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The Intermountain Catholic. (Salt Lake City [Utah] ;) 1899-1920, August 29, 1903, Image 5

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn93062856/1903-08-29/ed-1/seq-5/

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I = THE INTERnoUNTAlfSf AND COLORADO CATHOLIC AUGUST 29 1903 5
II I om4 nOIf and 6irfSI 1 I AUNT Edited BUSY by I
J
iv
was a terrible
Brown
ub Timothy
Laln he voted a bore
nd ie J gfill11l11ar EDni geography history
f lI
< Un IS ot learn any mora
fUTP l 1u > d lIot
1 I Tor the car he knew nothing
end
tht e
t
St 111
thins under thc sun
1ut gral11l11ar lilY geography history
fnJh
sun1 forgot n them every one
I1r d
rich uncle said Timothy
1ay 1
ra
on
BrOIl 1
question or two
k Y ni A
Ii fojO fin and vourc younger
l1 I
J 1
tJn al11 I older than you
Wd H jVnVitliJ j Brown he thought for
lP
t la t he dlB < vveied this fact
hiiu a notion how long hed
111 t hI
hflrn
Hn
J h d1dnt knoW how to subtract
birthday Ill give
r fl1 I 1 > 1 s your
lip
u utH v Hnd patted his pate
111
hlf
v d Brown he burst into
1il11lhY
lnvi
pol
ni r idn t romomhw the date
Hr 1j S tl1l nd < of the story of Tim
th Bnwn
t1iy nluV perfectly true
1 lr
theres 2 moral for no
rim
Ard rrha
t 1
nt theres a moral for you
> rhJPs
J1 p i I
BUSY HAS HER SAY
AUNT
Nps and Nephews Aunt
i sr rite much this week
mtt
I n
This Y ultes that are nearly de
t diffiulties
1111 ni old rerves She is in
1 yJl1S he 1onr l
vaaction and
taking ncr
1lIlJlry
h perched on a big gray rock
is
1U 11lW t r > rite 1 few lines to the
vig children in America
hct
n <
RI1
rM 1
j lf 1
P dlo wasps aie flying around
Big nmranifd by mzzing lees all trying
I under Aunt Busys big sun
TrUt and trying to sting her funny
11O
h1 1
Hundreds of toads and frogs are ly
around on the ground chipmunks
jg
nd ualnfk are uoning up the moun
MIII nttle id I ints are waltzing all
Aunt Buhys neck mosquitoes are
fr
hhimg i at hr face a HUe red calf with
white nse and a Dig voice is calling
tI
I r its mamma afiojoh dear oh dear i
with horns
frf fl1S three cows big
L nnnr fat old Aunt Busy must say
godbvc and waddle to a safe vi ace
ll ° f mCl
AUNT BUSY
LETTERS AND ANSWERS
Rawlins Vyo June 15
Pear Aunt l3usy4 guess you thought
I had quit riting to you but I have
nm My mother and sister Kate have
pone to Salt Lake City to the concert
bfcau my brother Will is there and
h < if i going to come home with them
He got the gold medal I have a broth
er John
4 MARGARET WALLACE
Aunt Busy never forgets any of her
little friends Margaret Why have
you not answered Aunt Busys ques
tion Write soon again dear
j +
MATOOCHA
Far out on the nathless prairie
II Dwelt a tribe of Indian braves
Matoocha sweet forest fairy
Was the beloved of them her slaves
i
I H r firm with faultless breauty
I crowned
Her soul with purest innocence blest
Among he friends these gifts re
nowned
Were known as MetcliuTchusilb
vest
Chief Latoka read her father
Chief of the warriors brave
To him fighting vas no bother
He had many scalps to wave
Well at length Jesuit
a young came I
To instruct them in the truths of God I
But these Indians were not tame
Xtey quickly felled him to the sod
I
ifcey bound hte feet and hands
the hands that God had blest
BoUDd them with ropes and bands
tits soul would soon have rest
Sut Matoorha like one before her
Threw herself in Latokas arms
And he who did adore her
OwM not fijjht against her charms
At her wish he freed the priest < I
for her wish n as his command
for the Jesuit he gave a feast
To all Indians in the land
1 > > 1 tc
U5Olatncha first came
The truth of the tfprfe Land
Ever on her Ups His name
in her heart His command
TIM JelUit told hfr of the nuns
Who labor for Gods love
itrlOUgh hoee midst ever runs
The fire of love for Him alone
from whence he came
VIdtUOCfla the forest fairy
lId Sbe labored in His name
ne sweet Princess of the prairie
RICHARD C MURPHY
Pocatello Idaho
1it > tchu TchuliJ Vature
IAe one before her Pocahontas
Aunt Busy is I always pleased to re
< heany1hing from The pen of her dear
De bew
bne5 Richard Murphy Aunt Busy
> ou will persevere in your writ
bit
w vjn
do you not
iI1 answer Aunt
UE3r equation Uiohard
f
bear Boise Idaho July 22
Aunt RUfIIYC been thinking
W writing to You for some time T have
W net Wtjtt4fl a letter to you for such a
time that perhaps = you have < for
jah mf w e used to live in Eureka
but nw d to Boise about two
ieh htbll aglJ T ik > this l11ace very
but
J am lonesome Dear Aunt
r you vcr lonesome I had
4ra ntaiy ni f ttle piaymates in Eu
il2rf1iJp1 mamma and a little
W nt bIJI and f1Ptr hcre but T am can
Rois4 feeling lo Hwome sometimeP
i
of Idaho a btiautrul city the capital
4 d ha = H population of 12000 lo
in i
dc 8 raIl of fruit grain bay
ttI l
TIM ranches The city is sup
f1tst with boun < anco of water The
fi hav
a fcewitiful
bUilt new wing
to till St
it Ic Alohr is hospital and
aIs0 a fand buil l g t There is
i refias 8 bea addiljon Vin built to St
8 aadf >
I afadeniy
Pram
your
loin
w
Iov1nIRE
TREXO i HALEY
Atiat
from BUllY is very pleased to hear
hl
3ar Inn
deed She giis again In
little girl did not forget them Yes
lOtn Aunt Busy as been lone
r friends fry lonesome many times for
do but she had to learn to
witiut
0 er them You will certainly
1
man
new nomo v little Playmates in your
ltg letter You Write a very interest
o bettr rL dear and Aunt Busy hope
from you very often
+
I
r Aunt Boise Idaho July 22
lHing rJLUs As sister Irene is
to write you a few lines
Iuanted to iiS
write j
se5 is le so many times and
about
Ut to let Your age I know you told
that
WSteftt J K0 but Aunt Bus
You
° Ii I and h just fooling about being
elashes having Xo no teeth and vearinff
MinaR aunti < 5 aje Jiot like that
11 > 1 am 16ht years old
I
and when I leave
to help mamma I school I am going
I from home Goodbye Wont ever go away
Your niece
lIiLDIlED HANLEY
I A good w
welcome
Who Wrote dear lutle Mildred
at last
to
Aunt
you are always Busy And
gOing
mamma Well to remain with
you will not Aunt Busy hopes that
change
You your mind because
will never
I gOod and lovely 15 find mamma anYone as dear
Aunt
Busy really will
thing more about her not say any
wanls to forget age because she
how
Write old she really is
soon again dear
I
Schley Was Stupid as a Boy
Jesuits Admiral college ScMev New was Orleans the guest of the i
cent Saturday nS Vn a rc
H
istlc address to the He Vlade a character I I
to his school das in student Alluding
the
Jesuit
at college
1 Frederick Md he said
J r am Sorry to say that
as a boy I
was very stupid
I creased Inversely My love of study in I
as the
I distance studies which If they separated had turned square me the from of class the my
upside
down I
would have
I ttearly head But been very
my pleasant
I 1ectlon5 recol
I are
mJ associations
I with
teachers my
I used to thInk
that
I er they were rath
exacting but I forgot to supple
ment that condition
the fact that I
was a little lazy
azy I
I touch But I emember today the sweet I
of
the
hand
th
tht
t
from cam to 1 1e I
Son1e of t hOI > n I T
u UIL leal1
ers some of whom are still
tillliving And
jj I have
achieved i t
j distinguish me above anything others that it would was
entirely l due to their counsel
I Do not think when
you lean theRe
halls
that your education
° n has been in
I july sense completed It has only be
gun The methods taught here the
I discipline availed of and the opportu
nity gIven he are only assistance
which will hold you in tho life that is
I before you I shall never forget as a
boy how < > earnestly my teachers in St
Johns Colleg in Frederick impressed
upon me the importance of duty in
everything They counseled me that
whatever I undertoook to strive to do
it better than anybody else
A Chinese Fable
Once a hungry tiger met a fox in the
forest and concluded make a meal of
himOh
Oh do not said the fox eat me
up Do you not perceive that T am the
noblest and most distinguished of all
the animals of the forest if you do
not believe me pnmr > win mr > nil i
shall speedfiy convince you
I So they vent through the forest to
gether The fox carried himself right
haughtily motioning right and left as
if bidding the other animals begone out
I f his sight And everywhere they ap
Peared the animals hastened to obey
I what seemed to the tiger the foxs
command The tiger therefore looked
more and more admiringly at his com
panion Truly he said to himself
the fox is indeed the king of all the
animals and too stupid to see that he
himself was the object of the animals
I fear and respect he forehore to eat
the fox who appeared so regal to him
How a Spider Saved His Life
On the cejling of one of the rooms in
Sans SoucS the world renowned palace
of Frederick the Great in Prussia is
the painting of a huge spider with its
web The reason for this odd decora
tion is that one morning just as the
king was about to drink his usual
cup of chocolate in his room he turned
aside for something and when a mo
ment later he took up the cup he
noticed a small spider had fallen into
it Immediately upon giving an order
for a fresh cup a pistol report wan
heard and it was discovered that the
cook had shot himself The reason for
this it was later found out was that
he had poisoned the chocolate and of i
course he supposed his treachery had
been discovered It was in remem
brance of this narrow escape that Fred
erick ordered a spiders web painted
on the ceiling I
A Legend
In Suffolk England robins are safe
from boys who hunt birds nests it
being considered unlucky to interfere
in any way with the bird that min
istered to our Lord on the cross The
tradition is that a robin tried to pinch
the thorns from our Saviours head
and that its breast was stained with
his blood A robin once died in my
hand said a boy who could not keep I
his pen steady enough to write and
if a robin dies in your hand it will
always shake
A Saints Reply
St Aloysius was once taking his rec
reation with some companions and in
the course of the conversation the
question was asked what should be
done if the hour of judgment had come
One said he would fall on his knees
and repent of his sins Another said
he would hasten to confession When
the turn of Aloysius came he re
marked I would continue my recre
ation for I began it in Gods name and
in his honor I would end it
0Cl80
ON GROWING OLD
Dr Alfred Schofield Describes Signs
of Increasing Age
Pall Mall Gazette
The night bell rang Mingling at first
with my dreams ss I sleep profoundly
it slowly disentangles itself and a second
I He in
peal rouses me to consciousness
bed with limbs of lead my body a dead
weight my head alone is alive and Is
consciously myself Yes thats Just it
The body is a weight because it is dead
not dead permanently nor conventionally
but if death bo the final separation of
body and spirit I am conscious that that
I separation has begun In short I am
growing old I well remember how dif
I ferent it was only a few years ago There
however minute between
no cleavage
was tween body and spirit then IfL bell
roused me out of sleep I sprang up that
instinct with life rny brain no more alive
body and the wholem self I
m
than mv
was a whole and had no consciously de
fined parts
flNowPhow different The ego the In
dividuality at any rate as I lie here on
seems to have retired into the
waking
I brain and let the body n dead machine
not myself into which I feid l thE enorglz
propelled from the brain slowly
Ing power painfully entering The cleavage
I and 13n Its
and death itself Is merely
has begun
I ss A surprising fact is the
completIon
SSSSSsVlshl becomes the
enormous weight the body
I moment It ceases to be part of the ego
I 1 was couscous of no weight at all In i leSs
long as they were myself
body as
or
nowthe
harmonious whole but
1 and a mbdeled in lead and form fur
logs seem
ags I to Ut them
lit the bed and as try
rowS
the enormous amount Qf
understand
1 sss
required I have no thought of
leverage paralysis J know they wlll move when
enters but It has to enter find
UH power apparently inert mass and this
entry enter an moreover is a matter of distinct
0fA tm1t will 1 am UP but It Is not a pleas
but an effort still My head forces
ore into Its clothes as a nurse
body
my wooden child
somewhat
would dress a
patient and as
to a
out see
I have to go
alternately
I propel my legs
I walk along
like
consciouslY r dont drive them
atlll propel them like the
horses but rather
how
As I proceed
cycle
cranks of a
seems graduall to
ever the cleavoge from the sick
J return
and as
disappear a unitylegs arms
more
I once
bed am
and not
is alive
The man
body held the head A1l this wlll be dismissed
nterolv
the
superficial reader as
missed by the
in walking but it is not
normal process j3
difference of
fen There is a profound
psychological and phrslol0lical
deepest between what I have described
meaning
circum
and my waking udder the same
cars ago
stances years
led a steadY temperate
56 have
r noW
am and mental
ate life am in good physical over
nor
hetijth ind commencinG neither under cleavage II the
workeP This slOwlY
processwhi °
Of that procc
bcinnhitg
disease
contlnuedbarrf1IS accltlents and
wilt end in
that natural death an end to life
country only come to one in ten in this
are other 1 am growing old But there
slight
a loss of signs I am conscious of
tie height elasticity If 1 JumP down a lit
over broken or run down hill Or stride
ground I find I down
come
on
my feet and
legs With
weight increased
elasticity Solidity with a seems to have replaced
somewhat resulting jar I am
stlffcL
in all my movements
though Course very slightly so There are of
elastic certain changes in my body The
tissue Is not so elastic but I am
conscious
I this is not all
The bottom
hat reasln seems to me to be
my feet
and legs are no longer an
I11separablc part of myself as formerly
arc not so to io
hut speak so highly vitalized
are more
ooden more like
to supports
the
this body than ldrts of It Vith all
m hraln
and mind
If not brisker seem brighter
Reason burns with less
smoke
and a clE3rer
flame A 1 the po
I seem to retire into till spiritual part of
me Slowly
hv derees
final rees before it takes Its
more flight at eath the mind seems
more powerflll 9l > a tanking becomes a
poslthe
then of body and soul Pleasure in a healthy The man separation seems
Imperceptible really a very gradual and Almost
ever the I Process that begins when
ummit of the hill
of life ib
reached
It und the long descent commences
becomes more and
more conspicuous
HI old
quite age creeps on bUt even at 5 is
apparent At first of course the
Cleavage
phenomlJon is only a tiny tlS5I1J > ieei n as a
becomes at ran limp But It soon
familiar and one gets more and
more
accustomed to looking all tIlt body
fiR
fin external 1
object and
This not ones self I
Is IHorr efbPS until toward the end it
lfter000is ill perhaps for a abort time in the i
rnoons when at ncs biKhtest that i
the old feelIng
thl of unity
briefly returns i
nun fh I
thUH the way is gently Prepared for
thE lat spirits final flight whpn the link at
is seered and the man dead I
r < s I
STOLEN CHINESE TREASURE
I
Curio Consisting of a Tree Construct
ed of recious Stones
The Chinese imperial city is due of I
the most mysterious snots in tim imM I
I about which a web u of romance and h I
tragedy has been woven through cen
turic5 but of the material condition
In the Forbidden City little is known
Jt is within the sacred confines of
the sacred city that the treasure anti
traditions of the empire are guarded
and it has long been considered impos I
sible fOI anything to be stolen or mis
laid because of the strict vigilance
maintained over the premises by a
strong force and the extreme penalty
given those who are remiss in theIr
I duties But notwithstanding this vig I
ilance of the trained watchdogs of the =
treasure several years ago perhap
no living min knows when or howa
tree of great value disappeared and its I
whereabouts was unknown till quit
recently when it was discovered in the
Boston museum
How it got there and when is not
known but the discovery of its pres
ence in Boston created a great commo
lion among the Chinese and a strong
effort has been mall to recover the
priceless treasure but to no purpose
This tree is made of native Chinese
precious stones known as the Chinese
I jet and stands about two and a hal
feet high and is a brilliant mass of
I radiating colors The loss of this tree
was unknown for many years and
when It was missed a systematic
search was made for it but without
success and since the invasion of the
Imperial City by the foreign troops the
tree has been discovered in the Boston
museum but there seems to be no one I
I who can explain how it got there If
there is the Chinese have never learned
I the facts in the case though every ef
fort has been made to learn in what
manner the tree was removed from the
Treasure City brought to America and
finally placed in the museum During I I
the recent isit of Leong Kai Cheu and
Pow Chee to New Orleans says the
II TimesDemocrat of that city the lat
ter discussed the disappearance of the
tree and its discovery at Boston
Of all the mystery connected with
the Chinese Imperial City said he
this is probably thc most inexplicablt
For more than two centuries the ston
tree has been closely guarded day awl
night and only a few persons knew of
its existence or where it was kept
though it has a romantic history and
that is why the discovery of its loss
created so great a furore several years I
ago among Chinese officials The em
pire was searched but no trace of it
could be found Then an effort was
made to locate the person or persons
who were responsible fo rits disappeai
ance but nothing could be learned from
those guarding the treasure house as
I none of them had ever seen the tree
An investigation followed lasting sev
eral years and the officers to whom
was intrusted the mission of locating
the culprit or culprits made a report
to the effect that the treasure tree had
been stolen years before Then an ef
fort was made to locate it throughout
the world hut no trace of it was ever
found and it had almost been forgotten
when shortly after the Boxer troubles
the tree made its appearance very sud
denly in the Boston museum How it
got to Boston Is as much a mystery
as its disappearance from the treasure
house in the Forbidden City and Its
discovery created a great commotion
among the Chinese throughout tli3
world It has been a subject of dis
cussion among the Chinese officials
and the matter was brought to the at
tention of the United States authori
ties but It seems that the tree is lost
to the Chinese fore er
Were it not known that it dis
appeared before the invasion of the for
eign troops its loss to China could
easily be explained but it was known
to have been stolen years before the
Boxer troubles It Is a mystery how
It was taken from the treasure house
and carried from the Imperial City
and there is still more mystery at
tached to its disappearance oecause 01
I the fact that no trace of its where
abouts could be found till after the
Boxer troubles All Chinese are asking
two questions How did it get out or
China and where has it been since it
was stolen years ago But there prob
ably is no one living Who can answer
these questions The value of the tree
cannot be computed in dollars and
cents as it is the only thing of its kind
in the world
According to tradition it was pre
sented to the emperor of China many
many years ago by a Chinese prince
who had been condemned to death for I
some alleged crime but whose inno
cence was discovered only a few days I
before the date set for his execution I
He had been confined to prison for a
number of years and during his incar
ceration had made this tree from na
thc stones rhen it was officially
known that he was innocent the em
peror pardoned the prince who for Joy
at being restored to life and liberty
presented his majesty with the tree
which was always kept in the treasure
house
Though Pox Chee is in a sense an
exile from his native country because I
of his prominence in the movement to
dethrone the empress dowager and has
long been a resident of the United
States and Australia during which
period he has embraced the Christian
religion he spoke of the missing treas
ure with a marked reverence
II >
LIVED TO GREAT AGE
New York Aug 22JaI10 Anna
Longland who as a child danced With
the Duke of Wellington who saw the
coronation of Queen Victoria and was
friendly with the children of Don Car
los the pretender to the Spanish
throne is dead at her home in Brook
lyn She was 94 years old Her fa
ther was an interpreter in the royal
navy The children of Dos Carlos lived
in his home for some time while he
acted as their tutor
c a
BILL ARF DEAD
Cartersville Ga Aug 24 Major
Charles H Smith widely known as Bill
Arp died at his home The Shadows
tonight after an illness of many month
aged 77 years Following an operation
for the removal of gall stones several
days ago he became gradually weaker
most of the time unconscious until the
end tonight
Marseilles Aug SSL The French steam
er Jldmlral Gueydonrwhichsailcd hence
July 15 for Colombo has been given up
for lost
r I oiversaios of Our fllalb I
By Ortst Ji Bc vnson
J wish said Father John conclud
ing a remark on college education the
Catholic public in our country tQ take
higher views of what a collegiate edu
cation should be I wish them to in
sist on a higher standard being reached
and to sustain the college in reaching
I it Fatrr John thought we had men
fully capable to educate to the full ex I I
tent demanded Give them theI
I I
youths he said and let them have I II
them long enough to carry them
I through the prescribed course and I I I
think there will be little cause for com
I plaint
CHAPTER XContinued
II Though I cannot agree to tolerate
the common schools as far as Father
John seems disposed to do said Wins
low I can agree with him in his views
of collegiate education But he ought
in justice to say that things ate already
taking the turn he wishes and the
Plan he suggests tins already been be
gun to be acted upon Ve can safely
leave the whole question to the proper
authorities and to the force of circum
stances
I am aware said Father John
that the changes rnd modifications I
contend for have commenced and arc
approved yery generally by the intelli
gent Catholics whether clergymen of
laymen who have much studied the
tubject In several of the colleges un
der the control of the Society of Jesus
the preparatory school ii partially sep
arated from the college proper and in
them all the college is separated from
the seminary The heads of colleges
and piofessors in general even when
they see not clearly what improvements i
can be made feel that our colleges as i
they have hitherto been do not pro
duce the desired results For my part
I think we have to many colleges and
not enough of schools of an intermedi
ate grade between the primary school 1
and the college The college is the
I
worst possible school for those who are
not intended to go through the entire
course The boys are sent to college
luite too young in some instances be II
fore they have been sent to school
and they are little more than boys
when they graduate The effects of I
this are bad Our colleges as now
managed take the boy at a tender age
watch over him with a maternal solic
itude provide him with all the helps
religion can give him use all the means
and aunliances that cin bo devisor to
I make him love and preserve his faith
cram him with religious instruction
refresh his religious sensibilities by re
treats and reiterated exhortations place
the confessional always before him and
a director at his elbow till he reaches
I the age when the passions begin to un
fold and he commences the dangerous
I period of transition from the boy to
the man And then when he needs
more than ever the spiritual aids an
counsels he has been accustomed to
they send him out into society weak
ignorant without any habits of self
reliance selfgovernment or selfhelp
exposed to all its seductions and temp
tations so much the more to be dread
ed as they all hayp for him the charm
of novelty and leave him wholly un
prepared to battle with the world the
flesh and the devil as best he may The
majority I believe succumb as we I
might expect in the struggle Some
thing would be done to remedy this
evil by separating more ctesidedly i the I
preparatory school from the college
and receiving students in the college at
a more advanced age
That would do something said
Diefenbach but the system of
but1 f gov
ernment and discipline of your colleges
I think is not and can never be
adapted to a free state The nursing
system is carried too far and the stu
dent is kept constantly in leading
strings never suffered hardly even in
his sports to think and act for himself
The maxim of the college is everything
for the boys nothing by the boys
All this is very good if your boys ar > c
to be trained up to be monks or to live
n a society organized on the maxim
Everything for the people nothing by
the people But it will not do in the
training of seculars who are to Jive ir
a republican not to say a democratic
state Your American society is
founded on the maxim Help thyself
What is wanted first of all in thr
government and discipline of the col
lege Is a system that shall form as
early as possible the child to selfhelp
selfreliance and selfgovernment You
fail precisely because you educate for
the monastery or for a society organ
ized on principles which American so
ciety repudiates You overdo you do
all for the boy and suffer him to do
nothing for himself and keep him ig
norant where his only safety is in
knowledge and weak ana Iepcndent
on others precisely where he needs to
be strong and able to help himself I
The college should image on a small
scale the society in which the boys are i I
to live and play their parts as men I
and therefore in this country it
should be not a despotism or a mon
archy where the governor Is every
hing and the governed are nothing j
but a miniature repnoiic in which 1
ave in religious instruction and in the
hours of study and recitation the boys
govern themselves where from the first I
hey begin to act the parts they are to i I
act in real life Your system may be
t
admirable in other countries consti
toted differently from this but it will J i i I
not answer here where the boy pucks
in republicanism with his mothers i i
milk The failure of the nonCatholSr 1
colleges of the countrYfor fail they I
dois owing to the adoption of a elm I
I Hal system a system which makes
the maintenance of the college author
Ity the great thing to which if need
be all else must be sacrificed You
system does not and cannot fit young
men to take their proper rank and
exert their proper influence in Amer
ican society for It breaks down the
sense of independence too often destroyS
stroyS the frankness and ingenuous
ness of the boy and renders him shy I
artful false decelful and hypocritical
in one word what Protestants er
press by the word Jesuitical
The first lesson to be taught the I
child is submission and his first virtue
is obedience said Winslow and it j
15 only in prOportion as you can en 1
force this lesson and obtain this virtue
that you can organize society on a
Catholic basis In my view there is an
innate antagonism between American
society and the Catholic religion and
if you educate for the one you cannot
educate for the other
So say in principle the Know
I
Nothings said Diefenbach Why
then does Mr Winslow lind fault with
nonCatholic Americans for opposing
Catholicity on the ground that it is
ntiAmerican No matter what les
sons you teach in your college a people
whose chiefs are trained l under your
resent system of government and discipline
cipline can never be a free selfgovern
lag people as we may learn from the
example of the French people who
have notwithstanding their Intelli
gence failed ia i every attempt at re
publicanism They cannot govern
themselves and must have a master
and the more absolute the more they
love him There is no need of words
01 speculation about the matter But
I deny the fact of the alleged antag
nism That there is antagonism be
tween the system of government and
discipline of your colleges or the hab
its formed under it and the political
and social order of this country Inot
only concede but assert Yet I dare
maintain that that system which has
grvn up in other times and in other
countries and may have been wise and
I just when and where it originated is
no part of the Catholic religion and
i I is I not only distinguishable but separ
able from it There isCatholics have
asserted it over and over again noth
I ing in the constitution of the American
political and social order repugnant to
Catholicity and an American priest of
high standing has maintained at Rome
ir La Civilta Cattolica that it is even
favorable to Catholicity I have never
heard from bishop or priest whether
native born or foreign born whether
Irish or French or German or Italian
that Catholicity can prevail here only
by revolutionizing the existing political
and social order and introducing the
Caesarism which obtains in France
Naples Austria and Russia You need
in order to have this a purely CatnOIlL
I country to change nothing but the re
ligion of the American people
Mr Diefenbach is right said Fa
ther John and I agree with him in
his view of the organization of our col
leges in regard to government and dis
cipline The system adopted was good
in its time and place and well adapted
to the state of society for which It was
intended That it needs essential mod
iPcations to adapt it to the principles
and wants of our American society I
think can reasonably be doubted by
I no one But we must give our colleges
time and not complain of them for not
having introduced at once an entirely
new system of which the president
and professors could know nothing
They naturally introduced the system
with which they were acquainted and J
under winch they had themselves been i
trained All men are more or less the
creatures of routine and evils we have
long been familiar with we are apt to I i
regard either as not evils at all or as I
inevitable and to which we must recon J
cile ourselves Time Catholic trained I
under the existing system and ignorant
of i any other cannot be aware of its de I
ficiencies Our colleges had need to
learn many things from experience and
I have seen in them except perhaps in I
here and there an individual no tin j
willingness to profit by erperience i <
Many changes have already been intro
duced others are contemplated < and in j
due time all that can reasonably be
asked no doubt will be adopted if the j j
public opinion of the Catholic body can <
be brought to sustain them What I i I
insist on is that the defects of our col j t
1
leges as they are be they greater or be
they less shall not be ascribed ex <
clusively to the college faculty or au j
thorities Parents must cooperate
with the college faculty and sustain it
in its efforts at improvement Unhap < i
pily too many of our Catholic parents <
I never think of anything of the sort I
To many of them a college is a college 1 I
partaking of the infallibility of the
I church and the best thing they can do
for their J sons is to send them to col
lege though it be only for a year jl
To be Continued
EducaflonaJo
A
I I I
ST MARYS AGADEMYG
Boarding and Day School
for Young Ladies
COMPLETE CLASSICAL AND
COMMERCIAL COURSES
tflTSIC DRAWING AND PAINTING
For Catalogue Addresn
SISTER SUPERIOR
Salt Lake City Utah
ai
I
THE UNIVERSITY Of NOTRE DAME
NOTRE DAME INDIANA
Full courses in classics Letters eco
nomics and history journalism art sci
ence pharmacy law civil mechanical
and electrical engineering architecture
Thorough preparatory and commercial
courses
Rooms free to all students who have
completed the studies required for ad
mission into the sophomore junior or
senior year of any of the collegiate
courses
itooms to rent moderate charge to stu I
dents over seventeen preparing for col
legiate courses
A limited number of candidates for the
ecclesiastical state will be received at
special rates
St Edwards hall for boys under 32
years Is unique in the completeness of
lItH equipment
The 60th year will open September S I
1003 Catalogue free Address
REV A MORRISSEY C S C Presi
dent Box 240 I
i
I
I
I
KT I
Sacred Heart Academy I
OGDfEN UTAH
Boarding and day school The highest
Intellectual advantages a beautiful
and comfortable home and careful at
tention to all that pertains to good
health sound mental training refined
manners and the best general culture
Superior advantages in music and art
Send for catalogue to Sister Superior
Ogden Utah
< ii i gJIir 1 1 ffoJ iiJ
A GREAT PART OF
04 >
YOUR 1IFE S
is spent at the dinIng table There you
should look pleasant be pleasant and
pleased
Our lino of silver tableware la con
ducive to pleasure and it is not expen
sive We have u new lino of both plated
and solid and ccn suit every fancy and
every purse
We cave also n fine line of Diamond
Watches and Jewelry I
lg
Mall orders filled tho day of receipt
irnyn PARK JEWELER
BOYD 1 liIiij
Successor tojoslin ft Park
SALT LAKE UTAH DENVER COLO
Established 1862 Mail orders a
specialty Booklet Tree by mall
if requested
lbfl1b i oi < bojff = 44IiAt
T
I r9ooooooooooooooooooc
S CUNMNGTON CO
8 WHOLESALE AND RETAIL
HARDWARE AND GROCERIES
48 and 50 SOUTH
MAIN STREET
SPORTING
AND
CASTING
POWDERS
o o
MINERS SUPPLIES OF ALL KINDS
MAIL ORDERS GIVEN PROMPT ATTENTION
SAMUEL H HILL Superintendent
Vt NtV AA1
U What is Worth Doing is Worth Doing Well 3
j
A Good Motto Ono wo try to live up to
GOOD PRNTING
i GOOD BLANK BOOK MAKING
Thats the kind we do and we would like to do some for you JS
Prompt and careful attention paid to orders by moll <
> = = = = = = = THE = i
1 F W GARDENER co
113 SOUTH WEST TEMPLE STREET
SALT LAKE CITY UTAH
I
S E E e e
ar i
J J S BBANSFOED Pres P J EUDDART Manager
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i Salt lakeHuddart Floral Go i
= = = = = n
m
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w SALT LAKE CITY UTAH
UTAHa
w
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g t No8 Main Street No 214 East Second South Street ij
ijm
tIlt Ti
TiW
t W
m
LARGEST GREEiraOUSES IX THE WEST
g
w
Twelfth South and State Streets
j9
ss aaasssgijaBsa33as s assssssssis3325333333 saaajai3
> r W 7 i r > 71
a Good to the Last Bite
I
Aptly describes the tender Juicy fine flavored
I k
sirloin steaks wo furnish Lots of other good
I h L r thlLgs In the meat line too roaita of beef
lamb and mutton turkeys chickens game
I ham fresh and cured etc etc Those who
t S know speak well of our meats You will Jf you
try them
TELEPHONES
Office 134 Order Department 163
a
Order Department 045 Yard 201
S PALACE MEAT MARKET
1r
263265 SOUTH MAIN STREET
copvnjeiir
TKOS J TJIPPER Proprietor
S Old Married People
f
S Young Married People
As Even Old Bachelors
Dont you want to save some money
on your Furniture purchases 15 cents
on every dollar isnt so bad Isnt it
worth your looking for A C X
S We give yon a pretty dish with or S
< S without making a purchase Every S
S S tiling new and bright and we will make S
payments to suit you C C
Trechard Harringo
228250 S West Temple Sireef
PHONE 1701 k =
CALDERS PARK
KEMODEIED REPAINTED ItEWIBED
DANCING AFTERNOON AND EVENING CHRISTENSENS ENLARGED ORCHESTRA
imnumu ill LiiliUUli rtnu JYLJIIUU ORCHEST
AND FIST REGIMENT BAND I
NEW BOATS NEW KESTAUBAJST
S FAKE ONLY 5 CENTS Admission to the park 10 conta
Each ticket entitles the holder to 10 cents In trade
I JI J
ITS CAL1 c RS j BERGERMAN MANAGER i I
MANACsm i i
iA
S
S
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