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Imperial Valley press and the Imperial press. (El Centro, Calif.) 1906-1907, December 29, 1906, Image 7

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn92070144/1906-12-29/ed-1/seq-7/

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Holtville Happenings
[From Oof Regular Correspondent.
I Lena Brldenstlne Is home from Po
[nona college to spend the holiday va
latlon with her parents. She Is enjoy
ing her school work very much.
I Mrs. G. A. Skafte, wife of the pastor
If the M. E. church, has been suffering
luring the past week from neuralgia.
I R. E. Polndexter, of St. Louis, spent
lunday In Holtvllle.
IA. B. Jones has moved to his new
|)me on Cedar avenue.
1 A large crowd took advantage of
He excursion to El Centro on Christ
las night and attended the dance at
Hat place.
■ The directors of Imperial Water
Bmpanles No. 5 and 7 were at Imper
■ Thursday on business.
HThe board of directors of Imperial
Hater company No. 5 held a meeting
■ last Saturday and held the sale of
H delinquent stock. There was but
fly little stock for sale and It was bid
E HI
Hit a good figure.
||. S. Davis left Monday for an ex-
Hied visit with his family ln Redlands.
H W. Hart, one of the prosperous
tjfchers of the north end of district
Pls, was doing business In Holtvllle,
IfHirday.
fir. Robert M. Fryer and his grand-
HBfrom Newbern, Term , Is spending
||Hv weeks In and about Holtvllle,
t.fflLg after his extensive land Inter
||Hon the east side of the Valley.
Knie ladles of the Aid Society will
IK their next meeiin s ° n Wednes *
||Hjanuary 2d, at the residence of
||Hf. J. Cole.
pH. B. Richards and wife entertained
pfie company of relatives and friends
I/Hiristmas dinner on that day.
pHe Holtvllle chambej of commerce
f iHiold their next regular meeting on
I Mday evening, January sth.
■Ha Rust returned Monday from a
p|H business trip to Los Angeles.
I* ft he went t0 ma^ e * lna ' pro °* on
Mj official board of the M. E.
feHh held a meeting on last Wed
|i#Hy evening for the transaction of
I^- J S SS :
Brawley Budget
ir specialtcorrespondent.
Christmas tree at the school
was well attended by the older
s well as the little ones. Ev
g passed off without a hitch
enjoyed a pleasant evening.
and Mrs. Tom Edgar spent
Ihrlstmas with friends and rela
1 Imperial. '
jvley was well represented at the
Liven at El Centro, Christmas
[why don't the young people of
ly get up a dance at home some
I Lydla Whlted came In Wed :
I evening to visit a few days
V. and Mrs. Frederick. Miss
I was teacher of the first school
fend Martha Malan and Will
Ire home from school to spend
1 Jones has put on a delivery
lo deliver goods to his custom
lines has an eye for business.
■Nellie Pellett has just received
■ointment as postmistress of
I, to succeed Mrs. Edith Mead-
Bned. The postofflce will be
ftmt to what location has not
■ made public.
H Dunn is In Calexlco this
■llevlng Cashier Morrlsou. of
H| State Bank, who was obliged
■Los Angeles for a few days.
H:hool here has closed for the
Hand the teachers and scholars
Hiding a pleasant vacation,
Is spending her vacation
" J me ln No. 8.
• r J'lelds is sdendlng the holidays
Hme In San Diego.
Silsbec Sayings
From our regular Correspondent.
the W. C. T. U. meets next Wed
nesday, Jan. 2d, 1907, at the home of
Mrs. Patterson, at 3 o'clock.
Preaching by our pastor, Saturday
night, Dec. 29th, Sunday, Dec. 30th,
morning and night, and a midnight
watch service Monday night. Every
body Invited to see the old year go out
and the new year come In. These
meetings will be In the Sllsbee school
house, beginning at 7:30 every evening
of these three evenings.
The Y. P. C. E. next Sunday even-
Ing beginning at 7 o'clock sharp. Top
ic Dec. 30, "Carey and Missions In
India."
List your lands with the Ira Aten
Land Co. They can get you best re
sults.
Wesley Masten Is home and has
taken charge of his father's draylng
business.
Preaching at 3 o'clock Sunday at
school house by J. F. Tout. Suncjay
school at 2p. m. All Invited.
Mrs. S. T. Clover, wife of the edllor
of the Los Angeles News, was register
ed at the Hotel El Centro, Thursday.
The rain seems \ ard on our tele
phone system. Thursday and Friday
El Centro had hard work to comml
cate with the other towns.
R. F. Moore orrlved here Saturday
from Los Angeles to take a position
with the Holton Power Company as
bookkeeper and stenographer.
H. J. Messenger was over from
Holtville Thursday. He Is having
some printing done at the Press office
for the Holtvllle Chamber of Com
merce.
We are expecting a large number
of land seekers ln soon from Colorado,
Oklahoma and Texas. If you have
land for sale now is the time to list It
with Ira Aten Land. Co.
Superintendent Ingram made a fly
ing trip to Holtvllle ln his special car
Thursday afternoon Mr. Ingram owns
land on the East Side and went over
to see after some work he Is having
done.
Rev. D. M. Gandler, of San Bernar
dino, superintendent of the anti-saloon
league for this district, has been ln the
Valley for the past week. He was the
guest of Rev. Croco here Thursday
night and till noon Friday, at which
time he started on his return home.
Mr. Marlon Keen, representative Of
J. Crouch and Son, breeders and Im
porters of fine horses, of LaFayette,
Ind., left Wednesday noon for Santa
Ana. where he' will exhibit some select
stock. Mr. Keen said he had never
been In a place where his stay had
been as pleasant as at the Hotel El
Centro. He expects to return In about
a month.
Pay off Old Subscribers
Considerably over $10,000 had been
paid back to subscribers to the San
Diego- Eastern railroad fund by the
relnbursment commlt:ee's office, Fifth
and C streets when the office closed
yesterday afternoon.
George W. Marston, a member of
the committee, said last night:
••More than a third of the San
Diego- Eastern fund has been paid
back to subscribers. On Thursday
1 14 checks were Issued, amounting to
$5,500, while on Friday the number of
checks was 136, and the amount un
doubtedly larger than on the previous
day, The checks drawn so far have
averaged $50 each,"— San Diego
Union.
Wilson says he has calls for
Imperial lands and especially for
exchange for good orange and
lemon groves, Los Angeles city
property, also Riverside, Pomona,
Pasadena, alfalfa lands in Downey
and Compton. Now Mr. Farmer
you want to see Wilscn about it.
Thelma Hotel, Imperial , Cal.
BALL FIELD STORIES
ODD INCIDENT THAT ONCE WON A
GAME IN CHICAGO.
One of the oddest things that ever
happened on n ball field took piaro ou
the west side grounds, In Chicago, In a
game against New York. Alison's meu
were playing the Giants, and the vic
tory hung in the balance until in the
ninth inning, with the s^ore even, Bill
Lange faced .Touet Meekln and rainp?od
a certain double to center. There were
two out, and the crowd rose with a yr>U
of- delight when Lange smote the ball,
which rolled past Van Haltren.
That ball rolled on and finally disap
peared. Van Haltren was on top of it,
but Instead of picking It up lie sudden
ly threw himself flat on the ground,
rammed his right arm Into^the earth
and commenced reaching. Lange
meantime kept on. He turned second,
raced on to third, gave a look outward
nnd then sprinted for home, scoring the
winning run.
The ball had rolled Into n hole ln the
ground from which a post had been
pulled that morning, and Van Tlaltren
had been able only to reach It with the
tips of his fingers. The next day the
hole was filled ln.
Upbn what small things the* results
of baseball depend can be guessed
when It is known that a forty-five cent
bucket of paint won the National
league pennant for Baltimore two years
in succession. The men who composed
the three times champion Orioles all
admit the fact that the bucket of paint
had more to do with their pennant win
ning than anything else.
The facts are these: The Orioles
were not hitting. They could not find
out why until one day Willie Keeler
remarked that the ball when pitched
from the pitcher's box was the same
color as the center field fence and that
the ball was lost to them against the
dark background. The players set
themselves down to figure it out, and
hi the end they figured that the reason
they were not hitting was because
there was a lack of relief ln the color
scheme of the grounds. The bat boy
was sent in a hurry for a pot of white
paint and a patch of the fence in cen
ter field exactly on a line with the
pitcher's box, and the plate was daub
ed white. The paint made a difference
of nearly forty points per man in their
batting averages that season, and they
won the pennant.
After that the space in center on
most of the big league ball grounds
was kept clear or painted In some
color that would assist the team in its
hitting.
The color scheme in baseball is more
important than the casual observer
would suppose. For instance, the Polo
grounds are one of the hardest grounds
in the world for an outfielder. Back of
the grand stand rises a huge bluff—
"Coogan's bluff" — and the stand is
built partly on the side of the hill.
Naturally the shadow of the stand and
the bluff lies heavy over the field as
far out as second base in the late after
noon, and the outfielders have great
difficulty in seeing the ball until it rises
out of the shadow and above the sky
line. The players learn to judge balls
by the way they sound against the
bat, but visiting players at the Tolo
grounds have a hard time judging line
drives.
For years the New York players have
had the advantage because of the color
scheme of their grounds. In center
field is a panel of color to relieve the
batter's eye and show the ball in re
lief against it, while to mitigate the
effects of the shadow sections of the
front of the stand and even the bowl
ders on the hillside have been painted.
Those mechanical aids for batting are
great things. Almost every home team
has its grounds arranged for relief in
color, so thivt they can by looking at a
certain spot be certain to see the ball.
It is not necessary for the ball to rise
against the relief background, but it Is
necessary for the player's eye to bp
filled with the color, so that when ho
looks at the ball it stands out in relief
against the color which still is imprint
ed on the retina of his eye.
One of the best hitting pitchers thai
ever lived, Walter Thornton. Who was
driven out of baseball because of the
personal dislike of an official of the
National league to him, had a scheme
which worked well and which he claim
ed aided him in batting. He simply
sat and held his fingers tight against
bis eyes for several minutes before go-
In;,' to bat. Shutting out all light, he
claimed, rested his eyes after pitching
a^ hard Inning, and he went In to bat
with eyes fresh and steady.
And lW he did hit thorn! How he
did hit them!
Pietro Gladiator Browning tried ev
ery treatment possible for his eyes tc
keep them clear. Smoking a cigarette
on the bench was one of his ideas, and
he carried an eye wash with him which
Do poured into his eyes just before go
Ing to bat.
Most of the schemes of players tc
keep their "eyes In," as they say, are
ridiculous, but there is no reason why
a lot of players should not follow lit
erally the advice of the bleacherltes
and "see an oculist." Any good ocu
list can devise a color scheme that wIU
help the batter.— Hugh S. Fullerton it
Washington Star.
taSXSSK3KXS3K3JC23CSXSXSXS3KXa
|Homeseekers -^S
I' Colonists 1
jOi ShouM take advantage of the excellent Tourist Car service from ><
Jy New Orleans to the Imperial Settlements maintained by V
W the £j
I SOUTHERN PACIFIC g
*J >^UfjTi^V The only road Into tlie Imperial Vnlley, L*J
S/itS2*^rs\ Por Information. Write ->r Ask A. D. Medh Jrst.O
ffelfcl- A^ cnt « El Centro; or T. A. Oraham, A. Q. T. &^
K^ \5QSfnSy 6(K> South S P ri "K Street. UO
New Jewelry Catalog No. 22
BEAUTIFUL CHRISTMAS EDITION /f^T^.
V^W^^^^^^^mi k uyin 2 advantages of our three large f7^(Vy^^Ml)v}]
f& wig stores mean a saving for you. The \l\rJ^k^^^'JcJ/J
ma^ e yo ur Christmas shopping easy.
«u.« M Ann BROCK 8 FEAGANS ,4K, 4K S oiid <Lia Brood,
HO. 73 f BZb.UU IPYVFrFP? ■ „ *
, 14K Solid Goia R j JEWELERS. C fc a «el.,ne P.n. Very
Bm,t!ntfCa.e. 15- Jeweled Droadway and loorth M. Heavy. Exquisitely
Eldln or Wiltbim MoTement LOS Angeles, California Carved. Ro»e FinUti.
L. W. Blinn Lumber Co.
«
T. B. Blanchard, Agent
1
El Centro, California
LOTS
Florence $525
Avenue UP
Tract S5O CASH
$10 A MONTH
On Vermont Avenue the Great
IN THE NEW ANNEX TO GREATER LOS ANGELES
The Biggest Success of the Year
Send for Mays and Particulars, High Grade, Low, First-Offering
Prices.
THE M C CARTHY CO.
Main Office in Our Own Building
203 N: BROADWAY, LOS ANGELES
El Centro Livery^tables^
Good Turn-Outs
Rigs Furnished Land Seekers at Reasonable Rates.
Horses Fed and Cared For by the Day or Week.
Inquire at Hotel El Centro
El Centro California

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