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The people's journal. (Pickens, S.C.) 1891-1903, December 13, 1894, Image 1

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn93067634/1894-12-13/ed-1/seq-1/

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PIE
E o l- .
JE!EOPIJISE'S., E
-R
PICKENS, 8. C., THURSDAY, D)ECEMBER1 13, 1894.
be an4
~ Al' be hoice t taricsan
tb.th
w known to th
i W Id are now display'
edby
A83, Main St. Greenville, S. C.
thee garments are the finest specimens of the tai'oripg
art and without exception the most tastefully--made good'
Var sbown in Greenville,
Is it not to your interest to buy where you an combine
style quality and economy? This can be done at
83, Main, St, Greenville, S. C.
We are stocked from Cellar
to Garrett with every thing
known to the Clothing trade,
and at sich prices as' ivill sur
prise even tht. passer-by.
LOOKI UVCONSIDERI
250 Suits at $6.50 Worth $10.00
350 " " 7.50 " 11.00
250 " " 8.50 " 12.50
175 '- " 12.00 " 16.50
275 " " 15.50 ' 20.06
300 " "16.50 " 25.00
A full line of Boys "nd Childrens Shirts at the SamV
reportion.
-And as for Overeoa.s, andl Rubbers. "McIntosh" Coats
wie can coippte with the world, in both styles, colors anl
pric"s.
IE2WTHESE GOODS M.ust be sold at once:Regari
less of profit. Be sure to call at 83 Main Street, befor
buying6
HENDEL,
IL B3Main Streot,.
November, 1-94. 0 EENVILLE, S~ C
neneral Mrchandise
y E have jnt...netre8ourfSTtat
OF OOD forththeapresent
gooodel ie u nntlpCy Ot'a-- -
90, OUR, o eU., S.'. yU KU0FF EES, )I~J TR *(aiy tt~.
To en'ablo />p od customers
i miy~rerispay up those olddetcorat
in 1891. We wvill pay on accouni
50'cents for corn, 51 cents for co
ton, onel dollar per hundred for for
~',:'. enralflreail er n 60 etsfor pe..Yo
W willaveel better anddconrequentt
* WOF OOD fo th prsen imake bet~ter crops next year
* ~ .-.. ~* '* Iow w i tW liet3O~ ill paty some on thos6 01
debts. 'Yours,
*~' .* LISi & MonnlHs
BACO, VOEK su~~s,~ovw~, Mrs. T., HqlIwkins, Ohattano4
* M0ASSI, Tg~ ~BS,' ga. Tenn., .sa s: "Shilo xs V
S~o6, LOTIWO ~talizer 'SAVl D MY LL .~L
consider,. it the best remedy f
D RY GOO0DS, -f adebiliatd ytenIvr used
dFor opsia,Lir or' Kidne
' troubl itexcols. Pi-ice 75-cenit
old by all druggists.
-A. 0. WYATT. - ""'""okl - 14r'IERS.
.~s.y. 0. a neu Liuet gralneees
IR. ROB1ERT KIRKSEY,
Ofletit It iWrdene h &u tre
March 8, 1894
fr. 0. BowaN. L. E. CILDRs8s.
I IOWEN & CHILDRESS,
Attorneys at Law,
Pickens, S. C.
Oct 5. 1893.
D R. J. W. NORWOOD, Dentist. Dr.
W. M. N6nwooD, Assistant. Office,
88.4 Main Street, Greenville, B. C.
Jan. 9, '92 y
D I. J. P. CARLISLE, Dentist Groen.
ville, 8. - C. Office over Addison &
McGee's Drug Store.
DR., WIX AUSTIN,
Detitist,
SENECA, S. C.
Will be at Centrathe 2nd. week and at
Pickens the 3rd. week in each month.;
August 23rd. 1894
DR. DYERS
PRACTICAL AND SCIENTIFIC
20 years experience. Graduate from first
Schools-under patronage of highest Medi
cal authority, makes anl properly adjusts
any style Spectacles. Office over Dr. Ad
dison's Drug Store, Greenville, S. C.
June 28, 194.
1. E. HAGOOD, J. L. THORN-LEY, Jn.
L. C. THORNLEY.
HAGOOD & THORNLEY BROS.,
Livery, food, sale I 1411f[ stahlie,
Easley and Pickens, S. C..
(Opposite Hotel.)
Carriages, Buggies. and Saddle Horses, at
reasonable rates.
S Your patronage solicited.
ABE CLARK. GEO.B.COOPER
Clark & Cooper,
Dealers in
IA iril all Qrlaito 0oumonts,
TOMBSTONES, of every description
Also. MANTELS, STATUARY, VASES
and Wrought Iron FENCING, Greenville,
S. C. Sept. 19, '91.
If you want the finest PIOTURE$ made
in the State, go to
Wheeler's Studio,
1 IR McBee Avenne Greenville, S. C
*W- Crayon Portjaits a specialty
April 7-y.
For Rent.'
I NOW HAVE TWO GOOD
TWO HORSE FARMS, for
which I want good Tenants.
C. L. HOLLINGSWOnTH.
Oct. 1, 1894.
S. K NIDEE,
Dealel ir -
Wtches, Diamoods &8Jewelry,
GREENVILLE, S. C.
REPAIRING A SPECIALTY.
Oct. 19.-.3m
&IssE MVKA.Y
Has just opened all latest styles of
. .[all and Winter ilioery.
SAt~ the lowest possible prices.
.Main Street, Greenville, S. C.
April 19, 1894.
Hlas received his Stoelr of
NEW.
*FALL GOODS.
Best Styles and Latest Pat
erns-Come and See Them.
I pay the alghes~t prices for
Country .Produce.,
And vrill sell you Goods in exchange at thue
a lowest figure.
- Rtemeinber that I keep everything (in the
line of
Groceries and .Dry Goods.
-J. E. Browne
5 - Central, C' a
~ W4 UCLAS
95. C R DOVAN,
~' FRENCH CNAMELLE0CAL.F'
44.*5. o.Fl&KA8Afil
y 4 3.49$ POUICE,3 SOLI.a
f ~ 2so.2.WORKlNSMEN.
EXTRA FINE."'
42.417.98YsSCHO0LSHOES,
~Venn ste eybpyhsa .L
eitied shoes pthe world, aud uarantee
yeu cu~t wor n styleroeasy ftigan
".wedngualite.W khave te aold evera.
4ealr cannnot supplav you we can. tut byo
For ?ale by
W. TF. McFall, Pickens's, S. C
S. F. Manr-aan Cnntent S. C
FALL AND
Everything in Readiness
for Cold Weather Wants.
PRICESI Well here are a few
sapnples.
14 White Blankets, 65c.
All wool Red flannel, 124c.
Extra heavy all wool red twilled
flannel, 15c.
White flannels from 129c.Bto,
50c., por yard, guaranteed fully
twenty-five per cent, under value.
White Canton flannels at 5, 7, 8,
and 10 cents, that are world beat
era.
JEANS I Here we are strictly in I
it. Good Jeans at 10. cents and
20 cents, at 25 cents wo sell you
tha. best makes (all wool filling)
of Georgia and Tennessee goods. I
htens and Ladies plain and rib- i
bed winter weight under vest, from i
26 cents to $2.00.
84 inch Henrietta and Cassi
more in black and colors at 15c., t
a yard.
86 inch all wool dress flannel at i
25 cents.
64 inch all wool dress flannel at
50 cents.
RarNOW HERE!
25 Yards extra heavy Shirting,
for $1.00.
21 Yards, yard wide Sea Island, 1
for $1.00. t
60 Dozen Childrens Heavy rib- 1
bed Hose, at 5 cents, well worth t
12j cents.
Our Shoe stock is just full of i
good things for Bahies, Children, I
Mn and * Women. The best Ladies t
$1.00 Shoes to be had anywhere. e
Mail orders will receive prompt
attention. Call on us at 15 Pen
dleton Street.
Nov. 8-94. Greenville, S. C.
FERGUSON BROS.,
Jobbers of Ciga[8 a~d Iobacco,
-107 MAIN~-STREET,
GREENVILLE, S. C.
Nowv is the time for sowingI
field seeds. When you want to
buy
Crimson Clover Seed,
Red Clover Seed,
Kentucky Blue Grass Seeds.
Orchard Grass Seeds,
Silver Ball Onion Seed.
Pompeii Onion Seeds,
Or any other Seeds, go-to
FERGUSON BROS.
And when you want to buy
Coffee, (Seed-tick, Rio,)
Flour,
Sugar,.
Lard,
Bacon,
Cigars,
Tobacco,
Or anything in the Grocery line,
go to FERGUSON BROS.,
107 Main-st., Greenville.
Oct. 18
boes This
HitYou?
*The management of the
Equitable Life Assiurance
Society in the Department of
the Carolinas, wis~hes to se
*cure a few Special Resident
Agents. Those wvho are fitted
for this work will find this
A RareOpportunity
It is work, however, and those
who succeed best in it possess
character, mature judgment,
tact, perseverance, and the
respect of their community.
Think this matter over care
fully. There's an unusual
*opening for somebody. If it
fits you, it wvill pay you. Fur
ther info dtio'n on request.
W. J. Roddey, Manager,
Rockte&i Si. C.
GOVERNOR TILLMAN'8 MESSAGE.
!00
RIeview of the rest, 3ecesmae,
dations for the Future.
NInAT "REFORM1" BAs ACCOMPL10MBD-Tui
DivISION OF THE WuHTE PEOPLa O T111
STATn-THE LOUD CHARORS OF FRAWD A1
Tn. RxCENT ELECTION-HOW TSR CON,
STITUTIONAL CONVENTION MU8T BR MIAN
AGCD-A DEFENCF OF TIE D-19ENSAR-1
LAW AND iTs AlMIlNIaTBATION-THE DAi
LINUTON TROUBLF.--Tirr. DISORGANIZA.
TION OF TIlE MILITIA-EDUCATIONAL IN
STITUTIONS MUST EcONoM12Rru-LONUK
ANY INCOBIx FROM PHOSPHATE-OTuI R
MIATTER.S.
[Continued.]
I have mentioned the dispen sary
aw as one of the measures whic
vill signalize the Reform Admin
stration. I speak advisedly when
say that no new and untried ex.
>eriment n legislation has ever
ained so many friends in so short
, time and taken such deep root
a the popular heart. The law
Las como to stay, and it will de.
iond on its enforcement and ad
ninistration whether it shall
pread to other States or not. It
3 the one question of greatest pub
ic interest at this time, and I
hall necessarily devote much space
0 it.
The liquor dealers have resisted
ts enforcement and tried to evade
t by every device that cunning
nd greed can suggest; and they
iavo had as active sympathizers a
argo proportion of the people and
lihco of nearly all the cities and
owns in the State. There have
eon some notable and praisowor
hy exceptions, and I take pleas
re in montioning A bbevillo, Ches
or, Edgofield and Orangeburg am
ffording no aid or comfort to the
[licit sollers of liquor, except dur
ho time vhan the law was suspend
(I by the action of the Supreme
jourt.
The statute, as amended by the
ast Legislature, has proven very
atisfactory as a means of stop.
>ing the illicit traffic, but there
tro some dofoct, which I shall
oiiit out later on, and recommend
:hanges to correct. them.
As soon as the General Assem
>ly adjourned and the now Dispen
ary Act went into effect I set
bout actively to enforce it to the
etter. Detectives wero employed
,o obtain evidence, the constabu
ary was increased by adding pick
d nen to the force, and a vigor
>us crusado begun to drive the
'blind tigers" from the State. If
t had not been for the animositiei
ngenered by p)olitics, and the do
ormlination ot political, partisni
o0 sustain 'the liquor dealers iii
very way p~ossible, it is not likely
lhat tihe tragedy whlich followedJ
vould have over obourred. Some
>f the newspapers began early in
Fanuary to educate the public
nind to resistance to the search
ng of privat6 dwellings; and meni
voe taught to b~elieve that this
vas an invasion of their liberties
o0 which thley should not submit,
~t is needless to show the fallacy
>f this contentionl, hecause it is
eadily seen that if a man may
urn his 'private dwelling into a
Ien from whlichl lhe can sell liquor,
>r a dlepot from which to supply
t, without the right to search and
eize it under warrant, the law
vould b~e a nullity.
There is every evidence going to
how that there was a preconcerted
rrangemont or conspiracy, with~
ami fications in many counties,
.o procipitato a confiict with the
~onstalos and by butchering then
uitimlidate others from carrvinm
>ut the law. Tfhe purpose of thosE
lirecting the conlspiraicy was to
nflaimo the public mind to such
mi extent that the militia
oldl~ not be0 he relied upon01 to as.
iist the civil authorities and thus
'ring the law and1 State Govern.
nenut into conltompht.
'rie pla*cC selocted to precipi
~ato the conflict w~as Dairlinigton,
3nie of the constalose stationed at
his point reported the bold ani
>pen violation of the law ahd ask
nd for assistaince. Three picket
nuen were sent him the last wveel
n Mareh. When these four at
tempted .to execute search wai
rants they were hooted, jeered a
and treated with every mndignit
ahd for-cod to retire from .th
streets to provent a conflict.
telegraphed Chief Constable Gail
lard, in Qharieston. to un to -Dai
lington with1
which he did, carrygi igi hiAy
enough men to mak..hif d in
all twenty-two. Sonie ' f o
these were armed with a:i-hs
ters, but most of them 11ad -61'
their private side arms; fie call.
ad on the sheriff to assist-iii. serv
ing processes and used ev'ry pos
sible precaution to prevent a 9o0P
flict with the citizens, and . th1
Attorney General was sent to tho.
spot to advise and direct his move
mfents.
The conspirators had armed
themselves with improved :woap
ons, and had called in reiforce
ments from the barkeepers aikd.
their hangers-on from the neigh
boriqg towns of Florence 4n4.d.
Sumtor. A mass meeting of. the
citizens of the three places was
held in the Court House. at Dar
lington and resolutions wero paes
ed denouncing the soarching of
private residences, under whatov
or circumstances as an act of ty
ranny to be resisted at all haz
zards.
On Thursday, the 29th, I re
ceived intelligence of such a threat
ening character that I wired Capt.
Thompson, of the local military
company, to keep his men under
arms and hold himself subject to
the orders of the sheriff. In a
very little while I received advi
ces that a mob had broken into
the armory of the Darlington
Guards and had taken their guns,
and fearing that the local com
pany could not be relied upon
I ordered the Sumter Light Infan
try to proceed to Darlingtoir as
soon as possible by special train.
This order was promptly obeyed,
the company reaching there Thurs
d'ay evening.
The excitement among the e-iti6
zens was intense, Rnd I expoct(
every inoinwit that. a conflict
would be brought on ; but I insis
ted that the chief constablfe an1d
sheriff should complete tho sorvice
of all search warrants. I was on
my way to attend a meeting of
the Clemson College trtustees wlhen
these telegrams were sent. Fri
(lay morning early, the Attoriey
advising it, I ordered the Sumtor
compally home. I have always
regreted doing this, because I he
lieve that, had they remaiiied
there until the constables had left
the firebrands who wero spurring
the citizens on to resistance anld
trying to bring on a riot, would
have failed.
With the conflict at the depot
between the citizons and the con
stables-who hadI finished their
work and had gone to take the
train were followed by the citizens
and the riot brought on in which
two citizens were killed and two(
wounded, and one constable killed
and two wounded, one very ser
iously-every one is familiar. The
whiskey rebellion had broken out
in full fury, and for twenty-four
hours men held their breaths, not
only in this State but throughout
the whole United States, for it ap
peared that we were on the verge
of civil war.
Fearing trouble, 1 had cut short
my visit to Clemson and hurried
home Friday. I had scarcely
reached the Executive mansion
when, at 5 o'clock p. mn., I receiv
od a dispatch announcing the ter
rible tragedy. And then the con
spiracy, which had its origin in
the false teaching of the newvspa
pers, began to unfold itself. Dis
patches flew thick and~ fast, and
~ nto every town and hnmlet4 in the
Stato reached by a telegraph wire
the news flashed that the consta
bles hiad provoked the conflic, ,d1
shot dlown the citizens in dold
blood, and~ were being p~ursue(d by
two hundrod armedI men, to be
lynched when caught.
To me there was but one( courso
open and that was to restore oidor
and have the law obeyodl. 1 im
medIately provided a special train
to leave Columbia for the scone of
the disturbance and ordered the
three companies ini this city, the
c company at sumter and the comn
pany at Manning to got ready.
-The orders were extended to Gon.
t Farley and to Col. Willie Jones
y and they were urged to hurry.
oThe -conspirators in this city,
Iwhich seems to have immediately
Lbecome headquarters, set actively
,to work to nadnan the soldiers fron,
r4& ~y~of tho.00
parmr te
Goverujor's
flanamatory ; epb4
00adile
maniy whi4 Y
fkeely 8ekn
for' the afe
himself.
At 9 o'61
Col. Jones tyi 4
not, or could
D, telegran r
the.Sunter A
that his comyany
fused to go. Ap
heretha.the e
lielps rep4,
had returned r
would -go
wero notisel't
preserveh 016,
serviesoJitg
constables and g t is
pensary ] imhfeao
Gon. Farley to proeeitft
special train to Charle
ing up the Manning .an 0
he IVent. down, and
Gen. Hugenin to ordP
brigade under arms. 'AboUV'
paat'2 o'clock Saturan: 1g 'I
roceived afn unatf
from that officer,'aid
following.
HARLEITON,..
Govornor B. 1.A ,I11hW0
Limlbija, S. C : - u.a
command .
uilary lii ]
brigadlo wNl
the honpr of the State
hold and dofond $ho 1
State, but Will not -lerfd.
formen t oivil Vara
Brigadlet
This will show the tell -
insolence of the political. Waror
who composad the city compa
11108.
I had b.)een ondeavorin. for nine
hours to get some of our boasted
militia to movo to the point of dis
turbance and rostore the peace; -
and to' their evorlasting disgrace
ho it said, for the first time in
thoir history, the oldest and most
notod1 military organizations of
the State refused to obey orders.
Saturday morning, as soon as the
telegraph offcos were opened, die
p)atchosR were sent to the captains
of nearly every accessible company
in the State ordering their men
und~er arms and to await orderue
Six othor companies refused to
obey, or their oflicers refused to
extend the order, but the officers
of many companies respondet
p~romnptly. Special trains we'
arrangod for on the various hir
of road leading to Columbia,
all of the men west of the Sar
andl Wateree rivers were ord.
to rondevzous at Columbia at
earliost momentphw
matter of record and af
nition of their patriotio re&.
to tho. call of duty. I gi
names of tho several commanuu, p
with the names of their command1"
ig oficors:
Manning Guards, Capt. W. C.
D~avis, 9 oflicors anid men.
Morgan Rifles, Capt. -W. S.
Mitcholl, 30 offncors and men.
Maxwoll Guards, Capt. F. S
AEvan s, 30 oli c&1r and ma'n,
Gordoni L igh t Dragoons, Capt. H.
Jf. Iharvey, 21 officers and me~s
Edgofiold Light hDgions, Capt. "
J. R. Blocker, 13 oflicers and men.
Darlington Guards, Capt.'i'. T.
Thompson, 37 officers and men.
Groonville Guards, Capt. W. P.
Coniyors 14 officors and men.
Buleor Guards, Capt. J. A. Noon.
cy, 20 officers and mnen - :,
Dibble Lia Dragook,
IT. Moss, 31 oflcess
Sally Rifle, daytyT
man, 82 officers atnoVlK
Edgefield Hfilsar, ~ (
Maya, 22 officers atamen,'
Palmetto Rifles, yjt4 , 'k +
hey, 18 officers an4d ~ 2
Hamptonri'
Westfield, 24 df~~V
Santuo Rifles,,~
81 oflicers and me -
[Ogniinued og fr

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