OCR Interpretation


The Saint Paul globe. (St. Paul, Minn.) 1896-1905, June 26, 1904, Image 15

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn90059523/1904-06-26/ed-1/seq-15/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for 15

MINNEAPOLIS NEWS
HUNGRY MAN GRABS
PURSE FROM WOMAN
Matle Desperate by Hunger
Pangs Attempts Daring
Robbery
Unable to obtain work and suffering
from, the pains of hunger. Frank Hick
ev, a young man twenty years old and
a stranger in the city, yesterday
enatched a woman's pocketbook in the
Leader store, but failed to lay his
plans and was caught before making
his escape from the building.
According to the story told by Hick
ey at the central police station, he came
fit>Ui Rochester, Minn., less than a
week ago. in hopes of receiving em
ployment as a waiter. Work was not
forthcoming, and he had soon spent his
entire capital. Alone in the city and
with no friends he found it impossible
to even get the necessities of life and
was unable to withstand the tempta
tion upon seeing a woman in the store
holding the pockstbook carelessly in
her hands. He made a grab for it and
the woman screamed and Hickey was
scon surrounded and put in the hands
of an officer. During the excitement he
had thrown the pocketbook away and
the woman's identification of him was
the only evidence against the man.
As the officers led him to a cell Hick
ey broke down and cried bitterly, say
ing it was the first time that he was
ever in trouble and swearing that he
only stole the pocketbook because he
had to have something to eat. The
owner of the pocketbook on hearing
the story announced that there was but
$2 in the book, and as she believed the
story told by him she refused to prose
cute.
CITY TO CARE FOR
MARRIfeD MEN FIRST
Council Discharges 400 Single Men and
Foreigners From Street Crews
The protest put before the city fa
thers i n regard to the city favoring
married men and citizens of the coun
try for all city work has evidently had
its effect on the council, for yesterday
when the 2.000 laborers employed by
the city in laying paving, sewer and
water mains were paid off nearly 400
were discharged because they were sin
gle men.
According to the protest which was
filed with the council a large part of
the men in the city's employ were for
eigners and single men, while theie
were hundreds of working men in the
city with families dependent upon
them that were out of work. A com
mittee was appointed to look the mat
ter up, and conditions were found as
mentioned in the protest. The four
hundred who received their discharge
with their checks expressed disappoint
ment at the action of the city, but no
demonstration was made, and their
places will be filled by men who are
residents of the city and have fami
lies.
BOLD BURGLARS HOLD
GUN AT WOMAN'S HEAD
Masked Men Are Discovered at Work
in Knoblauch Residence, but Escape
Two masked men entered the home
of Mr. and Mrs. Anton Knoblauch, 72
Sixteenth street north, early yesterday
morning, but after searching the lower
part of the house, aroused the family
and were frightened away before they
had succeeded in making a haul.
The men entered through a window,
using a jimmy to force an opening,
and cut all the telephone wires before
starting in the search for valuables.
Mrs. Knoblauch was awakened as they
started up stairs and cried to her hus
band to shoot them. The men hurried
to her side, one throwing a light on
her face and the other shoving a gun
against her head, but she continued
to scream, and neighbors, hearing the
noise, telephoned for the police, but
the officers arrived too late, the bur
glars making their escape by way of
the rear door.
Find Body in Medical College
After a week's search the friends of
Charles Wahlenberg, a laborer who
lived at 827 Washington avenue south,
found his body at the university med
ical college just in time to save it
from dissection. He was the man who
died from sunstroke last Sunday
morning, and who was supposed to be
a man named J. B. Johnson. Wahlen
berg was picked up Sunday morning
and taken to the city hospital, where
he died from the effects of sunstroke.
A card in his pocket bearing the name
J. B. Johnson gave the impression to
officials that it was his name, and
while Wahlenberg's friends saw the
accounts of Johnson's death in the pa
pers they gave no heed to it and did
not commence the search for their
missing friend until Monday.
Killed by Passenger Train
While working with his section crew
on the stone arch bridge yesterday
afternoon William Foley was struck
r.y a Northern Pacific passenger train
and died from his injuries shortly aft
erwards at St. Mary's hospital. He
was a man forty-five years old, mar
ried, and resided at 703 Fifth street
northeast.
Order Your Summer Suit Now
This week we will allow a liberal dis
count on all our modish summer suitings.
Suits to order from $20 to $35. Why pay
other tailors $15 to $25 more just to have
their name in your suit. Order a suit now
and save money. Every suit fully guar
anteed. Duncan & Barry, the moderate
priced tailors, 87 E. 4th st.
Perfumes and
Toilet Waters
I cannot allow you to forget them.
Toilet Waters in this warm weathsr are
so delightful, and we hava the bsst in
bulk. Just buy what you *ish. . . .
F. M. PARKER,
DRUGGIST.
Fifth and Wabasha Streets.
STREET RAILWAY
MAY CHANGE LOOP
Aldermen Introduce Resolutions Order-
New Tracks In Down Town District
It begins to look as if the long talked
of changes in the down town loop will
materialize, judging from the provision
of a resolution introduced before the
city council Friday night by Aid. S. R.
Adams. According to the resolution
the street car company will be re
quired to build tracks on the following
streets:
Second avenue south, from Third to
Seventh street south, from Hennepin
to Second avenue; Fifth street south.
from Hennepin to Fourth avenue:
Fourth avenue south, from Washing
ton to "~ # :rd street; Third street north,
from Rtunei'in to First avenue north:
First avenue north, from Third to Fifth
streets. The matter is now In the
hands of the committee on railroads
and the aldermen of the Fourth and
Fifth wards.
Aid. Sc heenmaker also introduced a
resolution directing the street railway
company to extend the Eighth avenue
line to Forth-eighth street so as to
reach the St. Mary's cemetery and the
Catholic orphan asylum. The resolu
tion was referred to the committee on
railroads and the aldermen of the Sev
enth and Thirteenth wards.
BAD LEAK IN WATER MAIN
Citizen Threatens to Sue City for Fill
ing His Well
The Central avenue water main,
■which springs an occasional leak at a
cost to the city of about $800 a leak, is
again causing trouble and a property
owner just south of the bridge across
the railway tracks, at Central and
Broadway, threatens to bring suit
against the city for turning city water
into his well.
The main is about forty feet under
ground at the approach to the bridge
and the water is spreading rapidly
from the present leak. Andrew Rinker,
the city engineer, has determined to
lay a new 'main along Central avenue
near the bridge, but the expense will
be large and he will experience no end
of trouble in getting the consent of the
council.
List of Patents
Issued this week to Northwestern in
ventors, reported by Lathrop & John
son, patent lawyers, 911 and 912 Pio
neer Press building, St. Paul, Minn.,
and Washington. D. C.:
Theodore Archer, Flat willow, Mont.,
combined letter sheet and envelope.
Andrew Braten, Bozeman, Mont., dis
play fixtures.
Thomas Caswell, Potomac, Mont.,
grading machine.
Walter Crane, Minneapolis, Minn.,
producing ice.
Gust Englund, Crawford, S. D., draft
equalizer.
William Jones, Fargo, X. D., chute
for pneumatic stackers.
Ole Larson, Minneapolis, Minn.,
pnumatic stacker.
Ole Larson, Minneapolis, Minn.,
windlass.
John Mason and G. O. Whitney,
Brainerd, locomotive water glass
shield.
David McLaughlin, Duluth, Minn.,
supporting and releasing means for
load retaining stakes.
Carl Miller, Minneapolis, Minn.,
comb.
Charles Sykora, Amo, Minn., steam
generator.
Guioj* Thompson, Duluth, Minn., par
tial circuit for electric currents.
Old River Pilot Ends Trip
Capt. Ed West, after a lifetime spent
on the river between New Orleans and
St. Paul, died at his home in Wayzata
yesterday morning at the age of sev
enty-five years. He leaves a wife and
two small children. He was the oldest
pilot on the river.
Accident Proves Fatal
Charles A. Pitts, the traveling sales
man for the Diamond Coal company
who had his left leg cut off by a Fourth
avenue car Friday night, died at the
city hospital at 5:30 last night from
the loss of blood and the shock incident
to the accident.
Sporting News
M'DERMOTT WINS CUP
IN HANDICAP SHOOT
With Allowance of Fifteen Birds Winner
Makes Straight Score in First Trial
In the regular weekly shoot of the St.
Paul Rod and Gun club Bazille was high
gun. with Perry second and Novotny
third. The club trophy was won for the
first time by McDermott. It was a 25
--bird handicap event. The scratch men
shot: Bazille 14, Perry 19. Pleiss 17 F S
Novotny 20. The 10-bird allows ' men
scored: O'Neill IG, Frankel 24, Davidson
24. H. W. 22. Bakeman with three allow
ance broke 19 and McDermott with 15
allowance broke 25. The gun winning the
cup three times will keep it. The fol
lowing scores were made in the regular
shoot. ' »
Shot at. Broke.Perry 125 91J
Shot at. Broke. Bakemn S5 4g
Bazille ..115 85 H. W. ...125 64
O'Neill ..100 38 Novotny 125 90
Frankel .100 38>Hutson . 55 30
Davidson. 85 46|Pleiss .. >5 17
McDer'ot 105 29 Womack . 50 24
English Tennis Sharps Play
LONDON. June 25.—The result of the
tennis championship rounds at Wimble
don this week was that F. L. Risely won
the finals in the all comers contest de
feating J. G. Ritchie in straight 'sets
Risely plays H. L. Doherty, the 1903 cham
pion, for the English championship June
-<. In the semi finals Risely played an
exhausting tie match with S. H "Smith
the tos s of a coin finally deciding the
game.
Lacrosse Club Gets Busy.
The St. Paul lacrosse club is putting
in the hardest kind of practice in antici
pation of the game next Sunday with the
Winnipeg Shamrocks. The team from
Winnipeg is supposed to be without peer
in the West and its members are going to
St. Louis confident they will have little
trouble to win the championship. The
game will be played at Lexington park
as the ball team will be working with the
Mfflen at Minnehaha
DEATHS OF THE DAY
Special to The Globe
HURON. S. D.. June 25.—Attorney K.
W. Wheeler died here today, aged sixty
seven. He was a former resident of lowa
and one of the foremost lawyers of the
Northwest. Mr. Wheeler w;is a prom
inent Mason and will be buried with
Knight Templar honors.
LONDON, June 25.—Clement Scott, the
dramatic critic, died today after a pro
longed illness.
MEXICO CITY. June 25.—M. W. Seller?,
a railroad man who wis about to take a
position as a superintendent of the Pan-
American railway in Chiapas, is dead of
yellow fever at Geronimo, Oaxaca. He be
gan life as a telegraph operator at Dodge
Wis.
THE ST. PAUL GLOBE. SUNDAY, JUNE 26. 1904
tfftJSf BEST WAY TO THE EASTrSsSISt
-33eE1 ls Via the "So Line and the Lakes njjjfffi
;-:fcs23Bw" ' - PLAIN YOUR VACATION TRIP BY THE MAP J ":"Hfcl*fs'si3BSi"'' l"
J**^ — =sThe Rates Quoted Here Are All of Them Snaps = —_ (HmP^^
Detroit and Return I TE' H*?> /\J GRAND
llpiiil /k2^4^^^^^^. ALASKAN
Toledo and Return tJ^^^^'^-WW -w/^^^SJWI FX TI IR<sl C\ N
.Pl/.OU V^ ) W* i ' I » \al4 ®' *To the Land of the
Cleveland and Return . \ C . OK . / '/ ° F '^'"l^C • MIDNIGHT SUN'
(tiO OC \ V f:> :■:»■■■ #V&. i .o t4' t \ Leaving July 9th.
Buffalo Return ! PV. J J Y<£'-jK^g $350.00
<kOffc O^L RAIL/LAKE 1 * J o£troit.o*^\+*?d^--$-
ROUTE VIA ST. ' j? h|CA ° i *i " ■ :---^3^^ \ »«! All Expenses En Route
IGNACE A^D STEAMERS P f — — j — w-« i ct^ J jg? tv'B'| AN (DEAL SUMMER TRIP
SUMMER RATES TO THE EAST
ALBANY AND RETURN | $38.20 I I THE THROUGH CAR L-J PORTLAND AND RETURN '. $43.50
BOSTON AND RETURN - $45.90 _ 'Ht THROUQH CA« _ TORONTO AND RETURN - $25.90
NEW YORK AND RETURN -. $41.90 ROUTE — MONTREAL AND RETURN - $33.00
-_^ -" ' - ■ . . - ■ •
TICKET OFFICE NEW/>SUm/VIER TICKETOFFICE
3-7^ ROBERT STREET BOOKLETS 119 SOUTH THIRD STREET
ST. PAUL, INOW READY MINNEAPOLIS
Railroad News |
MAY GET SANTA FE
Southern Pacific Credited With
Important Plans
CHICAGO. June 25.—1t was reported
today on what seems to be excellent au
thority that before the end of the current
year the Santa Fe will be a Southern Pa
cific property and the two systems will
hereafter be operated in closest harmony
and practically as integral parts of one
system.
The Union Pacific is by the same au
thority said to be a prospective purchaser
of the Chicago & Alton, the latter to be
come the Chicago end of the Union Pa
cific system from Kansas City.
RECORD RUN MADE
BY SMALL ENGINE
Minneapolis & St. Louis Officials Have
Flying Trip Over Road
Minneapolis & St. Louis engine No. 7,
a pigmy in comparison with the moguls
in use on the passenger trains of the
day, made a record run from Fort Dodge,
lowa, to Minneapolis Friday afternoon,
averaging between sixty-three and sixty
eight miles an hour for the entire dis
tance.
The engine is twenty-five years old and
is one of the type built in the early
eighties. It was pulling two coaches and
the party on board was composed of the
following officials: L. F. Day, general
manager; A. B. Cutts, general" passenger
agent; A. E. Clark, general counsel- W
M. Hopkins, general freight agent; H G
Kelly, chief engineer, and M. Sweeney,
general superintendent. The party had
been out on an inspection tour of the Dcs
Moines & Fort Dodge road, which has
recently been purchased by the Minne
apolis & St. Louis.
The conversation turned to the remark
able speed made by engines on different
roads, and when the train pulled into
Fort Dodge word was sent forward to
the engineer to see what he could do be
tween that point and Minneapolis. The
throttle was pulled wide open and the
little engine, with drive wheels barely
sixty inches in diameter simply flew over
the roadbed. It took just thirty-two min
utes to cover the thirty-five miles be
tween Albert Lea and Waseca. The rec
ord of the little engine has been the talk
of the officials since the Mill City was
reached and many of the older heads ex
pressed great surprise at the time made
b*y No. 7.
Congratulate Morton
NEW YORK. June 25.—Vice President
Paul Morton, of the Santa Fe. just named
secretary of the navy by President Roose
velt, has started for his home in Chicago
after a few hours spent in this city on his
way from Washington. He was warmly
Are You Waiting
FOR YOUR SHIP
TO COME IN?
Perhaps it is in Sight
— INQW =
IN THE 11/I»|T COLUMNS
GLOBE'S WAN I TODAY
27 WANT MALE HELP
22 WANT FEMALE HELP
31 WANT AGENTS OR SALES
MEN
17 OFFER BUSINESS
CHANCES
32 OFFER ROOMS, with or
without board; Flats and
Houses for Rent.
63 OFFER Miscellaneous Arti
cles, Houses, Lots, Farms,
Etc., for Sale.
LOOK AND SEEI
Look Every Day, It'll Ray
congratulated by fellow railroad officials
upon his appointment.
It is understood that Mr Morton was
in consultation here with Santa Fe of
ficials to arrange for his resignation so
that he may accept the post offered him
by the president.
The next meeting of the board of di
rectors is to be held on the first Wednes
day in July, and his successor probably
will be appointed then.
IT FOSTERS FARMING
Government Official Reports on
Our Experiment Station
Globe Special Washington Service,
1417 G Street
WASHINGTON, D. C, June 25.—
The work of the agricultural experi
ment station which is maintained in
connection with the University of Min
nesota is Interestingly described by A.
C. True, the officer of the agricultural
department in charge of experiment
stations throughout the country. The
Minnesota station, Mr. True says, con
tinues to be a strong factor in the de
velopment of the agricultural interests
of the state. The substations at Grand
Rapids and Crookston have been con
tinued, as heretofore, supported by
state funds.
The state has provided very liberally
for the Minnesota station, the last leg
islature having made grants for new
buildings for the college and station
amounting to $300,000. and yet the de
mands upon the station are so great
that it has been necessary to curtail
some of the investigations during the
last year for lack of sufficient funds.
The work of the station did not
change materially during the last year.
Breeding investigations with cereals
and grasses in co-operation with the
bureau of plant industry of the agri
cultural department and with other
Northwestern stations continue to oc
cupy a very prominent place in the
work of the station. The station has
also continued to co-operate with the
bureau of statistics in securing data
relating to the cost of growing field
crops and to farm management. The
entomologist of the station has suc
ceeded in breeding the Hessian fly,
and has thus been enabled to make
some advance in the knowledge of this
insect. The station chemist, in con
nection with his Investigations on the
food and nutrition of man, is planning
to take up work with macaroni wheats.
At the Crookston substation field ex
periments are going on, including va
riety tests, rotations and cultural ex
periments with the principal cereals,
and the seeds of promising varieties
are distributed throughout the region
in which the station is located. It is
planned to close out some of the work
of tnis station. Subsequently, experi
ments in animal husbandry will be de
veloped, and a new barn and silo are
to be erected for this purpose.
—Walter E. Clark.
A Thoroughbred "Piker."
That bets small in size are not nec
essarily "piker" wagers, and that thor
oughbred bettors are often those of j
limited means and not always the men
with the large rolls, would seem to
be the moral of the story that comes
from Cincinnati. It is striking evi
dence of the spirit of the gambler. Ar
thur Ferris, a negro exercise boy em
ployed on the farm of Ronee Respess, j
owner of Dick Welles, nea/ Woodburn,
came near dying some time ago be
cause he was without shoes. He was '
found unconscious in a field near the
village of Wyoming by a policeman,
and is now recovering. The boy, who
was nearly frozen, sold his shdes for
$1 to bet on Dick Welles, the pride of
the Respess farm, in a future book on
the world's fair handicap. Four other
young negroes, also employed on the
Respess farm as exercise boys and sta
ble assistants, had each raised a dol
lar, and to go in the pool Ferris had
taken off his shoes, recently presented
to him, and sold them for $1. This was
put in with the other $4 and sent away
to Chicago with the hopes that it
would bring back great wealth some
day if Dick Welles will only realize
their hopes.—The Illustrated Sporting
News.
Pleased With Satolli's Reception
ROME. June 25.—The pope has ex
pressed himself as satisfied with the very
cordial reception given in the United
States to Cardinal Satolli. Speaking to
day to Cardinal Merry del Val, papal sec
retary of state, his holiness said;
'•The American Catholics surpass all
my expectations in loyalty to the church."
I Northwest News a
Northwest News
NORTH DAKOTA LAWYER
IS SENT TO JAIL
J. L. Smith Pleads Guilty to Fraud in a
Pension Case
Special to The Globe
FARGO, N. D.. June 25.—1n the United
States court this afternoon J. L. Smith,
the Leonard attorney, changed his plea
to guilty in the case against him charg
ing fraudulent proof on a pension voucher
two days after the death of the pension
er. Six months in jail and a $100 fine were
imposed. Judge Amidon imposed the
sentence on men who had been selling
liquor to Indians.
Patents of a Week
Special to The Globe
WASHINGTON. D. C. June 25.—The
following patents were issued this week
to Minnesota and Dakota inventors, as
reported by Williamson & Merchant, pat
ent attorneys, 925-933 Guaranty Loan
building. Minneapolis, Minn.:
Earnest E. Bingham, St. Lawrence, S
D.. curtain pole.
A. R. Johnson, Minneapolis, ice making
apparatus, etc.
Gust L. Englund. Crawford. S. D., har
vester Reel and draft equalizer.
William E. Jones, Fargo, N. D., stacker
chute.
Ole L. Larson, Minneapolis, pneumatic
stacker.
John W. Mason and G. O. Whitney,
Brainerd. Minn., water glass shield.
David McLaughlin, Duluth, Minn., load
retaining stakes.
Jacob Mees, Alpena, S. D.. grain lifter.
Carl E. Miller, Minneapolis, hair
straightener.
Charles Sykora. Amo, Minn., steam gen
erator.
Guion Thompson, Duluth, Minn., par
tial circuit.
DENNIS GETS FIVE YEARS
Superior Postoffice Robber Convicted and
Sentenced
SUPERIOR. Wis., June 25.—Charles
Dennis, on trial for complicity in the rob
bery of the Superior postoffice last Octo
ber, when $14,000 worth of stamps were
stolen, was found guilty late this after
noon by a jury in the United States circuit
court. Judge Bunn immediately imposed a
fms ROCKER |fe^
ONLY 89C iKr
An arm roc ker just like picture. We bought a « iTijl^lr*l
large number of them and offer our customers c.^. \ flr^^l ft
the benefit of "^^Stll^iC^^TJ
THE BARGAIN ..^sl«^JL
89 CENTS
-iHjf $1.75 THIS CHAIR $1 n 75
I I CHASE LEATHER SEAT
j£§Fr^ SH < Strongly tructed and polished Golden Oak frame.
'^^f^'&SF^jfPjM Many dealers will ask you more for an inferior
|E^^ J I/* 1 it cane seat chair.
■"-\^l" • YOUR CREDIT IS GOOD WITH US.
GASOLINE STOVES m
We are agents for The Reliable P*
RELIABLE by name. RELIABLE in construction. I
RELIABLE in operation. RELIABLE in safety. •
$2.75 to $27.00 <4Qg»fr
Because they are the "most perfect, the best constructed * iffyTJ^jlj
and the best operating Gasoline Stove 3 in America. Look aU^jSlm.
for the name. Get the Genuine Reliable. -:' Q^Saqj WL
SOLD ON EASY TERMS. f^SSB^
Smith & Farwell Co.
St. Paul's Leading Housefurnishers. SIXTH AND MINNESOTA STS.
TRAVELER'S GUIDE
Minneapolis & St. Louis R. R. Co.
Office 345 Robert. . Unl3n 3jj>;
Telephona Calls—s6l N- W.— 590 T. C.
Leiv3 1 tEx. Sunda/ 'Dai!/ Arrirj
+8-20 am Watertown and Storm uicj +5-55 dti
•19.00 am ....Omahaand DssMainsi- .. t7.50?n
*5.40pm ;...Esthervi:is and Mail33T . *10.3>iti
*7 l(lnm TheJljrri Stir Unitil "J CT
I. IU|JIII to Chicago, St. Loui & Paarii 0. J J 111
•S-OOpm lOmahascDisMoln»s(Liniitsi) *3.03 m
Wisconsin Central Ry
tra for MILWAUKEE AND GHICA69
Leave 8.35 a. m. and 7.40 p. m. daily.
Airive 8.15 a. m. and 4.30 p. m. daily.
Both Phones 694.
fine of $1 upon Dennis and sentenced him
to five yeais' imprisonment, the limit un
der the law.
Winnipeg Block Is Burned
Special to The Globe
WINNIPEG. Man.. June 25.—The Qlaf
son apartment block, occupied by Olaf
son's grain and hay store and twenty
families as a residence, was badly dam
aged by fire today. Loss on building and
stock. $30,000; families. $10,000; fully in
sured. The building was completed two
years ago at a cost of 545.000.
Eckstein Will Rise Further
Special to The Globe
WINONA. Minn.. June 25.— W. B. An
derson, of this city, grand master work
man of the Minnesota A. O. U. W.,
states that the election at the supreme
lodge meeting of Joseph A. Eckstein as
supreme overseer means that in due time,
if custom is followed. Mr. Eckstein will
be elected supreme master workman of the
order for the United States.
Facilitates Mail Distribution
Special to The Globe
WASHINGTON. D. C. June 25.—Addi
tional rural free delivery service will be
established Aug. 1 at Pelican Rapids, Ot
ter Tail county, Minn., and at Freeman.
Hutchison county. S. D.
Justice Brown a Benedict
BORDENTOWN. X. J., June 25.—Mrs.
Josephine Tyler, of Crosswicks, and Henry
Brown, justice of the supreme court of
the United States, were married today at
the home of the bride's mother, Mrs. Mary
English.
TRAVELER'S GUIDE
Union Depot, Sibley Street.
Trains leave and arrive at SL Paul '
as follows: _^
Ticket Office. 332 Robert Street. Phono Main 35S •
Leava. *Dally. tEx. San. ArrtTe
t S.3Q an St. Cloud, Fergus Falls, Farssjt 5.25 p«
t 8 26.™ {SS^Farfr..^.. o}^ Msp a
•10.30 an Flyer to PaciflsCaasl ♦ 2.«Sj>b
t 6.4Cb« ...WayzataaniHutrhl-isai. .. t 9.25 aa
* SJOpm . Pua«t Sound Express-.. *13.4Cjn
* 7.60 Winnipeg Express..... * 1.05 . .
• TKc.. J Fargo. Grand Forks. Win- \ , _ ,_ ._
* 7.55 pa \ nJpK> £oo Fall3> Soo City J * 8.10
To Duluth
* 1.09 Gopher State Express... * 8.33 pu
t 2.35 pro Princeton. Milaca. Du'.uth.. t 1.19 aa
'11.10 pm .. .Ni?ht Express to Da!uth- ■■* 5.30 a<
Hi v L*J *j| Hi l/^^^vi '-■ -
Electric I.isThted-ObMrra-1 **•**• ) WTIT*
Bon Cars to Portland. Ore., Tia*lo:ls * 2:20
Butte, Spokane, Seattle, Tacoma ta pm
Pacific Express
Fargo, Helena, Butte, Spokane, tin>ic * 7 ,ja •
Seattle, Tacoma, Portland IU IO am
Fargo and Leech Lake Local
fet. Cloud, Little Falls, Brain- . o ark . _ _-
•rJ, Walker, Bemldjl, Fargo.... t B:4Q t 5 *SO "
Dakota and Manitoba Express %m *a
FeTcna Falls, Wahpeto^i,,
atoornead, Farro, (Jamestown _ _ ««>..•- n .
Dally Ex. Batrrday).Crookston, * 8 *.00 * 7:21 |
Orand Forks, tirafton, Winnipeg pm am ■
'Duluth Short Lina Il^C^Oi
th*,h.to 2:25 i i"2:so£
IULUTH AND SUPERIOR *H;lQ f *6;?5;
• D»Uy. tEx. Bund»y. . ,
NOTE—AII trains r*e t£i« Union SUUon, M.
Fa&l, and Union Bt*tlon In Klnae*polls. - -
TICKET OFFICE fenttrtg*
■ ■! iC ST r*.M.ttO.RxL-^. MI
Office: 398 Robert St. Phone 480.
•Ex. San. Others Daily. LEAVE ARRIVg
Cblcaco, Ml!.. Madison. 8.30 am 950
Chicago "Fast Mall" 6.35pm 935 am
NO<trhW£&TCHNUMITC3 .. .\ 0.35 -y.20
Chlcaso. Mil.. Madison .... f °pra am
Chicago ' 'Atlantic Exoross".. 10.50pm 4.45 pm
Duluth, Superior. Ashland.... »S.loam *4.300ti
TWIUakT LUWTIO V A.3Q QOO
Dumth. Sopsrior, Ashland.. J ''
E'.mora. Aljona, D;s Molnes, *7.40 am *7.40 pm
Eimore, A'.g-ina. Dcs Mcinas. 8-00 prok 8.00 am
New Ulm, Tracy, Watartown, 9.35 am 7.40 pm
Su. City. Omaha. Black Hills. •7.40 am 7-35 am
Su. Ctty. O.Tuha, Kan. City.. 9.35 am 7.40pm
Watertowß. Huron, Radfiald. 9-05 pm 8.00 am
Worthincton.Mltchen,SuFalls 9.05 pm 8-0-D am
OMAHAUMITCO \ 0.00 -7.35
Su. City. Omaha. Colorado-- / °pm ■am
Su. City. Omaha, Kansas City! 9.05 pm . 7.35 am -
C. St. P. M. & O. Ry.
Office: 393R3bsr2SL P.iois 480.
*Ex. Sun. Othars Daily- LEAVE | ARRIVE .-,
Chicago, Mi!.. Madison B..*>am I 9.50 pm
Chicago "Fast Mail" 6..\5pm 9-35
NORrhWfSTLIINUMirE] 8.35pm 7.20«»
Chicago "Atlantic Express".. 10.50pm 4.45pm
Duhitli.Supsrtor. Ashland.... *S.loam *4.30 Dm
TWILIGHT UWT£9 4.30pm »00pm
Eimore, A'.gona, Dcs Moir.33. 8-00 pm S-OOam
Su City. Om ha, Kansas City 35 am ' • 7.40 pm - '
Worthineton. Mitchell .SuFalis 9.05 pm 8-0 am
LMIITCD . B.oopm 7.35 am -
Su City. Omaha. Kansas City 9.05 pm 7.35 a-rt
Chicago Great Western Ri
"The Maple Leaf Route." , . . x» „ „
City Offieae Blh sod Rebart Ita. Pfeacis 159 H.
tExceptSoadayrothersDaily. s^p^, c^'pJJJ,
Chlcaco and East. Dubsque. ( S-IS* 11 f^ tm
Oelweln, Mclntire. Hayfiald '■. f-^S PiTl \l^ '
ii.ZQcm 12.40 cm
Kansas C\ty, St. Joseph, Dss (10-50iin 738pm
Molnaa. Marshalltown, Wa-■< 8.30 pm 7.20 am
tarloo ♦ -•• ■..-...■ Ul.2opm l?-40pm **
Red Wlnt. Rochester. Farl- tS.2sam t7-00 pm
banlt. Mankato .. \ 5.27 pm 10.25 am
Dodge Center. Hayfiald ■ ... 5-10 pm 10.45 am
Austin. Mason City, Ft.Dodge B.loam 7.38 am
Carroll, Council Bluffs an dj ■
Omah» ........■.;■■.... If B.lopm 7.20 rm
lnteiirt C. B. &Q.R. R.
U'ATVVJ 80TN PHONES MAIN 1256
iJS&MIj TICKET OFFICE: CO FIFTH anohob-rt
LeaTe | AH Trains Dally { Arrive "
8.20 a.ra Wlnona. La Crosse. Dv- I "
buqua, Chicaro. St. Louis I 12.45 p-n? *
S.4opm -CWCAeOUarTED".. ..... I 7.20 an
i>4op4B Wlnana, U Crosse. Du-1 . - ,„
bu«ae. CMcaco. St. Louis I &20 a,a "
: ■ • . , . , .■.-,.■'-..-. •■"
15

xml | txt