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The Saint Paul globe. (St. Paul, Minn.) 1896-1905, November 13, 1904, Image 13

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THE WEATHER
For St. Paul and Vicinity—Fair.
Minnesota — Fair Sunday and Mon
day; northwest winds.
VOL. XXVII— NO. 318
The Globe Special Train to the Governor's Reception
AT ST. PETER TOMORROW EVENING WILL CARRY A DISTINGUISHED DELEGATION OF ST, PAUL CITIZENS
The Minnesota State Band Will Furnish Music I?'™^™^™^^^^^^
»i. rAULb DEMOCRACY SHOULD HEAD THfc LIST AND PROCESSION == THE GLOBE
SPECIAL will leave the Union Station on the NorthWestern Line at 4 o'clock Monday afternoon, arrive St. Peter at 6:15; returning will leave St. Peter at 9:30, arriving home at 11:45.
A Rate Of $1.50 HaS Been Made fOr the Trip On the Special Tlckete may b 3 had this forenoon or after 8 o'clock tomorrow morning at The
>f X v Globe Counting Room or at.the City Ticket Office of the North-Western Line
KUROKI IS KILLED
BY SHELL SPLINTER
GREAT JAPANESE GEN
ERAL DIES OCT. 4
Only Now Is the Report of This Loss
to the Mikado's Arms Confirmed —
Japanese Finally Capture the Last
of an Important Chain of Redoubts
at Port Arthur --- Fierce Mastiffs
Chase and Devour Deserters in
Russian Poland
MOSCOW, Nov. 13.—Nemirovieh Danchenko, a Russian
•war correspondent, telegraphing from Mukden under today's
elate, says the reports of the death of Gen. Kuroki are confirm
ed. According to his version a splinter of a shell struck Gen.
Kuroki, tearing off a portion of his breast and abdomen. He
died on Oct. 4 at Liau-yang and his body was sent to Japan.
A rumor is persistently circulated that a kinsman of the
mikado, Sioosanai, literally "Little Third Prince," has been
appointed to succeed Gen. Kuroki, but the actual command of
the army has been intrusted to Gen. Nodzu, who is reviewing
operations.
NO ARMISTICE
Special Cable to The Globe
TOKYO, Nov. 12.-^—Reports from the third army, made
public tonight, show that rumors of an armistice were un
true, but that, on the contrary, the Japanese forces in front of
Port Arthur have been fighting desperately since Wednesday
to take the last line of redoubts on Etsze mountain to the west
of Port Arthur and on Quail hill, which overlooks the center
of the towti. There was fighting continuously Wednesday
end Thursday nights and on Friday morning before dawn
the Japanese infantry finally took possession of the last of the
Etsze redoubts. Siege guns were brought up in the after
noon, despite a severe artillery fire from forts across the
harbor and those at White Wolfe and Golden hill. Fierce
fighting raged all day Saturday.
DOGS EAT DESERTERS
Special Cable to The Globe
VIENNA, Nov. 12.—Napzrod, of Cracow, gives harrowing
details of means employed by Russian authorities to capture
deserters on the Austro-Russian frontier. When a few days
ago about sixty soldiers deserted from Zeltow, police sur
rounded them in a forest and set scores of ferocious mastiffs
on their trail. Many of the deserters were bitten by the dogs,
which had been left purposely without food for several days,
and a few were eaten by the animals. Notwithstanding the
adoption of such ferocious measures, desertions are becom
ing more numerous every day and the primate of Zeltow is
authority for the statement that from Russian Poland alone
desertions have amounted so far to 60,000.
STILL NO ADVANCE
MOSCOW, Nov. 12—"For the last
week," saiys Danchenko, a Russian
war correspondent, telegraphing from
Mukden today, "we have not advanced
at any point on the southwest front,
even a few versts farther than we
Etood on Oct. 5. On the contrary, at
several places we have been obliged
to retire several versts, but the pres
ent lines of defenses must be consid
ered permanent in view of -the strong
€> . j
r
FIRST SECTION
PAGES 1, 2, 3, 4—Comics
SECOND SECTION
PAGE s—Latest in Hats and Gowns
PAGE 6—The Spectrophone
PAGE 7—"The Gates of Chance"
PAGE B—Page for Young Girls
PAGE 9—What Women Did in Presi
dential Campaign
PAGE 10—General Baden-Powell as
Sculptor
PAGE 11—The Man Who Found Him
self
PAGE 12—Girls' and Boys' Page
THIRD SECTION
PAGE 13—Minnesota Defeats Wiscon
sin
Gen. Kuroki Killed
PAGE 14—Local News in Brief
PApE 15—Conditions Please Labor
Commissioner
T. D. O'Brien Defeated by Hallam
PAGE 16—Johnson Names F. A. Day as
Private Secretary
Democrats All Going to St. Peter
PAGE 17—Minneapolis Matters
Mews of the Railroads
THE ONLY DEMOCRATIC DAILY NEWSPAPER OF GINERAL CIRCULATION IN THE NORTHWEST
THE ST. PAUL GLOBE
fortifications constructed. The Japa
nese position at several points are only
800 paces distant from ours and must
be considered to be definitely occupied
by the enemy. The latter's fortifica
tions are acknowledged by all com
petent persons to be skillfully con
structed. Their trenches in many
places are so cleverly concealed as not
Continued on Twenty-fifth Page
THIRD SECTION
PAGE 18—In the World of Sport
PAGE 19—Sporting News
PAGE 20—Twin City Day at Fair
PAGE 21—News of the Northwest
The Globe Juniors' Prize Stories
PAGE 22—Doings in Society
PAGE 23—Suburban Social
PAGE 24 —Music and Musicians
PAGE 26—Business Announcements
PAGE 27—Commercial and Financial
PAGE 28—Business Announcements
FOURTH SECTION
PAGE 29—Advertisement
PAGE 30—The Geisha Girls
PAGE 31—Report of Chief Engineer,
U. S. A.
PAGE 32—Editorial Comment
PAGE 33—New Books
PAGES 34, 35—Dramatic
PAGE 36—Tipping is Greatest Graft
PAGE 37—Young Rockefeller Draws a
Moral
PAGE 38—Tales That Are Told
PAGE 39—Globe's Paying Want*
PAGE 40—St. Paul Women Describe
Their First Votes
How Prisoners Pass Time in St. Paul
Jail
SUNDAY MORNING. NOVEMBER 13, 1904-FORTY PAGES
~^^^w^^ fc w/^^^^^M_ \\ "^ **% f m #
REV. DAVID MORGAN STARTS CRUSADE
AGAINST SATURDAY NIGHT DANCES
Accompanied by Policeman in Plain Clothes the Minister Makes Tour of Hajis
of the City—Crusaders Are Ejected From Vasa Hall—He Declares
Conditions That Should Mot Be Allowed to Exist
Were Found at Twin City Hall
Rev. David Morgan is after the
dance hallp.
In company with Officer Paulson, of
the central station detail, he last even
ing made a round of the halls where
Saturday night dances are given.
What the minister saw will be in
cluded in a reporf> which it is under
stood he is to make to the police com
mission or to "the city council in the
near future.
Mr. Morgan, it Is said, intends to
have introduced an ordinance regu
lating the dance halls of the city that
make a specialty of Saturday night
dances, and last night took the first
step in securing evidence to be used
as arguments in support of his demand
for the passage of such a measure.
Mr. Morgan planned to secure his
material in a quiet and secret manner,
and yesterday afternoon visited Chief
of Police O'Connor and requested the
services of an officer in plain clothes
to accompany him on his tour.
Ordered Out of Hall
But the secrecy of the move went
to the winds at Vasa hall, where Mr.
Morgan was known to some of the
dancers. He was told that he had
forced himself into a private party
TRAIN WRECK FATAL
Nine Persons Are Killed in
Wyoming Collision
SALT LAKE CITY, Nov. 12.—Nine
persons were killed and ten* or fifteen
Injured, two seriously, in a head-on
collision today between a Union Pa
cific west-bound passenger train and
an east-bound extra freight west of
Azuas, Wyo. The dead:
WILLIAM MURRAY, engineer.
B. S. ECKL.ES, engineer.
H. M. SHERMAN, maii clerk.
SAM EFFERSON, car inspector.
JACK STAGG, fireman.
WILL COMSTOCK, fireman.
Two passengers in day coach.
John B. Winslow, of Eva us ton. Pa
cific Express messenger, was fatally
injured. Frank Nolan, of Cheyenne,
mail clerk, was injured and may not
recover. Three passengers in the day
coach were injured, but not seriously,
Both trains were going at a high rate
of speed and were derailed, going over
an embankment ten feet high and the
mail and baggage car* were telescoped.
CERTAINLY, DELIGHTED
and that his presence was not desira
ble and that "the sooner he left the
better." In company with Patrolman
Paulson Mr. Morgan took his depart
ure, and within an hour it was gener
ally known about the dance halls that
he was making a roundup that might
bring forth revelations.
The start was made quite early, and
the arrival at some of the halls was
at an hour when there was little doing,
but at some of the down town places
Mr. Morgan reports that he found a
condition that should not he allowed to
exist. This referred particularly to
Twin City hall. Rice and University,
where happenings are reported to have
been found almost as bad as it was
possible to imagine. #
"Having heard so much of the dance
halls, I determined to see for myself."
said Mr. Morgan, after he had finished
the round, "and in company with Pa
trolman Paulson, I made the rounds
to find out. if possible, the exact condi
tions. The reports of the Vasa hall in
cident have evidently been enlarged,
as nothing of Importance happened
during the evening of a personal char
acter. At Harbeck'« hall, on Rice street,
we found that wine rooms are main
tained in the saloon under 'the hall,
and that men and women were being
served. It was early and none of the
DULUTH PLANT GOES
Fire Inflicts Damage of Over
$100,000
DULUTH, Minn.. Nov. 12.—1n a flre
this afternoon the Pearson Boat Con
struction company's plant, located on
the bay front, was completely destroy
ed and six families rendered homeless.
The loss is $120,000, with insurance of
170,000.
y; The fire originated in a : small store
room in " y the upholstering department
and iin five : minutes the building was a
r—Hutu r**-y~» -;-| "— —<-Vi«»»c^;~ ■»«£►—
mass of flames. With the exception of
a r spasmodic f stream ? from, a small tug,
not a drop ?of ? water was thrown for
three hours, while an 1: entire block of
buildings was ; swept away. Two hun
■ dred feet distant : stood the canal ferry
bridge. 135 feet high and weighing 700
tons, supported on wooden « falsework.
a time the flames threatened to
born the falsework and precipitate the
bridge into the canal.
dancers were intoxicated when I was
there.
"But as much could not be said of
Twin City hall. There we found a num
ber of men who were under the in
fluence of liquor, some of them dancing
with girls of tender years. The. evils
of the Saturday night dance were here
portrayed in their worst.light. It being
evident that those present had ap
parently come out to drink beer and
dance and dance and drink beer. There
was a constant stream going up and
down the stairs and to the nearby sa
loons.
"We Intended Investigating a num
ber of other halls*, but found several
of them closed. They will be looked
after later. It apparently happened
that there were fewer dances than is
usually the case, but the work will be
continued until we find some means of
regulating such places. At several
places we found respectable dances—
at least they had the appearance of re
spectability."
Besides the halls mentioned those on
Mr. Morgan's list were Pfeifer's hall.
Ninth and Wabasha; Sherman hall.
Sixth arid Wabasha; Tschlda hall, La
fond and Arundel: Kreening's hall,
Grotto and- Edmund; Martin's hall.
South Wabasha and Colorado, and
Metropolitan hall. Fifth street.
ISLURED FROM HOME
Business Man Is Sandbagged
and Nearly X lied
EAST HAVEN, Conn., Nov. 12.—Ly
ing bound and gagged in an uncon
scious condition on the tracks of the
Consolidated Railway company, Henry
Curtlsa, president of the Connecticut
Tidewater Trap Rock company, es
caped instant death tonight by the
quick stopping of the car, which was
running slowly.
Mr. Curtlss was lured from his home
by a fake telegram purporting to come
from* one of the officials of the com
pany, making an appointment for 10
o'clock at the office of the company,
and was sandbagged while en route.
He was robbed of about $100 which he
had In his overcoat pocket- The office
of the Connecticut Tidewater Trap
Rock company was burned to the
ground about an hour befort Curtiss
was found. As a result of the blow
on the head Curtiss is now in a dan
gerous condition.
MINNESOTA EQUALS
MICHIGAN'S SCORE
WISCONSIN OUTCLASSED
FROM START TO FINISH
Badgers Put Up Plucky Fight
Against Overwhelming Odds, While
Gophers Score Five Touchdowns-
Ball Is Taken Over Visitors' Goal
Line After Three Minutes Play and
Thereafter Outcome Is Certain-
Real Victory Came When Last Point
Was Made Putting Varsity on
Equal Standing With Yost's Men
YESTERDAYS FOOTBALL SCORES "-: ; '• •': •:
west - ;
Minnesota *.. .....28-—Wisconsin.V':'; 1;.^.:.'.-. .' :0 !
;. Michigan r. ;; ................ 22 Chicago ...... /;:. ..r.r.r. .f ??. V 12 '^
Northwestern.;..--.:..r.t.■;..'.l" 12 Illinois .;..;...Vv;....;.-. V:fs O'*
v HaskeH r Indians ;.:.T?^.tV.%K;..■ 14 Nebraska... - v-r * \)\ ;; J 2 <
Purdue ..:....".VTJ;i".^.::::..:27^i^dlana^vfC: ■:Vr:/i:ii?^':';^o !
* Kansas ............%..;./.;..: 12 Washington i;-.. " "o^^
t Stanford.\;:-._;-.:V.tv.:,.T:....:: 18 California Vis.?~iv. C s;'.?;f!: ""' 0; i
v St. Louis :• •:• v- v• ••••:• '•; ■• •.• 17 Missouri :.. /.! . \\.^ ... ; o^"';
O^on 18 Washington O '<
EAST J
_ Yale --Ar•;••:"• •"• -^.^: ;V* r. 12 Princeton .v.-.vl:.;; ; ■;.^ -- 2 <
Pennsylvania .... .C v......;...' 1«—-Carlisle?:r.H^V^rr^^r^^o^ «
Columbia. :..;.;;...^.... ; ;i2^^C0i^!1^.\'..=:........-./ 6 )
_v; Harvard :v.^..;;..;..V;i;;V2B^^Ho:y Cross^^V.Vrv:;::;' ''^5- «
' .West Pofnt^TV;.; \ .K..:4lh^NeW.Y(^^H^;v; i - 0 :<
*»vy ;; .v.. „......-........ ::■;. 5--rVirgFn1a.::^;;....;......;. > ©'<
\\ Georgetown >..:.*;. '. :r?;::vii 12 Bucknei! ...'..^ .v: .:■;i.'.Vf^Sb^
Dartmouth ..;...:;.;..;:;. 115 V— Amherst i^rir.Y: ..'.' r 4 v^
t;Syracuse;...^.^..;V;^^^7^Vi3q^LchlghT......;.:. "'"r:^* 4 <
"8r0wn...;:.... \...J.V.:. .rf~..41-^^Colby;;: ?"; *" v *^ '"^'^ 0 V
Sometimes slow, then fast, but al
ways doggedly relentless, Minnesota
yesterday ground down Wisconsin In
a grueling game and achieved the un
hoped for triumph by equaling Michi
gan's score of 28 to 0. From whistle
to whistle Wisconsin was outclassed in
every department of the game, but bat
tered, bruised and torn as they were,
the Badgers never lost heart and never
faltered. Each rush by Minnesota was
met by a desperate if futile resistance,
and while the crimson now flies be
neath the maroon and gold it is not for
a lack of courage.
It took Minnesota three minutes to
score the first touchdown and In these
three minutes were crowded the pent-
Mp hopes and aspirations of the Min
nesota followers for three" long months.
Minnesota rushed Wisconsin off the!*
feet, threw them aside, hurdled and
plunged while 17.000 rooters, frantic
with glee, yelled them on. Before Wis
consin warmed to the game. Kremer
had crossed the line for the first touch
down.
.Wisconsin rallied for a time and
fought Minnesota hard, but they had
the losing end and they knew they
were but delaying the outcome.
Around the gridiron the multi-colored
wall of humanity roared deep and long,
but it was obvious to all that Wiscon
sin was beaten, although the struggle
would be bitter to the end.
With victory almost certain, the
burning desire that has lain in the
heart of every Minnesota supporter
THINGS GO WRONG WITH
AMERICAN DUCHESS
Duke and Duchess of Manchester Have
Hard Financial Sledding Again
LONDON, Nov. * 12.—The financial
affairs; of the . young Duke and ; Duchess
of 'Manchester are again in bad shape.
Before sailing for America this week
the duEe consented to a judgment for
: $10,000 being entered against him by
i London i money lenders. Wilton &.f Co.
In King's court. Dublin, today the
t duchess was^ue<l personally by three
workmen andjudgmenta were returned
for SI.SoO.
THIRD SECTION
PAGES 13 to 2 8
PRICE FIVE CENTS,
that Michigan's score be equaled, burst
forth, the coals that have been smold
ering since last year flared up, fanned
by every Minnesota gain, until the cry
from all sides was "hurry, hurry, hur-
They begged, pleaded, demanded
and then begged again, and the Minne
sota eleven never slowed up until the
goal was kicked that made the score 28.
Climax of the Game
This was the grand climax of the
game, and the victory over Wisconsin
was forgotten in the exuberance of
having achieved the figure which as
tounded the football world when reach
ed by Yost's eleven. The grand stands
packed to the railing, the bleachers
black with those who looked on stand
ing and the dense throng surged around
the fence Inclosing the gridiron united
in one grand cheer of victory when the
bail sailed between the goal posts after
the fifth touchdown. Reserve and ac
quired demeanor were cast to the winds
and every Minnesotan, man and wom
an, Joined in the mighty shout, a hoarse
raucous, but gladsome paean. Hats,
banners, cushions, megaphones, every
thing that was loose was tossed high
into the air. Stranger smote stranger
on the back and thought nothing of it,
the common bond of a fervent hop*
fulfilled knit them close together. Into
this deafening dlscorO, crept the strains
of "Hot Time" from the Minnesota
band and the Badger musician? joined
in. with as much will as if their team
had been triumphant.
Continued on Eighteenth Page
BELIEVE IN WIPING OUT
THE HUMAN RACE
Members of »n Extraordinary Society
Arw Convicted
RIAZAN, Russia, Nov. 12.—Eighty
three peasant* of all ages and sexes
have been tried here for belonging to
the Skoptsi sect, the main tenet of
which is the extinction of the human
race. The result of the trial, which
took place behind closed doors, was
that the jury acquitted eighteen minors
and the remainder of the accused were
sentenced to the loss of civil rights and
to be exiled.

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