OCR Interpretation


The Saint Paul globe. (St. Paul, Minn.) 1896-1905, July 09, 1904, Image 1

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn90059523/1904-07-09/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

THE WEATHER
For St. Paul and Vicinity—Fair.
For Minnesota—Showers and cooler
today; tomorrow fair, with south'
winds.
VOL. XXVIL—NO. 191
PARKER'S NAME INSPIRES
Enthusiasm in the National Convention Culmimates When Littleton, of New York, in a Brilliant and
Eloquent Speech Puts the Name of the New Y|>rk Jurist Before the Delegates—Amidst Frantic
y/ Applause That Is Maintained for Thiiiy Minutes, Delegates from Thirty-seven
States Take Ud the Standards and March About the Hal!
BANNERS WAVE FOR
PARTY LEADERS
ENTHUSIASM POSSESSES
ST. LOUIS CONVENTION
All Night the Coliseum, Filled With
Thousands of Demonstrative
People, Rings With Shouts as Nom
inating Speeches Are (Made—lowa
Man Objects to Fellow Delegates
Seconding Hearst and Himself
Seconds Judge Parker
Special to The Globe and New York Herald
CONVENTION HALL, ST. 'LOUIS, Mo., July 8. As this
dispatch is being -Written the convention is in the throes of
the presentation of candidates, and Judge Alton B. Parker, of
New York, is apparently as certain of the Democratic nomi
nation as ever. A ballot will not be taken until daybreak, and
the nomination has been deferred to meet the superstitions
of those who did not want to launch their ticket on Friday.
When Judge Parker's name was presented twenty-four
stales, representing about six hundred delegates, sent their
standards parading through the hall, and the demonstration
for Judge Parker lasted for twenty-eight minutes.
The making of the platform was really the most important
work of the convention. It has aroused greater interest here
and throughout the country than the selection of the can
didate for president. It is anticipated by Judge Parker's
friends that the omission of all reference to the money ques
tion will be a disappointment to the Democrats of the East
and will handicap them in the struggle for the electoral votes
of New York, New Jersey and Connecticut.
The platform is in the nature of a compromise. Bryan,
aving been voted down yesterday in the platform commit
tee on his motion to reaffirm the Kansas City platform, made
a strong struggle against any recognition of the existing money
Uandard. He threatened the committee with a plank declar-'
ing for an income tax to be obtained by constitutional amend
ment. Mr. Bryan might have carried such a plank in the
committee. Many Democrats in the South and West are in
favor of the income tax, because they are looking for a source
of revenue if the tariff is revised, and the plank Mr. Bryan pro
posed was a substitute for the income tax plank in the Chi
cago platform that contemplated packing the supreme.court
of the United States. Mr. Bryan would obtain the income tax
now not by packing the supreme court but by amending the
constitution.
Hill, Bryan and John Sharp Williams finally reached a
compromise by which both the money plank and the income
tax plank were dropped. Hill surrendered on gold. Bryan
beaten on reaffirmation, surrendered on the income tax.
TAMMANY MAKES FIGHT
Tammany Hall, opposing Parker to the end, sought to make
a fight for the gold standard on the floor of the convention.
Such a struggle might have meant reaffirmation of the Chi
cago and Kansas City platforms before it was over, because it
is known that in every Parker state delegation there Was a
strong minority who have a friendly feeling for W. J. Bryan,
but Tammany would not have cared for that.
Its only object has been to hurt Parker. The previous
question, however, shut the Tammany troublemakers out and
the platform went through. Many of Judge Parker's friends
are disappointed that there should have been«any compromise
■with Bryan. At the •same time, they would have preferred
siler.ce on the gold question to having the party committed
once more to the income tax. They are somewhat reconciled
to the capitulation by Hill, by the thought that matters might
have been worse if Bryan had brought in a minority report
of the platform committee.
The tumultuous cheer of the audience and the demon
stration for Cleveland on Wednesday and for Bryan on
Continued on Eighth Page
t ' ' • '■ ""'•"-■ "''"'-'- ■'-■•"• 7'r-■—-""''-• - -X'-'"'.';'""'."--'■;l.'.'..- f
PAGE I
Nominating Speeches Made in Demo
cratic Convention
Japs Continue Advance
Confess Montana Train Robbery
O'Donnell Drafted Republicans' Labor
Plank
PAGE II
Train Robbers Apply for Pardons
City Wins Victory in District Court
PAGE 111
Minneapolis Matters
News of the Railroads.
PAGE IV
Editorial Comment
Board of Control Encounters Difficulty
PAGE V
In the Sporting World
THE ONLY DEMOCRATIC DAILY NEWSPAPER OF GENERAL CIRCULATION IN THE NORTHWEST
THE ST. PAUL GLOBE
PAGE VI
Convention News
PAGE VII
Convention News
PAGE VIII
Convention News
PAGE IX
Weekly Review of Trade
PAGE X
Of Interest to Women
Popular Wants
PAGE XI
Financial and Commercial
PAGE XII
Norbeck Is Paroled.
O'Brien Sorry for Lind
SATURDAY MORNING, JULY 9, 1904—TWELVE PAGES
CLOSING SCENES IN THE CONVENTION
CONVENTION HALL, ST. LOUIS, July 9.—
1:18 a. m.—Minnesota makes the motion to limit further seconding speeches to four minutes; carried.
1:27 a. m.—Louisiana seconds Parker.
1:30 a. m.—Thomas H. Hall, of Texas, seconds Parker.
1:38 a. m—Champ Clark, who yielded chair to Senat«if Bailey, nominates Cockrell for president.
1:41 a. m.—Clark's mention of Cockrell awakens the convention to new enthusiasm.
1:47 a. m.—There is no disputing the spontaniety of tne Cockrell applause The waving of myriad flags, the
playing of "Dixie" by the band makes the occasion the most picturesque of the session.
1:55 a. m.—lf the enthusiasm lasts balloting will not be reached until daybreak.
2:07 a. m.—The enthusiasm having enthused, Champ Clark resumes.
BAD NEWS FOR THE G. O. P,
'*■'-■* '\\ -. * -\^^^^^7 'rj "'■" ■"'- '" - -■ 'l V GET * ■XOfiETHER^r 11*^^! "."'--^s -*3- ■> *^?* ?? - - -"*:: >Os*^\\\\\'//■-■'- 'T ' :" '■ • -:r .;.■■;. -•-. -
>^*^ rt(\\&. H I r<Wf(<r OUT I
TRIO CONFESS TO
BEARMOUTH ROBBERY
Imitators of Chicago Car Barn
Bandits Tell of Holding Up
Montana Train
CHICAGO, July B.—Three men, sim
ilar to the car barn bandits, Marx, Van
Dine and Niedermeier, are being held
here while investigation is being made
of assaults, hold-ups and train robber
ies the prisoners are accused of.
The existence of the band, whose
members say they are "the original
automatic trio," became known through
the confession of one of them, Truman
H. Wilkins, who lies at the point of
death from a bullet wound, received
after he and his companions had held
up and shot John C. Meiler, secretary
of a labor, union. Suffering from a
mortal wound, Wilkins made a con
fession, implicating two of his. com
panions, Charles Pheloyn and William
Erwin, who were surprised and cap
tured in a room. Later the two men
confessed.
The prisoners admitted the robbery
of a Northern Pacific train at Bear
mouth, Mont., recently, but said noth
ing of a shooting which took place in
connection. In his confession Pheloyn
spoke of having committed numerous
robberies, one of which was in a jew
elry store at Waukegan, 111., $3,000
worth of jewelry having been secured.
Pheloyn boasts of having lived in style
at Chicago hotels. AH three prisoners
told of $6,000 buried by them in In
diana.
ETZEL'S LfFE PAID FOR
IN MEXICAN MONEY
Chinese Government Pays $25,000 for
Death of War Correspondent
LONDON, July B.—Cabling under
date of July 8, the Standard's corre
spondent at Tien Tsin says:
"The Chinese government today paid
to the American consul 25,000 Mexican
dollars as indemnity for the death of
Lewis Etzel."
The Democratic Fleet Has United
MM DRAFTED
EIGHT HOUR PUNK
Grlmshaw Explains inside Work
of Republican Committee
on Resolutions
Report charges John O'ponnell, state
labor commissioner and, a delegate
from Hennepin county to the late Re
publican state convehtie-**! with being
responsible for the JeigTit-hour plank
in the platform adopted by the conven
tion.
It is said that the original draft of
the resolutions, as prepared by that
authoritative source of most of the Re
publican platforms for some years past,
William H. Grimshaw, United States
marshal 'for Minnesota, contained no
reference to an eigfcjjt-hour plank, but
O'Donnell appeared before the resolu
tions committee at its meetirfg Thurs
day night at the Ryan hotel, and vrged
the adoption of a plan proposed by
him. Acting on. his suggestion the
resolutions committee' added the plank,
then substituted a tariff plank of their
own way of thinking for Grimshaw's
tariff plank and presented the resolu
tions to the convention the next day.
The resolution indorsing Van~Sant*s
administration was the handiwork of
Grimshaw, and the committee, several
members of whom were opposed to the
plank but did not have the ■ nerve to
move its elimination, included this
plank with the others and the whole
platform went, through the convention
without discussion.
A Minneapolis paper a few days ago
gave a circumstantial x report of the
arduous work of the resolutions com
mittee in preparing the. platform ~£ or
presentation to the. conveation. Mar
shal Grimshaw, who' unquestionably
spent some time in the preparation of
the draft of the resolutions and who
gave his draft to Senator George R.
Laybourn, of -Duluth, after Senator
Clapp had examined the' report and
given it his approval, is not at all
pleased with the committee getting all
the credit for the effort.
Grimshaw Declares Himself
"That is all bosh; I purely imaginary,"
Grimshaw said yesterdayi. "The com
t mittee took out my plank and
added one of its own, and*added the
i eight-hour plank offered tby O'Dorinell.
It also cut f out my piahfe: on | the en
r largement Sof the nav.s^ This f story of,
the committee's hard^work doesn't get 1
;'■'■" '-j-->'--:■■<■■*■, ■:—... •—-?.-,t--^*>. .;_■.... .--fir-».:-<■>*:-'■■-■•: aw.'" '■■
'£rSIB*ZSZ:- -—' ' / -"^ T~ ' "-■'.'-" 7
Continued on £l£lith Page
WISE MM
iiHiii
Another Army Under Oku Pro
ceeds in Direction of Port
Arthur
TIEN TSIN, July B.—lt has been
learned from a Russian source that the
location of the Japanese is as follows:
The Second and Twelfth divisions
are marching from Feng Wang Cheng
in the direction of Liau-yang and Sal
maze. A division of the guards is near
the Yalu, and the Tenth division is
near Takushan, both the divisions are
marching in the direction of Baicheng,
and on their left and right flank are
reserves from the Yalu.
Gen. Oku's army is composed of
three divisions and with the Sixth di
vision and another unnamed division is
marching toward Port Arthur.
Think It a Maneuver
ST. PETERSBURG, July 8. — The
war office confirms the reports of the
Japanese advance toward Kaichou,
but is inclined to regard the movement
as a demonstration south while chang-
ing the disposition of troops to make
an attack elsewhere. Danger is con
sidered more likely from the direction
of To, or Fenshui pass, although there
is no sign of a move in force thence.
Yet the advance upon Kaichou ex
tends over a front of fifteen miles and
Includes about 30,000 men. The Japa
nese center is at Tai Shan on the Choui
river, eight miles southeast of Kai
chou. Constant skirmishing with Gens.
Samsonoff and Chirikoff is occurring
as the Japanese move forward along
the railroad and from the Siu-yan
mountains.
The military expert of the Russkyjn
Viedomesti believes Gen. Kuropatkin
has now decided to accept a general
engagement near Liau-yang, wherefore
he is not offering strong resistance to
the advance of the Japanese from Feng
Wang Chen, desiring to di' ,v them on
his selected ground.
Japs Capture. Guns
LONDON, July 9. —The Tokyo cor
respondent of the Daily Chronicle, un
der date of July 9, says that the Jap
anese captuaed over ten guns and fifty
prisoners near Kaichou. No other
dispatches In confirmation of the fore
going have been received.
PRICE TWO CENTS
PARKER'S NAME IS
CHEERED WILDLY
CONVENTION PASSES TIME
IN NOMINATIONS
Continuous Demonstration for Parker
Lasts Nearly Half an Hour—Making
of the Platform Is the Most Impor
tant Work of the Convention—Pre
vious Question Shuts Out Parker's
Opponents and the Platform Goes
Through
Special to The Globe
CONVENTION HALL, ST. LOUIS, Mo., July 9, 3:00 a. m.—At this hour
there is almost a certainty that a nomination will be made before adjourn
ment is taken. The men who have been shouting themselves hoarse all night
are still at it and willing to go any distance. The speech-making, which
has been continuous all night, is still insisted.
Mr Bryan was just given an ovation when he arose to give way to Rose, of
Wisconsin, \*ho presented the name of E. C. Wall.
It is probable that many of the states will pass their call on the roll, but
Nebraska will be heard from at length...lt is the general impression and the
object of the leaders to take one ballot on the presidential nomination before
adjourning.
The nomination of Parker on the first ballot is not probable in view of
the great number of nominees, Parker, Olney, Hearst, Gray, Miles, Wall and
Cockrell having been put before the convention.
ST. LOUIS, Mo., July B.—The Democratic national con
vention tonight adopted a platform by a viva voee vote and.
listened to nominating speeches for president. Judge Alton
B. Parker was named by Martin W. Littleton, and William
Randolph Hearst by E. M. Delmas. Both orators were ap
plauded at length. Anti-Parker delegations attempted to
create enthusiasm for their candidate, but the Parker men
remained undisturbed and unconcerned. Hearst delegates
paraded the hall, taut the showing was small in comparison
with the Parker procession which preceded it.
Nominating speeches for favorite son candidates and sec
onding speeches for both Parker and Hearst occupied the
convention for several hours.
HALL IS OVERCROWDED
The convention hall seats about 10,300 persons, and from
appearances hundreds more had been admitted. The floor
and lower and upper galleries contained thousands of swel
tering men and women oblivious to the fact that the crowded
condition of the hall endangered every ,life.
The Coliseum interior looked like a huge basin with bot
tom and sides formed by closely packed persons. Not an
aisle could be seen. They were filled by spectators who could
find no other place. Outside and in the crowds were the
same, except for the fact that those within the hall were
s. iSfied and those without were turbulent.
PLATFORM IS ADOPTED N
As soon as the convention had been called to order Chair
man Clark announced that the report of the committee on
resolutions was ready. Senator Daniel read the report as
Continued on Eighth Page
TORNADO AND DYNAMITE
ARE TIED ON VICTIMS
Seven Men Killed and Two Are Seriously Injured by
Storm in Missouri, While an Equal Number Are
Dead and (Maimed by Premature Explosion Among
Railroad Workers in Ontario
SUDBURY, Ont., July B.—Seven men
killed and two men injured is the result of
a premature dynamite explosion upon the
new Canadian Pacific Sudbury-Toronto
line near Romford.- T^ dead are three
Austrians, three Jgjnnb and the walking
boss, H. Poole, of Wakefield, Que. The
bodies of the killed, except Poole, were
literally blown to pieces. The accident
occurred through placing dynamite in a
hole which had shortly before been blown
with powder.
READ THE GLOBE
THE ONLY LIVE NEWSPAP£*
IN ST. PAUL
On Trains
FIVE CENTS
GTRARDEAU, Mo., July S—Seven
workmen were killed and two seriously
injured by being blown from the second
arch of the new -railroad bridge aciosa
the Mississippi river at Thebes, 111., to
night. The tornado struck a training
crane, upon which the men were at work,
and pushed it backward for 200 feet. At
the second arch from the Missouri shore
it struck an obstruction and was hurled to
the rocks below.

xml | txt