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Rock Island daily Argus. (Rock Island, Ill.) 1886-1893, April 10, 1889, Image 3

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THE BOOK IST.AND AHGU6. WEDN ES D A Y. APBLL 10, 1S89.
NOW
AND THEN
to oner wdicq seem
AS
A
t too (food to be true, and nothing
.n inspection of the Roods them
i'U c.n satisfV that every hsr
Sn i ju.t This wek it
Turkey Red
Table Linen.
We liave just purchased
3000 Yards
r the en ix of the Renfrew Mils, "short
Hoirfii ' ninniii!? from 1J to 7J yards II
' none will rut; nil will he sold
. ,t they rme from the mi'l. we have
ri..rt ihem over and huve all the riif-
Knock down argument, and to direct at
tenlion to our large line of Crochet and
Marseilles bed spreads, we will sell on
Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday of
this week, a limited quanty each day, if
they last
Nice white fringed Crochet quilts at
34 cents each. Also on same days only.
a limited number of the celebrated Bates
Crochet quilts at 84 cents each
Our other great bargains in Marseilles
and Crochet quilts will ne snowo you
cheerfully if desired
We place on sale this week a nice lot
of JACKETS and beaded WRAPS at
exceptionally low figures.
TEA JACKETS, STOCKEXETTE
JACKETS. STRIPED JACKETS.
Puffed and braided jackets, smocked
and brained jackets, cork screw jackets,
Wide wales jiokctr. blouse waists, and
many other choice styles much under
value.
DRESS GOODS.
This week we make some startling
dices on a lot of new dress goods. We
have some special drives in this depart
ment without sufficient space to describe,
and will knife some short lenghts in a
most reckless manner.
Try and call early in the week for pick
of 11
f, ri nt pri.MH, according to selection at 16,
h id f'"1 i,,r yHr,, A" re
worth iiintl'. and many re worth ihree
Rnil fr times the price marked.
Cuitmners will quickly appreciate that
nur 'ohject in naming these pricos and
dncrihVinc the K"otls is to thoroughly ad
vertUe nur linen department, which is
the largest and fullest we have ever
fhnwn. bikI rontaina more real genuine
har.'aini than m will see on any one
floor at any other place in the three cities
Our Flwer seed, English lawn grass and bulb distribution will be continued
ilurinv: the coming week. We sent out several thousand papers last week, but still
huve plenty for all. at only 3c per paper.
McOABE BROS.
1714. 1716. 1718. 1720 and 1722 Skcond Avenue. Rock Island.
the bargains.
STATIONERY.
KINGSBURY & SON
Are the Leaders in LOW PRICES on-
03
H
0
WALL IPAPER
COME AND SEE OUR STOCK
and get our prices.
H H-iT0 110t forget the place,
ART STORE,
1705 Secend Avenue.
WINDOW SHADES.
M
Q
H
a
a
Ul
CONSIDERING THE PAVING
Yesterday's Sleeting of Property
Holders.
VINNEDGE'S;
NEW
:Dry Goods Store
CUTTER BLOCK,
Corner Second and Brady Sts.
DAVENPORT, IA.
s
Silk Sale!
We place on sale To morrow ten pieces of
LJlew Francois Silte
AT 88 CENTS
"'lifh are worth $1.25 at ordinary retail price. The
p"lors are Serpent Gretn, Myrtle Green, Electric
(itfn, Navy Bine, Quaker Grey, Mahogony, Gold
1'iown and Black. These are new and a particular
ly (iod bargain at the price. Here is a chance to
cuie a silk dress at a merely nominal price. We
aim at good value as well as low prices. Call and
e tht-m ami he convinced of the truth of this state-
in.
Yours truly,
JSEO. VINNEDGE & CO.
WALL PAPER at a BARGAIN
CO
W bars the largest stock in the citv. n(1 k a ...
, --- xvuuu m mi, au prices are
Sond Am., Md 16th itreet SDTCLIPFE BBOS.
Am Attempt to Have Brick Hnbstltnt-
ed for Cyprrns Blorkn. Whir h, How
CTrr, Htm alao the Popular Material
What was Drar.
The mee ti :g of property holders in the
Second avetue paving district at the
rooms of th Rock Island Citizens Im
provement association at 8:30 yesterday
afternoon was fairy well attended. Mr.
Fred Hass culled the meeting to order,
and upon hit motion Mr. B. D. Buford
was chosen chairman. Mr. . II. Guyer
was made xecretary upon Mr. Phil
Mitchell's motion. The secretary read
the ordinance adopted by the council Fri
day Dight rel itive to the paving of Sec
ond avenue ith No. 1 cypress blocks,
the understanding at the outset being that
discussion of certain points might occur
as they suggt sted themselves during the
reading. Mr. Phil Mitchell stated that
he had been informed that yellow cypress
was the best and he asked it that mate
rial was implied by No. 1. Mayor
Blanding replied that yellow cypress and
No. 1 were the same, very gummy and
the best quality.
Discussions being in order, Mr. Henry
Krell was the first to take up the issue
against the ccuncil. He appeared to be
in a highly indignant frame with regard
to the aldermanic body, and asserted that
the paving in provement was going up
too far and down too far. He had prop
erty above Nineteenth street, that he did
not think, from the revenue it brought,
would stand the cost of such improve
ment. He bf.dbeen informed, too, that
the grade along Second avenue would
be raised fourteen to eighteen 'inches;
but, being diselled of that idea, with the
assurance of Mayor Blanding, that the
proposition vras not to increase the
grade more th in six inches, be felt easier,
though he thcugbt there ought to be
further efforts to gain the impression of
property holders as to material.
To this remark, Mr. Crubaugh re
marked: "Tien you won't get any ma
terial at all."
Mr. Joseph Rosenflald thought the
property holders ought to employ an
engineer to conduct the paving opera
tions and protoct the property interests.
Mr. Fred Hass expressed his opinion
that the city should provide a competent
and experienced engineer to superintend
the paving. lie believed the preference
of the property holders was for brick, yet
he was not disposed to oppose cypress.
He thought thut all specifications should
be included in the ordinance that pro
posals be adve-tised for and all bids be
accompanied by approved bond.
Capt. T. J. Hobinson stated that he
was present to learn the views and pre
ferences of property holders as to the
nature ot the material to be used. An
expression, he said, had been had in
favor of vitrified brick, based upon ex
haustive inquiries that bad been prose
cuted for months by the Citizens' asso
ciation. He thonght if these wishes
were properly represented to the council
the ordinance would be changed and
brick adopted, ne regarded brick as the
next best material to granite, and much
more economic il, and preferred it to
wood of any kind. He favored the ap
pointment of a committee to examine
pavement in o.her cities with a view to
ascertaining if brick is in any respect a
failuie; if so, the property holders might
be willing to consider cypress or red ce
dar. He movjd the appointment of a
committee of :hree to wait on the city
council at its next meeting and ask that
the ordinance Ihj amended so as to sub
stitute vitrified brick for cypress blocks.
This be though: would be the best man
ner of getting tie matter properly before
the present meeting for discussion and
interchange of tiews.
Mr. L. S. McCabe moved that the com
mittee suggested by Capt. Robinson be
increased to five, and the amendment was
accepted.
Mr. Phil Mitchell stated that he was
heartily in favor of paving Second avenue.
He believed thet brick was the fovorite
material of property owners, but he was
not opposed to cypress blocks. It was
u'.? desire to disclaim the impression
which had gotten abroad that the Second
avenue property owners were obstruc
tionists, and while he believed the
council had a med to do its duty,
he thought it would have acted more
wisely to have appointed a corns
mittee toinquiie into brick and other
paving material before finally deciding.
There wa3 no public good that did not
embrace some small ill. He would like
to see Second avenue paved, and if no
better and cheaer material than cypress
blocks could be had, he would go in for
cypress.
Mr. . U. Ouyer was very enthusias
tically in favor of brick, though he took
occasion to say i.hat he believed, as Mr.
Mitchell did, tht.t there was nothing of
the nature of obstructionists about
Second avenue property holders. He
thought, though, that the council did not
consider the sanitary phase of the pav
ing project in its adoption of cypress
blocks, in view of the possible satura
tion of wooden Mocks by animal excre
tions. Mr. David Don said he thought there
were more people in favor of cypress
blocks for paving than those at the
meeting knew of. The more the sub
ject was talked of the more favorable was
the tendency toward cypress blocks. He
thought there were one or two property
holders who had an especial interest in
brick, and were attempting to force it on
the city. He thought wooden blocks lest
noisy than brick or stone, and much
more preferable und endurable.
Mr. Fred Hast said he though Mr. Don
was mistaken as to the noise created by
brick. He thought it Mr. Don was to
investigate he might favor brick, too.
Mr. Don said he spoke from Investiga
tion. He knew what was used la Chi
cago and how pc pular wooden payement
waa there.
Mr. Anderson, of Chicago, who la in
the paving basin jss, spoke in favor of
brick. In Chicago brick lasted two years
and wood six years. The cypress blocks
had not been used cedar being the ma
terial where wood was employed, the cost
being $1 to $1.20 yer yard.
Mr. P. L. Mitchell gave an instance of
his experience with wooden pavement.
He had been assessed $700 for Nicholson
pavement in front of tome lots in Coving
ton, Ey., and four years after it was put
in it waa worn out and dangerous to
drive over.
Mr. Joseph Rosen field held that cli
matic influences had great effect on
wooden pavement and that what might
tend to the destruction of pavement in
this city would not in others. In illustra
tion of thia assertion he cited Washings
ton, D. C, where he said wooden pave
ment would not last any time at all.
Capt. Robinson then suggested that the
motion introduced by bim be referred
to a committee to more fully embody the
views of the meeting as to an investiga
tion by the council previous to finally de
ciding upon the pavement to be adopted,
and moved that the property holders de
clare themselves in favor of paving Sees
ond avenue from Fourteenth to Twenti
eth streets. The motion carried almost
unanimously. Chairman Buford named
as such committee: Messrs. T. J. Robin
son. E. H. Guyer. Phil Mitchell. L. S
McCabe and Joseph Rosenfield, to which
Mr. David Don was afterward upon mo
tion added.
The committee retired for deliberation
and returned with the following resolu
tions, which upon motion of P. L. Mitch
ell were adopted:
Whereas, An ordinance lias been
passed by the city council for the pav
ing of Second avenue with cypress blocks
as to the sanitary fitness of which grave
doubts are entertained; and
Whereas, In a matter of such vast
importance to the city's future, and in
volving so large an expenditure of
money, the greatest deliberation should
be exercised in determining the proper
material, in adopting the most approved
specifications, and in securing com
petitive bidding by proper provisions in
the ordinance for extensive advertising,
which provisions are entirely omitted
from the recently adopted ordinance;
and
Whereas, We are anxious that what
ever paving is put down shall be so free
from objection on the score of health,
durability, smoothness and cost, that it
shall be a lasting argument for the exten
sion of the paving system. Therefore,
be it
Resolved, That we, the abutting prop
erty owners on Second avenue do hereby
respectfully petition the mayor and alder
men not to allow the said ordinance
as at present draughted to become a
law; that the council be asked to ap
point a proper committee to accom
pany a like committee of property own
ers, charged with the duty of examining
samples of street paving in neighboring
cities, and to report as to each, the sani
tary fitness, the durability, the cost, the
smoothness, the freedom from noise, the
expense of repairs and renewals, and also
which payment would involve least ex
penditure for labor and material outside
the city.
Retolved, That from previous investi
gation made by us, we are up to the pres
ent time favorable to the adoption of
vitrified bruk pavement, but are willing
to abide by the deliberate conclusion of
the council formed upon the investigation
asked for.
Mr. Mitchell offered a motion that the
committee lay before the council all in
formation derived for the investigations
on the subject of paving. The motion
being adopted, Wm. Jackson's name was
added to the committee.
Mr. Phil Mitchell offered a suggestion
which was accepted, that should the
council respect the sentiment of the reso
lutions, the chair appoint three Second
avenue property holders to accompany
the aldermanic committee.
Mayor Blanding said the municipal
situation was one of two alternatives: If
the mayor refrain from signing the ordi
nance it will be open for reconsideration
at the next meeting; but if not reconsid
ered will become a law. If approved by
the mayor it can be repealed at any time
before operations under its provisions are
begun.
When asked as to his opinion of cypress
blocks, the mayor spoke at length in
favor of it and gave his experience with
it as exceedingly satisfactory.1 lie looked
upon it as the best material for paving
purposes owing to its toughness, inter
locked grain and durability.
The meeting then upon motion, ad
journed. Ho, for Hosiery!
Ladies' and children's hosiery will, this
week, be thrown on the market at fabu
lous prices. We shall open a sale on
Thursday morniner. the 11th inst., to
continue the rest of the week, which will
place good hosiery within the reach of
everybody.
ladies' hosiery.
Lot 1 One hundred dozen full, regular-made
Balbriggan hose, unbleached,
pin and facy stripes, sold as a leader
everywhere at 25 cents, we will sell these
three days at 13 cents.
Lot 2 Fifty dozen full, regular-made,
fast black hose, sold usually at 30 cents,
for this sale 19 cents.
Lot 8 Fifty dozen of our celebrated
standard black hose, every pair war
ranted absolutely fast and stainless or
money refunded regular price 35 cents,
this sale at 24 cents.
Lot 4 Fifty dozen of the same black
hose as the foregoing only our best
quality regular price 50 cents, this sale
at 36 cents.
Lot S 20 dozen silk hose in all colors
and black, hew shades, very cheap at $1,
we will sell at 69 cents.
CHILD RENS' HOSIERY .
Lot 1 SO dozen boys' hose, heavy
ribbed, fast black, regular price IS cents
for No. 6, rise 2J cents a size, will be sold
all sizes from 6 to 9 at 10 cents per pair
Lot 250 dozen full regular made hose
for boys and girls, in all black and black
with white feet, sold everywhere from 40
to 65 cents according to size; we will sell
all sizes from 6 to 9 for 25 cents.
Lot 8 50 dozen of the finest children's
hose made in black and split feet an ex
cellent quality, will stind any test regu
lar price 40 cents for No. 5. rise 2 cents
a size; we will sell No. 5 at 25 cents, rise
2 cents a sice.
All other hose not included in this sale
will be sold at a special discount of 10
per cent.
Thursday, Friday and Saturday.
M. Arnold,
129 west Second street, Davenport.
Vunty ilOfK.
TRANSFERS .
8 L J Schoening to Anne M Schoen
lng, net 25. 16, 2w, $1,000.
Martha A Rodman to J M Detiens, lot
18. M A Rodman' addition, Rock Island,
f600.
BRIEFLETS.
Nice bananas at May's. -
No placa like the M. & E. for fine boys'
clothing.
Mrs. Porter Skinner left for the east
this morning.
Sweet potatoes, celery and nice bas
nanas at F. G. Young's.
Rock Island baby carriages. 60 styles
at wholesale prices, C. C. Taylor's.
Mr. Ashley W. Elliott, of Buffalo
Prairie, was in the city today on business.
Those new bronze slippers with beaded
vamps at the M. & K. are perfect beau
ties. Mrs. Ausust Herkert has been given
charge of Turner hall and will assume
control on May 1.
Those patent leather Oxford ties, with
ooze calf tops, are really handsome M
& E's. is the place.
Have you seen M- & E's. natural foot
form shoe? They are something new
ladies are invited to inspect.
M. & K. will receive a big invoice of
children's jersey suits this week. Watch
their announcement.
Every parent, every child knows that
the M. & E. carry the only decent stock
of boys' clothing ia the city.
8c, 13c, 25c for pants; 5c, 9c, 25c for
waists and 22c for a suit at the M. & E.
is it a wonder they are rushed?
"Kid" Browner has signed with the
Hamilton. Ohio, club, of the Tri-State
league, instead of the flpringflelds.
Mr. J. B. Webb, of Chicago, will do
liver an address at the Central Presby
terian church prayer meeting this even
ing. The Elm street grocery firm of Dan-
quard & Browner has been dissolved by
mutual consent, Mr. Geo. B. Browner
continuing alone.
Wanted. A good German eirl for gen
eral housework. Applj to W. Seefeld,
corner of Sixteenth street and First ave
nueopposite C, B. & Q. depot.
The new Davenport nine plays its first
games Saturday and Sunday with the
West End club of Chicago. Plays will
be called at 8:30 8atuiday.and 3 Sun
day.
Mr. and Mrs. Dunnia McCarthy deaire
to publicly express their thanks to their
friends and neighbors who rendered their
tender care and sympathy in their late
sorrow.
Clemann & Salzmann have the largest
assortment of furniture and carpets and
the lowest prices west of Chicsgo. Don't
forget the place, Harper's theatre build
ing. No. 1525 and 1527 Second avenue.
Mayor-elect Wm. McConochie, city
clerk-elect R. Eoehler, magistrate elect
H. C. Wivill, city attorney-elect J. L
Haas and aldermen-elect Knox, 111 and
Larkin have already qualified.
At the Kimball house billiard parlors
last evening. Max Ochs, of this city, and
George Norris, of Rock Island, played a
series ot pool games, twenty-one in all,
or $25 a side. Ochs won by a score of
11 to 8. Davenport Timet.
Since M. & E. made their spring an
nouncement their store has been jammed
with customers night and day. And why
should it not be? Such bargain? as they
are giving were never heard of in this
section.
In the iprlDg the politician
Talcrth off hi vt-ut and coat;
In tile airing talks prohibition . . --
juei to eaten me party ve
in the spring the circ us (.osier a
Gaily nibbled by the goat;
In the spring the peanut roaster
la an object of much note.
Mr. and Mrs. James T. O'Connor, of
1013 Third avenue, have lost them
bright little boy, Leo Francis, who died
this morning, as a result of paralysis of
the stomach. The funeral notice ap
pears elsewhere.
County Superintendent J. II. Southwell
is in receipt of the programme of the
Northern Illinois Teachers' association to
be held at Aurora on Friday and Satur
day. April 20 and 27. Principal Hatch ie
to participate in the discussions.
The Rock Island Turner society has
been fortunate enough to secure the ser
vices of Prof. Wm. Reuter, of Daven
port, as instructor of gymnastics. Prof.
Reuter, who is one of the best in the land,
will commence next Friday afternoon
with instructing the junior class.
A wounded man was put off the steamer
Pittsburg at Quincy Sunday afternoon.
The man's name is Dick Thompson. He
was paid off at St. Louis and started
north. A little after midnight he was
robbed in his bunk, after having been
knocked unconscious with a slungshot.
In falling from bis bunk his shoulder was
injured.
The C. R. I. & P. railway will have
on sale daily after May 1, round trip
tickets from Rock Island to Denver, Pu
eblo, Colorado Springs and Trinidad;
good to return until October 31, at
the rate of f 44.25; also to Oden or Salt
Lake, Utah, at the rate of $31.75 to fors
mer, and $46 25 to latter point. Stop
over allowed west of Missouri river go
ing or coming.
Ex-Aid. Stephen J. Collins returned to
Rock Island from Rush Centre, Kansas,
yesterday for permanent residence, his
family having reached here Sunday night.
He will again associate himself with his
brothers in the contracting business.
Collins is like many another Rock Isl
ander, who tried to live in the land of
yahoos no Kansas in bis.
The Merchants' Retail Commercial
agency, or hock isiana, in., nave re
ceived their state reports, giving the
names of hundreds of delinquents. And
any name reported can be withdrawn
before final action, if the delinquent
thinks enough of bis character to settle,
in some way, before the expiration of
two weeks from date April 10. T. H.
Ellis, Sec, Rock Island Branch.
Sonet.
The regular monthly meeting of the
Citizen's Improvement association will be
held at their rooms on Thursday evening.
April 11. Cards notifying members of
the same will not De issued.
T. J. Medill. Jr , Sec
HARPER'S THEATRE.
C. A. Stbcl, - - Manager.
ONE NIGHT ONLY,
Loafs Bones.
St. Paul lod?e. No. 107. K. at P
work in the rank of Esquire this even
ing. A full attendance of members is
desired. Visiting Knights cordially in
vited. G. B. Stebbens, C. C.
F. S. Hodges, E. R. & 8.
"Can't eat a thing." Hood's Sarsapa
rilla is a wonderful medicine for creating
an appetite, regulating digestion and giv
ing strength.
D1K.D.
O'COHHEB Ia Bock Island, at 9 o'clock, a. m.
Fedneaday, April 10, 1889, Leo Francis. Infant
sob of Mr. ond Mrs. Jamos T. O Conner, of n.
raiyaia of too stomach. Vnaoral from St. josepVe
Catholic chuch at o'alocktn. an TtiDMA.
April 11, '
THURSDAY, APRIL 11th.
The Picturesque Idyl,
Passion's Slave !
A Car load of Scenery 1
Elegant Costumes!
Startling Situations!
Charming Acting!
Delightful Singing!
Graceful Dancing! A Grand Metro
politan Cast!
Produced as Promised.
The Grandest Dramatic Representa
tion of Modern times.
Prices 25, 50 and 75 cents.
HARPER'S THEATRE
C. A. Stikl. - Manager.
ONE NIGHT ONLY,
SATURDAY, APRIL 13.
Grand production of Little's Famoua Scenic
Drama, entlile l
THE
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OOO K R LI.LLL DPVtD
t'nrtcr the prrMv.at management of Geo. O.
Moirie, It trodncine America' favorite ac
tor, J. Z. LITTLE, in his original crea
tion of Harry Elliaton.
The Harbor,
The Sinking Ship,
The Great Raft Scpne.
Tbe Lunatic Asylum. Revolving Walla and mag
mutcni aiooniiKui ranorama.
We positively carrv evenr acene neroxaarv tn
the production of thix great play.
t-rice s, to ana i centx.
Turner Grand Opera House.
DAVKNPORT.
Saturday and Sunday, April
13, 14. Sunday Matinee.
A perfect production of Mr. L. R. Shewett'a
Shadows ; Great City
Tnder the management of Chas. B. and
Thos. Jefferson.
The Original Cast.
t Our own Snecinl Cat rennireil in imnannrt
vast wealth of
Alarrnificent
Scenery.
Prices an Uanal No Hicher 8r
oiuai place.
BASEJALL.
Davenport
vs
Chicago West End.
Saturday and Sunday,
April 13 and 14.
Game called at S Sip. m. Saturday.
Sunday game called at S p. m.
Dancing School
AT
ARMORY HALL,
Wednesday Evening, April 10
Admission 35 Cents.
Good order maintained. Objectionable
characters strictly prohibited.
Street cars for Moline after dance.
GK. 8TROEHLK.
CHAS. BLEI ER.
Managers.
J)issolution notice.
The co-partnership heretofore exietin? uuder
iuc aim uauic 01 uanquara K Browner ban thia
"j wuuiiwintQ oy mutual consent, Mr. Theo
Danquard retiring. Mr. Geo. B. Browner will
continue tbe baeinees at the old stand, assume all
ii.uuiucu ana receipt ror all moneys due the firm
TH KO DANQCAHD,
, . , , . OEO. B. BROWNE.
Rock Island, 111., April 10, 1S8S. 8t
DC
O
o
a
o
NEW STOCK-
or
Wall Paper
CURTAINS, .
Room and Pioturb
Mouldings
Curtain Pulls,
Chains, Pins
and Cord.
Picture Wire,
Cord Nails & Hooks,
At the very Lowest
Prices.
Call and see.
C. C. Taylor
Under Rock Island Ilouae.
FIHAICIAL.
FARM LOANS
SECURED BY FIRST MORTGAGE
Always on band for sale at 6
and 7 per cent to investor.
Interest Collected without
Charge.
Eery effort made to handle
only choice investments.
Call or write for details.
Extra Value;
McINTIRE BOS.
Offer extra inducements to close buyers
in all departments this week.
Shallies
in cream grounds, pretty designe,
3h cents
But one dress pattern to each customer.
This price for a short time only.
Seersuckers
in checks and plains, very good quality,
6 cents
for this week only.
G i ii crh a m s ,
Checked Ginghams.
5 cents
better quality than usually sold at
that price.
Laee Curtains.
A handsome assortment in Lace
Curtains, in Brussels and Nottingham,
just received, which will be offered at
very low prices. Examine our Lace cur
tains at
$1.25 a pair
AND
11.75 a pair.
You would call them cheap at $3.25
and f 3 00. The better ones are as cheap
in proportion,
JACKETS !
Have just placed on salo new arrivals in
Ladies' black Jersey sheet jackets at
Popular Prices.
McINTIRE BROS.
Hock Island, Illinois.
A Mammoth Stock
OF-
ji ,,
1 -cWlfPPl
55
(0
Pi
0
1ARGER THAN EVER:
and three times as large as any other establishment in
this city can be seen at the popular store of
CLEMANN '& SALZMANN.
They buy direct from the Manufacturers, thus saving the
wholesale dealers' profits and are enabled to command the
lowest prices.
No. 1525 and 1527 Second Ave.,
The only Double Front Store in Rock Island.
U. B. ZIMMER
Merchant Tailor
f
Star Block,
0pp. Harper House,
-IS RECEIVING DAILY HIS STOCK OF-
Spring and Summer Goods,
of the latest patterns. Call and examine them and remem
ber that he makes his suits up In the latest styles.
HIS FRIGES ARE LOW.
To Cure Spring Fever
-TAKE-
KOHN & ADLER'S,
IB I TT TT IE RS!
$1.50 per Gallon.
POST OFFICE BLOCK.
ROCK ISLAND. ILL.
Greatest Bargains Ever Offered
IN ROCK ISLAND IN
BOOTS and SHOES
Childrens' Shoes - - 10, 15, 25 and 50 cents.
Childrens' H. C. School shoes, - - 85c and $1.00
Misses best School shoes, - - - $1.25
Misses II. C. Fancy Lace shoes, - - ' - $1.50
Ladies' Slippers, - - 50c, 65c, 75c and $1.00
Ladies' Grain Button shoes. ....
Ladies' Fine Dongola Button shoes,
Ladies' Fine Dongola Hand Tamed shoes,
Mens' solid Working shoes.
am.uo wuujjiooSi 1IUIWU3 auu. units, ' ci.uy A
Sv
all other goods in proportion
t9I will guarantee better eoods and lower rjricea
three cities or refund money.
GEO. SCHNE
CENTRAL SHOE S
ELM STREET SHOE STORE, PI
29S9 Fifth ATenue.
7
than
7 dP,-
V a F -
D, ILL.
4i
if!
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