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The Saint Paul globe. (St. Paul, Minn.) 1896-1905, July 10, 1904, Image 16

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn90059523/1904-07-10/ed-1/seq-16/

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fSP© RTS II. NEVVS FROM DIAMOND, TRACK AIND FIELD
SAINTS TAKE BOTH
ANDCOTOTBETOP
Four Straight Games Lost to
1 Kelley's Men in the
<,**~~ Series
* -
* . ( Standing of the Clubs
Played. Won. Lost. Per Ct.
St. Paul 75 48 27 .640
m Columbus 73 45 28 .€l6
Milwaukee 72 41 31 .569
IJouisville 78 42 36 .538
. Indianapolis ....75 37 88 .493
.^linusapolis ...:73 34 39 .466
Kansas City ....69 25 44 .362
Toledo 72 22 60 -.305
t y, Yesterday's Results
St. Paul 5. 5. Columbus 3. 1.
Minneapolis 1, 2. Louisville 0, 0.
- Indianapolis 6, 1. Kansas City 4, 4.
Milwaukee 9, Toledo 0.
|||l|,The Saints deposed the Ohioan usurpers
yesterday in two merry-go-round events,
1 ' in which the Saints did most of the going
round, and when the duplex occasion clos
ed the Saintly crew resposed once more on
the top perch. Both games were com
paratively simple, and. inasmuch as "it
" made four straight. Manager Clymer will
liave to pay no excess baggage on his vic
tories this trip. Scores. St. Paul 5, Co
lumbus 3; St. Paul 5, Columbus 1.
It was a case of herding the hits to
• - gether -and letting go of them all at once
that won. In the first delightful affair the
visitors. hit Ferguson safely ■ as often as
the Saints hit Olmsted, but they came
along singly or in pairs and generally
w.eren't_numerous enough to become dan
gerously effective.
-. ' •-.-Slagle did the skimming in the second
game and repeated his performance in
: Minneapolis on the morning of the Fourth.
Two.singles was all Slagle had to regret,
arid, neither of "these amounted to any
thing. - One came in the -first inning, the
other in the second. He was a little short
- of control at one time, and to this shortage
is due the sole run accumulated by the
• ambitious laddies from Columbus. On this
occasion Slagle had the bases carrying a
full stock and got out of the trouble with
i ithe single run, and Wheeler's error con
tributed somewhat^ \i--\
" "Olmsted pitched the first game for Co
lumbus and was in poor physical condi
tion after the first few innings. His face
Was distorted with pain every time . he
pitched the ball, but he stuck to it until
■ two men were out in the eighth and then
. sank to his knees on the rubber. Glendon
• I finished the game for him. „He gave first
v ;on balls eight times, but none of- the
passes counted for anything in the scor
,• ing.-'-" '.•;
1 '■ Both Field Fast,
' Fast and clean fielding on both sides -
; marked the first game. In the eighth
Kelley made a beautiful one-hand catch of
a line drive by Friel, and O'Brien covered
all kinds of territory after fast ones. Jones
* started out by allowing three rollers to get ;
\ , more -, or ' less - away from far ■: enough to
convince the base runner that he was eh
* r- -titled to ; another. In each instance this
conviction proved wrong, as Jones would
• recover the ball in time . to effect a put
, out. Xn the eighth inning he sprained his
ankle • sliding to second and this affected
liis playing in the second game. '-' ;
• <:., Flournoy made his first appearance in
• • the uniform of the Saints, and delivered
♦ the goods from the jump off. He got one
hit and three bases on balls in the first
game and two hits out of four times at
t bat in the second.
Wheeler was the bright particular star
•v "with the stick yesterday, and -the things
I that he did to Olmsted and Glendon are
■worth mentioning. Two doubles in the
first game and three singles and a double
in the second, or six hits out of nine times
up in one day. Kelley also did some bat
ting, getting two hits out of twice up in
the first and two out of three times up in
the•second. ;
The first game started off with a rush
and. for a few moments innings went
Whizzing by so fast that the fans could
hardly see them. - Davis went out to
Kelley on the first ball pitched and
PKrigley made things look blue with a
double. Fnel and Kihm disappeared sud
dently and left Wrigley on third. Jones,
Jackson and Wheeler went out one, two
three and the same fate was. meted out
to Clymer. Martin and Bridwell.
Teaser started the third- with a liner
across the rubber that traveled to center
! field. Olmsted waited and walked and
Davis forced him-at second. Wrigley hit
.•where Jones was waiting and Yeager
scored. As Jones, went to throw the ball
it slipped and wont bounding to Marcan.
who hustled it to third in time to catch
Davis. Then Friel hit to center and
Jones, probably intentionally, juggled the
ball, and | Wrigley started for thirty but
■ Jones nailed him on the bag, retiring the
fciJc SKckjiuajrun.
Three in the Third
♦iJ!ti USO« ushered in the bountiful
I third by flying out to Lefty Davis and
Jones followed with a single to right
Jackson drove the ball to the right center
field fence and Jones went to third':
Sn,,rf "I' f Or his second hit and
l.u.fi out a two-bagger, scoring Jones
nnd putting Jackson on third. O'Brien
fanned and Kelley hit for two bases scor
ing Jackson and Wheeler. Marcan and
• La"esn^li \^u- passed- *and' the
oases full Sullivan'.went^ut, WriKlev to
- K.hm, and the Saints had three-in. *
the e<tlU, Gd l!h";V S< .^ slonMn# S S oc^d on
Ji&^o S3 rel°^d lhe innint"b?-
V- IS, l ls-!lc.v singled by third and
V hoc er advanced a base, and Keller £nd
■Wheeler operated a double J^l Wh^r
Wheeler «,:t at fr^ allov-i-f^ g&J*??
* 6«ifce- Wrfeiey tlirov- rv^j,- gl:aon to
M! and ih^hed SftaalSfc" CUt at
" l«t run'ft U?o SSh€ ?& «"•« and
( Pavis.on third. l'n> d^o ■/, rCh put
* first'.-.intl tSird ami Vne'ort '? an on
BASCBaLiLi TODAY
LEXINGTON PARK, 3:45 Pr M.
" ADMISSION 25 CENTS =============
Si, Paul vs. LouisviSSe
line to Ferguson too late to catch Davis,
but Ferguson whipped it over to third
and nailed Wrigley.
Ferguson led off for the fourth time in
the eighth and flew out to Bridwell. Jones
hit safely to right, but Jackson forced
him at second, where he sprained his
ankle in sliding. Wheeler closed the in
ning by fanning.
Martin started the final round for the
visitors with a single. Bridwell flew out
and Yeager went out from Ferguson to
Kelley. Glendon, who pitched one-third
of the previous inning, dropped the ball
into Marcan's hands and the Saints were
once more leaders of the American asso
ciation.
Second Starts Hurriedly
The second game got even a swifter
start than the first and the visitors occu
pied but little time at the bat. There were
some scattering hits by the Saints, but
none effective until the fourth period,
which Kelley launched with a single to
right field. Marcan followed with a
single and put Kelley on third. Flournoy
drove the ball to the left field fence and
brought in Kelley, Marcan tarrying for
the time being on third. Peirce sacri
ficed. Slagle was passed and Jones flew
out to Bridwell, Marcan stealing home.
Jackson flew out to center and the in
ning was over with two runs for the
Saints.
In the fifth Wheeler got his third hit
and O'Biien drove a safe one along the
first base line. Kelley sacrificed, and
Marcan hit to right, scoring Wheeler.
O'Brien tried to come in pn the hit, but
Davis threw him out at the plate. Flour
noy went out at first and the Saints were
three to the good.
Clymer's band got a lonely unit in the
seventh. Clymer started by going out
from Slagle to Kelley and Martin was
passed. Bridwell knocked a roller to
Wheeler, who threw wide to second to
get Martin, and first and second were
occupied with one out. Simon flew to
Wheeler and Glendon walked, filling the
bases. Davis had but one hit in the two
games and it looked as if he was about
due. and he was walked, forcing Martin
home. Wrigley cut short the suspense by
flying out.
Kelley began the eighth with a double to
left, the ball falling in the crowd. Mar
can put him on third with a sacrifice
and Flournoy brought him in with a long
single to left. Peirce went out at first
and Slagle singled to left. Martin threw
into the plate to catch Flournoy, but
Simon dropped the ball.
The visitors then began their final ef
fort. Martin flew out to Jones and Brid
well walked. Simon drove a hot liner in
Kelley's vicinity and Mike brought it
down, jumped to first, retiring the side
with an unassisted double play. That was
plenty of joy for one day. The scores:
FIRST GAME
St. Paul. AB. R. H. PO. A. E.
Jones, cf 4 1 2 2 3 0
Jackson, rf 4 1 1 1 1 fr
Wheeler, 3b 5 2 2 4 1 0
O'Brien, ss 4 0 0 0 4 0
Kelley, lb 2 0 2 13 0 0
Marcan. 2b 2 0 0 4 2 0
Flournoy, If 1 0 1 1 0 0
Sullivan, c 4 0 0 2 0 0
Ferguson, p..4 1 1 0 3 0
Totals 30 5 9 27 14 0
Columbus. AB. R. H. PO. A. E.
Davis, rf 4 1 1 5 0 0
Wrigley. 2b 4 0 3 3 5 0
Friel. 3b 4 0 1 1 2 0
Kihm, lb 2 1 0 9 0 0
Clymer, cf 4 0 0 2 0 0
Martin. If 4 0 3 0 1 0
Bridwell, ss 4 0 0 S 1 «
Yaeger. c 4 1 1 1 1 0
Olmsted, p 1 0 0 0 0 0
Glendon, p 2 0 0 0 3 0
Totals 33 3 i M 13 0
-St. Paul 0 0 3 0 1 1 0 0 *—5
Columbus ....0 0 110 0 0 1 o—3
Two-base hits. Wrigley, Wheeler 2.
Kelley, Ferguson; sacrifice hit, Jackson;
stolen bases, Marcan, "Wheeler. Kelley,
Kihm; double play, Olmsted to Wrigley to
Kihm; bases on balls, off Olmsted € r off
Oregory 1, off Ferguson 3; struck out,
by Ferguson 2, by Olmsted 1; left on
bases, St. Paul 11, Columbus 7; time of
game, 1:40; umpire. Hart.
SECOND GAME
St. Paul— AB. R. H. PO. A. E.
Jones, cf 5 0 0 2 ,0 1
Jackson, rf 3 0 0 % .0 0
Wheeler, 3b 4 1 4 6 2 3
O'Brien ss 4 0 1 3 1 0
Kelley. lb 3 2 2 8 0 0
Marcan. 2b 3 1 1 3 3 0
Flournoy, If 4 1 2 1 1 0
Peirce c 3 0 0 2 1 0
Slagle, p 3 0 1 0 2 0
Totals 32 5 11 27 .9 4
Columbus. AB. R. H. PO. A. E.
Davis, cf 3 0 0 0 10
Wrigley. 2b 4 0 1 1 2 0
Friel, 3b 4 0 0 0 6 0
Kihm. lb 4 0 0 14 0 1
Clymer. cf 4 0 0 3 0 0
Martin. If 3 1 0 1 1 0
Bridwell. ss 2 0 0 1 2 0
Simon, c 4 0 1 2 1 1
Glendon, p 2 0 0 1 3 0
Totals 30 1 2 Hi 16 2
St. Paul 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 2 *—5
Columbus 0 0000010 o—l
Two-base hits, Wheeler, Kelley; sacri
fice hits, Peirce. Kelley, Marcan; stolen
bases. Wheeler, O'Brien. Marcan. Wrigley;
bases on balls, off Slagle 3, off Glendon 2;
struck out, by Glendon 1; double play.
Kelley (unassisted); left on bases. Colum
bus 7". St. Paul 8; time of game, 1:40; um
pire, Hart.
Millers Land Double Bill
MINNEAPOLIS, Minn., July 9.—Minne
apolis won two games from Louisville
here today through the magnificent
pitching of Morgan and Thomas. Morgan
in the first was invincible and allowed but
tv.-o hits. Thomas was lilt more but
could not be touched with men on bases.
Scores:
FIRST GAME
~Minn. H.P.A.E.I Louis. IT.P.A.E.
Maloney.rf 2 0 0 OlKferwin.rf.. 110 0
Sullivan.cf 110 OJHallman.lf. 010 0
Coult.er.lf. 3 3 0 0 Campbell.cf 110 0
Freeman.l. 0 9 1 O'Arndt.3.... 0 3 4 0
Starnagle.c 1 G 1 OlDextcr.c... 0 2 2 0
MqNicTs,3 2 12 oßrashear,2. 0 5 2 0
Fox.2 0 3 4 OiWhite.l 0 7 0 0
0y1cr.5.... 0 4 5 OjQuinlan.s.. 0 4 3 0
Morgan,p.. 00 1 OjEgan.p 00 3 1
Totals.. 927 14 o! Totals... 224 14 1
Minneapolis ..10000000 •—1
Louisville ... .0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 o—o
Bases on balls, off Morgan 5. off Egati
3; struck out. by 6. by Egan 1;
sacrifice hits. Sullivan. Fox. Egan; double
play, Oyler to Fox to Freeman; hit by
pitcher, by Morgan 1; left on bases. Min
neapolis 11, Louisville 4; umpire, Klein;
time, 1:45; attendance, 3.500.
SECOND GAME
Minn. H.P.A.E.I Louis! H.P.A.E.
Maloney.rf 2 10 OjKerwin.rf.. 12 0 0
Sullivan.cf. 10 0 O;Hallman.lf. 0 2 0 0
Coulter.lf. 13 1 o!Campbell,cf 2 2 0 0
Freeman.l. 2 7 1 o!Arndt,3 0 111
Weaver.c. 16 0 OiSchriver.c. 16 0 0
McNic'ls,3 2 5 3 ljßrashear,2. 12 3 0
Fox,2 12 3 OlWhite.l 0 6 11
Oyler.s 0 2 0 OiQuinlan.s.. 0 3 2 0
Thomas,p. 0 IJ2 OJWright.p.. 10 2 1
Totals.. 10 27 10 lj Totals... C 24 9 3
Minneapolis ..0 0110000 •—2
Louisville 0 o_o 0 0 0 0 0 o—o
Two-base hit, McNichols; bases on balls,
eff Thomas 2, off Wright 1; struck out,
by Thomas 5. by Wrigbt 3; double plays.
Fox to Freeman to Oyler; Quinlan to
Brashear to White; sacrifice hits. Fox 2,
McNiehols; left on baser,. Minneapolis 10,
Louisville 2; umpire, KJem; time, 1:45.
Indians and Blu.-s Break
KANSAS CITY, Mo., July 9.—Kansas
City and IndianapclSa each won a game
THE ST. PAUL GLOBE. SUNDAY, JULY 10, 1904
here today. The second game was called
in the fifth inning to allow Indianapolis
to catch a train. Attendance, 800. Score:
FIRST GAME £•
K. C. H.P.A.E. Ind. H.P.A.E.
VBuren.rf. 0 2 0 0 Swander.lf. 3 10 0
Nance.lf... 0 4 0 OiMagoon.s.. 0 2 3 2
Sullivan,3. 2 0 1 OjM'Creery.cf 12 10
Ryan.c 111 0 Montg'ry.rf 2200
Hill.cf 2 2 0 ODicKey.l... 0 9 0 <a
Rothfuss.l 216 0 oCarr,3 10 3-0
Bonner,2.. 2 0 5 1 Berry,c 0 7 10
Lewee.s... 12 2 0 Martin,2... 0 3 3 1
Durham.p. 0 0 3 l|Newlin,p... 0 0 0 0
Gear.p 0 0 3 OjAllemang.p. 0 12 2
Totals ...10 27 15 2| Totals ...7 27 13 5\
Kansas City...l 0 0 0-0300 o—4'
Indianapolis ..11003100 o—60 —6
Earned runs. Kansas City 2, Indianapo
lis 1; two-base hits, Rothfuss, Swander,
Montgomery 2; home run, Swander; stolen
bases, Gear, Montgomery; double plays,
Lewee to Rothfus, Allemang to Martin to
Dickey; hits, off Durham 4, in five in
nings; off Gear 3, in four innings; off
Newlin 4. in one inning; off Allemang 6,
in eight innings; bases on balls, off Dur
ham 4, off Gear 3, off Allemang 3; struck
out, by Gear 1. by Newlin 1, by Allemang
1; hit by pitched ball. Carr, Newlin; left
-on bases, Kansas City 8, Indianapolis 7;
time, 2:30; umpire. Bausewine.
SECOND GAME
K. C. H.P.A.ETI Ind. H.P.A.E.
V.Buren.rf 0 3 0 OJSwander.lf. 0 0 0 0
Nance.lf... 10 0 OiMagoon.s... 0 0 0 2
Sullivan,3. 0 0 0 0 M'Creery.cf 0 2 0 0
Ryan.l 0 4 0 0 Montg'ry.rf 14 11
Hill.cf 0 2 0 o|Dickey,l... 0 4 0 0
Butler.c. 2 4 0 o!Carr,3 2 0 2 0
Bonner,2.. 2 11 o;Berry,c 0 10 0
Lewee.s... 11l o|Martin,2... 0110
Gear.p 0 0 1 o|Fisher,p.... 0 0 2 0
Totals ... 615 3 0| Totals ... 312 6 3
Kansas City 1 2 0 1 *—4
Indianapolis 0 1 0 0 o—l0 —1
Earned runs, Kansas City 2, Indianapo
lis 1; two-base hit, Montgomery; sacrifice
hits, Nance, Ryan, Dickey; stolen bases.
Lewee, Carr; base on balls, off Gear 1;
struck out, by Gear 4; hit by pitched ball,
Van Buren, Gear; left on bases, Indian
apolis 3; time, 45 minutes; umpire,
Bausewine.
Brewers Make It Four
MILWAUKEE, Wis., July 9.—Milwau
kee made it four straight with Toledo
today, the score being 9 to 0. Toledo
scored two runs in the four games played.
Brouthers and Deininger. of the Toledo
team, and Hemphill, of the MHwaukees.
have jumped their contracts and joined
independent teams. The score:
Mil. H.P.A.E.! Toledo. H.P.A.E.
Stone.rf.... 3 0 0 O'Frisbie.cf... 2 10 0
Schaefer,s. 0 2 3 2|Clingman,s. 13 3 1
O'Brien,2... 10 2 OiLee.rf 2 2 10
C1ark,3.... 3 4 2 o|Moriaty.3... 0 2 3 1
McKay.lf.. 0 11 0 Cristall.lf.. 10 0 0
Strick'tt.cf 13 1 0 Brown,c... 2 8 0 1
Batem'n.l. 2 8 0 0 Reisling.l.. 0 6 0 0
Slattery.c. 19 0 0 Sweeney, 2.. 0 2 10
Curtis.p... 2 0 0 0 Weinig.p.... 0 0 10
Totals ...13 27 9 2 Totals ... 824 9 3
Milwaukee ....2 0200203 •—9
Toledo 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 o—o
Earned runs. Milwaukee 5; two-base
hits, Brown. Frisbie. Stricklett. Clark,
Stone; three-base hit, Clark; bases on
balls, off Curtis 0, off Weinig 2; sacrifice
hit, O'Brien; struck out, by Curtis 7, by
Weinig 7; left on bases. Milwauke 5, To
ledo 8; double plays, Stricklett to Schae
fer, Clingman to Sweeney; stolen bases.
Stone, Schaefer 2, O'Brien. Frisbie; um
pire. Holliday; time, 1:37; atendance,
MINIKAHDA WINS
Town and Country Club Golfers
Defeated In Minneapolis
The Town and Country club golfers
were beaten at the Minikahda club course
yesterday afternoon in a closely contested
scratch foursome by a score of 1 up.
The play was exceptionally fast
throughout, and while brilliant work was
done by the Town and Country golfers
the steady play of the Minneapolis men
landed them on top of the heap. The Mini
kahda players had the contest cinched up
to the last two sets when Gardner and
Gribben and A. E. S. Johnstone and
Caughey defeated their opponents and
added 6 points to the Town and Country
club score, leaving them but 1 to the
bad at the finish.
The afternoon was ideal and the larg
est crowd of the season followed the
play. Nine sets of fours were played
and with few exceptions the sets were
hotly contested throughout, in no instance
was a set won by a better than 3 up, and
two of them ended In a tie. The score
follows:
Minikahda—
Jaffray and Marfield 2
Christian and Legg 3
Gage and Ireys 0
Brooks and Hood 3
Lowry and Webb 0
Gates and Greer 2
Watson and Carnahan 0
Belknap and Deaver 0
Hawkins and Heffelfinger 0
Totals ■. • -10
Town and Country—
Bend and Karlin 0
Schurmeiev and Steltz 0
Finch and Griggs 3
Langford and Gordon 0
Millar and Markham 0
Doran and Thompson 0
C. L. Johnstone and Henderson 0
Gardner and Gribbon 3
A. E. S. Johnstone and Caoghey 3
Totals • 9
a NORTHERN LEAGUE -a
NORTHERN LEAGUE
fc »
Standing of the Clubs
Played. Won. Lost. Per Ct.
Duluth 44 32 12 .727
Grand Forks ....44 23 21 .523
Crookston 42 21 21 .500
Superior 41 19 22 .464
Fargo 45 19 26 .422
Winnipeg 43 17 26 .395
Yesterday's Results
Duluth 3. Winnipeg 1.
Crookston 3. Grand Folks 1.
Superior 0, Fargo 7.
Maroons Lose to Duluth
Special to The Globe
DI'LI'TH. Minn.. July 9.—ln a hard
fought game played this afternoon the
Maroons were defeated by the White Sox
by a score of 3 to 1. The visitors got
three more hits and drew one more pass
than the locals, but the three errors prov
ed strong factors in losing the contest.
The score:
R.H.E.
Duluth 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 ♦—3 6 2
Winnipeg 0 00 0 10 0 0 o—l 9 3
Batteries. Duluth. Koukalik and
O'Leary; Winnipeg, Bemis and Clarke.
Captain Soaks Umpire
Special to The Globe
GRAND FORKS. N. D., July 9.—After
being put out of the game, Capt. Cole, of
the locals assaulted Umpire Hogan by
hilling him in the back with a thrown
ball. President Laxdale has suspended
him indefinitely. The incident sent his
teammates in the air and Crookslon won.
The score:
R.H.E.
CrooKston 0 1000000 2—3 10 2
Grand Forks ...0 0000010 o—l 7 4
Batteries. Grand Forks. Newmeyer and
Hess and Cheek; Crookston, Martin and
Henry.
Fargo WJns From Superior
Special to The Globe
SUPERIOR, Wis., July 9.—Superior and
Fargo played a game marked by but one
feature. Fargo was much snappier than
Superior and won handily in a slult out.
The one feature was Anderson's one
handed catch of Roses fly in right center
Score:
R H E
Superior 0 0000000 o—o 4 4
Fargo 05H0004 o—7 13 2
Batteries. Shaw and Rogers; Lempke
GOLFER ANDERSON
RETAINS MS TITLE
Apawamis Club Professional
Scores Third Victory on
Glenview Links
CHICAGO, July 9.—Willie Anderson,
the professional of the Apawamis Golf
club, of Rye, N. V., won his third gold,
medal on the links of the Glenview club
today, distancing a ll competitors with a
score of 303 for the seventy-two holes for
two days' play. Anderson retains the
tffle of open golf champion of the United
States Golf association, which he won last
year, and had previously taken in 1901.
Anderson is certainly the professional
golfer of the country, as his triple vic
tory in the national open event and
double victory in the open championship
of the West indicates. This afternoon be
finished with a fine seventy-two, which
was low score for the tournament, al
though Alexander Campbell, of the Coun
try club, of Brookline, Mass.. had com
pleted his round in a seventy-two a few
minutes before Anderson came in. Camp
bell's previous work, however, was too
poor to gain him any money.
The ten leaders in this probably the
most successful open championship held
by the United States Golf association
were as follows:
Willie Anderson, $200, a gold medal and
custody of the championship cup; second,
Gilbert Nichollp, St. Louis, $150; third.
Freddie Mackenzie, Onwentsia, $125;
fourth and fifth, Lawrence Auchterlonie,
Glenview, and Bernard Nicholls. Elyria,
$90 each; sixth, seventh and eighth. Rob
ert Simpson, Riverside, Stewart Gardner,
Garden City, and P. F. Barrett, Lambton,
Ont., each $53; ninth, James Foulis. Chi
cago Golf club. $30, and tenth. Donald
Ross, Oakley Country Club, Boston, Mass.,
$25.
H. Chandler Eagan, ex-Western, Har
vard and intercollegiate champion, led
the amateur with 329, but he was to
twentieth place.
Weather and course were in perfect con
dition for the championship and fully 500
people came out to the links during the
day. The scores:
_ Anderson's card of today and summary
of the others:
Willie Anderson, Apawamis Rye, N. V.:
Morning—
Out 54 3 5 563 4 4—39
In 4 2445564 5—39—78
Afternoon—
Out 4 3444535 5—37
In 5 3453444 3—35—72
Total first day, 75—78—153.
Grand total, 303.
George Baird. of the Town and Country
Club of St. Paul, was fifteenth. His score
for the first day was 158, second day 164,
total 322.
MAKE GOOD TIME
Local Horses Step Out on
Hamline Track
Yesterday's matinee given by the St.
Paul Driving club drew a large crowd to
the fair grounds track where they wit
nessed some keen sport. The track was
heavy, but nearly all the horses v entered
in the different events proved to be good
mudders and some fast time was made.
In addition to the events scheduled by
the *club, spectators witnessed several
fast workouts by the strings training at
the track.
Dr. F. L. Beckley's El Banello won the
2:20 pace and had to go the distance to
beat out Hal Davis, who finished second
both times, a half length back. The time
for the half mile, 1:08 and 1:10, consider
ing 1 the slowness of the track, was much
better than expected. Summary:
2:20 pace, two in three, *alf mile —
El Banello, Dr. F. L. Buckley 1 1
Hal Davis, Dudley Scheffer 2 2
Ida L, H. J. Pothen 3 3
Time, 1:08, 1:10.
Road race to bike, half mile, two in
three —
Faunlie. John Anderson 1 1
Xi Washi, O. A. Horning 2 2
Hammont Jr.. W. H. Kent 3 3
Time. 1:11%, 1:11%.
The track was too heavy for the road
race to wagon and the event was declar
ed off.
AMERICAN LEAGUE
Standing of the Clubs
Played. Won. Lost. Per Ct.
Boston 68 46 22 .677
New York 66 40 26 .606
Chicago 69* 41 28 .594
Cleveland «3 35 28 .55<;
Philadelphia 66 34 32 .515
St. Louis 62 27 35 .435
Detroit 66 28 38 .424
Washington 65 12 53 .185
Yesterday's Results
Detroit 5. Cleveland 3.
Chicago 1. St. Louis 0.
P.oston 2. New York 1.
Philadelphia 3, 3, Washington 0, 11.
Senators Break Even
PHILADELPHIA, Pa.. July 9.—Wash
ington was shut out in the first game to
day, but easily won the second by su
perior batting. The fielding of the locals
was ragged. Attendance. 14,312. Score:
FIRST GAME
Wash. H.P.A.E.i Phil. H.P.A.E.
Coughlin,3. 110 0 Hartsel.lf.. 12 0 0
Donovan.rf 0 0 0 0 Pick'ring.cf 0 0 0 0
Cassidy.s.. 0 4 3 lL.Cross.3-. 112 0
Stahl.l 010 0 1 Seybold.rf.. 10 0 0
O'Neill.lf.. 110 oMurphy,2.. 10 0 0
M'Cor'ek,2. 0 3 5 0iMu11in.2.... 1 12 1 0
Herring.cf. 110 0 M.Cross.s... 0 3 3 0
Kittredge,c 0 4 2 OiShreck.c.... 18 0 0
Patten.p.., 0 0 4 0 \Vaddell,p ..0 15 0
Totals .. 324 14 2 Totals ... 627 11 0
Philadelphia ..00020010 *-%3
Washington ..0 0 O_J) 0 0 0 0 o—o
Sacrifice hits. Kittredge. Murphy: stolen
base. Coughlin; left on bases, Washington
5, Philadelphia 7; bases on balls, off Pat
ten 2, off Waddell 2; hit by pitched ball,
by Patten 1; struck out, by Patten 2, by
Waddell 8: passed ball. Kittredge; wild
pitch. Waddell; time. 1:30; umpires, Dwyer
and King.
SECOND GAME
Wash. H.P.A.E.! Phil. H.P.A.K.
Coughlin.3. 3 10 1 Hartsel.lf... 15 11
Donovan.rf 2 0 0 0 Piek'ng.cf. .2000
Casstdy,s.. 15 3 o|L.Cross,3... 0 12 0
Stahl.l 2 8 2 OiSeybold.rf.. 2 10 0
O'Neill.lf.. 2 2 0 OJMurphy.2... 2 3 3 1
M'Corek,2. 2 2 2 o|Mullin.l 0 8 2 0
Herring.cf. 13 0 o|M.Cross,s.. 0 2 2 1
Clarke.c... 2 4 2 OJSchreck.c.. 0 2 0 0
Orth.p 12 6 OiPowers.c... 0 4 2 1
— — (Henley.p.... 0 0 11
Totals ..16 27 13 i;Ber.der,p... 0 13 0
Totals ... 727 16 5
Washington .3 0020J01 2—ll
Philadelphia .0 1100300 Q—3
Two-base hits, Stahl. Orth. Pickering;
three-base hit. Seybold; sacrifice hits,
Stahl. Mullin; stolen bases. Hartsel,
Murphy. Clarke: left on bases. Washing
ton 6. Philadelphia 5; base on balls, off
Orth 2, off Bender 2; struck out, by Orth
2. by Henley 1, by Bender 4; hits, off
Henfey. 4 in one Inning; off Bender, 12 in
eight innings; passed ball. Powers; time,
1:45; umpires, Dwyer and King.
White Sex Blank St. Louis
ST. LOUIS, Mo., July 9.—ln a pitchers'
battle here today the St. Louis American
league team was defeated by Chicago 1
to 0. An error by Hill was responsible
for a tally by the visitors. Attendance,
2.000. Score:
St. L. H.P.A.E" Chi H.P.A.E.
Burkett.lf. 0 2 0 0 Dundon,2. ..0120
Hem'hiil.cf 10 2 OF. Jones.cf 2 10 0
Jones,!.... 115 1 1 Callahan.lf. 14 10
H'elsnTn.rf 0 1 0 0 Green,rf.... 110 0
Wallace.s.. 0 3 1 ODavis.s 0 2 2 0
Padden,2... 13 4 OJDonohue.l. 012 0 0
H111,3 0 10 lTannehill.3 113 0
Kahoe.c... 113 0 McFarld.c. 0 5 10
Howell,p... 0 1 S 0 Altrock,p... 0 0 3 1
Totals ... 427 16 2 Totals ... 527 12 1
St. Louis 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 o—o
Chicago 0 0 Q Q Q Q 1 Q Q —i
Three-base hit. Padden; sacrifice hits,
Callahan, Davis; double play. Padden to
Wallace to T. Jones; stolen bases. Jones,
Davis; hit by pitcher, Howell, McFarland;
base on balls, off Altrock 1; struck out,
by Powell 2, by Altrock 4; left on bases,
St. Louis 5. Chicago 4; time, 1:38; um
pire, O'Loughlin.
Young Trims Highlanders
NEW YORK, July 9.—Boston won from
New York itoday by a score of 2 to 1.
Young outpitched Chesbro, although his
support was not nearly as good as that
received by the local pitcher. Attendance,
21.403. Score:
Boston. H.P.A.E-1 N. Y. H.P.A.E.
Stahl,cf.... 14 0 o]Doughy.lf. 110 0
C011in5,3... 012 OjKeeler.rf 00 0 0
Fteeman,rf 0 10 1 Williams,2. 0 3 4 0
Parent.s... 11l 2lAnderson,l. 012 0 0
Selbach.lf.. 10 0 OjElberfeldLs. 113 0
Lachance.l 212 0 o|Fultz,cf 0 4 0 0
Ferris,2... 115 l|Conroy,3... 1110
Criger.c... 17 0 OlMcGuire.c.. 2 5 2 1
Young.p... 10 4 HChesbro.p... 0 0 5 0
— j*Ganzel 0 0 0 0
Totals.. 827 12 5
Totals ... 527 15 1
♦Batted for Chesbro in ninth.
Boston 0 0 0 0 0 0~~l 0 I—2
New York 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 o—l
Two-base hits, McGuire, 2. Selbach: sac
rifice hits. Conroy. Stahl. Selbach; stolen
bases. Selbach, Ferris; left on bases. New
York 8, Boston 6; first base on balls, off
Chesbro 2, off Young 1; first base on er
rors. New York 4; struck out. by Ches
bro 5. by Young 7; time, 1:55; umpire,
Sheridan.
Crawford Breaks Up Game
CLEVELAND. Ohio. July 9.—Craw
ford's single with the bases filled drove in
the winning runs for Detroit in the tenth
inning. Chicago will play a postponed
game here Monday, the game scheduled
for that date with Detroit having been
played Friday. Attendance, 4.105. Score:
CleveT H.P.A.K Def """iTp.aTe'.
Flick.rf... 2 3 0 0 Barrett.cf... 2 S 0 0
Lush.lf 15 0 OjM'lntyre.lf. 14 0 0
Bradley.3.. 0 2 1 OlCarr.l 010 2 0
Lajoie,s... 2 0 1 0 Cra'ford.rf.. 110 0
Hickman,2. 12 6 0 Lowe.2 12 3 1
Stovall.l... 0 7 0 oGrem'ger,3 2 2 2 0
Bay.cf 0 2 0 OBuelow.c... 0 4 10
Abbott.c... 19 0 1 Donavan.p. 0 2 3 0
Moore.p... 2 0 2 2 O'Leary.s... 1 2 4 1
Totals .. 930 10 3 Totals ... 30 15 2
Cleveland .010000 2 00 o—3
Detroit 0 00030000 2—5
Two-base hit, Lajoie, Mclntyre; three
base hit, Flick; sacrifice hit, Hickman:
stolen bases. Bay; bases on balls, off
Moore 1, off Dona van 2; hit by pitched
ball, by Moore 1; left on bases, Cleve
land 8, Detroit 7; struck out. by Moore
6. by Dona van 4; wild pilch, Moore; time,
2:00"; umpire, Connolly.
KAISERKNOWSBOATS
Emperor Orders One Like the
Fleet Ingomar
KIEL, Germans', July 9.—Emperor Wil
liam has decided to- order a schooner
yaoht on the model of the racing schoon
er-yacht Ingomar, owned by Morton F.
Plant,' of New York.
Herr Huldschinsky, the owner of the
Germp.n schooner-yacht Suzanne, which
won King Edward's cup, has renounced
his claim in favor of the German em
press yacht Iduna because one of the
Suzanne's sails was not included in the
official measurements. The empress, on
her part, has presented the cup to the
Imperial Yacht club.
The emperor's yacht Meteor 111. has left
the waters to take part in the race from
Heligoland to Dover and also to partici
pate in regattas on the English and
Scotch coasts.
Big Ben Is Sold
CHICAGO. July 9.— S. W. Street & Co.
disposed of their stable of horses in train
ing at public auction in the Harlem pad
dock today. Big Ben brought the high
est price of the twelve sold. C. E. Durnell
bidding him in for $4,200. Port Royal
brought $4,000 and was purchased by J.
A. Wornberg. Others brought the follow
ing prices: Mad Mullah, $2,200; J. A.
Wi-rnberg; Birch Broom, $2,000, Charles
Bowman; Leila. $1,350. D. Clark; Ko
mombo, $1,600. T. J. Parker; Cardinal
Wolsey, $1,000, J. H. Young.
Three I League
Cedar Rapids 5-. Davenport 1.
Rock Island 1, Decatur 3.
Rockford 3. Uubuque 11.
Bloomington 5, Springfield 1.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Standing of the Clubs
Played. Won. Lost. Per Ct.
New York CS 51 17 .750
Chicago 66 40 26 .606
Cincinnati 66 38 28 .576
Pittsburg 66 36 30 .545
St. Louis 66 33 33 .500
Brooklyn 72 28 44 .359
Boston 70 27 43 .380
Philadelphia ....66 16 50 .242
Yesterday's Results
Pittsburg 6. Boston 0.
Chicago 4. Brooklyn 3.
Cincinnati 5. Philadelphia 2.
New York 5, 5, St. Louis 4, 3.
Giants Take All In Sight
ST. LOUIS, Mo., July 9.—Five runs in
each game were sufficient to land the New
York National league team in first place
in the double-header here today. Ma
thewson was forced to retire in favor of
McGinnity at the end of the seventh In
ning of the first game. McGinnity also
went to the assistance of Wlltse in the
last inning of the second game. Attend
ance, 9.300. Scores:
FIRST GAME
St. L. H.P.A.E. N. Y. H.P.A.E.
Farrell,2... 2 2 3 1 Bresna'n.cf 4 3 0 0
Shannon.rf 10 10 Browne.rf.. 12 11
Shay.s 2 14 0 Devlin.3.... 10 4 0
Smoot.cf.. 110 OMcGann.l.. lIS 0 0
8rain.1.... 111 1 OMertes.lf.. 110 0
Barclay.lf.. 110 ODahlen.s... 0 2 4 0
Burke,3... 1 € 1 0 Gilbert,2... 0 3 3 0
Zearfoss.c. 0 5 10 Bowerm'n.c 0 3 10
Taylor.p.. 2 0 4 0 Math's'n.p. 10 4 0
iMcGi'ty.p.. 10 0 0
Totals.. 1127 15 1|
Totals.. 10 27 17 1
St. Louis 0 0000101 o—2
New York 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 3 —5
Earned runs. St. Louis 1; two-base hits,
Farreli. Bresnahan. Devlin, Mathewson;
three-base hits, Bresnahan, Mertes; sac
rifice hits, Shannon, Brain. McGann, Bow
erman 2; double plays, Dahlen to Gilbert.
Gilbert to Dahlen to McGann; passed
ball. Zearfoss; stolen base. Shay; hits,
off Mathewson S in 7 Innings, off McGin
nity 3 in 2 innings; bases on balls, off
Taylor 5, off Mathewson 1; struck out,
by Taylor 2, by Mathewson 3; left on
bases, Sfc Louis 7. New York 7; time,
1:55; umpires. O'Day and Emslie.
SECOND GAME
St. L. H.P.A.E. N. Y. H.P.A.E!
Farrell.2.. 13 3 C'Bresna'n.cC 3 10 0
Slumon.rf. 12 1 ©[Browne.if.. 12 10
SPgRTSj
Shay.s 10 3 0 Devlin.3.... 0 2 10
Smoot.cf.. 12 0 OMcGann.l.. 0 9 0 0
8rain,1.... 114 1 2Mertes,lf.. 1 1 c o
Barclay.lf. 3 0 0 0 Dahlen,s... l 3 4 o
8urke,3.... 0 0 4 0 Gilbert.2... 2 4 3 0
Zearfoss.c. 0 5 0 IWarner.c. 0 5 0 0
McFarl'd.p. 0 1 4 0 Wiltse.p... 10 3 0
*McCorm'k 0 0 0 0
Totals.. 827 16 3|McGinn'ty.. 0 0 0 0
, Totals... 927 12 0
♦Batted for Wiltse in ninth.
St. Louis 0 0 0 0 0 0 I 2 o—3
New York 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 2—5
Two-base hit, Bresnahan; home run,
Bresnahan; hits, off Wiltse 7 in 8 innings,
off McGinnity 1 in 1 inning; double plays,
Gilbert to Dahlen to McGann. Dahlen 'to
McGann, Farrell to Brain, Shannon to
Farreli; stolen bases. McCormick, Mertes,
Gilbert; wild pitch. Wiltse; bases on balls,
off McFarland 1, off Wiltse 4; struck out,
by Wiltse 4, by McFarland 5; left on
bases, St. Louis 5. New York 6" time, 1:36;
umpires, O'Day and Emslie.
Flaherty Had Boston Guessing
PITTSBURG. Pa., July * 9.—Boston
could do nothing with Flaherty's pitching,
and had not the ghost of a show for mak
ing a run at any time. MeNichols was
wild, but when he could get them over
the plate, puzzled Plttsburg. Attendance,
5,030. Score:
Pitts. H.P.A.E. I Boston. H.P.A.E.
Leach.3... 12 1 OGeier.cf... 0 1 0 01
Beaum't.cf 2 0 0 0 Tenney 1 012 0 0
Clarke.lf.. 14 0 0 AbbatiVio.s 1110
Wagner.s.. 12 6 0 Cooley.lf... 0 10 0
Bransfi'd,l 112 0 0 Delehan'y.3 0 2 3 1
Sebring.rf. 0 10 lßaymer,2.. 0 13 0
Ritchey.2. 114 0 Carney,rf.. 0 2 0 0
Smith.c... 0 5 0 OiMoran.e... 14 10
Flaherty.p. 0 0 3 0 Willis.p.... 0 0 0 0
m . . McNich'ls.p 0 0 10
Totals.. 727 14 1]
. Totals... 224 9 2
Pittsburg 4 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 *—6
Boston ■■■ 0 0 0 0 0 0 Q 0 Q—o
Two-base hit. Wagner;* three-base hit.
Leach; sacrifice hit. Clarke; stolen bases,.
Leach, Wagner. Abbatichio; double plays.
Wagner to Ritchey to Bransfield, Ritchey
to Wagner to Bransfield: first base on
balls, off Flaherty 2. off McNichols 7;
struck out. by Flaherty 4. by Willis 1.
by McNichols 3: wild pitches." McNichols
2: hits, off Willis 4 in 1 inning, off Mc-
Nichols 3 in 7; time. 1:35; umpires, John
stone and Carpenter.
Microbes Win Close Game
CHICAGO, July 9.—Chicago won a close
game today by clever bunching of hits
in the third, fifth and eighth innings. The
visitors could do nothing with Weimer,
except in the first and ninth. Attendance.
COOP. Score:
Chicago. H.P.A.E.I Brook. H.P.A.E.
Slagle.lf.. 2 10 OlGessler.cf.. 2 10 0
Casey,3... 10 2 1 Dillon,l 17 0 0
Chance.l.. 0 9 3 0 Lumley.rf. 14 0 0
McCar'y.cf 110 0 Sheckard.lf 2 10 0
Kling.c 0 8 1 0 Babb.s 0 4 10
Eyers,2... 0 3 4 0 Ritter.c 15 3 0
Tinker.s. .2221 McC'rm'k,3 1100
WHH'ms.rf 10 0 0 Jordan,2 1' 1 1 fl
Weimer.p. 2 3 1 0 Poole.p 0 0 4 0
Totals.. 927 13 2 Totals... 924 9 0
Chicago ...0 0 2 0 1 0 0 1 •—4
Brooklyn 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 Q 2—3
Left on bases. Chicago G. Brooklyn 7;
two-base hits, Casey, Sheckard 2; thfee
base hit. Tinker; sacrifice hit, Casey;
stolen bases. Tinker, Gessler; double play.
Tinker to Evers to Chance; struck out,
by Weimer 7, by Poole 3; bases on balls,
off Weimer 3, off Poole 2; time, 1:42; um
pire. Moran.
Mitchell Has Wild Day
CINCINNATI. Ohio. July 9.—Mitchell's
wildnees save the Cincinnatis material as
sistance in their scoring, to which the
locals added timely hits. Corcoran was
benched in the third inning for disputing
a decision. "Woodruff taking his place at
short. Attendance. 3,340. Score:
Cm. H.P.A.E.I Phil. H.P.A.E.
Huggins,2. 13 3 OJThomas.ef. 10 10
Seymour.cf 2 1 0 oGleason.2.. 0 2 5 0
Dolan.rf... 2 3 1 1 Lush.rf 110 0
OdwelUf... 1 5 0 ODoyle.l 113 1 0
Ke11ey.1.... 1 8 0 OlDooin.c 12 10
Steinfldt.3 112 o|Magee,lf 110 1
Corcoran.s. 0 13 o|Hall,3, 0 0 1 2
Woodruff,s. 0 1 1 lHulswitt,s. 3 4 10
Peitz.c 2 4 1 0 Mitchell,p.. 0 16 0
Walker.p.. 0 0 1 0 *Titus 0 0 0 0
Totala ..10 27 12 2 Totals ... 824 16 3
♦Batted for Mitchell in ninth.
Cincinnati ... 1 6 2 I I 0 0 0 •—5
Philadelphia ..1000 0000 I—2
Two-base hits, Lushu Doyle, Peitz,
Doom; stolen bases, Lush, Keiley; double
play, Huggins to Corcoran to Keiley: first
base on balls, off Walker 1. off Mitchell
5; sacrifice hits, Corcoran, Woodruff, Od
well; struck out, by Walker 3; wild
pitches. Walker 1, Mitchell 2; time, 1:55;
umpire, Zimmer.
WESTERN LEAGUE
At Denver— R.H.E.
Denver 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 o—o 8 1
Omaha 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 o—2 8 5
Ollendorff and Lucia; Pfeister and God
ing.
At Colorado Spring?— dft.H.E.
Dcs Moines 10 0 0 4 0 0 2 1-^ 17 0
Col. Springs 0 3210000 o—6 13 1
McNeeley and Herman; Morrison and
Towne.
At Sioux City— R.H.E.
Sioux City 0 0200103 o—6 10 0
St. Joseph 0 1000201 3—7 9 5
Kostal. Parker, Jarrett and Ward;
Clark. Chirm and McConnell.
No Wallflower, She
"No. Mr. Puffed," said the fair young
girl; "I cannot promise you an opportu
nity to teach me to swim this summer.
You see, I've agreed to let twenty-five
vQung men teach me, one after the other,
and I fear that by the time they are
through the season will be over. "But,"
seeing the look of disappointment on his
face, "you may either be the first one
to teach me to skate this winter, or the
first to give me a swimming lesson next
summer.''—Judge.
CLOTHING HOUSE
Men's Clothing
H ALFPR ICE
Genuine bona-fide half price sale of New
York, Rochester and Chicago Clothing
from the best makers. Just half price.
Compare Our Merchandise With Others
The Old Reliable Clothing Corner
Seventh and Robert
SHAMROCKS WIN OUT
IN DESPERATE GAME
Wlnnlpeggers Defeat Local La
crosse Team After Close
and Fast Struggle
The Winnipeg Shamrocks defeated the
St. Paul Lacrosse team in a hotly con
tested game in the down town ball park.
The game was fast from start to finish
and was not won until the last quarter
was over. Score: Shamrocks 7. St. Paul 5.
Yesterday evening's game between the
Shamrocks and the Saints was the most
desperately disputed contest that has-ever
been seen in St. Paul.
The brilliant plays on both sides were
applauded time and again, and the large
audience fairly lost their heads as tho
game went on. From the start the
Saints showed they had lost the fear at
their opponents that characterized their
play in last Sunday's game. From th<?
first draw the blue shirts went at it
hammer and tongs and had the famous
Shamrocks played off their feet. In the
first quarter, while the play was fairly
even, St. Paul had the best of it, and
when time was nearly up Elliott made a
dash for goal, eluding Flett and Cat
tanach, and passed the ball into the net.
This attack of Elliott's was probably the
most sensational piece of work of the en
tire game as he dodged successfully three
men and tallied. A few minutes later
the bail again found its way to the St.
Paul attacking division and two shots
were made on the Shamrock flags. In one
of the latter the ball bounded back from
the Scoreboard and Whyte shot it by
Cloutier for the second score.
At this stage of the game it looked as
though there was nothing to it but St.
Paul. The crowd was frantic and the
few Winnipeg followers w<4~e in dis
may.
In this quarter Haines, in goal, proved
himself a star, stopping shot after shot.
and he was ably seconded by Armstrong
and Raymond, who relieved again and
again, while Murphy kept the outside
home men at a safe distance.
The Saints went after the Greens with
spirit in the second quarter, but the
Shamrocks had evidently come to the
conclusion that they had to do something,
and after five minutes' play Pentland shot
the ball in the nets for the first goal for
the Shamrocks. The Saints were still one
to the good, and in a few moments Brown
got the ball in and added to their lead.
Both teams were playing with dash and
fire, and the passing and checking was
such a_s to arouse the wildest enthu
siasm in the grand stand and bleachers.
Then Lyle began to get into the game,
and before the second quarter came to an
end he shot a goal. The score still stood
S to 2 in the Saints' favor, and the hopes
of the followers of the blue and white
were high. Lyle got two more goals in
the third quarter, which put the Sham
rocks one to the good, and Burns followed
with another in a few moments.
It was growing dark by thig time and
the Saints went at the game desperately
and with determination. They massed In
front of the Shamrock flags "and shoved
the ball inside in the fiercest scrhrtmage
of the season. The fourth quarter was
played in the gloom and at the start the
Saints managed to tie the score, but
Burns and Lyle again shot goals and the
game was over with the score: St. Paul 5,
Shamrocks 7.
The Saints did not play the game put
up at Lexington park last Sunday. The
field was small and slippery, which af
fected both teams alike. Alien. Brown
and Kervin forgot all about passing sev
eral times and made futile efforts to shoot
from the center of the field. Time after
time there were men uncovered waiting
for the ball, but the anxiety to score was
too great and chances were wasted. The
line up:
Cloutier goal Hainea
Cattanaoh point Raymond
Jameson cover point Armstrong
Flett Ist defense Murphy
Bretz -d defense Gui.-
Innis 3d defense Sellars
Laidlaw center Oehme
Brennagh 3d home Allen
Lyle 2d homo Elliott
Burns Ist home Kervin
Cowan outside home Brown
Wm. O'Brien, .inside home Whyte
Carper captain Monkman
The Doctor Wa 5 Out
She was a maid who had been with
the doctor for years, and the habitual
expressions of those years could not be
easily laid aside.
When the doctor died she remained at
the house. An old friend of the doctor,
who had been abroad and had not heard
of his death, called and was admitted.
"I would like to sop Dr. H.." ho said.
"I'm sorry," said the maid, "but the
doctor is dead!"
Stricken by this dread intelligence, the
visitor .sat silent for some minutes.
After waiting for some time the maid
ventured timidly:
"Will you—will you—wait?"—Lippin
cotfs.
Further Side Lights
Galatea had just given Pygmalion the
stony stare.
"Ha. old girl," hinsea Pygmalion. "Re
venue!"
With which venomous muttering ho
proceeded to give her the marble heart.
Rabelais was looking over the proofs of
"Garermitua" and discussing it with his
publisher:
"I think." Rabelais v;as saying, "that
we ought to get out a limited edition. "
"The more so the better," said the pub
lisher.
But Rahelais look it as a compliment.—
Chicago Journal.

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