "edu
cational" campaign. The spellbinding
will come later.
Gov. La Follette, in his speech to a
conference of state employes and other
administration men, declared that the
railroads and great corporations were
dominating the national Republican
party.
The central committee of the stal-
IS LABOR'S FRIEND
President of Stonecutters Thus
Describes Parker
Special to The Globe
WASHINGTON, D. C, June 25. —
James Duncan, president of the Gran
ite Cutters' association, said tonight:
"President Roosevelt's nomination
has awakened no enthusiasm in labor
circles. It has awakened no enthusi
asm anywhere. The best friend labor
has in this country is Parker. I think
his is the finest judicial mind in the
United States. He is a whole man. He
has done more for labor than any man
who ever sat on the bench. Every
time a question has come before him
he has rendered a decision that was
based on humanitarianism."
Special to The Globe
PITTSBURG, Pa., June 25.— F. C.
Dickens, of the American Flint Glass
Workers union, of Toledo, Ohio, said
tonight:
•'The nomination of Roosevelt for
president and the appointment of P. C.
Knox as senator from Pennsylvania
will make the Republican party trou
ble. The working classes will be heard
from at the fall election."
SMITH HEMMED IN
Harris' Murderer Will Be Taken
In Twenty-four Hours
TREMPEALEAU, Wis., June 25. —
John Smith, the alleged murderer of
Sheriff Harris, of Eau Claire county,
and a policeman at Havre, Mont., is
surrounded in the tamarack swamps
several miles north of this city and
will be captured in twenty-four hours.
A report reached here that the fu
gitive shot a boy and a woman near
North Bend in an attempt to steal a
horse to aid his escape.
LIVES TEN DAYS WITH
HEART WOUND SEWN UP
Then W. Edward Pelt, Chicago Boy,
Dies of Self-Inflicted Injury
CHICAGO, June 25.—Surviving ten
days after having a bullet wound in
his heart sewed up, W. Edward Pelt,
fifteen years of age, died today at St.
Josephs hospital. He shot himself in
the heart with a revolver.
La Crosse Entertains Turners
LA CROSSE, Wis., June 25.—The Wis
consin state turnfest opened in this city
today with 600 turners present from lowa,
Minnesota and Wisconsin.
THE NEWS INDEXED
FIRST SECTION
PAGE I—New York as a Chromatic
City
PAGE 2—Wishes in the Mine
PAGE 3—Making the Home Beautiful
PAGE 4—Quest for Health and Beauty
PAGE s—California's Foreign Colonies
PAGE 6—Toggery for Half-Holiday
Girls
PAGES 7, 8, 9, 10—Comics.
SECOND SECTION
PAGE 11—Wisconsin Fight to Be Na
tional
Russian Admiral and 750 Men Perish
Tammany vs. Parker
Republican Caucuses
PAGE 12—McConnell Advises Butter
makers
PAGE 13—Eagles End State Conven
tion
Ward Associations to Unite
Army of Philippines Reunion
Fourth of July Fund Grows
PAGE 14—Ranchman Refuses to
Marry
PAGE 15—News of the Railroads
News of the Northwest
Minneapolis Matters
PAGE 16— In the Sporting World
PAGE 17—Sporting News
PAGE 18—Doings of Society
PAGE 19—Suburban Social
PAGE 20—Music and Musicians
THE ONLY DEMOCRATIC DAILY NEWSPAPER OF GENERAL CIRCULATION IN THE NORTHWEST
THE ST. PAUL GLOBE
wart faction will meet shortly, on the
call of Chairman Theodore W. Goldin,
of Janesville, and two campaign com
mittees, one Republican, the other
claiming to be Republican, will be in
operation. The regular committee,will
have the prestige of the Chicago con
vention and the assistance of the na
tional campaign organization. Many
observers say the only result of this
situation will be a victory for the Dem
ocrats in Wisconsin this fall.
The Republican state central com
mittee of the La Follette faction elect
ed officers as follows: Vice chairman,
Perry C. Wilder, Evansville; secretary,
Henry F. Cochems, Milwaukee; treas
urer, C. C. Gittings, Racine. An exec
utive committee of seven will be ap
pointed by Chairman Connor. Perma
nent headquarters will be established
at Milwaukee.
APPEALS TO VATICAN
Case of Father Harrison, of
St. Paul, Goes to Rome
ROME, June 25.—The case of Father
J. T. Harrison, of St. Paul, Minn,,
against Archbishop Ireland, in connec
tion with the contention over St. Jo
seph's parish, has been laid before the
congregation of the propaganda.
The congregation of bishops and
regulars has received a petition
against Most Reverend Alexander
Christie; archbishop of Oregon City,
Or., accusing him of not being suffi
ciently orthodox.
KENT LOOMIS STILL
AMONG THE MISSING
Report That He had Arrived in Paris Was
Erroneous
PARIS, June 25.—The suspense over the
disappearance of Kent J. Loomis con
tinued throughout the day. Officers who
are conducting the inquiry as to the
whereabouts of the missing man tonight
say that not the slightest trace of him
has been discovered. While Mr. Ellis was
here he assisted in the investigation, but
since his departure the officials are mere
ly waiting In the hope that Mr. Loomis
will be found in London. The correspond
ent who sent out the report that Mr.
Loomis had been found here was rigor
ously examined by the officials and ex
plained that he had mistaken Mr. Ellis
for Mr. Loomis.
INDIANAPOLIS GETS
NOISY OVER FAIRBANKS
Mayor Thinks Another Hoosler Will B«»
Named for Vice President
INDIANAPOLIS, Ind., June 25.—
Charles W. Fairbanks. Republican candi
date for vice president, returned to his
home this evening from Chicago. He was
greeted cordially by thousands of persons
of all parties all along the route of his
homeward trip today and at his Indian
apolis house tonight. Mrs. Fairbanks,
Postmaster General Henry C. Payne, Mrs.
Payne, George B. Cortelyou, chairman of
the Republican national committee; D.
M. Ransdell, sergeant-at-arms of the
United States senate, and several others
made up the Fairbanks party.
Bands led the shouting procession two
miles to the Fairbanks home. The streets
were illuminated with fireworks, while
flags fluttered from every building. Fully
20,000 persons greeted the Fairbanks party
at the senator's home. Mayor Holtzman,
in a welcoming address, predicted that a
similar reception would soon be given to
John W Kern when he returned from
St. Louis with the Democratic nomina
tion for vice president. Senator Beveridge
and Mr. Kern also spoke, and Senator
Fairbanks expressed his thanks.
SECOND SECTION
PAGE 21—King Talks Peace
Suit Against Jordan Estate
Patriarch Attempts Suicide
PAGE 22—How Homes Are Found for
Foundlings
Where Children Find Fresh Air and
Fun
PAGE 23—Trademark Prize Contest
PAGE 24—Runaway on Seventh Street
State Fair Race Programme
THIRD SECTION
PAGE 25—Hillman on Hurdle Racing
PAGE 26—China's Dowager Empress
PAGE 27—Advertisement
PAGE 28—Best Things From Abroad
PAGE 29—Recollections of Father Time
PAGE 30—Woman's Page of New Ideas
PAGE 31—Duel Between 801 l Weevil
and Ant
PAGE 32—Editorial Comment
PAGE 33—New Books
Sunshine Society
PAGE 34—Dramatic Summary
Seumas MacManus' Irish Letter
PAGE 35—"Romance"
PAGE 36—Yeggman and His Thieving
Trade
"The Chase of the Tide"
PAGE 37—Market Record
PAGE 38—Globe's Paying Wants
PAGE 39—Advertisements
PAGE 40—Tutuila, Isle of the South
urn s»».
SUNDAY MORNING. JUNE 26, 1904 -FORTY PAGES
FOES OPPOSED AT VLADIVOSTOK
i
BPbbb*^ x<*^*< <^- *•*#&■•*' *3&.*S
Admiral SkrydJoff, Whose Situation in the
Bottled Up Harbor Is Becoming
Desperate
PRIMARY RETURNS
SATISFY FACTIONS
Caucuses in 44 Counties Send
Gratifying News to Both
Dunn and Collins
Forty-four counties in Minnesota
yesterday held Republican caucuses to
select delegates to the county conven
tions next Tuesday, these to elect dele
gate to the state convention of Thurs
day.
According to telegrams received by
The Globe, the Dunn element in
the party obtained a decided advantage
in the caucuses. Telegrams received
at Dunn's headquarters were also of a
nature to rejoice the'Princeton man's
friends. On the other hand, Judge Col
lins' managers declared that the re
turns were entirely satisfactory to
them.
The counties to hold caucuses yes
terday were Aitkin, Anoka, Blue Earth,
Brown, Carlton, Carver, Cass, Chip
pewa, Chisago, Clay, Cook, Cotton wood,
Crow Wing, Douglas, Faribault, Fill
more, Grant, Houston, Hubbard, Jack
son, Kandiyohi, Lake, Le Sueur, Lin
coln, McLeod, Marshall, Meeker, Morri
son, Nicollet, Nobles, Norman, Olmsted,
Pine, Polk, Pope, Red Lake, Redwood,
Rice, Sherburne, Steams, Swift, Todd,
Traverse, Wabasha, Wadena, Wilkin
and Yellow Medicine.
Of these counties, George A. Flynn,
one of Dunn's lieutenants, said at a
late hour last night that advices re
ceived gave surely to Dunn: Aitkin, 9;
Carlton, 9; Todd, 14; Carver, 12; Chip
pewa, 11; Redwood, 14; Crow Wing, 12;
Faribault, 17; Fillmore, 20; Houston,
12; Jackson, 12; Kandiyohi, 14; Polk.
16; Le Sueur, 13; Morrison, 13; Nor
man, 11; Nicollet, 12; Pine, 9; Red
Continued on Fourteenth Page
. /--X % jd^W* ' __ _ :
H^S JHEJ3OYS r^^MWii <^y^^^ )STH£POIifHEoJIL
PATRIARCH PLUNGES
KNIFE INTO LUNG
Aged Laborer Makes Unsuc
cessful Attempt to End
His Life
With two knife wounds in his left
side Henry Koetz, a laborer sixty-nine
years old, residing at 214 Maple street,
staggered into the Margaret street po
lice station at 11:30 o'clock last night.
"I wanted to die," gasped the old
man as he fell into a chair. "I drove
my knife into my side two times, but
it didn't kill me and I couldn't find
strength to strike again."
Sergeant Aamold, who was in charge
of the station, examined the man and
when he opened his coat found two
deep gashes, from which blood flowed
in torrents. The man then handed over
a big jackknife with which the wounds
had been inflicted. Dr. E. A. Meyer
ding was summoned, and after receiv
ing temporary treatment Koetz was
sent to the city hospital.
Though weak from loss of blood,
Koetz was able to walk to the ambu
lance from the station and was able to
walk into the city hospital when the
ambulance arrived there. He was im
mediately taken to the operating room,
where his wounds were dressed.
Physicians at the hospital said early
this morning that at least one of the
cuts had penetrated the lungs and that
the other was also dangerous. Though
It was said that Koetz is in no imme
diate danger of death from his self
inflicted wounds, the physicians were
not able to say last night that he would
be able to recover.
Koetz was unwilling to say anything
save that he was tired of life and wish
ed to die. He refused to tell the police
Continued on Twenty-first Page
THE RAGTIME AND THE CLASSICAL
;■.,.'. ■ ■ ■.-.-.' ■•£& "■■-■"■ v-" ■ r,'.''j.:: ,■ 5? 1"-1- 1 ■•""■■■■■"■■■■■ ■'■■■*■'■ ■■' . *".' ■" ■■ ■ ■ ■■"■" ■.■.".■.'. ■.'■■■'■' ■ ivjqJß-X-'-'^PSMB - ■'■'&*•
Bb at* m Wt j«
Admiral Kamimura, Japanese Commander
Who Is Investing Vladivostok
by Sea
TAMMANY GOES TO
ST. LOUIS TO EIGHT
Murphy, With Towne and a Big
Staff, Leave New York
Thursday
Special to The Globe
NEW YORK, June 25.—Charles F.
Murphy has given out word that Tam
many is going to St. Louis to fight.
This is the staff he will take with him
to the convention city, leaving here
Thursday: Charles A. Towne, Bourke
Cockran, Victor J. Dowling, Bird S.
Coler, Police Commissioner William
McAdoo, Thomas F. Grady, J. Sergeant
Cram and John J. Delaney.
The Tammany delegation will make
strong efforts to convince the delegates
that Judge Parker cannot carry New
York, and that his nominations means
the splitting of New York Democrats
Into factions. It was with the under
standing that Tammany would follow
this line of policy that Senator Gor
man returned home. As to whether
they can convert anybody, the braves
seem to have much doubt. Charles A.
Towne said tonight:
"There is a disposition on the part of
certain Democrats to barter away thi
dignity and moral position of the Dem
ocratic party on vital principles in
volved in this campaign, and that will
not be quietly consented to at St.
Louis. If we fail to take a position
that meets with the approval of the
heart and conscience of the people, we
might as well not put out a ticket. We
can't throw away our position in order
to collect campaign funds."
Parker on Second Ballot
Eliot Danforth, who has been in con
sultation with David B. Hill for the
past few days, declared tonight that
Continued on Twentyvfirst Page
HUNDREDS OF
RUSSES ARE LOST
ADMIRAL AND 750 MEN GO
DOWN WITH WARSHIP
Togo's Latest Success at Port Arthur
Is Reported Disastrous to the
Czar's Forces — St. Petersburg
Paper Claims That Kuroki Has
Been Defeated Badly
Special to The Globe
NEW YORK, June 25.—According to a cablegram to the
World from Rome, the Tokyo correspondent of the Cuernale
d'ltaha says: -Admiral Uhtamsky and 750 Russian officers
and sailors were drowned by the sinking of the Russian bat
tleship outside of Port Arthur Thursday."
RUSSIANS CLAIM VICTORY
Special Cable to The Globe
ST. PETERSBURG, June 25.—The Novoe Vremya prints a
telegram stating the Russians attacked the right flank of Gen.
Kuroki's army and inflicted a severe defeat, the Cossacks
subsequently pursuing the Japanese for ten miles.
BIGGEST OF BATTLES NEAR
LTAU-YANG, June 26.—The armies of Gen. Oku and Gen.
Kuroki, aggregating at least six divisions, are confronted by
the huge force under Gen. Kuropatkin. The tension is acute
at the appi'oach of the important battle of the war, in which
three times the number of troops engaged at Kiulien Cheng,
Kinchow or Vafangow will take part. The proximity of the
-rainy season makes the battle unavoidable.
DEMANDS MOST MODERATE
VIENNA, June 25.—The Allgemeine Zeitung says that, ac
cording to a diplomatic note received, the Japanese govern
ment has resolved, in case peace is restored, to demand noth
ing else than was mentioned in the government's note of De
cember last; that even if Port Arthur be taken by the Japa
nese to restore it to Russia, respecting the Russo-Chinese
agreement, and that Japan will regard Russia as economical
ly predominant in Manchuria. Japan demands only that she
be considered with the other great powers in the solution of
Asiatic questions.
ATTACK ADVANCE POSTS
ST. PETERSBURG, June 25, 6 p. m.—Maj. Gen. Mistehen
ko, commander of the Eastern Cossack brigade, according
to reports received at the war office, attacked the Japanese
advance posts on the Siu-yan and Tatchekiao road and a
sharp engagement resulted, in which artillery was brought
Continued on Twenty-first Page
DESERTER USES GUN
Two Men Are Dead anda News
paper Man Wounded
L.EAVENWORTH, Kan., June 25.—
Two men were killed and two seriously
wounded in a street fight with revolv
ers as the result of a quarrel between
tAvo harvest hands.
The dead:
WITXJAM HAMMOND, farm hand.
GEORGE P. COLE, army deserter.
The wounded:
Charles F. Seeley, newspaper man,
Minneapolis.
Joseph Besser.
George P. Cole, a deserter from the
Thirtieth infantry, who had been em
ployed on a farm, quarreled with Wil
liam Hammond and without a word
shot him through the heart. Cole, with
the revolver in his hand, passed
through the main business streets,
which were crowded with women and
children, warning everyone to keep
away. Several policemen hurried after
Cole and forty shots were exchanged.
Charles F. Seeley, who was in the
crowd following the man, was shQt
down with a bullet through the left
groin. Joseph Besser, formerly a Kan
sas soldier, was also shot in the left
groin by Cole, who took refuge in a
dwelling.
When Capt. Taylor entered and call
ed on him to surrender, Cole shot twice
at the officer, who returned the fire,
killing Cole with a bullet through the
right temple.
VISITS CROKER IN
CLEVELAND'S INTEREST
Ex-Mayor Van Wyck, of New York,
Makes a Journey to Wantage
LONDON, June 25. —Former Mayor
Van Wyck, of New York, and John F.
Carroll, accompanied by New York po
litical friends, reached London tonight.
Van Wyck and Carroll will go to
Wantage to see Richard Croker early
next week. It is said that the object
of the visit is to urge Mr. Croker to
use his influence in behalf of Grover
Cleveland for the presidency. Mr. Van
Wyck said:
"I am practically out of politics, ex
cept as a loyal adherent of the party,
but I put what I -think is for the good
of the country before the party. It is
no secret that I am a Cleveland man.
I am going to see Mr. Croker. There is
no new political deal on, but it is well
to talk over things. After visiting Mr.
Croker I shall go for a few weeks to
the continent, returning to the United
States to participate in the campaign."
SECOND SECTION
PAGES 11 to 24
PRICE FIVE CENTS,
LAKE GIVES UP DEAD
Body of John Crawford Recov-
ered in Manitoba
Special to The Globe
WINNIPEG, Man., June 25. — Th«
body of John Crawford, who, with
John Knox, two Minnesota naturalist'?,
was drowned in Shoal lake on the 10th
inst., was brought in here today, it
being found by Henry, his brother, of
Harperville. The body of Knox was
previously found and was forwarded
to friends by D. Crawford, who has
been waiting here in hope of finding
his brother. In all probability the
body of Crawford will be shipped
south tomorrow. The party, which in
cluded also Mr. Lord, who escaped,
were naturalists from St. Paul.
August Miller, of Harperville, found
the remains of Knox fifty yards from
the scene. The brother of the deceas
ed recognized the remains, which were
badly decomposed. The reward of $200
offered for the recovery of the body
was paid over to Miller by I. Riley,
M. P. P., custodian.
TAMMANY ORGAN
NOMINATES M'CLELLAN
New York Daily News Opens What Is
Said to Promise a Strong Campaign
NEW YORK, June 25.—The New
York Daily News, which has recently
changed hands and has come out as a
straight Democratic newspaper and is
recognized as the organ of Tammany
Hall, will tomorrow print a three page
article advocating Mayor George B.
McClellan as the nominee of the Dem
ocratic party for the presidency.
On account of the paper's policy,
knowledge of the publication has cre
ated considerable speculation in local
political quarters, where it is construed
as indicating the beginning of a strong
campaign to nominate McClellan.
The News claims McClellan to be
"the one man whose election would
mean certain party success. The eyes
of the North, East, South and West
are upon him." McClellan's record on
most public questions is set forth, re
peating speeches delivered while he
was in congress.
Pope Admires Japanese
ROME, June 25. —The pope today re
ceived in private Mgr. Mugadur,' the co
adjutor archbishop of Tokyo, and had a
long conference with him regarding the
situation in Japan and the events of the
war. His holiness expressed admiration
for the valor and heroic efforts of the
Japanese and satisfaction with the com
plete liberty that Catholics enjoy In
Japan.

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