OCR Interpretation


The Saint Paul globe. (St. Paul, Minn.) 1896-1905, July 11, 1904, Image 1

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn90059523/1904-07-11/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

THE WEATHER
For St. Paul end Vicinity—Fair.
For Minnesota —Fair In south, show
ers in north today; showers Tuesday.
VOL. XXVII.—XO. 193
DESPERATE BATTLE
FOUGHT AT KAIPING
JAPS DEFEAT RUSSIANS IN
awmmmmmmmmm
More Than 30,000 Soldiers of the
Czar's Army Are Beaten by the
Mikado's Troops After Three Days
of Hard Fighting—Kaiser William
Wishes Success to His Russian
Regiment
TOKYO, July 10.—After three days severe fighting, char
ncterized by the desperate attacks of the Japanese and the
übborn resistance of the Russians, Gen. Oku's army occu
pied Kaiping (Kai-chou) last Friday, driving the Russians
northward in the direction of Hai-teheng.
The Russians had strongly fortified the hills situated in a
semi-circle south of Kaiping. Their forces consisted of over
J30.000 men. _ ; ->
The operations began last Wednesday by the* Japanese
driving 1,600 Russians from the heights south of Kaiping,
constituting the first line of defense. The Japanese occupied
the positions and the Russians retreated n6rthward.
On Thursday the entire Japanese' army forced its way
close to Kaiping, overcoming the stubborn resistance of the
Russian infantry, cavalry and artillery located in the narrow
defiles. The Russians held many strong positions in the
mountainous country, but, despite their desperate resistance,
they were forced to abandon them one by one.
During the night the Russians were greatiy reinforced by
the troops brought from the north by train, in preparation
for a big battle Friday.
RUSSIANS MAKE LAST STAND
The Japanese began the last day's fighting at daylight with
an artillery fire from guns placed on the heights previously
captured from the Russians.
The Russians finally took position on the tops of the high
precipices and again offered a stubborn resistance. About
noon they were forced to again withdraw, the Japanese oc
ixipying the last line of defenses, and the Japanese pursued
the enemy despite a severe artillery fire from the Russian
batteries on me nign hills to tne north.
The Japanese artillery finally occupied new positions and
silenced these batteries. In the afternoon the Japanese occu
pied the town without further resistance.
GENERAL CONFIRMS REPORT
ST. PETERSBURG, July 10.—Lieut. Gen. Sakharoff, in a
dispatch to the general staff, confirms the report of the Japa
:>ccupation of Kai Chou. He says that the Russian loss
did not exceed ISO killed or wounded. Gen. Sakharoff adds
that the Japanese are on the Yin Kow road.
GERMANY MAY MIX
ST. PETERSBURG, July 10.—A sensation has been caused
by the publication in the Russky Invalid, the army organ, of a
telegram from Emperor William to the colonel of the Wiborg
(Finland) regiment, of which the emperor is honorary colo
nel-in-chief. The emperor congratulates the regiment on
the prospect of meeting the Japanese, and adds that he is
proud his Wiborg regiment will have the honor of fighting
for its emperor, the fatherland and the fame of the Russian
■my. In concluding the emperor says: "My sincere wishes
accompany the regiment. God bless its standards."
This telegram was only published this morning but by
evening its contents had become widely known and formed
[lie general topic of conversation. A considerable section of
the public even deduced from the message that Germany in
tends before long to abandon her position as a mere onlooker
with regard to events in the far East.
In diplomatic circles, while the telegram has caused much
surprise and comment, it is immediately associated with, the
approaching commercial treaty negotiations in Berlin.
MAKES TORPEDO ATTACK
CHIFU. July 11.—A European who left Port Arthur at o
o'clock Sunday afternoon reports that the Japanese made
p torpedo attack Sunday morning attempting to penetrate
into the harbor. They were repulsed without loss to either
bide.
The European reports that on July 7 severe fighting oc
curred around Port Arthur. The Russians claimed to have
driven the Japanese back on all sides, but admitted a loss of
over 1,000 killed. Seven hundred wounded are said to have
arrived at Port Arthur July 8 and it was said more were to
come in.
JAPANESE CONCEAL LOSSES
ST. PETERSBURG, July 10.-—An important point in the
official account of th<s battle of Kiac-chou is the statement in
Lieut. Gen. Sakharoff's report that the Japanese are advane-
Continued on Eighth Page
SENATORS ARE HURT
Tillman and Bailey Injured in
Automobile Collision
ST. LOUIS, Mo., July 10.—An auto
mobile In which Senator Tillman, of
South Carolina, and Senator Bailey, of
Texas, were riding collided with a Jef
ferson avenue street car and both sen
ators were thrown Into the street, but
neither wore seriously injured. -
Senator Tillman sustained a sprained
aiikle and Senator Bailey was bruised
about the body.
After ascertaining the extent of their
injuries and viewing their wrecked au
tomobile the two senators bearded a
blreet car and returned to their hotel.
The chauffeur was badly bruised, but
»ci about collecting the debris of the
automobile.
The street car was crossing Chsslnat
boulevard, when the: automobile, run
ning rapidly -west, struck the car on the
tide. • A.. panic ; ensued i among the pas
sengers, but was quickly ended and ; the
passengers immediately devoted them
selves to rescuing the occupants of * the
automobile.■.-■■ :>.*r:H:'<-::>:;^:;: ' -\.
THE ONLY DEMOCRATIC DAILY NEWSPAPER OR GENERAL CIRCULATION IN THE NORTHWEST
THE ST. PAUL GLOBE
THE NEWS INDEXED
PAGE I
Taggart Indorsed for Chairman
Kaiser Cheers Up Russians
Burglar Suspects Fight Police
Welcome the Candidates
Seventeen Aro Killed in Wreck
PAGE II
Archbishop. Redwood, of New Zealand,
Speaks at Cathedral '
Salvation Army Lays Bar/ac^V ; Corner
Stone
Pardon Boar* to M^et!^^-^^ ":: ."
PAGE II!
Newo of tin Northwest ■ ■":*■.' *
SS?:-^ ; PAGE iv.,- ; :
Editorial Comment .~-C;;->.
• - : ~';- r"' • ' ■■"* * PAGE V
In the : Sporting World "c f-
PAGE VI
Fighting About Port Arthur Is Con
tinuous
Popular Wsnta
-- :«7 'page VI! v ;#|?
Financial and Commercial ?,\ „>-%,
■- : i - ' ->■ PAGE VIM ~ :.!fe«fe
■ Minneapolis -*.
Latest War New*
MONDAY MORNING, JtJLY 11, 1904
HOW FATEFUL MESSAGE WAS SENT
Telegraph Company Held Judge Parker's Telegram Until It Was Verified at Esopus
by the Nominee, Then Forwarded It to Mr. Sheehan Aftej Delay
ESOPUS, N. V., July 10.—Judgf
Parker has, not yet received the tele
gram which the St. Louis conventior
last night voted should be sent him ii
reply to his dispatch addressed to Wif
liam P. Sheehan, in which he declare*;
his allegiance to the gold standard.
While it has not reached him in anj
formal way he is acquainted with it«
wording, the text of it having beer
communicated to him at Rosemoni
last night, as soon as it had beer
adopted by the convention^ togethei
with the main facts of the battle over
the question and the details of the
vote.
It is now known that Judge Parker's
SEVENTEEN DIE IN
ERIE TRAIN WRECK
Regular Passenger Train Runs
Into Excursion Special-
Fifty Are Injured
NEW YORK .July 10.—Seventeen per
sons were killed and about fifty in
jured in a collision which occurred at
Midvale, N. J., just before noon to
day, when a regular passenger train on
the Greenwood Lake branch of the
Erie road, ran into an excursion train
which had stopped to take water.
Those killed in the accident are:
HENRY OTTERSTEDT, Hoboken.
WILLIAM WEIDEMEYER JR., Ho
boken.
WILLIAM RENZ, New York.
MRS. ANNA LEMKOHL, New York.
WILLIAM LANE, Hoboken.
HENRY DECKER, Hoboken.
WILLIAM ROHFING, Hoboken.
WILLIAM WINDERKNECHT, Ho
boken.
GEORGE S<*HEER, Hoboken.
HENRY KOCH, Hoboken.
ISADORE MANZER, Hoboken.
FRANK HOLNWEDDELL (child),
Hoboken.
GEORGE McDERMOTT, Hoboken
WILLIAM WISTOW, West Hoboken.
E. K. KELLY, Jersey City.
AGNES LEMKOHL (child), New
York.
BOY, name supposed to be Batter
son.
Towerman Caused Accident
All the dead and injured lived in
Hoboken, Jersey City and New York.
The accident is believed to have re
sulted from a towerman lowering his
signal too soon, and this was admitted
by D. W. Cooke, general passenger
agent of the Erie, who gave out a
statement in which he said:
"An excursion train, from Hoboken
to Greenwood Lake, stopped at Mid
vale for water and the operator in the
tower failed to set the block signal
against the train following. As a result
there was a rear-end collision in which
eight persons were killed and forty in
jured.
"A hospital train with doctors and
surgeons on board was immediately
sent to the scene of the accident and
rendered all possible aid."
The train which was run into was a
special carrying members of the First
Plattdestoher association, of Hoboken,
on their annual outing and had about
800 passengers aboard. In consisted
of twelve cars and two engines.
The first engine had taken water and
the train had moved up with the sec
ond engine beside the track, when the
regular train approached. The flag
man of the special train signaled the
oncoming train, but owing to a curve
in the track his signal was not seen.
It is said the engineer of the regular
train, had slackened down to twelve
miles an hour, but his engine pierced
the rear car the' greater part of its
length and drove the front end of the
Continued on Eighth Page
* ' a*' '' ' - ■'-- - --rj-- ■- nj.jj Z.-JTT!*!.. -hi _
TuJr''SM&W^^£Xf^^ ,^M^W^^o&MW^&^^^^^^^M^^^^B
i nc i rusits—oay, cant you iim.t ths4ight!ng area so as to preserve tne integrity or tne trusts
s.^Xelegram to Mr- was sent
: from the Western Union telegraph
t -office at Esopus and the story of the
t precautions taken, both to keep it se
• cret and to verify its authenticity be
l- fore it was delivered, constitute a re
markable chapter in the stery of this
r extraordinary political incident,
s Judge Parker's eoachmaj£ Robinson,
i took the original message $o the West
t Shore station at Esopus srt;ll:30 yes
-1 terday and delivered it to 'fhe Western
• Union operator there.
The message was addreesed to WU
! liatri F. Sheehan, at the Jefterson hotel.
St. Louis. Very soon after it had been
i sent the superintendent of the Western
BURGLAR SUSPECTS
EH WITH POLICE
Men Caught at Night Prowling
Give Officers Desperate
Battle
Patrolman Rafferty, of the Margaret
street station, and Special Officer Co
gin, of the Northern Pacific, had a des
perate fight at 2 o'clock yesterday
morning with three suspected bur
glars whom they discovered coming
from a rear door of the Marlowe
block, Fifth street, and Maria avenue.
The policeman -and the watchman
were walking together up Fifth street
when Rafferty saw the three men
emerge, from the rear door and com
manded them to stop. They walked
away and the officers pursued them.
The men refused to tell what they
had been doing in the building and
Rafferty decided to place them under
arrest. The men i resisted and fought
desperately with the officers. During
the fight one of the men escaped, but
the others were held and were sent to
the Margaret street^ station. They
were "Tod" Metz an<3 .George Matouse.
The man who escaped*,was said to be
a brother of "Ted3«'Me4z.
Metz was s6 severely hruised-v=and
cut about the head that the attention
of the police surgeon was necessary-
He was taken to the central station,
where his wounds were dressed. The
men are held on a charge of attempted
burglary.
The police say ift^v several occupants
of the tniilding were awakened by
noises, and that the men arrested had
been frightened away before being
able to effect an-'entrance into any of
the flats.
GONFESSKJRINiES
Colored Man Condemned to
Die Admits of Many
PITTSBURG, Pa., jfuly 10. — John
Johnson and F. Ousl^-, both colored,
will hang next Thursday for the mur
der of Grocer James Ddnnelly. John
son has confessed to four other mur
ders. He says he wa»t>©rn in Georgia,
and when about eigteteen years old
started out as a tramp.
Two of his victims "were with him
traveling in a box catE on a Virginia
railroad, and after mustering them for
the $5 in their possession he threw
their bodies from the car while the
train was going.
His other two victims suffered a like
fate on a Georgia railroad.
Convention Closes
DETROIT, Mich., Jijly 10.—A splen
did consecration in Gi'and Armory to
day, led by Rev. G. T^eist. of Chicago,
closed the fourteenth- annual conven
tion of the Baptist Young People's as
sociation. This afternoon in the ar
mory Rev. J. McNejft preached the
dedicatory service to pearly 5,000 per
sons.
Union Telegraph company .in Ne-v
York called up the Ksopus operator
and required him to personally verify
the original telegram by a visit to
Judge Parker himself. The delivery of
the message in St. Louis, it appears,
was being delayed until the authen
ticity of the dispatch could be proved
beyond question. The operator called
Judge Parker's house on the telephone
and insisted upon talking with the
judge himself.
At Judge Parker's request the oper
ator read the message to the judge, and
upon the latter's assurance that it was
all right, St. Louis received word to
deliver it to Mr. Sheehan.
PARKER AND DAVIS
ARE GIVEN OVATION
Each Candidate Receives Many
Telegrams and Messages
of Congratulation
.. IESOPUS, •N. - V., July 10.—In spitf:
of the very unusual hour at which
Judge Alton B. Parker retired this morn
ing after receipt of the news from St.
Louis, he was prompt in his departure
for church at Kingston today. He
drove with Mrs. Parker to the Episco
pal Mission Church of the Holy Cross
at Kingston, of which his son-in-law,
Rev. Charles M. Hall, is rector.
Mr. Hall has been attending the St.
Louis convention and in his absence
Rev. Dr. Edward Cooper, rector of the
Church of St. John the Divine, at Has
brouck Heights, N. J., conducted the
services. Judge Parker assisted in
taking up the collection.
The sermon included no reference to
matters civic or political. After the
service Dr. Cooper was asked if he had
Judge Parker's silence in mind in his
reference to the eloquence of life when
he said:
"It is not the eloquence in life that
speaks as loudly or counts for as
much as the life itself of a man." The
doclor' smiled, but declined to say.
Visitors Depart
Judge Parker's visitors. John D.
Mac-Donald and Judge Hatch, remained
with him until 3 a. m., receiving bulle
tins, and then departed for New York.
This afternoon the Democratic nom
inee for president spent his leisure
time seated on his veranda with a
number of friends.
Telegrams of congratulation for
Judge Parker continue to arrive.
Among those received today were the
following: - From Cord Meyer, chair
man of the Democratic state commit
tee: "After receipt of your message
to Sheehan and final action of the con
vention I hasten to congratulate you
heartily on your nomination. Ouv
work in New York is much lightened
and success assured."
From Gage E. Tarbell, president of
the Cortland County society, of New
York city: "All your Cortland county
friends rejoice with you. Heartiest
congratulations."
Victory Is Assured
From Congressman L. F. Livingston,
Atlanta, Ga.: "Accept my heartiest
congratulations on your nomination.
Now for a strong pull by a united line
and victory is assured."
From Supreme Court Justice D.
Cady Herrick, of Albany: "The honest
thing, the brave thing; party to be
congratulated."
From Arthur Pue Gorman Jr. at St.
Louis: "Maryland delegates congrat
ulate you upon your splendid victory."
From former United States Senator
George Turner, of Washington state,
at St. Louis: "Sincerest congratula-
Continued on Eighth Page
-PKICE TWO CENTS ?? v l riF NT *
INDORSE TAGGART
TO RUN CAMPAIGN
INDIANA MAN MAY BE NA
TIONAL CHAIRMAN
Committee Refuses to Make Selec
tion Until Judge Parker Is Consult
ed, but the Hoosier Is the Choice
of the Members—Chairman Will
Be Named at Meeting to Be Held
In New York
FOREIGNERS ADMIRE PARKER'S DEED
LONDON, July 10.—Among the comments by the press on the nomina
t.on of Parker there is all the way through a note of- admiration for his j
attitude. The Standard says:
"Judge Parker's message to Sheehan is a deed which will give Parker a '
place in history. Conceivably, it may send him to the White house, but it '
will certainly make him a force to be reckoned with in American politics <
for some time to come." <
The Times says:
"By a single act of that courage which is so often the result of political
wisdom, Parker has placed himself among the most striking individualities '
in the public life of the United States."
Special to The "Globe
ST. LOUIS, Mo., July 1O. —Thomas Taggart, of Indiana,
today was indorsed by the Democratic national committee
for chairman of that body.
The indorsement -was a compromise between the Parker
forces andthe ultra-Taggart men. The supporters of the In
diana man insisted upon his election at today's meeting, but
the friends of the. presidential nominee refused to agree to
his selection until after a conference with Judge Parker.
As a compromise measure, it was decided to give Tag
gart the commrttee's~mdorsement, and t*hen if his selection
is agreeable to Judge Parker, to elect him to the chairmanship
of the national committee, at a meeting to be held in New,
York at the call of Chairman Jones,, of the old committee.
HOLDS MORNING SESSION
The national committee, now in its makeup, met at 2:30
o'clock this morning and again at 4 o'clock this afternoon
with the avowed intention on behalf of the supporters of
Taggart, of Indiana, of organizing by electing him chairman.
The early morning meeting was not fully attended, and
the object aimed at was not accomplished. It was pointed
out by Mr. Mack, of New York, that it would be discourteous
to take any action until Mr. Parker, as the candidate, was
consulted.
The Taggart men, while not having enough to elect, still
suggested that Mr. Hill, Mr. Sheehan and Mr. Belmont, the
candidate's friends, were still here and adopted a resolution
that they be invited to meet the committee this afternoon.
ACTION IS BLOCKED
When afternoon came there were three new complica
tions in the way of electing. Chairman Jones, of the old com
mittee, boldly asserted that such action as contemplated
would be unprecedented, and, in fact, illegal. It also turned
out that at a late hour the convention adopted a resolution
authorizing Chairman Jones, of the old committee, to call the
new committee .together in New York city air such time as he
might suggest.
Then the other thing was that Senator Hill and Mr. Shee
han left for New York at noon and could not therefore attend
the meeting.
Senator Jemes K. Jones, the retiring chairman of the na
tional committee, made this statement: ,
"The national convention by specific resolution adopted
last night, authorized me, in fact, instructed me, to call the
first meeting of the new committee in New York city. Until
I call it the new committee cannot organize and meetings
they have are unauthorized. Now, let me say, forcibly, if
need be, that acting under the convention authority I call the '
national committee to meet in New York city at such time
as Judge Parker shall designate, for before I call it I shall
consult him. It would be an unprecedented thing for the
new committee to organize without consultation with the
candidate. Such a tiling was never heard of."
Just after the afternoon session began, Mr. Taggart, who
Continued on Eighth Page
HONOR TO CERVERA
Spanish Admiral's Kindness to
Americans Recognized
MEDINA-SIDONIA, Spain, July 10.
—As a demonstration of gratitude re
garding his conduct at Santiago ani
care of American sailors, Admiral
Cervera was presented here with an
engrossed message bearing the sig
natures of a" number of well known
Americans^ besides letters from the
subscribers, bound in a volume. The
presentation was made by Mr. Bird,
of Vienna, in behalf of his fellow
Americans.
The admiral, in returning thanks for J
this manifestation of American goocl
will, said that Ws conduct toward
Lieut. Hobson and the American sail
ors after the sinking of the Merriinac
had been inspired by sjiperior orders.
Admiral Cervera had repeatedly re
fused to permit his American admirers
to so honor him, but notwithstanding J
these refusals the plan to make the
presentation was carried out.
Spanish General Dies
MADRID, July 10.—Gen. Torn), who
commanded the Spanish garrison at
Santiago when that place surrendered
to the United States forces, died today
at an asylum for the insane near her?.
The general became insane brooding
over his capitulation.
READ THE GLOBE
THE ONLY LIVE NEWSPAPi*
IN ST. PAIR
GIRL DIES IN STORM
Wind and Rain Work Destruc
tion in Pennsylvania
PUNXSUTAWNEY, Pa., July 10.—
Death and destruction of property fol-*
lowed in the train of a terrific storm
that visited Punxsutawney and adjacent
region west of here yesterday and last
night.
The dead:
NETTIE DIB.EL.PISS, ten years old,
daughter of Robert Dibelblss, of Wal
ston.
Nettie Dibelbiss was one of thr^e
girls who tried to cross Sawmill run,
which had been swollen to a river.
The girl was caught in the current and
swept away from her companions, who
gave the alarm. Hundreds of people
living in the neighborhood of "Walston.
joined in the search for the child's
body, which was found five hours later.
It had been carried down the stream a
quarter of a mile by the swift cur
rent.
The losses from the storm are enor
mous. The damage suffered by farm
el's will amount to thousands of dol
lars. Bridget were carried away, ila
honing creek overflowed its banks for
several miles above and below ihla
place and the water vese in three hours
to a point almost touching high water
mark.

xml | txt