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The Sedalia weekly bazoo. (Sedalia, Mo.) 187?-1904, July 15, 1884, Image 6

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THE SEDALIA WEEKLY BAZOO, TUESDAY, JULY 15, 1881.
CLEVELAND CONQUERS.
He is Nominated qel the Sec
ond Ballot by an Over
whelming Majority.
v n-gated in the north end of he chamber
The chair rapped splinters off his table in
an effort to curb the demonstration,
but he might as well have attempted to
stop
AN ERUPTION OF "VESUVIUS.
with the top of a tack hammer. Bo far
Hendricks Secures the Second
Place by a Unanimous
Vote.
Full Report of Yesterday's
Proceedings Wild
Enthusiasm.
The Triumph of the Ticket
Pretty Generally Conceded.
GROVER CLEVELAND
The Democracy's Choice.
HmhSLav ssflflflflflpSMBslB
BENJ. F. BUTLER.
On the Streets.
Chicago, July 11. It is understood this
morning that Randall will withdraw and
permit the vote of Pennsylvania to be cast
for Cleveland. This gives great hopes to
tee mends ot that candidate, that he will
fee nominated on the second ballot. On
the other hand, the opposition under the
lead of Butler and Keliy will make an
effort to prevent an increase of Cleveland's
strength on the second ballot in the belief
that it will then be possible to turn the
tide to some other candidate, possibly to
the representative of the old ticket, Mr.
Hendricks.
Hon. Patrick Walsh, expresses the opin
ion to the associated press that Cleveland
will be nominated on the first ballot this
morning, the second ballot of the call.
PROPHETS SPEAK.
The following telegram has been sent to
the democracy of Cuyahoga county :
We, the undersigned, your representa
tive in the national convention, familiar
with the entire situation, are satisfied that
neither judge Thurman nor Mr. Hoadley
can be nominated ; that Thurman's name
is suggested simply 4 by Tammany and
other interests opposed to Cleveland, and
we believe that Cleveland will most likely
be nomiaated,
W. W. .Armstrong,
Jacob Mueller,
J. H, Parley.
THE CONVENTION
was called to order at 11 o'clock and pray
er was offered by Dr, Clinton Locke, of
Grace church, Chicago
He prayed that the consultation of the
"body he for the furtherance of just and
equal laws, for the presentation of liberty,
for the punishment of wrong doers and
praise worthy of those who do well. That
every delegate should be kept from being
guided by his otto selfish gain, by his own
pride or his own likings or dislikings. He
prayed that in the great and noble contest
which was opening before the American
people there would be a cessation from
strife and anger, that men's eyes should
not be blinded to that which is fair and
just. That all
CORRUPTION, BRIRERY AND ILLEGAL
VOTING
be kept far away and that after the election
the whole people may unite in their sup
port of the president.
THE CHAIRMAN
eaid he had received among other letters
and telegrams from all parts of the coun
try, one from Mr. Goodwin, of Massachu
setts, with the presentation of a gavel made
up from woods and relics from different
parts of the world. A delegate from Penn
sylvania, moved that the convention now
proceed to business.
A second ballot was then ordered. Mr.
Snowden, of Pennsylvania, with thanks to
those who had voted for Samuel J. Ran
dall, withdrew that gentleman's name.
THE SECOND BALLOT
was commenced at 11:20 with the following
results :
Alabama Bayard, 14, (cheers); Mq
Donald, 1 ; Cleveland, 5.
Arkansas Cleveland, 14. (Cheers.)
California Thurman, 16.
Colorado Cleveland, 6.
Connecticut Cleveland, 12.
Delaware Bayard, 6.
Florida Cleveland, 6 ; Bayard, 2.
Georgia Cleveland, 14 ; Bayard, 10.
Illinois Hendricks (Here there sud
denly broke out a
SCENE OF WILD ENTHUSIASTIC
cheering and waving of hats, fans and
handkerchiefs.
General Palmer arose to announce the
vote and said, "niinois casts one vote for
Thomas A. Hendricks," and then paused
as if wating for the outcome of some pre
concerted arrangement. He cast his eyes
towardB the Missouri delegation and ap
parently in response Gen. Mansur, of Mis
souri, jumped up and
EMITTED A TERRIFIC YELL.
This was immediately taken up by the
audience and a tremendous howl arose
from all parts of the hall. South of the
space allotted to the delegates the excite
ment and noise swept gradually around
among the audience in the rear of the dele
gates and 'rolled in a tremendous wave
through the vast masses of spectators! con-
the excitement had been confined to the
audience with the exception of a few en
thusiastic delegates, who, remaining in
their seats, waved their fans and handker
chiefs. At length a little ct.mmotion was
visible in the New York delegation, and
the grim v'sage of the grand sachem of
Tammany was seen slowly rising out of
the confusion, like the light on a dark
night.
r, kelly's mouth was as wide open
as the large orifice of a pound net, but
whatever individual noise was being emit
ted by that gentleman was drowned in the
friehtful uproar which took possession of
the hall. Mr. Kelly's arising appeared to
be the signal for a general demonstration
. . ... . it r
on the part ol the anu-ieveiana men oi
the convention. Delegates from all parts
of the space within the railing sprang up
on their chairs and raised a yell of such
intensity that the putty dropped out of
the immense sashes which composed the
roof of the hall. Prominent among the
members ot the body who assisted in cre
ating this section of bedlam were the dele
gates from Indiana, Missouri, Wisconsin.
Pennsylvania and the Tammany end of
the "New York delegation.
In the midst oi the turmoil the band
struck up
HAIL TO THE CHIEF
and the thundering noise of the demonstra
tion raised in a volume until the strains
of music were lost in the deafening uproar.
One enthusiastic delegate from Indiana.
Mr. Gibson, seized the Indiana marker and
bore it to the chairman's desk. He pass
ed up the aisle and shouted something in
to the chairman's ear. The chair, how
ever, refused to listen, but continued to
thump the desk with his gavel and Mr.
Gibson retired with a half uttered anath
ema on
THE INFERNAL IDIOCY.
of anybody who would attempt to contro
vert so evident an indication of popularity.
In the mean time the audience and dele
gates vied with each other in producing
ear-splitting noises which drowned out
the voices ot two or three aozen Cleveland
men who were endeavoring to gain the ear
of the chair, with all this turmoil about
him. Governor Hendricks presented an
external calm which contrasted strangely
with the frenz- which possessed the vast
assemblage. He sat as if frozen fast to his
chair and resisted the determined efforts
of
A HORD OF HOWLING DELEGATES
Hendtick. The deafening uproar had now
usurped the rights oi all other business for
a period of eighteen minutes which was go
ing one minute longer than the Blaine dem
onstration in the republican convention a
month ago. The erect form of
THE
"TALL SYCAMORE OF THE WABASH"
was called for and the chairman announced
for Cleveland 42.
ANOTHER NOISY DEMONSTRATION
announce-
the eastern marching organizations taking
tneir departure.
The "Americans" and Randall clubs of
Philadelphia, paraded the streets before
taking their leave, bearing in additton to
their club banners, one inscribed with the
name of Cleveland.
Daniel Voorhees appeared at the side of
the chairman and the noise and excite
ment generally died, and finally Mr. Voor
hees voice was heard calling " Mr. Chair
man." Ths Chairman said, " Gentlemen
of the convention take your seats, the gen
tleman from Indiania has the floor." Mr.
Voorhees then spoke as follows :
GENTLEMEN OF THE CONVENTION,
I understand there is a roll call of the
states in progress at this time, I am re
minded by the Chair that nominations are
not now in order. I stand before you, how- votes from Bayard to Cleveland amid great
ever, at the unanimous request ol the de- excitement and cneenng.
legation of which I am a member, to with
draw the name of J. E. McDonald, here
a wild burst of applause interrupted the
l . a
speaserj lor the purpose at the proper
time for casting the vote of Indiania for
Thos. A. Hendricks, renewed and tremen
dous applause.
At length the rest of the vote of Illinois
was announced.
Illinois (continued) Cleveland, 38.
"Now whr thf nnnnrlnnifv fnr thf fripnrln
nf thp New York nan rfidatP nd tW hng for recognition
availed themselves of it, the delegation ?!ori4a changed her vote as
from that state rising to their feet and
cheering lustily, while the audience waved
fans, hats and handkerchiefs. The spec
talors took part in the demonstation, but
not to the same extent as in the case of
Hendricks.
THE TAMMANY BRAVES,
which interrupted the further
ment of the Pennsylvania vote.
Hendricks, 11
Randall 4
tu.. '. i six hundred strong, took a special at o p. m.
Jk UUI LLIHU, ...... ......... ......... ...... ......... J. I r. I
. ' . . ... I Knmo moTnrmro man K r 1 1
Illinois corrected its votes as follows : 7 - r . wr w,uru,c jwuiany,
RmwlriMra i DUl 1D ine mam ine crowd showed a bitter-
................... .................. I r T - J Z .1 . 1 .
Ravai-d iJ UCM UA P"it uu some oi me marchers dis-
MvTrw-u s played bits of crape in their button holes.
PiotroTond I think the democratic party has committed
w.v .vtuw . ....................................... sw I 1 1 T . ,j .
K annan phman hpr xrntA aa fnllnwc- V
t,i " o oeverai abseiuons are reported as
untdlU, M f TU TT11 t a. 1 , , ,
io uoujiuK irum iiuuu jvejiy. oui ne aeciarea
LICjeiBUU, ID ... - t J - ' r ..i
Thurman 2 P3Uive1 UB.uau oi conversed wim anj
A"VVrriulT'kVVlirU newspaper men and that he has not ex-
not responsible for any statements comine
t 1 T 1 i r V
-tr- - u a u- fnt- . I iruui iuc lauiuinuy weiuuera wno may ieei
Cleveland .. 23 that y have encoanter(i a poisonous de-
- - I foot
Hendricks, 1 v
Cleveland, 22 ew f
Bayard,.. 2 derate i
CLEVELAND WAS NOMINATED ON THE SEC
OND BALLOT.
At this time all the delegates were on
their feet and many of them were clamor-
Mr. Manning and the majority of the
delegation are exuberant but
in their speech. Air. Manning
savs
CLEVELAND WILL SURELY CARRY NEW
YORK.
by majorities but we shall carry New York
beyond anjr doubt. If the other demo
cratic states do their duty Mr. Cleveland
will occupy the white house alter next
March. The party at large in the state
will give him as earnest a support as it
did Mr. Tilden. I am safe in promising
victory in jew xorsc state, mere were
Mann of Illinois hoped that the declina
tion would not be received. He paid a
high compliment to Gen. Black, saying
that when the surgeon was operating on
his arm after & battle he declared that al
though he lo'st an arm his whole body was
firm and true for the union and firm and
true for the democracy. He was
without exception the mo'st gallant son
that Illinois possessed.
follows :
Cleveland, 3
West Virginia changed as follows :
Cleveland, 10
Maryland changed her sixteen votes to
Cleveland. The changes were so numerous orast nrnwd nniidp iTip rnnnfinn Til! tn
After awhile the band joined auu aotapauu wim au muuu upruw uu
keep track of them.
The Missouri delegation announced a
change of thirtv-two votes solid for Cleve
land. This set on the enthusiasm
again.
Joseph e. Mcdonald.
who tried to drag him to his feet. A num
ber of the Tammanyites resumed their
seats but Senator Grady danced about on
his chair violently waving a newspaper
and opening his mouth such a width that
it seemed as if it could of itself take in
and dispose of every Cleveland mac in the
New York delegation. A good old soul
in the last gallery while engaged in flour
ishing a gingham umbrella dropped the
weapon which floated down like a para-
shute and
ALIGHTED ON THE BALD HEAD
of a yenerable delegate from Ohio, flags,
handkerchiefs, fans, coats, hats and shawls
were brought into use by the Hendricks
men in the audience, and a view of the au
dience was like that of an Illinois brush
patch torn by a violent gale. All at once
out of the terrific uproar came a blast like
he blast of a
FOGHORN
in agony and Mr. Beck, of Indiana, mate
rialized with a call for three cheers for
Thomas A. Hendricks. The cheers were
given with an almost venomous good will
and were supplemented by a good old
southern yell for Hendricks from General
Mansur, of Missouri, having given vent to
his exuberent feelings. Gen. Mansur forc
ed his way throueh the crowd in the
aisle and climbed up to the chairman
Vilas position with a statement that Mis
souri wished to cast its vote solid for Hen
dricks, but the chair with a few vigorous
thumps of the gavel, which began to look
worn and frayed at the edge, informed the
Missouri man that he was out of order.
OUT OF THE CONFUSION ROSE THE CLAIRON
VOICE
of Secretary Tom Bell repeating the call
for the vote of Illinois, but neither from
Illinois nor any other commonwealth
came an audible response, except yells for
with the air
''WE'LL XOT GO HOME TILL MORNING."
which seemed to stimulate enthusiasm.
The scene lasted three or four minutes.
Illinois continued Bayard 4: McDon- The cheerinz wasdeafenine and
aia i. Illinois cast one vote less than the and an anchor of flowers
r..n i I . .
jLnuiana nenancKS, ou. j . 0mwi QO r.',W,n nvnM1.
Iowa-Oleyeland, 22; Hendricks 4. Lio The band struck up more patriotic
i i t a. a i n l i i
At ims tKjint me jrennsvivania aeipca- i : j a j u . . j
, , . - I ana suu UBin auu uauucia nexe itatcu auu
uon asKea leave io ua anttarnant a;naA fa nn;nf tonco
the Cleveland vote had nearly reached the
necessary two-thirds at this junction.
When the success of Cleveland was ertain
some of the minority delegates left the hall.
Outside
THE ARTILLERY BEGAN TO BOOM.
and inside the uproar was tremendous.
The change of California was announced
as, for Cleveland 8: Thurman 8.
Mr. Menzies. of Indiana, changed the
vote of that state to Cleveland and moved
that the vole be made unanimous.
Illinois changed hei vote of 44 to Cleve
land.
.
SAMUEL J. BAND ALL.
of
Punlow, of Kansas, presented the name
GEO. w. glice:
the-the
HENRY B. PAYNE.
JOHN G. CARLISLE.
Bayard 1.
The chairman stated he would rule out
of order the motion to make the vote unan
imous until after the result was annouced.
California again changed her vote to 16
(solid) for Cleveland.
South Carolina changed, tor Cleveland 10
Bavard 8.
Texas gave her whole 26 votes for Cleve-
and.
Ohio changed her vote as follows for
Cleveland 27, Thurman 10.
Tennesee changed her vole to Cleveland.
Iowa transferred her twenty-sixth votes
solid to Cleveland. At this moment
AN IMMENSE FAINTING OF GOV. CLEVELAND
I
was carried on me piauorm waning io oe
set up when the vote should be announced,
and while the work oi changing tne votes
was going on i nthe most confused manner.
JOHN KELLY LEAVES.
John Kelley, attended by some of his
supporters left the hall confused and dis-
Hpndrioks : Susled at his lhoroDgn defeat.
' The votes oi tne states in detail were
announced by the
hear the result of the balloting and heavy
D". cheering followed the final result Can-
Kansas changed also, lor Cleveland 1, nong planted on the lake shore took up the
refrain and one hundred rounds were
five
was
Mr
RETIRE FOR CONSULTATION
and a New York delegate objected but the
chairman decided that the Pennsylvania
delegation had the right to retire for con
sultation and it did so amid great excite
ment. During the confusion it was an
nounced that another vote had been gained
m Illinois for Hendricks, the vote there
fore stands
Cleveland, , 38
McDonald, 1
Bandall, 3
THE CALL OF THE ROLL PROCEEDED.
Kansas Thurman, 2 ; Bayard, 4; Cleve
land, 12.
When Kentucky was called, McKenzie,
who had nominated
CARLISLE WITHDREW
that nomination and announced the vote
of Kentucky as follows:
Thurman, 1
Cleveland, 3
Bayard, 7
Hendricks 15
(Cheers.)
Louisiana Thurman,!; Cleveland, 12.
Maryland Cleveland, 10 : Bavard, 6.
Massachusetts Hendricks, 12A : Cleve
land, 8; Bayard, 7.
Michigan Hendricks, 13 ; Cleveland,
13.
Minnesota Cleveland 14.
Missouri Cleveland, 21 ; Bayard, 5 ;
Hendricks, 6.
Mississippi Bayard 14 ; Cleveland, 2 ;
Hendricks, 2.
Nebraska Bayard, 1 ; Cleveland, 9.
Nevada Hendricks, 5 ; Thurman, 1.
New Hampshire Cleveland, 8.
New Jersey Bayard, 2; Cleveland, 5
Hendricks. 11. (Announced as for one ol
the men cheated in 1876.)
New York Cleveland, 72.
Chairman Manning announced that on
pollin? the delegates there were 50 for
Cleveland and 22 scattering.
Cochran asked in the name of the dis
franchized minority of the New York del
gation to have that last statement extended
in the minutes.
North Carolina Bayard, 22.
A delegate stated that there were 16 of
the North Carolina votes for Bayard and 6
for Cleveland, but they had agrted on this
ballot to cast their vote as a unit
Ohio Hendricks, 1; Tilden, 2; Thur
man, 22 ; Cleveland, 21.
Oregon Bayard, 2 ; Cleveland, 2 ; Hen
dricks, 2.
Pennsylvania was passed for the present.
Ehode Island Bayard, 2 ; Cleveland, 6.
South Carolina Bayard, 9 ; Cleveland, 8;
Hendricks, 1.
Tennessee Bayard, 10 ; Thurman, 11 ;
Cleveland, 2 ; Hendricks, 1.
Texas Hendricks, 1 ; Thurman, 1 ;
Bayard, 12 ; Cleveland, 12.
Vermont Cleveland, 8.
Virginia Cleveland, 13; Bayard, 8;
Hendricks. 2 , Thurman, 1.
West Virginia Thurman, 2 ; Kandall,
1 , Bayard, 3 ; Cleveland, 6.
Wiscon Hendricks, 2. (As the candi
date of the young democracy.
Arizona Cleveland, 2.
District of Columbia Hendricks, 2.
Idaho Cleveland, 2.
Montana Cleveland, 2.
Washington Territory Cleveland, 2.
New Mexico Thurman, 1 ; Cleveland, 1.
Utah Cleveland, 1 ; Hendricks, 1.
Wyoming Cleveland, 2.
ine rou
then (at one o'clock)
clerk for verification. The general result
was announced at 1:10 a, m. as follows :
States:
Alabama
Arkansas . ...
California....
Colorado
Connecticut
Delaware
Florida
Georgia
Illinois
Indiana ..
Iowa
Kansas.. ..
Kentucky.
Louisiana
Maine
Maryland.
Massachusetts.
Michigan.
Minnesota
Missouri..
Nebraska
Nevada
Jersey.
York..
N.
N.
N. Car
Ohio.. .
Oregon
B. Island
S. Carolina..
Tennessee....
Texas
Vermont.. ..
Virginia
"W. Virginia....
Wisconsin
Territories ...
Arizona
Dakota..
Dis. Colum'a...
Idaho
Montana
N. Mexico
Utah-
Washington
Wyoming
Totals -
Necessary. ..
O ra ZZ j
r el c w
S a a
a js o es
.20 5 1 14
14 14 ... ... ..... ...
16 16 ... ... ..... ...
6 6 ... .. ... ..... ...
12 12 ... ... ...
6 ..... ... 6 ... ..... ...
5 8 ... ... ..... ...
04 00 2
44 43 1
30 30
26 26
13 1 1 1
. 26 4 ... 21 1
16 lo ... 1 ..... ...
1 1
iu X ... .. ... ..9 ...
16 16 ... ... ..... ...
28 8 ... 7A ... io ...
26 23 3 ...
14. 14
18 14
32 33
10 9 1
6 1 5
3 8
18 o 2 11
70 79
2 20
46 46
6 6
. HO 42 ... 2 1 11 4
3 1.
18 10 3 ...
24 24
26 26
8 8
24 23 1 ...
12 10 2
22 22
j
2 2
2 2
2 2 ...
2 9
2 9
2 2
9 9
9
820 683 2 81A 4 45j 4
fired
in rapid succession. It was half past
before the
evening- Convention
was called and the first business don
the adoption of a resolution electing
Vilas as chairman of the convention to no
tify the new nominees of their selection
as candidates. A telegram was read from
the president of the New York produce
exchange stating that the business men 01
New York were solid for Chveland. A
delegate from Louisiana offered a resolu
tion providing that
IN CASE OF A VACANCY
on the ticket for the office of president and
vice president, a majority of the National
Convention shall have power to fill the
vacancy, lhere was so much opposition
made to the resolution however, that it was
withdrawn.
A delegate from Texas offered a resolu
tion declaring that the Democratic party
in convention assembled, endorse the Mor
rison bill for the reduction of war taxes.
There was a storm of opposition to the re
solution and the chairman ruled that it
must be referred to the committee on reso
lutions.
THOS. F. BAYAKD.
The convention then proceeded to the
CALLING OF THE BOLL
for the nomination of a candidate for vice
president. Searles of California, came to
the platform. He said, that California was
a loving mother to her children and they in
turn were devoted to her behalf, and as a
representative of the delegation from the
Pacific coast. He presented for their suf
frage a man who had been eminent among
his fellowmen, who in the councils of the
nation had been: prominent, who had led
their soldiers tp battle, who
victories, who had assisted
the banner of the country ;
the honored name of
had achieved
in upholding
he presented
s.
ROSECRANS,
river, the faithful
80I-im-
The convention adjourned until 7:30 p.
m.
GOING HOME.
The outward trains for the east were
being concluded Pennsylvania ' heavily loaded this afternoon, nearly all
GEN. WK
the hero of Stone
dier. the erand old commander whose
- . ....
age was impressed on thehearts ot ail who
served under him. "Cheers for Kosecrans.l
Mr. Branch, of Colorado, nominated
JOSEPH E. MCDONALD.
Mr. Bacon, of Georgia, said he was com
missioned by his delegation to present the
name of a man eminent in war and in
peace, a distinguished commander and
a gallant soldier,
GEN. JOHN C. BLACK, OF ILLINOIS.
Cheers for Black. Mr. Black expressed
his appreciation of the high and unmer
rited compliment paid him. It was almost
absolutely a surprise to him but he had
come here as the spokesman and represent
ative of another candidate of the republic.
He had put his hand in the hand of Jos.
K McDonald's and while that gentleman's
name was before the convention he could
not appear as in any sense his rival for any
position. "He therefore respectfully de
clined the nomination.
A telegram was read from Council Blufis,
Iowa, stating that the nomination of Cleve
land has been received with enthusiasm ;
that thousands of democrats and hundreds
of republicans were equally captivated
with it and that Cornell Bluffs would do
her part toward carrying Iowa for the democracy.
A delegate from Missouri seconded
nomination of McDonald.
Franklin, of Mississippi, seconded
nomination of General Eosencrang.
No other candidate, her said could come
so near bringing together ail the old sol
diers who fought on either side in the late
war.
An Oregon delegate expressed the united
voice of Oregon in favor of Kosencrans.
SENATOR WALLACE, OF PENNSYLVANIA,
said he nominated as a candidate for vice
president, a man conversant with public af
fairs throughout his whole life, was an
honored statesman, was a pure and upright
citizen, a victim 01 jne grossest fraud ever
perpetrated on the American people.
THOS A. HENDRICKS
Cheers. Waller, of Connecticut, sec
onded the nomination of Hendricks, and
said that the democratic party would, in
defense of fraud and in accordance with
law, place him in the chair of vice-president.
The announcement of Mr. Hen
dricks1 name was greeted with enthusiastic
cheers, the convention repeating in a less
degne thescenes which took place at the
morning session in honor of the same gen
tleman. ( Menzies, of Indiana declared very
emphatically that Mr. Hendricks was not
and could not be a candidate for yice-pres-eiient.
He had been authorized by Mr,
Hendricks himself to say so. -He therefore
warned the convention not to do that
which it would have to undo..
Walsh .of Georgia, asked Menzies wheth
he was authorized to say that
MR. HENBEICKS WOULD NOT ACCEPT
the unanimous nomination of the national
democratic convention for the office of vice
president ?
Menzie repeated his statement.
Wall, of Connecticut said his state had
surely no desire to force upon Indiana a
candidate against its will, but this was not
an Indiana convention ; it was a national
conyention and the democrats of the coun
try had a right to take a fit man from any
place in the Union. Cheers. If any man
said he knew Mr. Hsndricks at this time
was
NOT PATRIOTIC ENOUGH
to take a nomination tendered him under
these circumstances he would withdraw his
name but with humiliation. Wallace, of
Pennsylvania, said that Mr. Hendricks
had been once chosen vice-president and
had been despoiled of the office. The de
mocracy of the republic demanded of him
asram his name as a candidate and they
would not take uno" for an answer. He
moved to suspend the rules and nominate
Thos. A. Hendricks as a candidate for vice-
president by act limalion. Cheers. i
Harris, of Virginia, united the voice of
Virginia with that of the Keystone states;
Cheers.
Sears, ot Ualilornia, withdrew nis nomi
nation of Bosecrans. The other nominees
were all withdiawn one by one so that Mr
Hendrick's name alone remained before
the convention.
Hubbard, of Texas,, made a spirited
speech in favor of giving to Hendricks
the office out ot which he had been cheat
ed.
Weed, of New York, suggested that the
roll of states be called so as to put on re
cord the unanimous vote for Hendricks.
Wallace accepted the suggestion and with
drew his motion to nominate by acclama
tion and moved that the pomination now
close. The motion was agreed to and the
clerk proceeded to call the roll of states.
The result was the unanimous nomination
of Thos. A, Hendicks as the candidate for
vice-president.
Mr. Menzie, of Indiana, asked that that
state be excused from voting j cries of
"no, no."
He then asked wheter there was any
name but Mr. Hendricks before the con
vention, and on receiving an answer in the
negative from the chairman, he said then
sir, the state of Indiana casts 30 votes for
Thomas A. Hendricks. This was at the
close of the call, making the result a unan
imous vote.
When this was announced it was appar
ent that Hendricks nomination was unanimous.
Do Not be Diflcouraflfed
even if you have tried many remedies for
your Kidney disease or Liver complaint
without success it is no reason wny yon
should think your disorder incurable.
The most intractible cases readily yield to
the potent virtues of Kidney-Wort. It
is a Wirely vegetable compound which acts
on the Kidneys, Liver and Bowels at the
iame time and thus cleanses the whole sys
tem. Don't wait but get a package to-day
and cure yourself.

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