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Rock Island Argus. (Rock Island, Ill.) 1893-1920, December 09, 1904, Image 4

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THE 'ARGUS, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 9, 1904.'
THE ARGUS.
Publish Dally and Weekly at K24
Second trrnue. Rock Island, XII. En
tered at the postofflce aa second-class
natter.)
BY THE J. W. POTTER CO.
TERMS Dally. 10 cent per week.
.Weekly. SI per year In advance.
All communications of argumentative
character, political or religious, must
have real name attached for publica
tion. No such articles will be printed
orer fictitious signatures.
Correspondence solicited from every
township la Rock Island county.
Friday, December 9, 1904.
Shop early and as often as you can.
The time to buy for Christmas is
now.
Curtis and Wellman are again run
ning neck and neck in saying gushing
things about President Roosevelt.
There is likely to be a whole lot of
speaking at Springfield this season.
There are already eight candidates far
speaker in the field.
Pierpont .Morgan has just bought
$2'.00.OOO of Burlington railway
bonds. If you find them in your sock
you'll know who they came .from.
-This is leap year, but lis most dis
tinguishing charact eristic." says the
lies Moines Capital, -seems to have
teen divorces, rather than marriages."
The Boston minister who believes
Rockefeller will never go up the shin
ing road Is reminded that subways
are being built to accommodate those
in a hurry.
their repeal. Oar duty to the Philip
pines and our self Interest also prompt
the opening of our doors to their trade.
Their prosperity Is the solution of our
Insular problem."
Commenting on this statement, th
New York Times remarks:
"Impenitent high tariff men will be
Inclined to describe the act of the Trib
une as a wounding of the Dingley act
In the house of Its friends. We feel
moved rather to regard it as a sign
that at last the tariff Is to be revised
by Its friends. It has become the con
firmed habit of Republicans to Insist
that the tariff should never be touched
save by Its friends and that when the
changed condition of our Industries
warranted revision It would be at
tempted by them.
The Tribune admits that the change
has come; that revision Is warranted.
The time Is approaching when the de
mand for American consumption will
materially diminish our exportable sur
plus of agricultural products. There Is
nothing to take their place but manu
factures unless we are willing to ex
port gold In sufficient quantities. Our
exports of manufactures will Increase
but slowly under such a tariff as that
which now weighs upon them. If the
administration and the Republican
leaders see these things as McKinley
saw them and as tariff reformers have
seen them for years, then In truth has
the mm of the new day risen.
DAILY SHORT STORY
BEAUTIFUL WOMEN
A WOMAN'S PREFERENCE.
j!
Perhaps the Texas woman who had
a $20o diamond stolen from her ear
in a St. Juis street car will learn
from this experience that diamond ear
rings sre entirely out of fashion.
The Sioux City Tribune U author
ity for the statement that the very
latest cokir in New York is "scorched
pumpkin." which is a cross between
ringed persimmon and blistered toma
to. Tbl. the Tribune adds, cleans
up the entire garden.
Having stripped the earth of its
romance and adventures, history of its
heroes and heroines, art of its gods
and goddesne. the seas, and skies of
their mysteries, the novelists are al
most at the end of their string. One
of them has gone down to the bottom
of a copper in in. for material for a
new story.
Fretting for the President. "ZZ
According to Mrs. I-roy Sunderland
Smith, of New York. Scretary Ijoeb Is
the mistake man of the administration.
Mrs. Smith exploded a bomb at the
moetlnz of the Woman's Society for
Political Study, by saying:
"Kvery wrong move that President
Roosevelt makes Ixb says: 'I did It."
The dispatches tay that immediately
half the member In the room were
ready to defend the president In this
usually peaceful society. Every mem-b-r.
officers included, talked at once.
Th-y resented the Idea of a scapegoat
In the White House. It was all be
cause Mrs. Itates had asked in a most
Innocent way if it mere really true
that President Roosevelt had cut off
the weather bureau report from the
Boston Herald because that paper had
printed stories about his children chas
ing a turkey around the White House
grounds.
If we may believe Mrs. Smith. Sec
retary Ixx-b holds a Job similar to that
enjoyed by the late Billy Rice, who was
fond of relating that be was getting a
good salary fretting for a ricb hanker,
who was too busy to borrow trouble
and turned It over to an assistant.
The Boston paper incident was so
pity that probably Ix.b will feel like
unloading it on his stenographer.
Tariff lie form Needed.
The following ts from the editorial
Columns f the New York Tribune:
"The I Hurley act was pnstwd nearly
elgfct years ao. Sint-e then a wonder
ful development in American manufac
tures and commerce has n-vurred. No
wise and patriotic man can wish to ar-
A Condition, Not a Theory.
Senator Hale of Maine say's that he
will do all In his power during the Fifty-ninth
congress until March 4. 1007
to defeat tariff revision. He believes
the country Is "satisfied to allow pres
ent prosperous conditions to rest as
they are."
Speaker Cannon, who has been a
"stand patter" In the past, says that
bis position Is not changed and that
the "receipts and expenditures will
soon draw together."
Tbey will not. Uncle Joe, unless the
Republican party abandons its schemes
of heavy army, navy and colonial ex
penditure. At the present rate the defi
cit should amount by the time limit
Mr. Hale has set to $150,000,000 or
more. And the deficit rate tends to In
crease. If only to get money, without regard
to the powerful and growing sentiment
for reciprocity and revenue reform, the
Republicans will soon have to under
take some sort of fiscal legislation. As
In 1893, "it Is a condition, not a theory,
that confronts us. New York World.
THE HOTELS.
At the 'Harper J. M. Conch. Louis
ville; Louis A. Noble. Mattoon; B. R.
Smith. Pittsburg; A. Lederes. Frank
Gaekill. Chicago: J. T. Rhoades. A. C
Sharin. George 11. Sheldon. J. K. Sul
livan. J. Kirk. Cedar Rapids; I Em
try. Moiine; George H. Tiverterson.
Colorado Springs; S. W. Seoobury. I).
It. Morgan. Chicago; George T. Sabin.
Oshkosh. Wis.; J. N. McCarter. Adrian
Mich.; M. T. Owens. L. II. Voak. Chi
cago; r . F. Tilburg. Peoria; .1. M. Dim
mitt. K. H. Burke. W. A. Cavanaugh
Julius G. Sarran. J. A. Marshall. W
Missbaum. Chicago; W. L. Decker
Cedar Rapids; Franklin V. Elder. W
L. Hope. Chicago: Charles S. Amlsy
Rock Island: . Smith. New York
1. B. Lee. A. S. Appleby. Chi
cago; C. W. Briggs. Chicago
Harry E. Brown. Geneseo; J. A. Wen
dall. New York; J. Sternberg. San
Francisco; F. F. Gilmore Jr., iuis
ville; K. Jenkins. Buffalo: St. Clai
Eastman. Chicago: I. E. Pritchard
Woodhull; R. A. Kirtley. New York
R. S. Witten. Genoa. III.; V. Wijetun
go. Ceylon; James Rich. Milwaukee
II. E. BvGraff. Three Oaks; A. H
Jaman. New York; Al Hochenberg
New York; J. H. Fisher. Chicago; H
H. Bratt. city; P. F. Melville. New
York; T. E. Van Sant. Kansas City:
S. C. Gifford. city; Henry Kervinninsra
X. Kervlnninga. Hartburg; J. I Lind
sey. Rockford: O. H. Gray. Chicago,
L. X. Miller. New York.
At the Rock Island (European I M
R. Grove. Chicago: M. W. Rotchford
Peoria: A. J. Dunbar. New York; X
K. Ives. Galeshurg; E. T. Berry. O.
lender. R. J. Randall. Chicago:
Thomas Hawes. Indianapolis: G. W
Killinger. Sterling; O. F. Avery. Pn
tiac; II. H. Williamson. Springfield:
D. Timnierman. Cincinnati: Ed war
Reynolds. St. Ixuis; I. W. Howeth
Chicago: E. Reynolds. St. Iuis; W.
D. Whicker. J. B. Mackie. Chicago
D. Horse. Bloomington: A. L.
Thadbridge. W. J. Butler. D. Warr-
gartin. Chicago; F. F. Rice. Peoria;
W. O. Caster. Greenfield. Ind.; D. E
Daley. Ottawa; E. Brown. Chicago; W
Llnalley. Streator; C. F. Ames, city;
L. D. May and wife. Springfield; J. R.
Walch. S. C. James and wife. C. E
Phelps. Chicago: T. R. Lees. W. F
Garnett. S. T. Bell. Coal Valley.
Revolution Imminent.
sure sign of approaching revolt
rn i t, . I ...... I 1 . A . .
. ., 7""'',u'"- "''- """' and serious trouble in your system is
realize that in some reNiectN the ouu-1 . , ,
try has outgrown the law and that In
some other reswt-t. as eiprin-e has
demonstrated, the law was faulty from
the lteginuing.
"The Iron and steel schedule have
certainly Iwn outgrown and need re
vision. Some tin plate manufacturers
concede that tbey do not ned any
longer the measure of protection which
they receive. The leather duties, which
were intetvlvd to proteet cattle raisers,
seem ly a ml.-x .i)-nItion to bare re
sulted 1 1 luimpertn the manufacture
for export of beary leather goods made
from tbM. r-."tli American bides and
In making tLox goods unnecessarily
dear at home. Then more and mure
the people realize the short !(:! tcdoe
and folly of taxes on tiooks aud art.
The up(oMd beneficiaries of tLese
Ul- altntwt unanlmoulT rfrmand
nervousness, sleeplessness, or stom
ach upsets. Electric Bitters will
quickly dismember the troublesome
causes. It never fails to tone the
stomach, regulate the kidneys and
bowels, stimulate the liver and clarify
the blood. Run down systems benefit
particularly and all the usual attend
ing aches vanish under its searching
and thorough effectiveness. Electric
Bitters is only 5 cents, and that is
returned if it don't give perfect satis
faction. Guaranteed by Ilartz & I'lle
meyer, druggists.
Comforts the heart, strengthens the
mind. It's good, ill or well. Makes
one s lace origin as a summer moru-
ing. That's what Holilster's Rocky
Mountain Tea does. 2-j cents, tea or
tablets. T. 1L Thomas lharmacy.
Original.
I've hunted and trapped and scouted,
man and boy, for forty years and been
observant o the queer doin's of differ
ent kind o animals, but I never see
nothin so unsarten as wimmin. There
ain't no feller can tell jist what a wo
man's goin' to do. Any other machine's
bnilt up on certain principles and as
long as kept In repair will grind things
ut the same way. Wlmmen won't do
It. They grind Irregular.
One evenin' forty year ago when I
was huntln' antelope in the Rockies I
was camped in a pass along which
wagon trains was coin in' on their way
to Calif orny. I see a single wagon
lumberin' up the road, and when It
come nigh I noticed a woman was
drivin'. There was three men with
her, and It turned out that they was
all workin' fer her. Tbey camped with
us, and it wasn't long before we found
that the womau w as a widder who bad
Sot a lot o' money from her husband
and was goin' on some sort of a busi
ness deal hi San Francisco. She was
a good lookin' pusson. some'ers about
thirty, and it was easy to see that all
the meu was try in' to git into her fa
vorthat Is. two on 'em was. T'other
one, a feller named Sneath, was a
measly sort o' chap that didir't seem
to care much about her. But I put
that dowu to the fac' that lie hadn't
got no chance. The feller that 1 reck
oned she'd take, If she took any of
'em, was Nettleton. He was about
thirty-five ami a thorough man, hand
some as a pictur and brave as a lion.
The third man, Jimmie Saunders, was
too young for her. beiu' only about
twenty-two years old.
' We all camped together that night
and the next mornin went over the
divide together, Journeyin ia the same
crowd fer a matter of two weeks.
There wasn't nothin to take me with
'em except that the widder, who seem
ed to have a faculty fer ropin' men in
to her affections, lassoed me. That
made three of us all, elbowln' one an
other fer the same woman, Nettleton.
Saunders and me. Ieastaways Saun
ders and me was elbowin, fer Nettle
ton was a proud sort of a man and
wouldn't put in a claim. Howsomever,
the man I was most afeard of was this
same Nettleton. lie was such a fine
lookin', manly chap, and, though he
wouldn't stoop to palaver over no wo
man, he was consld'able polite to the
widder, and of all her hands was the
most use. But sometimes I thought
Saunders would light In ahead of the
hull lot of us. He was n lively little
chap, and the only rule I've ever been
able to apply to wimmen is that when
they git along in years they mostly
reaches down fer men below 'em.
Well, one evenin' when we was at I
supper Nettleton, who kep an eye out
fer safety, saw somepin black on the
horizon 'twlxt him and the settln sun
aud knew it was Injuns. You bet we
wasn't long In makin a corral, with
the wagon fer one side, a log fer an
other and throwin up dirt fer the rest
of It. We was rushin' roun fer things,
not mind in' what each other was doin'
and didn't notice till we'd got the stock
Into the corral and was all ready fer
the redskins that Sneath was missin.
The inis'nble coward, not rellshln a
6lege. had left us to bold the Injuns
while be vamoosed. The worst of It
was that he took one of the bosses.
You oughtcr heered that woman lash
him with her tongue. She was so mad
that she forgot the Injuns.
The fight ain't got nothin to do with
the story. Nettleton took command
and handled us so well that we killed
most o' the Injuns and drove off the
rest. I see that Nettleton bad got the
better of me with the widder, and if I
didn't do somepin to balance up I'd be
left clean out. So as soon as we'd got
rid o the trouble I mounted the best
boss in the team and lit out fer Sneath.
I caught him ten mile away and
brought blm back.
When I rode inter camp with him I
was disapp'Inted to obsarve that the
widder's wrath was cooled. Instead
o beratin him, as I supposed she
would, she didn't take no notice of
him. I axed her what punishment she
thought was best fer him, and she said
that she didn't think be was worth
punishin. Consequence Is be didn't
git no punishment onless the fac that
none of us men would speak to him
was slch.
Now, the onsartainty o' wimmen that
I'm try in to show up by this story Is
this: As soon as we men showed the
cold shoulder to Sneath the widder be
gun to treat him reiectable, and it
wasn't long before it was plain that
she was takin bis part agin us. We
put it down to a natural perpensity o'
wlmtnln to sympathize and excuse any
body In trouble, makin "em on that ac
count entirely on fit ted fer Jurymen.
So we didn't iertest or anything like
that, J 1st showin our own contemp
fer Sneath and lettin her have her own
way.
Bnt the worse we sat down on Sneath
the more the widder warmed to him.
and at last we noticed that they was
a good deal together, whlsperin". and
we begun to suspec that the widder
was goin' to try to help him out and
persuade us to stop sittin down on
him.
About this time we went down inter
Salt Lake City, and the widder put up
at a tavern. The mornin' after we cot
there Jimmie Saunders come to me.
and he says:
"What d'ye suppose has happened?
"WbstV" I asked.
"Las night the widder married
Sneath."
And so she had. And that's the rea
son why I maintain that a woman Isnt
wound to go regular.
JONATHAN B. ARMSTRONG.
How They Maintain the Charms of
Their Sex.
i
(3
The Importance That Attaches to the
Care of the Blood if One Want
Bright Eyes and a Clear
Compjexion.
Every sensible woman naturally
wishes to appear attractive, not only
for her own sake but also for the pleas
ure she mar eive iithers. She knows
the value of bright eyes, delicate com
plexlon and lively spirits. She may
make her skin appear fair for a short
time by the use of a complexion beauti-
fier, but in the end the cheat will show,
for the cause has not been removed.
the effects have merely been hidden
The light that'glvea brilliancy to the
eyes, and the stir of vivacious spirits,
cannot be obtained from cosmetics,
What every wise woman knows is
that good health is at the basis of her
charms, and that good blood is the
source of good health. She does not
therefore waste" moey on washes or
external applications of any kind, but
buys at a small expense a few boxes
of Dr. Williams' Pink Pills for Pale
People and puts her blood in sound
condition. Nature does the rest.
Miss Mamie Conway has a complex
ion which is the admiration of all who
know her. Asked if she could make
any suggestions that would be helpful
to those of her sex who were less for
tunate in that respect, she said:
"My complexion would not have
pleased you if you had seen it two
years ago. It was then about as bad as
it could be and it gave me a great deal
of dissatisfaction, if you want a good
complexion you must take care of your
health, especially of the condition of
your blood. My health was at that
time completely broken down. I was
nervous, had frequent headaches, a
torpid liver and a great deal of pain in
that region. I suffered also from indi
gestlon. I could eat only the simplest
food and that very sparingly. It was
clear that my blood was in bad condi
tion for pimples broke out all over
my face."
"It is hard to realize that, for there
isn't the slightest trace of such blem
ishes now."
It was unfortunately quite other
wise then, and a long time passed be
fore I found anything that gave me any
relief. I became very weak and list
less. The doctor's medicine did me no
good, and I took a number of highly
recommended tonics with no better re
sult. As soon, however, as I began to
use Dr. Williams' Pink Pills for Pale
People I commenced to improve in
every way. My complexion cleared up
at once, and after I had taken two
boxes there was not a sign of a pirn
pie left on my face. My cheeks became
rosy. I gained flesh and have had per
fect health ever since. I owe every
thing to five boxes of Dr. Williams'
Pink Pills." ...
These famous pills purify and enrich . $3t 0,
me uuxm. i ney cure anaemia, nerv
ous troubles and ail forms of weak
ness Every prudent mother gives
he Greatest!:
of All Sales
During our third annual Decem
ber Sale starting Dec. 3, we will
place on Sale our entire line of
Men's, Boys' and Children's Suits
and Overcoats at from
25 to 50 Per Gt. Off the Dollar
this line of Clothing is the finest
ever placed on sale in the three
cities.
EVERYTHING NEW.
Gmstafsoa L Hayes
them to her daughters to insure their
development to healthy womanhood.
Rosy cheeks and sparkling eyes are
merely signs of healthy blood. They
j
have come not only in the case of Miss 8J.
Conway, whose .tome is at 1241 East last
iMgntn street, uanion. unio, Diit to Lgt.
k. ....... n .1.. ..e r ... i. n li'n I
i uuti scut u a ui wuiijvrii iiri w uuiii 1M . tvu
Hams' Pink Pills have made new blood
There is no surer wav for von to oh
tain them than to buy a box of these
pills from any druggist and try them JoJ
on yourself. If you are interested in I $5.
other points that relate to the caret...
r 1
' J j
- .4 '-iT.,i
s :r-"
i v-7 i
0',-. " )
of a woman's health, send to Dr. Wil
liams Medicine company, Schenectady,
N. Y.. for a free booklet "Plain Talks
To Women."
A Pleasant Pill.
No pill is as pleasant and positive
at DeWitt's Little Early Risers. De-
Witt's Little Early Risers are so mild
and effective that children, delicato
ladies and weak people enjoy their
cleansing effect, while strong people I
say they are the best liver pills sold. J 0
E x tr lO r dimaury Brgaiuis
On Wines and Beverages that
are Pure For CKristmas 5 3
Soli by all druggists.
GET THOSE
Christmas
Pictures Now
A Speaking, living portrait in
Albvmat
Sepia
makes the most pleasing
and appropriate gift
possible.
The
Studio.
1823 Third Avenue. Telephone
for appointments, -
'
:
;
THERE'S REAL DELIGHT AND A FULL MEASURE OF SATISFACTION IN A PURE WINE OR SOME
GOOD OLD WHISKY. THEY ARE THE ESSENCE OF PURITY IF BOUGHT FROM FUCH'S BROS.
WE CARRY A COMPLETE LINE OF WINES AND LIQUORS. WE HAVE PURCHASED FOR CASH
FROM AN OLD RETIRING LIQUOR HOUSE, WHICH WAS FORCED TO SELL TO CLOSE UP AN ES
TATE, A LOT OF OLD KENTUCKY WHISKIES AND CALIFORNIA WINES AT A PRICE THAT EN
ABLES US TO UNDERSELL ANY OF OUR COMPETITORS. HERE WE LIST A FEW OF THEM.
RYE AND BOURBON WHISKIES
Maryland pure rye. seven years old.
regular price $2.50 per C
gallon, special price
Kentucky Bourbon, eight years old.
regular price per OO
gallon, special price f)J
Hackley Bourbon, ten years old. reg
ular price j:J.75 per
gallon, special price
Guckenheimer. twelve years old, reg
ular price, $1 per 71
gallon, special price
Sherwood, the finest whisky in the
United States. 12 years A
$c old. four full quarts Te W
CALIFORNIA WINES.
Gtitedel Riesling, six years old. regular
price $1.25 per gallon, OA
special price SJK
Clarbt, six years old. Regular price
$1.50 per gallon, ff
special price AmJJ
Catawba, seven years old, regular
price $1.75 per gallon, C
special price Jle J
Port, seven years old, regular price
$1.75 per gallon, J C
special price mt J
Sherry, eight years old. regular
price $1.75 per gallon, C
special price 15
Sole Agents for the celebrated Pennsylvania. White Rye Regular
4
Price $4. Reduced to $2.75 Per Gallon
FREE TO PUR.CHASER.S.
WITH EVERY GALLON OF THE $2.50 GOODS OR OVER WE WILL GIVE YOU FREE YOUR CHOICE
OF A BOTTLE OF THE ABOVE WINES, OR BLACKBERRY BRANDY, OR A PINT BOTTLE OF FINE
IMPORTED JAMAICA RUM FOR HOT PUNCHES. NO BmR ON THE PREMISES. WE PARTICULAR
LY INVITE THE LADIES. ORDERS BY 'PHONE GIVEN PROMPT ATTENTION. OLD 'PHONE
WEST 1055. WE SELL NO LESS THAN ONE GALLON LOTS.
OPPOSITE THE
POSTOFFICE,
ROCK ISLAND.
Fuicks Bros.
OPEN EVENINGS.
RETAILERS AT
WHOLESALE
PRICE8.
w
o
... & .. 1ST. v.

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