OCR Interpretation


The Saint Paul globe. (St. Paul, Minn.) 1896-1905, June 26, 1904, Image 16

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn90059523/1904-06-26/ed-1/seq-16/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for 16

16
SPORTS
KELLEV'S MEN LOSE
TO BLUES AT FINISH
Nance's Blues Send Sessions
to Bench in First With
Three Runs
Standing of the Clubs
Played. Won. Lost. Per Ct.
Columbus ... 37 21 .638
St. Paul 59 36 23 .610
Milwaukee ... 58 S3 -5 .569
Louisville tW 33 30 .514
Indianapolis . ...«6 30 M .500
Minneapolis ....57 24 33 .421
f>7 •.'-' :{•"> .386
X sas City ...58 19 39 .328
Yesterday's Results
St. Paul ."». Kansas City 6.
Louisville 3. Toledo LO.
Columbus 4. Indianapolis 6.
Minneapolis-Milwaukee, wet grounds.
Yesterday's second attempt to work in
R double-header when Pluviua wasn't look-
Ing was only partially successful from a
busiiu >s offUv standpoint. One game was
edged in and Willie Nance's Blue Jackets.
remembering the six cute little nonenti
handed out t«» them Friday after
noon, hopped onto Mr. Sessions with de
mo: aliziujr avidity and scaled off six hits
before he became acclimated to the same.
He was made pitcher emeritus too late,
g re: St. Paul ">. Kansas City 6.
Despite the advantage that accrued to
the tailenders by reason of Session's wob
bly tosses in the first, the halo bunch
managed to nose into the lead in the sev
enth, but this is invariably the hoodoo
sign at home, and Nance's debaters spurt
ed in Hie eighth and swept all doubts
eside.
The field wasn't within several shades
of being in the pink of condition and sec
tions of that valuable piece of real estate
stuck like hay fever. Then again it would
be the exact reverse, and once a player
starter faster than a walk there was no
telling where he would stop. This condi
tion gave the visitors a run in the first,
when Marcan's center of gravity was se
riously disturbed, allowing Hill to come
home.
There were large wads of saw mill
crumbs scattered around home plate, and
three times the ball was lost to view in
the mire. In the fifth inning: Hill drove
- It so far into the breakfast food that it
took half a minute for Peirce and Holli
day to dig it out. Hill became so inter
ested in the work of excavation that he
forgot to go to first and was tagged out.
Jones and O'Brien were victims of the
same sloppy circumstance In the first in
ning.
Saints Had Chances
These little uncertainties only added zest
to the contest, particularly as the Saints
were in wireless communication of vic
tory at every stopping place. In the sev
enth the world looked particularly bright
and rosy after Jones beat out a tubercular
bunt, with Jackson coming up. James
merely walloped the ball over the extreme
left field fence for a home run, which put
the sanctified crew one large run to the
good. This little tender of good faith on
the part of Mr. Jackson was the cause of
great elation and likewise commotion in
and about the grand stand, where it was
freely predicted that the afternoon's in
cident was closed and hermetically sealed.
Such was far from being the actual
state of affairs, however, as three hits
In the Kaw portion of the seventh showed.
With a tie score Kelley's artisans were un
able to add any figure of value to the
score board, while two singles and a
double by the Missourians gave them an
other counter and the game. T4ie double
responsible for this disappointment was
executed by Lewee. Stranger things than
that have happened since the dawn of
creation.
Jones opened with a pile driving stunt
that availed him naught, and Jackson fol
lowed with three dopey §wipes. Then
came "Wheeler, and the ever smiling and
ever deceitful Barry waxed maudlin mer
ry at the prospect. Barry got one strike
and, seeking to catch Wheeler unawares.
returned the ball In a hurry. Wheeler hit
it in just as much of a hurry, and it went
over to the score board. O'Brien hit the
ball into the earth and was retired.
Van Buren Starts Trouble
\ an TJuren was the first sign of disaster
and he singled by short and the plump
\\ illiam Nance jammed one out to the
right field fence. Sullivan was sent back
to the coop. Marcan to Kelley. and Ryan
smashed a single into left field, scoring
Van Buren. Hill singled to right, scoring
Nance, and Butler did likewise, making
Ryan count.
Kelley saw that Sessions was going to
he beaten to a pulp if he continued and
the humane manager dragged him to a
■>f safety and sent Slagle in to do
the daring rescue act. Slagle was quite
effective until the seventh and eighth
when he allowed the hits to come a little
thick. In all he permitted eight hits and
starting from scratch, he would hav e won
fiml.T went benchward on Bonner's
fielders' choice, and with Hill on third
Bonner turd a double steal. Marcan"s
feet elected to go in opposite directions
and the stealers got away with it Lewee
got a gift, but Barry retired the side
Four units in the rear. Kellev started
the second by not reaching first but
Marcan's fastidiousness got him there.
CUngman's wallop counted for two in
addition to bringing Marcan home
Peirce's out put Clingman on third, and
fclagles hit to left brought him home
Jones fouled out to Ryan.
Hill and Butler failed to get within
reaching distance of Slagles slants and
Banner was a simple out. Jackson came
into his second strike out and Wheeler
picked a likely looking one for a single
to right. O'Brien furnished his fare for
the remainder of the route with a double
and Kelley and Marcan retired the side.
Lewee Robs Slagle
From this time until the Saints' half
°^ tl-T .,?f. venth tnere wasn>t anything but
possibilities and conjectures. Slasrle
started in by driving a liner out over
£hort. but the larcenous Lewee projected
him?e!f about five feet upwards and
.spoiled a guaranteed hit with one hand
Jones bunted * along the first line and
beat the ball to the sack. Ryan wanted
to enforce the "keep off the grass" rule
1( make Jones run in the mud, but
Holliday considerately couldn't see it
Ryan and his brethren held a talking bee
and Sullivan of the Blues, was mulcted
• in the sum of $5 by Mr. Holliday
When things had quieted somewhat
Jackson complied with the requests of an
enthusiastic constituency and lacarated
Barry's feelings to the extent of one
home run. The score now stood 5 to 4
In the Saints 1 favor, but it wasn't keot
standing long enough to get tired
Van Euren hit. Nance hit and Sullivan
flew out to Jones. Ryan sent one to
heeler and Van Buren died on the way
home. , ,Kansas City papers please copy.
Hills hit brought in Nance and tied the
score and Butler forced Hill at second
With Marcan out. Clingman got to first
on Ryan's muff, but Poirce flew out and
Slagle expired at fir?t. Bonner singled to
short and Lewee followed with his two
bagger over the right field fence, which
put Bonner on third. Barry fanned and
van Buren singled to center, scoring Bon-
Jier. Lewee attempted to come home but
, Jones executed a copper plate tHrow
from the depths of the center plot and
. caught Lewee at the plate. Nance didn't
get to first on his grounder.
Jones led the forlorn hope, but Sullivan
■ threw him out to first, while Jackson put
the ball into Ryan's capacious mitt
Wheeler looked to have a hit, but the
Industrious Bonner traveled far and fast
Jammed the ball into the mud, picked it
out and threw to first in time, to end the
game. Two games are scheduled at Lex
i«»«rton Park this afternoon, providing too
:. V
NEWS FROM DIAMOND, TRACK AND FIELD
COLONIAL GIRL WINS
FROM MIGHTY HERMIS
1^ « «m|
*jff Wr^S^T aa^BBBBBBBBBBBBBB^BBBB
Colonial Girl, Winner of World's Fair Handicap
Rich World's Fair Handicap Goes to St. Louis Horse,
With Thomas' Crack Entry Second
ST. LOTIS. Mo.. June 25.—Coloniai Gill,
by Meddler-Springtide, five years old,
owned by Otto Stiefel, of St. Louis, run
ning in the name of C. EL Rowe & Co.,
won the World's Fair handicap at the
fair grounds today. The Eastern cham
pion, Hermis, was second, three lengths
back, Molmrib, owned by John W. Schorr,
was six lengths behind him. Colonial
Girl won the race very easily.
The horses finished as follows:
Colonial Girl, 97. A. W. Booker. 5 to 1,
won; Hermis, 130. Redfern, 8 to 5, sec
ond; Moharib. 103, W. Fisher. 15 to 1,
third. The others in order: Flying Tor
pedo, 101. Higgins, 25 to 1; Witful, 108,
Henry. 9 to 2; Bernays. 100, Cormack, 4
to 1; Sambo, 97, W. Davis, 25 to 1; Six
shooter. 112, T. Knight. 4 to 1; Bugler,
86, Perkins. 15 to 1; Old Stone. 92, H.
Howell, 20 to 1; Judge Himes, 107, H.
Booker. 30 to 1; Gold Heels, 120, D. Aus
tin. 15 to 1.
♦Gold Heels and Bugler coupled. Hays'
entry. Bernays and Sixshooter, Respass
entry.
Time. :24%; :s<Hi; 1:18%; 1:43; 2:09y 2 .
The World's Fair handicap is at a mile
and a quarter and is worth $41,500 to the
winner. The track was in fair condition,
about six seconds- slow. After a delay
of seven minutes at the post, caused by
the restlessness of Bugler, Moharib atid
Flying Torpedo, Starter A. B. Dade
caught the field in alignment and gave
the word to go.
Hermis Jumps Away
Redfern, on Hermis, was the quickest
to get his mount into motion, followed
closely by Gold Heels, Moharib and Co
lonial Girl. Redfern immediately shot his
mount to the outside of the track, where
the going was better, followed closely by
Gold Heels and Moharib. Passing the
stand the first time Hermis was lead
ing by four lengths, running very easily.
with Colonial Girl a length ahead of
Moharib and Gold Heels, whose bad un
derpinning began to bother him. fourth.
The others were running well bunched
behind the three leaders. Taking, up
the long run down the back stretch, Her
mis showed the way. leading by six
lengths, with Colonial Girl running easy
and a length ahead of Moharib, Sixshoot
ninth. Hermis carried the field to the
half in :50%. a terrific pace for a slow
track.
Colonial Girl still hung on. running well
within herself. Moharib was third and
Sambo fourth. At the three-quarter pole
Hermis seemed to have the race at his
mercy, but little A. W. Booker, noticing
that the Eastern horse faltered and was
tiling: rapidly, sent Colonial Girl after
him. Redfern felt his mount tire under
him. struck him twice with the whip as
the St. Louis horse ran up alongside of
him.
much rain doesn't fall and the Kansas
City tribe doesn't get chesty and bust.
The score:
Kansas City. AB. R. H. PO. A. E.
Van Buren. .rf 5 1 3 0 0 0
Nance. If 5 2 2 0 0 0
Sullivan. 3b 4 0 2 0 4 0
Ryan. lb 4 1 1 17 0 1
Hill, of 4 1 2 1 0 0
Butler, c 4 0 2 4 1 0
Bonner, 2b 4 1 1 2 4 0
Lewce, ss 3 0 1 3 4 0
Barry, p 4 0 0 0 4 0
Totals 37 6 14 27 17 1
St. Paul. AB. R. H. PO. A. B.
Jones, of 5 1 1 3 1 0
Jackson, rf 5 1 1 0 0 0
Wheeler. 3b 5 1 2 2 1 0
O'Brh-M. ss 3 0 2 2 2 0
Kelley. lb 4 0 0 7 0 0
Marcan. 2b ?, 1 0 1 4 0
Clingman. If 4 1 2 0 0 0
Peirce. c 3 0 0 9 0 0
Sessions--, p 0 0 0 0 0 0
Slagle, p 4 0 2 0 3 0
Totals 36 5 10 24 11 0
Kansas City ..4 0000011 •—6
St. Paul 0 2 1 0 0 0 20 o—s
Two-base hits, Clingman. O'Brien.
Lewee; home run. Jackson; passed ball.
Peirce; sacrifice hit, Peirce; stolen base.
Bonner; bases on balls, off Barry 2. off
Slagle 1; struck out. by Barry 2. by Sla
gle ti; innings pitched! by Sessions 2-3;
hits off Sessions 6. off Slagle 8; double
play, Lewee to Bonner to Ryan; time, 1:30
umpire. Holliday.
Indians Do Very Well
COLUMBns. Ohio. June 25.—Indian
apolis defeated Columbus today by a bat
ting rally In the ninth inning after the
locals apparently had the game won. At
tendance. 4,070. Score:
Col. H.P.A.E.! Ind. H.P.A.E.
Davis.if... 0 2 0 OiHog'ver.rf.. 0 3 0 0
Wrigley.2.. 12 5 o|Magoon,2... 0 0 5 0
Friel.P, 2 2 3 KM'Creery.cf 12 0 0
Kihm.l 114 1 l!Montgry,3. 112 0
Clymer.cf. 13 0 ijDickey,].... 213 0 0
Martin.lf... 0 10 OjCarr.s 0 2 3 1
Bridwell.s. 2 0 2 OlHeydon.c. 14 10
Yeager.c. 13 1 OJCromley.lf, 2 10 1
Dorner.p... 10 3 OJFistier.p.... 0 14 0
♦Simon 000 0|
„, 1 Totals ...7 27 15 2
Totals ... 927 15 3)
♦Batted for Dorner in ninthl
Columbus 0 0 0 2 0 2 0 0 o^4
Indianapolis ...1 0 1 1 Q op p 3—6
Stolen base. Clymer; sacrifice hits. Mar
tin. Magoon 3. Carr 2. Heydon- first base
pn balls, off Dorner 2, off Fisher 2; three
base hits, Cromley 2; double .play. Carr
to Dickey; hit by pitched bali. Hogriever;
struck out. by Dorner 3, by Fisher 1; wild
pitches, Dorner 2; time, 3:80; umpire,
Hart. r
Toledo Wins From Colonels
LOUISVILLE, Ky., June 25.—Tote4e tte-
THE ST. PAUL GLOBE. SUNDAY. JUNE 2G, 1904
Hermis shot out into the lead again,
but it was a dying effort. Colonial Girl
was surely and speedily overhauling him.
As they rounded into the stretch a cry
went up from the 50.000 spectators that
the great Hermis was beaten.
"Colonial Girl wins!" "Hermis has
enough!" Sure enough Hermis had shot
his bolt. Colonial Girl, beautifully ridden
by A. W. Booker, had overhauled him be
fore the turn for home was made and was
going away.
Fisher, on Moharib, then made his move.
His mount responded gamely, but was not
good enough to get to the fast tiring Her
mis.
The horse passed the wire .with Colonial
Girl under wraps three lengths to the
good; Hermis, tiring at every jump, sec
ond, six lengths ahead of Moharib, with
the rest of the field beaten off.
After the race Otto Stifel presented
Jockey A. W. Booker $10,000.
Otto Stifel. principal owner of Colonial
Girl, is reported to have won heavily
from Chicago bookmakers, who hung up
prices on the big race.
Stifel's friends said today after the race
that he had put out at least $2,000 on the
mare, starting to bet at 40 to 1, the first
price offered about her chances. He made
bets all the way down to 5 to 1.
Delegations from Chicago, Kansas City,
Louisville, Cincinnati. Memphis and other
cities witnessed the race.
Lady Fonse and Joe Gqss were the win
ning favorites. Summaries:
First race, six furlongs—Goody Two
Shoes, 106, D. Austin. 15 to 1, won; Se
lected, 87, Blake, 5 to 2, second; Sol
Smith, 92. James Hennessy, 5 to 1, third.
Time. 1:20. Bride. Maud Wallace, Esher-
Bon, Sanctissima, Atlas, Federalist, Algon
quin. Royal Deceiver also ran. Blumenthal
lost his rider.
Second race, mile and seventy yards—
Lady Fonse, 87. H. Anderson, 9 to 5, won;
Wall, 109, Wolf. 10 to 1, second; General
Prig, 103. W. Davis. 5 to 1, third. Time,
1:55; Burrows. Sister Lilian, Faequita.
Easter Walters, Charlie Grainger, Jim
Winn also ran.
Third race, six furlong?— Joe Goss, 104,
Ivers. 3 to 1. won; Jerry Hunt, 107. Aus
tin, 8 to 1. second; W Tolfram, 100, Stoval.
5 to 1. third. Time, 1:19%. Ciales, King
Fox 11, Sid Silver, Breakness, Radium,
Evening Star and Velasquez also ran.
Fourth race. World's Fair handicap.
Fifth race, seven furlongs—Forehand,
103, Austin, 4 to 1, won: Frank Collins,
106, Howell. 25 to 1. second; Mountebank,
103. W. Fisher. 6 to 1, third. Time,
1:32%- Mordella also ran.
Sixth race, five furlongs—Woodlands,
108. J. Daly. 2 to 1. won; Dishabile, 108,
Henry. 4 to 5. second; Princess Orna, 105;
D. Austin. 10 to 1. third. Time, 1:20%. A
Muskoday and Abelar also ran.
Seventh race, mile and three-sixteenths
—Thane, 112. Crawford. 13 to 5, won;
Hymettus. 99, James Hennessy. 8 to 5,
second; Trio, 109. Howell, 12 to 1. third.
Time. 2:05%. Strader. Memphian Brood
ier, Goo Goo and Lynch also ran.
feated Louisville today in a loosely played
game. Wenig had the local batters
guessing. Attendance. 2,600. Score:
Louis. HP. A.E.| Toledo. H.P.A.E.
Kerwin.rf.. 10 1 OiFrisbie.cf... 2 2 0 0
Hallman.lf 0 4 0 olßurns,2 10 2 1
Dexter.cf.. 0 4 0 OjLee.rf 110 0
Arndt.3... 13 2 OJDeininger.l 013 0 0
Schriver.c. 0 3 3 3|Donovan,lf. 15 0 0
Brashear, 2. 2 2 3 l!Brouthers,3 4 10 0
White.l... 16 0 OjSweeney.s.. 2 14 0
Quinlan.s.. 14 2 Oißeading.c... 14 10
Campbell,p 0 13 OJWenig.p... 0 0 11
Totals ... 627 14 4! Totals ...12 27 8 2
Louisville ....0 0000000 8— 3
Toledo 0 2 1 4 10 11 o—lo
Two-base hits. Brouthers 2. Sweeney,
Brashear. Quinlan; stolen base. Kerwin;
base on balls. ofE Campbell 4 off Wenig 4
struck out. by Campbell 3, by Wenig 2;
passed ball. Schriver; left on bases. Louis
ville 8, Toledo 2; time, 1:45; umpire,
Klem.
WESTERN LEAGUE
At Dcs Moines— R H E
Dcs Moines 1 0 0 0 0 0 12 • —4 10 2
Denver 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 o—3 11 4
Leifield and Clark; Hostetter and Lu
cia.
At Omaha— R. H. E.
Omaha 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 o—2 8 1
St. Joseph 0 10 2 0 2 0 0 3—B 9 2
Schafstall and Gonding, Hodson and
Garvin.
At Sioux City— R H E
Sioux City 3 3001000 •—7 l« '%
Col. Springs 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 o—3 5 4
Jarrett and Kelly, McNeely and Baer
wald.
Three I League
Decatur 8. Rock Island 11.
Davenport 7. Dubuque 3.
Rockford 7. Cedar Rapids 4
Springfield 2, Bloomington i.
The Infant Terrible
"Where do we get the most valuable
furs from?" asked the teacher. rtlu<toie
"From the .flr-tree," answered the
small boy at the foot of the class.
n J OXJ T e, r ls a lon . tlme • comlni
down said lhe young man in the parlor
Perhaps she has made up her mind not
to see me. • - ..-..■v >;
i, "S. hf tt "ft . that,".. replied her small
brother. "She s making up her face "
Chicago News. .■ • : % ~.':X-~
Grave
■ "Why does Sourly wear such a funereal
expression?" :
- "He has just buried some of his hopes."
—Cleveland Leader. r
CHICAGO TRACK TEAM
WINS STADIUM MEET
Stagg's Athletes Turn Tables
on Princeton, Who Finish
Second
ST. LOriS. Mo., June 25.—World's Fair
Stadium—Although the Olympic national
collegiate athletic championships, held to
day under the auspices of the world's fair
Olympic games, early developed into a
struggle for supremacy between Chicago
and Princeton universities, the competi
tion between the athletes representing
those colleges was so keen and spirited
that the largest crowd that has yet at
tended an athletic event on the world's
fair grounds was amply repaid for brav
ing the hot sun.
Chicago won the championship and the
Walter B. Stevens silver trophy, with a
total of seventy points, defeating Prince
ton by ten points. The scores for other
contestants were as follows: Michigan
Agriculture college 6, University of Illi
nois 6, Colgate college 5, Leland Stanford
university 4. Contestants from the fol
lowing colleges were entered, but did not
finish among the first four: South Dakota,
Amherst, Christian Brothers college of
St. Louis and Missouri university. Sum
maries:
100-yard dash—B. S. Rice, Chicago,
first; H. E. Moon, Michigan agriculture,
second; F. R. Castleman. Colgate, third.
Time, ten seconds.
Running high jump, two competitors—
Tooke, Princeton, first; Ferriss, Chicago,
second..Height, 5 feet 6 inches.
Throwing the discus—Rodman, Illinois,
first; Catlin, Chicago, second; Sheik. Chi
cago, third. Distance, 120 feet 8 inches.
Shot put—Dewitt, Princeton, first; Max
well. Chicago, second; Gale. Chicago,
third. Distance, 43 feet 4% inches.
Pole vault—Dowe, Leland Stanford, and
Moore. Princeton, tied for first; Clark,
Chicago, third. Height, 11 feet 9 inches.
Doland Moore divided first and second
points.
Running board jump—Friend, Chicago,
first; Fox, Princeton,, second; Ma thews,
Chicago, third. Distance, 22 fpet 6 inches.
Mile run—Williams, Princeton, first;
Chapin, Princeton, second; Henry, Chi
cago, third. Time, 4:41 1-5.
220-yard low hurdles—Catlin, Chicago,
first; Carter, Princeton, second; Ferris,
Chicago, third. Time, 26 seconds.
220-yard run—V. S. Rice. Chicago, first;
Moon, Michigan agriculture, second; Tay
lor. Chicago, third. Time, :22 3-5.
Throwing the hammer—Dewitt, Prince
ton, first; Tobin, Chicago, second; Max
well, Chicago, third. Distance, 161 feet.
Two-mile run—J. L. Eifel, Princeton,
first; W. E. Mathews. Chicago, second;
E. E. Chapin, Princeton, third. Time,
10:12 2-5.
440-ya»-;i run—Auitlee. Princeton, first;
Taylor, Chicago, second; Cochran, Prince
ton, third. Time. :52 2-5.
800-yard run—Adsit, Princeton, first;
Williams, Princeton, second; Cochrane,
Princeton, third. Time, 2:00 3-5.
120-yard high hurdle—Catlin, Chicago,
first; Castleman, Colgate, second; Friend,
Chicago, third. Time, :15 3-5.
NATIONAL LEAGUE 1
Standing of the Clubs
Played. Won. Lost. Per Ct.
New York 56 40 16 .714
Chicago 53 34 19 .642
Cincinnati ..56 35 21 .625
Pittsburgh 56 29 27 .518
St. Louis 54 26 28 .481
Brooklyn 59 23 36 .399
Boston 57 22 35 .336
Philadelphia 53 13 40 .245
Yesterday's Results
Pittsburg 0, Chicago 2.
Cincinnati 10, St. Louis 2.
Brooklyn 6, Boston 9.
New York 9, Philadelphia 6.
Giants Defeat Phillies
NEW YORK. June 25.—New York de
feated Philadelphia today, 9 to 6. Mc-
Pherson was a bit wild. Wiltse suc
cumbed to McGinnity and the latter was
hit seven times safely. Score:
N. Y. H.P.A.E. Phila. H.P.A.E.
McC'ick.cf 10 0 0 Barry.cf.... 2 3 0 0
Bres'han.cf 10 0 o|Gleason,2... 2 4 2 1
Browne.if. 3 2 0 l|Lush,rf 12 10
Devlin.3... 0 2 1 OiDoyle.l 2 4 10
McGann.l.. 314 0 OJDooin.c 0 110
Mertes.lf.. 2 2 0 o|Roth,c 1111
Dunn.s 13 5 3|Titus,lf 14 0 0
Gilbert.2... 0 2 5 0!Ha11.3 0 2 0 0
Warner,c. 0 2 0 o|Hulswitt,s.. 3 2 3 0
Wiltse.p... 10 1 l|M'Phers'n,p 1110
M'Gin'ty.p. 0 0 3 6|
1 Totals ...13 24 10 2
Totals ...12 27 15 5| Brook. H.P.A.E.
New York 3 0032100 *—9
Philadelphia ..10010 000 4—6
Two-base hits. Mertes, Barry, Doyle;
home run, Wiltse; stolen bases, Mertes,
Dunn; double plays. Gilbert to Dunn to
McGann, Lush to Doom, Hulswitt to
Gleason to Doyle; left on bases. Philadel
phia 10, New York 6; first base on balls,
off Wiltse 1, off McGinnity 1. off McPher
son 7; first base on errors. Philadelphia 2;
hit by pitched ball, By Wiltse 1; struck
out, by Wiltse 1, by McGinnity 1. by Mc-
Pherson 1; balk, McPherson; wild pitch,
McPherson 3; time, 1:55; umpire, Emslie;
attendance, 8,000.
Boston Bunches Bingles
BROOKLYN. N. V., June 25.—Boston
won today's game from the home team by
good batting. Both pitchers were hit
hard at times. Scores:
Dobbs.cf... 110 0] Boston. H.P.A.E.
Di110n.1.... 0 9 0 OiGeier.cf 12 0 1
Lumley.rf.. 10 0 01 Tenney. 1.. 3 8 10
Gessler.lf.. 2 2 1 o|Cannel,lf... 0 0 0 0
Babb.s 15 3 l|Carney.rf.. 0 10 0
Reidy.2... 0 0 3 l|Abbat'io,s.. 2 13 1
McCor'k,3. 0 14 o|Delehanty,3 3 0 3 0
Bergen.c... 19 0 o!Raymer,2... 2 12 0
Cronin.p... 0 0 3 o|Needham.c. 214 0 0
IWillis.p 10 11
Totals ... 627 14 21
Totals ...14 27 10 3
Brooklyn 3 0 0 2 0 0 1 0 o—6
Boston 0 ft 0 2 5 0 0 0 2—9
Two-base hit. Delehanty; three-base
hits. Tenney 2, Raymer, Lumley; stolen
bases, Cannell, Raymer. Babb; double
plays. Willis to Tenney to Abbattachio to
Needham, McCormick to Dillon; left on
bases. Boston 6. Brooklyn 7: first base on
balls, off Cronin 3, ofE Willis 5; first base
on error, Brooklyn; hit by pitched ball,
by Willis 1; struck out, by Cronin 5. by
Willis 11; time. 1:58; umpire, Johnstone";
attendance, 4,000.
Corbett Easy for Reds
CINCINNATI. Ohio, June 25.—Corbett
was the easiest sort of a mark for the
locals today, all but one of the hits made
off him being clean drives. Attendance,
5,210. Score:
Cm. H.P.A.E. St. L. H.P.A.E.
Huggins,2. 114 0 Farrell.2... 0 2 3 0
Donlin.lf.. 10 0 llShannon.rf. 0 2 0 0
Odwell.lf.. 13 0 IBeckley.l.. 17 2 0
Kelley.l... 2 10 0 OSmoot.cf... 0 3 0 0
Sey'our.cf. 13 0 0 Brain,s 12 2 0
Dolan.rf... 110 o|Barclay,lf.. 14 10
Steinf'ldt,3 14 2 0 Burke.3 2 10 0
Corcoran.s 2 0 4 OMcLean.c. 13 10
Peitz.c 13 0 OCorbett.p.. 0 0 12
Schlel.c... 1200
Harper.p.. 2 0 0 0 Totals ... 624 10 2
Kellum.p.. 0 0 0 0
Totals -.14 27 10 2[
Cincinnati ...0 S 0~~0 3 2 2 0 * 10
St. Louis 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0— 2
Three-base hits, Seymour. Peitz, Cor
coran; stolen bases, Burke, Shannon, Do
lan. Keltey; double play, Barclay to Beck
ley; first base on balls, off Harper 1, off
Corbett 2; hit by pitched ball, by Corbett
1; struck out, by Harper 2, by Corbett 3,
by Kellum 1; passed ball, Peitz; wild
pitches. Harper i ( Corbett 1; time, 1:55;
umpire, O'Day.
Lynch Loses Game
PITTSBURG. Pa., June 25.—After
pitching an excellent game up to the
ninth inning, Lynch lost the game by
IRISH LAD'S VICTORY
MAKES NEW RECORD
' irirt fl^k. $&'w3BSBSBi3HKIIa |i§l
Irish Lad, Winner of Advance Stakes
Favorite Wins Advance Stakes With The Picket and
Highball Strung Out in the Rear
NEW YORK, June 25.—Driven to the
limit in the last few strides, the favorite.
Irish Lad, won the $15,000 Advance stakes
at Sheepshead Bay today, making a new
world's record of 2:17 3-5 for the distance,
one and three-eighths miles, the best pre
vious record, made by Sabine. in Chicago,
July 5, 1894, being 2:18%. Ort Wells was
second and Bryn Mawr third. The crowd
In attendance today was equal to that of
Suburban day, and the throng witnessed
the greatest racing seen in the East in
years.
The field that made up the Advance
stakes was one of the best that has ever
faced the starter for this rich prize. So
evenly were the horses matched that the
favorite, Irish Lad, was quoted at the
good price of 5 to 2. The Drake-Gates
combination bet heavily on Ort Wells, who
closed at 3 to 1. Bryn Mawr, winner of
the Brooklyn Derby, was quoted at 7 to
2, while The Picket was held at 4 to 1.
Delhi and Highball, the latter the Ameri
can Derby winner, went begging at 10 and
12 to 1, respectively.
The horses made a good start and Irish
Lad, who ran today without blinkers and
equipped with a burr, was the first to
show, with Delhi second and Ort Wells
third. The Picket was off in a good posi
•tion, but in the rush for the rail was shut
off and Interfered with, which probably
accounted for his bad race.
Irish Lad Leads Past
Passing the stand the first time Irish
Lad was leading by a head from Delhi,
while Ort Wells ran third. The quarter
was covered in 24 seconds. Making the
turn into the back stretch and coming to
the half mile pole Delhi took the lead,
with Irish Lad second, a length back. The
time to the half was 48 2-5 seconds. Ort
Wells was third, with Bryn Mawr and
Highball close up.
Delhi was still leading at the three
quarters, which was covered in 1:13, Irish
Lad being in second place and going
easily. Ort Wells was third and he too
was going in a good easy stride. The
mile was covered in 1:38 flat, the fastest
mile run in the East this year. The fast
pace had told on Delhi, and as the lead
ers swung past the mile post he slowly
dropped back beaten.
Hildebrand, on Irish Lad, at this point,
sent his mount to the lead, and as he
flashed past the one and one-quarter pole
in 2:04 the game son of Candlemas-Ar
rowgrass was a length ahead of Ort Wells,
who had moved up as Delhi fell back.
It was at this point that the boys on
the leaders began to ride hard. Irish Lad
was ahead, but O'Neil, on Ort Wells, be
gan to gain. He was, however, unable
making a wild throw to first trying to
field Casey's bunt. Attendance, 8,190.
Score:
Pitts. H.P.A.E. | Chi. H.P.A.E.
Leach,3... OH) 2 O'.Slagle.lf.... 2 3 0 0
Beaumt.cf 12 0 0 Casey, 3 0 4 10
Clarke,lf.. 2 3 0 0 WilliajnXl. 16 0 0
Wagner.s. .0320 M'Carthy.cf 0100
Carisch.l.. 0 9 1 0 Jones,rf 0 2 10
Sebring.rf. 0 2 0 oiEvers,2 0 3 3 1
Ritchey.2.. 2 3 3 lJKling.c 0 7 0 0
Smith,c... 0 5 3 1 Tinker.s.... 0 13 0
Lynch,p... 0 0 2 lßriggs,p... 0 0 10
Totals ..5 27 13 S\ Totals ... 327 9 1
Pittsburg 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0* o—o
Chicago 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2—2
Two-base hit. Slagle; three-base hit,
Ritchey; sacrifice hits, Clark. Casey, Wil
liams, McCarthy; stolen bases. Clarke,
McCarthy; double play, Evers to Casey;
first on balls, off Lynch 1; struck out. by
Lynch 3, by Briggs 5; time. 1:45; umpire,
Zimmer and Moran.
AMERICAN LEAGUE
Standing of the Clubs
Played. Won. Lost. Per Ct.
Boston 55 35 20 .636
New York 54 33 21 .611
Chicago 57 33 24 .579
Philadelphia ...54 30 24 .556
Cleveland 51 26 25 .510
St. Louis 51 25 26 .490
Detroit 53 23 30 .434
Washington 53 9 44 .170
Yesterday's Results
Boston 3, New York 5.
Detroit 4. Chicago 2.
Philadelphia 6. Washington 3.
St. Louis 5, Cleveland 2.
Detroit Downs White Sox
DETROIT, Mich.. June 25.— While Mul
lin was puzzling Chicago batters today
the locals were hitting Owen in profita
ble bunches. Attendance. 4.000. Score:
Det. H.P.A.E. Chi. H.P.A.E.
Barrett.cf.. 12 2 oDundon,2.. 0 4 3 0
Mclntyre.lf 10 0 OJones.cf 0 5 0 ft
Lowe,2 3 3 3 0 Caliahan.lf. 2 10 0
Crawfrd.rf 2 3 0 oGreen,rf... 110 0
Carr.l 3 9 2 ODavls.s 12 4 0
Grem'ger,3. 10 0 ODonahue.l.. 16 0 0
Mullin.p... 114 OTannehill.3. 12 10
Buelow.c. 0 5 1 1 Sullivan.c.. -0300
O'Leary,?.. 0 4 4 0 Owen.p 0 0 4 0
Totals ..12 27 16 1 Totals ... 624 12 0
Detroit 0 0 2 0 1 0 1 0 •—4
Chicago 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 o—2
Sacrifice hits, Jones, Callahan; stolen
base. Lowe; bases on balls, off Mullin 2,
off Owen 1; left on bases, Detroit 8, Chi
cago 3; struck out, by Mullin 5, by Owen
3; double play, Owen toT>undon to Tanne
hili; wild pitch, Owen; time, 1:40; um
pire, Connolly.
Highlanders Pound Young
BOSTON. June * 25.—Young's lack of
speed and Williams' fast work at second
SPORTS]
to head Irish Lad, which passed under the
wire a winner by a short head in 2:17 3-5.
Ort Wells was five lengths in front of
Bryn Mawr.
Appropriate Music
It was one of the greatest races, one of
the gamest finishes seen in many a day in
the East. As Hildebrand rode Irish Lad
back to the judges' stand a great volume
of cheers proclaimed the popularity of his
victory, while the band struck up "The
Wearing of the Green," the colors of Irish
Lad being green with white hoops on the
sleeve.
J. E. Maddens Fly Back won the $25,000
Great Trial stakes. Coupled with his
stable companion. Councilman, they were
favorites in the betting. Councilman
made the running to the fence, where
Fly Back moved out and won driving by
one and a half lengths.
Hildebrand won both stake races today,
besides taking the fifth race. He also
rode two horses, finishing second. Sum
maries:
First race, six furlongs—Lady Amelia.
122, Phillips, 13 to 10, won; Major Pel
ham, 108. Hildebrand, 10 to 1, second;
Auditor. 109, Helgesen, 10 to 1, third.
Time. 1:12 4-5. Cobourgh, King Pepper,
Orly 11., Pentaur, Reliable, Ancester, Es
curial, W. B. Fasig and Brother "Bill ran.
Second race. Beacon steeplechase, about
2% miles —Judith Campbell, 135, Mara, 5
to 2, won; Caller, 156. Donohue, 7 to 10.
second; Titian, 151, Henry. 40 to 1, third.
Time. 5:08. Fox Hunter fell.
Third race. Great Trial, six furlongs—
Fly Back. 122, Hildebrand. 9 to 5, won;
Sparling Star, 122. Martin. 2 to 1, sec
ond; The Claimant. 122. Shaw. 20 to 1.
third. Time, 1:13 2-5. Councilman, Veto,
Simplicity, Voladay, Right Royal and Agile
also ran. Fly Back and Councilman
coupled.
Fourth race, Advance, one mile and
three furlongs—lrish Lad, 12G. Hildebrand.
5 to 2, won; Ort Wells, 111. O'Neil, :} to
1. second; Bryn Mawr. HI, Lyne, 7 to 2
third. Time, 2:17 3-5. Highball. Delhi and
The Picket also ran.
Fifth race, one and one-half fur
longs—Virgo, 95, Hildebrand. 5 to
2, won; Asterisk, 107, O'Neil. 3 to 1,
second; High Born. 109, Crimmins. 2 to 1,
third. Time. 1:08 4-5. Fireball Clover
Hampton, Salt and Pepper. Fiat. Go to
Win, Mon Amour, Cashier. Halmyra. Re
creo, Captain Sam, Annie Russell, Baroque
and Dance Music also ran.
Sixth race, one mile and a sixteenth, on
turf—Ben MacDhui, 11. Martin. 13 to 5.
won; Florham Queen, 100, Hildebrand 16
to 5. second; Leader. 109. O'Neil, 5 to 1
third. Time, 1:46 2-5. Rosetint. Gay
Lothario, Garnish and Illyria also ran.
were the principal causes of Boston's de
feat. Attendance, 16,622. Score:
Bost. H.P.A.E. N. Y. H.P.A.E.
Stahl.cf.... 0 0 0 1 Dough'ty.lf. 3 0 0 0
C011in5.3... 2 12 0 Keeler.rf... 2 4 0 0
Freeman,rf 111 0 Williams,2. 0 010 0
Parent.s... 2 2 6 0 Anderson,cf 2 0 0 0
O'NeiUf... 110 OGanzel.l.... 112 0 0
Lachancel. 116 0 0 McGuire.c.. 14 0 0
Ferris,2... 0 14 0 Conroy.s... 17 4 0
Criger.c 1 5 2 lOsteen,3... 10 11
Young.p... 2 0 4 OChesbro.p.. 0 0 3 0
Totals . .10 27 19 2| Totals .. .11 27 18 ~1
Boston 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 — ?,
New York 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 l—s
Two-base hits, McGuire. Keeler, Pa
rent; sacrifice hits, Keeler. Conroy; sto
len bases, Anderson, Conroy. Dougherty;
double plays. Williams to Conroy to Gan
zel 4. Ferris to Parent to La chance; first
base on balls, off Chesbro 2. off Young 1:
struck out, by Chesbro 4. by Young 5:
wild pitches, Chesbro 2. Young 1; time.
1:45; umpire, Sheridan.
Howell Puzzles Cleveland
ST. LOUIS. Mo., June 25.—St. Louis
defeated Cleveland today. 5 to 2. The
locals pounded Donahue, while Howell
was very effective in all but the second
inning. Attendance. 4,000. Score:
St. U HJP.A.E. ~Cleve. H~.P.A.E.
Burkett.lf. 2 2 0 0 Flick.rf 12 0 0
Hem'hill.cf 110 1 Lush.lf 0 10 0
Jones.l 2 8 1 0 Bradley,3... 114 0
Hue'mn.rf 110 0 Lajoie.s 114 0
Hi 11.3 11l OHickman.2. 1250
Padden,2.. 2 3 5 0 Bern is. c 0 5 2 0
Wallaces. 0 0 1 Oißay.ef 12 0 0
Sugden.c. 0 10 0 o|Abbott.l.... 010 0 0
Howell.p.. 0 0 4 o|Donahue.p. 10 2 0
Gleason.s.. 113 0j
Totals ... 624 17 0
Totals ..10 27 15 1|
St. Louis 0 0040010 *—5
Cleveland 0 2000000 Q—»
Two-base hits. Bay, Lajoie, Bradley;
sacrifice hit. Jones; double play. Padden
to Gleason to Jones; stolen bases. Hill,
Padden, Jones; bases on balls, off Dona
hue 3; struck out, by Howell 8. by Dona
hue 3; left on bases, St. Louis 6; Cleve-
To the World's Fair # Return
June 2? ]jk | 4L fHlaVl Via he
■ •. . . ..... - ■'■'■».
Minneapolis (S& St. Louis Railroad
Seven-day limit exclusive of date of sale. Through chair cars and-coaches
and elegant new dining cars. Only line with a World's Fair station.
For tickets call on H. S. Haskins. Ryan hotel.
PRIZES OFFERED FOR
STATE GOEE TOURNEY
Winona Links Are Flooded for
Second Time This
Season
Special to The Globe
WINONA, Minn.. June Is.—As the re
sult of severe rains the links of the
Meadow Brook Golf club are again floo;]p<l
by the overflowing of the cret-k which
runs through the grounds. Under ordi
nary, conditions this creek will carry off
the water, but high water in I^ake \\'inona
has caused the numerous overflows this
year. The Winona golfers are hoping
there may be no severe rains near the
time of the state tournament scheduled
to'open on July 18. The schedule of pi iz.s
to be given at the state tournament was
announced today. There will be thirteen
In all. A handsome solid silver loving
cup has been contributed by A. B. You
mans to go to the winners of the cham
pionship, and a small solid silver loving
<up has been given by Charles Horton
for the runner up in the championship
contest.
The complete list of prizes announced
follows:
Spaulding trophy, offered by Spaulding
Bros.
Prize for best individual score in bogey
contest, offered by Messrs. Tearse and
Marfleld.
Prizes for the winners of the four-ball
match, offered by Meadow Brook Golf
club.
Championship cup, offered by A. B.
Youmans.
Prize for runner-up, offered by Charles
Horton.
Prize for the winner in qualifying round,
offered by Messrs. Smith, Booth and Lan:
don.
Prize for the winner of the second
flight, offered by the Winona banks.
Prize for the runner-up second flight,
offered by W. B. Parsons.
Prize for the winner of the third flight,
offered by Hastings fJros.
Prize for runner-up of the third flight,
offered by M. M. Morse.
Prize for the best gross score in medal
handicap competition, offered by E. K.
Tarbell.
Prize for the best net score in medal
handicap competition, offered by H. S.
Youmans.
On account of the wet condition of the
links, the contest scheduled for today be
tween the Winona and La Crosse golfers
had to be abandoned.
land 2; time, 1:30; umpires. O'Loughlin
and King.
Usual for Washington
PHILADELPHIA. Pa.. June 25 —
Townsend was effective today until the
seventh inning, when he gave two bases
on balls and was hit safely four times
for five runs. Washington's game was
listless. Attendance. 6,351. Score:
Phil. H.P.A.E.! Wash. H.P.A.E.
Hartsel.lf. 10 0 oiCoughlin,3. 2 2 10
Bruce,cf.. 3 2 0 OlCassidy.cf. 3 3 0 0
Hoffman.rf 2 5 0 liDonovan.rf 0 0 0 1
L.Cross,3.. 0 13 OjOrth'.lf 2 10 0
Seybold.l.. 1 9 1 o!M'Cor'ck,2. 0 2 3 0
Murphy.2.. 0 12 o|Stahl.l 19 0 0
M.Cross.s. 0 0 3 liMoran.s 0 2 2 1
Shrecke't.c 18 0 0 Clark.c 15 2 0
Waddell.p. 114 OiTownsend.p 0 0 2 0
Totals .. 927 13 2! Totals ... 924 10 2
Philadelphia .00001006 *—6
Washington ..01100100 Q—3
Two-base hits. Coughlin. Cassidy 2,
Orth; three-base hit, Clark; sacrifice hits.
Cassidy, Donovan. McCormick; stolen
bases, Bruce. Hoffman 2; double play.
Murphy to Seybold to Schreckengost; left
on bases. Washington 7. Philadelphia 7;
first base on balls, off Townsend 4. off
Waddell 3; struck out. by Townsend 3. by
Waddell 7; time. 1:53; umpire, Moran.
NORTHERN LEAGUE
Standing of the Clubs
Played. Won. Lost. Per Ct.
Duluth 32 23 9 .719
Grand Forks 31 18 13 .SSI
Crookston 28 14 14 .500
Superior 29 14 15 .433
Fargo 33 13 20 .394
Winnipeg 31 10 21 .326
Yesterday's Results
Winnipeg 5. Duluth 4.
Fargo 2. Grand Forks 4.
Crookston 1, Superior 5.
Superior Defeats Crooks
Special to The Globe
CROOKSTOX. Minn.. June 25.—Crook
ston narrowly escaped getting a shutout
by Superior today. Patterson scoring in
the last half of the ninth. Rogers and
Anderson, of the Superior team, made
home runs and both of them brought in
an extra run. The game was a hard
fought one. Superior playing an errorless
game. Bieyette fell down at short today.
making two costly and rank errors. The
score:
R. H. E.
Crookston 00 ft 00000 I—l 12 :'
Superior 0 0 0 2 0 10 0 2—5 10 0
Batteries—Martin and Henry, Symons
and Rogers.
Forks Takes Big End
Special to The Globe
GRAND FORKS. June 25.—Ten innings
were necessary to decide todays game.
but Grand Forks won. making it two out
of three. Fargo tied the score in the
ninth. In the tenth two errors by Fargo
and three hits gave the visitors two more
runs. Fargo failed to hit in their half.
The umpiring of Smith aroused the fans
to a thirst for gore, especially in the third
inning, when Nagel kicked a batted bail
out of the fielders' reach and escaped
penalty of any nature. The score:
R. H. II
Fa rgo 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 o—2 7 6
Grand Forks..o 01001000 2—4 10 1
Batteries—Fargo. Faulkes and Edwards;
Grand Forks, O'Brien and Check.
Winnipeg Wakes Up
Special to The Globe
WINNIPEG. Man.. June 25.—Duluth lost
the third of the series today in a clos.
and interesting game, the score being £»
to 4. Nolden, for the visitors, was wild
at times, but Greens pitching-and batting
for the home team was the feature. Kel
ley's two-bagger brought in two runs.
winning game. Score:
R. H. E.
W mnipeg 0000.1 02 0 ♦—5 S 2
Duluth 0 0 300010 o—4 S 1
Winnipeg:. Green and Clark: Duluth,
Nolden and O'Leary.
Detroit and Return $15.25
Via Soo Line, via Mackinac and the pa
latial D. & C. steamers for the conven
tion of Baptist Young People of America.
Tickets on sale July 2, 4 and t>. to return
Aug. 15. Ticket office. 379 Robert.

xml | txt