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The people's journal. (Pickens, S.C.) 1891-1903, January 08, 1903, Image 1

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_LTHE PEOPLE'S JOURNAL.
VOL. x1P- rICKENS, S. C,, TI URSDAY, JANUARY 8. 1903.
PALME1O_of6LEANINGS.
I'inor Events of the Week In a
Brief Form.
Saturday night about 9 o'clock Dr.
Andrew N. Gray of Columbia fell dead
in th'. bridge kecper's house at the
foot of (b'rvai; street. Dr. Gray con
iwets a drug store in lrooklyn and
lives In Cohamnbia. lie had walked
ai-ross th Congaree bridge and had
tried to catch the 8:46 car. Ilaving
llnisseid hi>. car. Dr. Gray went into the
hotlst" of Mr. I,ybrand, the bridge
kepr, andi wis talk lug and joking
with thisO around the fire. Mr. I.y
bralnd says that. Dr. (.ray wits stand
lug with his back to the fire auci was
appmrently in good heaith and spirits
when lie took a step forwards as if to
.go to the loor. He fell forward upon
his fac, and when Mr. laybrand and
otihers in thi' room got to him1n and
tulrncd him over. Dr. Gray was quite
dead. lie was subject. to attacks of this
kind, and hiis death. while unexpected.
was not in1h of a shoek to his fanily
as it night olherwise have been,
,. 0. Rtissell, a well-known citizen
of Ande,son coulnty, met a sudl'n
death il:mier peculiar circumstan'es
Friday. Ile and ihIs son, a young man
about. grown. had been to a neighbor
hood house and were returning home.
They were in a buggy and in sone way
one of the shafts broke and it was lim
possible- to pro:eed further with the
vehicle. Air. Russell wiais under the In
1luence of liquor. and his son decided
to leave him seated in the buggy while
be rode he mule home for assistance.
TlIhe young man went on home and
when he eiinie back a short while after
wa(trds he was horrifed to find that his
father had fallen frQm the buggy and
lioken his neck. lie had fallen over
it dashboard, landing onl his face. The
coroner held an inquest Saturday and
th' jury returned a verdict in ae'ord
an.1' with the facts.
Thie1iay night at a negro frolic on
Mi. liob Cowan's plaice, about two
miles from Rock Hill, Sam Allison was
shot and almost instantly killed by his
stepson .lohn Smith. It seems that. Al
lison was heating his wife, when the
boy caitme up and interfered. Allicon
upon seeing that it was the son junmped
ill). kicked him and then went for his
shot-gun. He tried to shoot Stmith. but,
the gin failed to fire the first time.
and as he was trying the second tine
Smith shot him with a 3-caalibre pistol.
Allison fell and Smith came to the city
and gave himself up. At the inquest ia
verdi't was rendered of killing in self
iiefense'. Smit.h. however. is in the
guiard house here. having been found
guilty of carrying the wrong size
- .s.hootIng iron."
Coroner Black held an inquest I"ri
day morning upon the body of 0. N.
.wanegan at his home in the Vest
End of Greenville. and the jury ren
'lerted a verdic"t that the deceased 'amne
lo his death fron an overdose of mnor
ihline .adma11inliste'ed by his own hand.
He bought 15 cents worth of morphine
onai Clristmas day at the \Vest End
drug store, and that night ended his
lif'e by swallowing the fatal drug. Hiis
aIlege'd wifc t"estlilled that he said to
ii r Ihiat Ili Would take the lorphintie
to kill limnc'elf' anal that lie had thre::t
ned'i severt'al tinaes to cutl his than-il.
lie toldl her' ait he had b heen tid
t hree I tmes for his life and that his
peplthad inuas'l~t im 1 off. It. Is niot.I lkely
tilat hae was tuilMing utnder his pa'opae'
tialile. altid huis ~tu history will prob1
aly~ nevera Ihe kiicwn. Swanegaaz is a
very' tai'i;tl nantae.
Saturaday afterntooni Offi acir H-al, of
t h 'a poit' forc'e :arrest ed on the' ' ihni
i::rl"'i Saatanburgt~'t a mil(et a ert
wite ain v.ho hasi: baen g;oinig abom)lt
lhI st1i'i' JIretendingL to be t allute' al
OIirit intg aluIaas. A anumbe 1i'of icersons'
pilit's thi' nppara'tly3 afflicted t tioan. so)
;tkir' aand tile ofVih:ar took( himl to ft
-It atioan house.. lie plalyedLLi t' roe of at
tileI for' three'i hourt"; buat then~ e':ved
in and i tohil the (fil' that1. heo was
shaamm:inag lIe pr'oiineed a p)iiackag' of
cardIs, onl (eh ofI whichi was pinated ai
I uga urioaus wa I. a skintg fot' ch,ia'it y for i
the. aftflicted. lite will be ti'ied in' policle
TI'h edircitrI': of thle Mol loh on 'l anI
'i'fa atuainog ('o.. of' NewhIearry, at a met -
itng (detidl:d to i':nrese the capital
toc'k oft t'' cman frlvi.oml $200,000 to
000.0000) hIn i ilias' the capaity of
te inili to ::Mta spindtle's. When the
miill was bit iIIt'was(X txpected Li) in
tireast' th pihot . anld t his improvemnlt,
runingtit. The' I polat ion (i'ofii th ill
tUlatge will he abtant doulet.
.\ total dleuruidtion (f eight . ili it.
Jau' ol'fic'ars. .ix aa opl('t ' oat ilts wl'i
founad alt tw~io. Off'icera'. suceodedi i a'
'r'stintg foua' opertors1)1. wVhot)Ii1 alt) nw
in WVaihatlla jail awaiting trial.
Alas Aliee Watkins, i<atghtea' of a'r.
.1. N. Watkins of the Long Creek sec
tioni, was shot Tuesday evening la'st ait
heir fat.her'"s homne. Thle hall etntered her'a
left. jaw andtt lodigedl in t hack of her
head1). '[he ('ond t ith1 of Pte young lady
ir end ii to be v'ery criticeal. One o1t'
per'zsona was present wvhen tile shot wals
11red. No cauls(' hias beeatnassignled f'or
Madte Big Profits.
St. Lotus, Special.--Thomias A.~
Cleage closed Is big Doeember eor'n
0.eal at noon WVednesday a heavy wIn
ne'. HeI matdo settlement~is on1 all deala
ait -16 cents, which was~ 2'cents over~ the
eiernt quotatIon at ChIcago. Heb estj
r' ites that betwee(n 5,oT3.00.0 and 6,
t0)f,000 bu.shels of (co)ntraact t'or't werei'
iut'.olved inl tile d(l, andI that, is aver'
ego prioiit wa's C 'ctt to L.h" bushel.
'This makes him ahe'ad oin the deal
t.i< m300On ( o a m.'ii.o
SOME EXCELLENT SUGGESTIONS
Plans For School Improvement By
Superintendent Mcf7ahaun.
The Columbia State of I)ec. 30th con
tains the following interesting ex
tracts from the forthcoming report of
lion. ,John J. McMalian, State Supt. of
Schools:
"The length of school session is the
most conspicuoutts fact by which the
school work is Judged. Each one feels
satisfied with the school term as long
as his own neighborhood school is do
ing well and the average for the State
is no worse than last year. It ('annot,
he too nluc'h impressed ttpon eac'h leg
islator. however. that if his neighbor
hood school lasts nine mlloiths (or even
six 1 it is an exception, and that the
State 'average.' and even the colity
'average,' charitaibly covers, as w-ilh a
blaniet. the nakl'iness of the back
woods country School. Tabi 01ne of
the statisth-al part of this report will
Show the Iength of session and many
othc- facts for :ch ; school iisirict in
each county. An examination of these
details would astonish 111n who have
the Scho in the State are satisfac
tory. Suo'h aln examination is not 1151
atlly inle. This is tinfortunate. Surely
the consciences of legislators would he
arused if the facts were broight. home
(t their minds. 13' averaging separate
ly t'o' the schools inside and those out
side (of incorporated towns we come
11e'are' to an idea of tH' differem-e in
schools within a coun:ty,."
Some averages are here ne-centci in
tabular form. le shows ;*nt of the
2.602 white schools in the State, the
average number of weeks of school
session is 21 weeks: of the 2.111 colored
schools 14.27 weeks. The white schools
in the county have an average length
of session of 20.3 weeks attd 28.8 weeks
in towns. Colored schools 13.6 weeks
in the county and 21 weeks in towns.
in some of the counties the average
length of the sessions of white schools
is as follows: Pickens 19.6; lainpton
18.7; Spartanburg 18.3; 1lorry 12.6;
Charleston 34.4; Fairfield 29.9: 'Chester
28.5; Richland 24.9: Williamsburtg 1;1.3,
etc., etc.
TEACIERS' SALARIES.
Continuing Mr. McMahan says of
teachet's' salaries:
"The quality of the teacher is of
more coasquence than the nnmber of
"eckis he teaches. No report can prop
erly set forth the qualities of the
teacher. it the salaries receivel for
the session or year will alord some
basis for Judgment. I regret that I
have not the data for seperate aver
ages of salaries for town and country
tcachers In the State and in each c'onnh
ty. In table 2 the average in each dis
trict is given, but the schools of one
district are not always exclusively in
town or in country.
"The average annual salary of
tenehers in the State in 38 counties re
ported is: White teachers, $195.28;
negro teachers, $79.41.
"in Haorry county white teachers
averaged $94.49; some received nothing
In Willianshurg the average was
$104.30. While the average in Chester
field was $126.11 ; there were flve dis
tricts having 22 teachers whose aver
age salary was less than $70. In Saluda
the average was $130.42. District. No.
26 had seven teachers averaging $77.13.
In Lexington the average salary was
$171.77; yet four teachers. each in ia
(listrict having hit one white school
reived less than $100 each.
LOCA1L TAX CANNOT StJt" I"I('lE.
A favorite defense against the t' de
mland for a. legislative appropriation
lo the I)1lii0' schools is the4 Specious
argtiment that the extra iax w'hic i
e:ac11 listrict is permllitted t vote i i
t he way' to good schools, and that sch
commulntIity should he left. to apply this
!'e'lnedy3 for itse'lf, levy3 a local tax.
Tis tax caninot he dl'eended upon1
bty the legislature. It is v'oliunlary. and,tl
t hereforelt. 'v ill 1not 1he lev.ied unt il o
4'ommunlOlity' is ailiv(e to its o(wn needsk.
Tim d:,irk'st 011aces wvi Ill miin Ia4:rrk
o' .a: until light comies inl fromt w':ho41.
.Meco:''erci. sonn-.t school distric5ts di( 4e
11he people ar w''~ illinig to noktte sal -
ti's for' educcati, are1 ye4: 3t so toor that
11h4 ihavie'St t:ax prIttedi b thei h.
still faIls short of1 yiieluing Ith' amutuhIl
I quiriaed for' a go(cl :school. 'The4 !i:i o
1(o U <d all other(1 'i<mthernI States in the
ally levies a nmoder'ate4 tacx . whIichi
yiehti.-: a larg:.e sum11 of moneys hoe:tuise,
to 11a13 largely of its. mteanis. wi th but1
anl extra 3-mnill tax, 0or even the4 'nax -
imum11 41-mlills. inl adt4ltion to its riiiIegula
The1i aiver'a.e ('(st of schoolin1 g i'e'
pmpil Is of great signIficanc1e. if we
the1 idividulal schiools of cer'tinl ('oun
11r' 4istriits and11 01' ('ties 0 o l prosper
441s townsic. hI t there is conllsideriabhle
signif1( ican( ini the (co1inparison02 of the
h'V"'Irge's fo' (''rtin ''ounlt is and thtere'
(ii' a:no Iinteres inO'IlC t14 copaiso of4''
' - \virage 441st jper puplIil hais 1been
S' 2; 1900O, white $5.55, ne4gr'o $1 .3::
1901,* white $5.82 negro $1.30; 19,02,
whtite $6.01. negro0 $1.53. (In I 8911 six
al onties were'4 1not fully roroted , four11
in 190011 and two in 1902.)
5 s(eflorts to seenre'4 a State apprlio
piat iOn for1 the putblic schools have
thus far' failed. Th'ie only3 form in
w)(hih su1ch a1 bill has5 paissed the lower
al county1 t 'Iax. Somne of th 114' prdel'sen1ta
tive oIS(f r'icher'i coun ties are un'tilwilIlig
that1 their(1)10 coutie shold( 1)ay toward4:
the sutpporlt of thle schools (of o(ther'
th(llat count'is ae iit anI'f d separa~'te1
inl inteI rest anid r'espons1i bility'. Tihe 01(1
Soulth C~tarli na dost rinte is 1ost sight 1
(If, t hat, the( S~tt in the sover'eign. A
inore leg itimate a'gum21ent agalinst such'l
itn oIpportuity 5Is 2114 jutst fear that,1
It will lhe misspend't.
CONl)iTIONS T1O STlATlE AllD.
Unhder' preseniClt 'onitions)1 there are
ser'iouls obstacles to thle policy5 of
State aid to weak schools. T1his pIolicy
tile aiet (If 1899 to dlistribte State dis
pen'isarly prlofts to bring til defieient
schools to a mliniimumn three months
termi, or $75 fund. With dlencienlcies
'ofthne .i',c~,mi eanr as n basis. (is.
pensary money has been for four
years annually apportioned to bring
tip the schools to this minimum ses
sion, yet the foregoing statistics show
that the law has failed to accomplish
its purpose. The law does not require
the trustees to apply the money to the
schools that need it.
In my report of 1899 1 called atten
tion to the need of safeguards against
I he unnecessary multiplying of
schools to be thus aided by the Stale.
Some districts support several schools
and apply the funds in very different
proportions to the different schools.
The constit utional provision that
each county board should lay off its
county into convenient school dis
tricts of not less than nine more than
49 square miles has been carried out
in very few counties. Its spirit and
purpose, though ont. Its letter, was
that. each district should support but
one school for the white and one for
the negroes, each to be centrally lo.
eated. II some cointies tihie districts
are still townships. so large that they
tist support several schools. some
of which the lruste'es are not inter
ested in and shamefu1lly ncglec"t.,
while some are entirely too neal to
others.
loreover. i t.hre(' months' school
with a $75 teacher Can hardly he cnlled
a school. Necessarily the trustevs
haive little choice of Ite(i('rs. Wit I
tie( acquiescence of the county stlipel
inttendents they sometimes employ
tctlcne's without. (e'rtfieates of quali
lic'ation and unable to pass the ie
(11utr-d e'xaminlationls. 11ut. in somne
cu111nt ies there is ani ampl suipply of
incolpetents holding the county .c'c'
tificates. Although. the Itrustees of
short term1 schools are in thl4e habit of
('tploying very 1)or teachers, for
whom it should not, be thli )licy of
the State to furnish longer sessions.
Aid from the State should be granted
not iierely upon a showing of pov
erity, but iipon the guarantee of prop
er location of the school and the et
ployment. of a thoroughly capable
tacher. Better far to aid a few
schools i nthis way than to aid many
less effectively.
A legislative appropriation to the
5(110015 should be Iased 111)011 a gen
eral law with safeguards along these
lines. The teacher whose salary is
supplement.ed should he required to
have a certificate of qualification from
the State board of education ( issued
upon examination or u1pon the diplomna
of ait approved college). The school
shoti id be in district supporting but
one school for each race, or the school
should not. be less than four miles
from every other which the pupuiis
might. attend, and if its enrolment. he
less than 20 pupils its distance from
every other school open to its children
should be not. less than five miles, or
sieccially justified by swamps or othet
peculiar conditions treported by the
county board and approved by tlh
State board). The county hoard should
furnish a list of its schools fulfilling
the conditions in teacher. location.
enroliment and financial inability. the
latter fact being certifled also by the
county treasurer on March 15th. if
ter the collection of taxes has been
completed and the funds of the dis
tric't for the clrre:nt scholastic year
are ascertained--anl, in the case of
the nei'dy districts, exhausted. The
nmles of tle teachers and thi'
amounts. to be paid them should he
(ertilled to the State t.reasuri'er by h
State superintendent of eduention On
behalf of the State hoard of edu"a
tion. Tlie State's aid should he sutti
ci(111 to bring up the sila.ries to $:1.i
a 111m 11 for six mllontus.
At th(le bcginning of this policy no'
many school:; would be aile to avail
th'msclve's of the prolfered assist
an1ce. Undier' thle trlonig in1(flu('cement) lo
(c11onorm to tile ('0nditions11. truIst.c('s
woob Ihle st irr'ed' from prIesenti . illdif
fotcle' andi errlors. Theiire wou ili e :u
whuich would : greatly~ strmen r Iw n 43h
er). ItheFt en ai.n cmira ttie'l small
mis-h lb et'r toi'.:etl with1 hitte l i m-l
rte-Sons uniist' with11113 ston man11151
agim--ni anid ' xpt superv!soo n
NEWSY GLE ANINGS;
St':'rI'l tchanges ini thec land lawts of
h,itterpoo'l les: .inst rec'-eie ifs first.
3'oi5lInaiu of0 tiIl:lhe;:a y fi roii A\lts
It. lii.
'flotonu Il de iIe thllt shes ilend lssnd
($9.: ii ro l .'.'7drostouiioto iaul '
V. t'u'u url) i.iisir.vi-n
j)!3'illy-3 ill 1) ble si ain3' ill)1:) the 30 it'
NAoi'd:1.iM. 0 few d'111la li'g10 1idnaoii
(1h11 ir 'hlgai.:lil Ir alil o c 11
Th'aie duty ohaveltomabilt ninbl : Usii
The rai'war brh)e at Koksil. '11.
'WIGNl 0Iot lions iniia ry 1ierv(i'8 :31)1
10ym14 of015 a sonl'3 itL mone s12 Ito( bJe
Alvl ohf solarlmpine westc of rip n
hee by J.c a'pnxieyfl iogn.Mxc
Aordin to midalegrantseq from'Lon-iI
dtn, wage-ans aou gtoifllowi the31
oerd cs of usiingl, Wli n aml1ii
Ir ntWoresytshir nglm'tol. to th
Wnomesr. nagdmkngaeos
Whlaugh, adthe maket neadghs aitd
There wroei 1 they-i iiglaughsmakin
plnsi o eainun.i drn h
OPERATORS' REPLY.
Markle and Company File an Answer
Before Strike Commission
THE OWNERS TELL THEIR STORY
Their System of Dealing With Their
Ismployes-Not Required to Trade
At Company Store.
Philadelphia. Special.-- -The answer
of G. 11. Markle & Company, itnuen
d)nt. cotl operatttors, to the dmiiandis (,f
Ite miners. wasas nade it bhlic hier Sr 1l!
day. T1he atnswer will I'' submni(tted to)
the Anthracite ('((al Sirike('Coin llis
siun, which re-:tssemblles inl this e"it.v
tunmorrow. it WaS writit'ln by .ilii
Markle, mllanltiging partner of the irit.
''lho statemenci t says (he tutu etinploys
about. 2,100 ten, and inany ii its eil
ployes rside in the viiittlaes of I ree
tad ab(dItout. 1 wO tiles distailt, amd
Hlazleton, ;lht aot teven miltes distant.,
from .leddo. 'ThI'e lessees erected and1e
w11ni) tl( il!ot' ee'1d 0istipo t hei i' pro
perty,i(ncluding breakers, stOre,
shops and tenlem(nt houtses. It say
the company always has mtaintained
two physicians for the m en. de'let
75 ents a mlonth from the matrriod
and 50 ('enIls a month fromt the single
mnen therefor, and paying it over tO
the physieianls withotit clhar0ge or
deduction. ''his arrangemtent was not
comipulsory u1pon the mlen %)r famlili(-s.
Stores for the sale of general er
ehandiso and of m1iners' supplics have
always been mnainltained upon the
property, and have been and are an
accolmmodation to the mlenl and their
famnilies. The men have never been
r'eguired to deal there.
It says in September, 1897, a eomi
mittee of miners prosented certain
dlllallds to the Iirl. An agreement
was then in existence between tlt'
colpany and mnen to settle differences
by arbitration. 'rht colipaly replier
to the demands and i'tved no fut'th
er collmunication from the miners.
Work at the mines continued unin
terrupted until the latter part of 1900
when John Mitchell made his head
quartet's at. Hazleton and endeavored
to organize the Marlcle employes.
In September, 1900, another list of
grievances was furnished the firm.
wnich offered to arbitrate. but the men
strtuck. Between 1900 and 1902, mitny
requests were made for the correction
of alleged grievances wlt:lhi were all
taken Ilp and consldo:'e( and acted
11pon, "ut. neither Individually nor
collectively, orally or in writing,"
says the statement. "did the men
make any complaint in reference to
the collecting of dities for the doctOi'S
or the priests: nor was our attention
ailled to any defect. in respet to ven
tilation, or unfair treatmlent at tht
store: nor as to the size of the ear.s
nor as to the slope cleaning; or the
locking, tutil April, 1902: and we had
every reason to believe t hat, taken as
a whole, the mteni wCre ett ire1 ly sat.(
illoymt.l't Obijectilon is also mallde ltha
the full Ill pet' Centt. adlvan--i was ntot
explained ((to ii th ('en anid it will b
shown by thie Cei't aiC'Couttt Ihat
hitra'tion C'ommiiission, and says tht ' 1
men11 (evijted w'~ere so treatetd herau11-e
1m10n fromn I <stuning work'l. No att(0m11
w~as miadeC to) C'ill'''t fr'm themit arriei:
inig fromi $350 toI $1O.000. Spioeitic sa
thle fCmmirissiont alleginig htarish tre'm-s
mienlt of v'ar'ius individutals wvll.>
namnes had beent'i givent.
Against Anterican Cotton,
Pais. fly Cablle.--It is saild that
Jle s Siegfri ed, i ihtiChar Warr'tinIgI t
depuities aoml Senaitorts, andC a numberi
of' leadin Il otton)1 1011 mnflaturers(t', hiave
foirmedi a ('oloinial ('ott(on Association,.
wvit aI iw to'v rIes4istinlg I ite Amerilcan
'The Colorado Sentatorship.
l)onver', Special.--Th'ie s'-nati(':l sit
utlin in Colom ~do is liuoin lig dIeeldi
edly ('omlient CaIed and sl:on111id presentII(
dleclarecd plans he carried out th' tn
teCs1t overi thie select ioniiC of a1 successo,:'
b'gin1 in C arne st 'wi (th(1 C th Voen ing of
th LiC egitslaturt e (1n Wednesda':Jty neoxt,
will, to ray (lie lea~st, lie ('xC!ting and
mtCoe thani liknlIy e putttaeilarI. Thle
aol id sutppo~rt of Itho D emoea tie wing
oIf the LoglIla!tre rot' 'Tellet' is still
1m5 sinain1, whIl theI llC' pu)tbllcana
striength It.: paricel led amnig four' canitt -
datl of' whom fiom' Sentor 10E. 0.
W\ol ceitt i; (lhe raoutst ('OIrmpiCous.
Destructive fire.
Olympia, Wash., Splecial.-The build
itng (lccuplied by thle Capidtal BrewvIing
ICompany, as bottlinag workhs, was al
most comntpletel y demtol ished Saturdl(ay
ntightt by ai slide of sand fr'om the bluff
back of thbe biLlding. l'The bluff Is
about 50 f'eet high andt was e.lmosit per-'
1'endiular with the side of (lie buildI
lng. T[he oIfIen buildinag is in Immedi
ato danttger' and t he officials oif the com..
pan1y are expecting It wvill he crutshed
at any13 mtomenlt, Cas small slides are
Iconls(ttlv ('nmbg down.
SUIT FOR DAMAGES.
Claimed Tlat lany Were Ktidnappe
and Sent to the lines,.
New York. Special.---Sutits haVe bee
brought by 22 residents of this cit_
who claim that during the recent co.
sirike they were devoyed to the mine
in Pennsylvania by agents of the Iri
road and of the Pennsylvania :Co
Company. Damages for $50.000 to
each. amounting to $1.100.000 in al
Are stued and the attorney f>r" 1.1
plaint iffs consulted wit h an assstaIt
oistriet attorney today alout uriugin
the matter before tlhe grand ju1 y to h
.1worn in next Mondt.y. The ,;a:.tiff
claim that under pletene" c; idoine,
work for the railrea and c"ct,tl ."om
pan1y they were dec"oyed tc, II'bokc"o
wNher' they were lorkc "ci in at ,";:r .ui
carrhrd, against their N' ill. t(, IIhe ("o,
regions in Pennsylva,iat atcl cot,:ptull'
to act as st riki'-,itker.; .i' r irceat
of, " lIg tillried oNic r 11) tile fIury of I lk
mniners.'' The nu'n s,,y they 1inal!)
snce(lrcded in m<atking t hir way he l
to the city'. but I'I.tr " th:lt oII th i
way houe they had ;tuerow , ;-ape
I rom being inoblbe"d.
An oice'r of ti i0t i.' RIailtoad :si.
that no eomplailit t:a". been served .t:
yet oin t he company. I1 saidi he hac
1-0 dotlbt that the roipaiie: wonht ht
able to succes:tfully iI"fend any suit:
that might be brought against Ihem
The company. said this oli''r. Is al
ways ext.remely carel;tI to explain t4
the men the colition. under whicL
they are employed.
Pacific Cable Opened.
Washington. Specinl.--The followin;
cablegram was received at the Whitc
House at 2:30 this morning, dated Hon
olulu. .January. 1, II:33 p. m.:
"The i'resident. Washington:
"The people of the territory of Ia
wall send their greetings to you anc
express their gratillcation at the inau
guration of telegraphic co mnunieatioi
with the mainland. We all believe tha
t.he removal of the disadvantage o
isolation will prove ia strong factor Ir
the upbulldingk of a patriotic and pro
gressive American Comonill 11 weal ltih i1
these islandis.
(Signed)i IENRY 1E. COOPECR.
"Secretary of liawaii.'
The President's response was as fol
lows:
"White House, Washington, ,Jan.
"llenry E. Cooper, Secretary of -lawai
Honolulut, Hawaii:
"The President sends through yc
to Governor Dole and the people c
Ilawaii his hearty congratulation
upon the opening of the cable. lie be
iieves that it will tend to knit. tI
people of Hawaii more closely tha
ever to their fellow citizens of tI
main land and will be for the great ad
vantage of all our people.
(Signed) GEO. 13. CORTELYOIJ,
"Secretary to the President."
To Fight Trust.
Chattanooga. 'Penn., Special-\\'hole
sale hardware dealers in thi: city hav
recelved advic's from the h!adliuarter
of the East Tennessee liar"dw are anm
Implemecnt Dealers' Associall:n to thi
ce'ffct. that a pollev has been adnplte
for the do aler"s inl the assicia ilon to r<
t sen ted by he l .trnlat iionalI Ilm
etr Cmpato Atneasthri
know as1 the tru-d. A\tich; :.g:int 1h
Iwr by41 uth o lo al Srepr":en t4aive''( oft
I S.A bl,ieaboar'd Chanes.'i'iaI.
N( rfil . Sp~~' ecil.-14 -\ie ill 'r ol
andIiti ( .-ne alr .\ ln ger l. .\ lid a r. lhi
'w (K. illSe, super(intIem' ieNew or i
wouhit hel nail l"as g<ner superr:1in
tendet' ofi lthat' system. (ftoi;l succed (4
4lved I. how4ver. 4tit:lj- ill h e a41
(4)1n44.:d. .\lajor4'4 \lli ((r ad .\If, th Ir
14har~~tre htle, with a:l~ (nIa to k l44i
come14~4 associated41 n it ffiias o (Iheus 11I4
Loui:: & i'w franicoa i n 5iijirs Ah 1:1
v fats The0ohj4--I of1 ohe 0(orp oio
i to bueillng ofi ailrot rom No'' 14
s*.rlans byli1 way. o \rkansas toiI'$ ('h
4.') The1(4 t(4b oranztion (if in connal
tion cwth th- rAncquiftte is
'ilt Sings .--'Sig.,o sh r
to i. h e(y (l a.ir vihi; 'gxof th 1e '/ur a
$5,000ie from h:s8 onjur lils.' AhIm
i48 11red, sweling Ithlist tvo more thal41
rig.i'Ti.w mor viatcegbi < tare 11 stil ain
lhiandmr int T iruitfam,y
Cicago(, N.eCa.---Spialor Masa
ti h e compoer l starraged ini conil
ard lltard, hI'o Hngtou.Afr Fihear
wasX V4ile wah etly who applan)d
flevarod,00.. ISpean.--Thursd
Origin of flre unknown.
REPORT ON COTTON
Government Statement of the Crop of
the Past Season
A FULL RECORD OF BAlES GINNED
Niere i4 no liuess Work About the
'igures This Year, as (in Records
t have Ileen kept.
W\ashtint(t. Ir-erial.-- Thill"n.
lt1)r--;lu repor tt (ln te ruttou tinne(t
fir t, hli' 1!m' ! (IrI)) ut i nto ti l rI lull.
in i 'n1tm b r I::. l -st . i i !.:; 11 ..lI !,i
hales. irreSJ)eetiv. (If 5halr- ( r we'ighlt.
l' -1 1 to .\.911.5,(. 1ccord ing 73 th-'
-(111 -1t'lal '4 041 11i n.1 "1T' i ' I' ' t(l. t
r 'ntl . I lfil e cr1 .
' lal n\"eI'71 1 1111 ( (Ii. i44 (' 1t1:1114
iThe' a l e slati1stics1 of t he sp7antily
(It (111ou intell tI I I'l'e'1tl ober I.1,.
(re i 'e.se il h1 a s as r11'essei a1t
t4 i.itel('il"s, irres(5 l (I i1 f il :hti - W:
w( it;bI. In the( to(-:1 l (f l'.31 1. :1.- hail..,
I1h('re are :.',1; 1 2. 1. ( 11und h11l("s av'er
Ia:ginti fronit to :,f00 pnirun s (11h.
('llntiuig siuch Io1t1c h,als as hall'
hales, as is tIel e(iston1 in til' com:
the(rc'ial onnln)nity the lotal gIlnned1
in 1)l'("ellEl')r 13 is t"9 f:.:..i3. The giln
n'rs have not. yet retui n t h( i eir ha11'
weights for !tis ('rol, ut -140 c"'onllc
('omp r('ss vompallnies distributed
throuighoul the (oltonl states advise
til' offleI tin they ro1r11isseId an I
nctna11"l wvighed1 froinl the growth otf
1!(2 up to I)enheb' 1:1. I 1tit,43I
l bales. averaging eah .ell ,I3.N l1unls
gross. 'sing this weight as the aver
at;e ('or S<inare halrs and1 for. rounll
hal(s 2:3 pllonnds. ilthe average Ih
taige(1 from, th(' we'tigiit returns of the
hol'u ofi('O, of I the rop111)aniPS oper),a.
1 1ng s1t4("Ith tll'Is. the t u(I vai ett( 1 t-11111
4- lr ,ir 500-plontal hlies ginned to 1)e
lrenlher 13th is f'oundi to be S.971,722.
I)edluning the wreight of the bagging
andlt] ti(S 122 1 punds i)er sqiuar.e hale),
tht' nunliber of eqlulvalet 500 poundi(
1 hales, n''t weIgh, is found to ie N,
, y1 two inost tho'olughl ennv1 1tSS('S
this selason, 32.528 gintleries, netive
- 1nd i(1', have been locate(1 and re
I)orted1, of which1 numnber :10.194 have
he'ln operat''d for' tils c"roi. In their
)evembi)e' (av .1 thl' a1(111 spe InI
agents asre1'ritan11 tll quilitity of
r( tion ginned froln the beginning of
18 the S('a1SOn1 to an inrluding Ieenl.
3- her 13 t h, an(1 also s'nred from, eaeih
e of tht' at'tive gil'ners his estimate of
nthe (unttit.y of ('otton to be ginnedI by
his ('stahlishnl nt. after ' c1")ee m'nlber 13.
The( (Stimalt(' of the( 1)'1erlentag( of lth
(ro) gillnn(d is inil:e'd on the ('St1111a (cs
of 621l ('din%'aSSIh,'J agents. wVht wvere
instrn(eted to ((Infine their (Stinante'
Ito the terr'it rieh "iln :1 v Ssed by I hemn
1ani to thei knowleIdgc gained Ithere.
fromt. 01n esti late, II(ref( r Ie, se1''e"
as a4 if i :tgli.et t114- oth1 -r. Areo(rdl
ing to th"' l t n111ate of the. giline S
111.2 per (etll. of the c'roll rematinled t'
hn ginne(1 aft1r1 Ih-e e)ulr I::. Wh)ille,
according to thi - estillna e of itlh emtll
t S ing t he 44er4e ntIl);e w', 4
thle aill 4ers. i14 4j.!43.I,i hab.:41. 74n4! :14
I ( rdli lg to4 til'he 4''7114 7 7an'assing ',.
we4ight1 of 7ti4 '4414nds1. lT'h.. 45 su of''
h1(4 assun44o1 5 37, re- 'pour-,4ihi7liy for 4 1' ...
71(''4r17ey of1 tills4' 4'43s ;tial . Tis ,
illrt wil il ' 4e follow4'led 1, by 4 tird a'1 7414
17inal reportli' 't the4 '':41 4f t il 4. g i17j;.
4l1441an4 and 7444 7 a1; Is 1lmit ('(tto(444
mit4h14rpor1 117h4't(or .\ler'i'i-jim4
st thi47-t 1:,' 74t1 i41'. 74h' 4 f ( t ol
a t Il unnhor of:& Im 11' l 4'f 444l 4( till'
tInt has' 1 471111 been da' -'by 41414,u 1ffi4'
is eto m4)k11 and1l~~' t1 verf the41 (b4ition
Anyhm11 y (is a'I') liberlhy to exmine 111114t
wholei'I 1714I process mitpe by43 the11 1444 nsus44
returie 41(4 pr'e'4 nt' (.lin- 4 ginnin4g4 74p ra
- 4ns11 74of ''~ '~>'' every 4inning es tlishmen
whi'ch1 47 h I h.indhV i4liy p (rtion 3f 11.44
1-4441mIt a very1 171 414 4 I ppoima('t i41.n o'f
14ound hale 4414,. 144olu ('pr Iobab t(imWt11
.\ 'iar 1h 4144h tixt, w 1'ill sho a1vai-'
t ill' of I(''7,'41 hal 1 frotI he44 4171 imales
of14h41total'4rop wi)1 are( submi)0ed
1''hel' f ~iiie of4y'I 741 (ietio tn ginn"d, feem
Thi3 S is t he44') firs i tim in ithe11 h o ry11
of3(71'50(1 the4144rican 115tton 0( r ll 1hat ('01l
n il1I('7 4m '1xa114114 knowtleg lIof 1te3 sea
session of( th144 pubic' at1 1o 14arly a dat.il
or within a1 31a1t4 livt mnh aseiin early.
n(( ion wit t741 1he tirop 1( of 1 114 Its first
yreport4' will 'overI'l tie ('tton1 g110inld,
ing7441I31' Se tilling 1. Tis&I'l pr i of each
year1 (I ro is nlf'owl ass(inet tle Wom~
t1 the41( previustyar a,s. th'e fommtrcre
dY pTht secon repor~i.th w'ill ncIudedl
t.ob 1eral)eh, 13t, the dafth ofl th ftr
y 11 report. oe h cto indu
It will he seen at tnis plan i"on
tenrplates praetically a monthly report
(i'Ag the cotton ginni,g season of
1903. If It shall he found that stilT
more frequent reports are de'guitrle,
the ('ensum Office wilt be prepared to
make them fot the crop of 19M4..
The census methoti of seerta'iing
the annual cotton cro1 can bd gradua
ly extended and developed with cen
paratively little increase of expen'sti so
as to include statistics of the cotton
seed oil industry. the aereage. n'nuaf
ly devoted to cotton. and' tie tuflT t'ak
ings and eonsutnptlon of cottort, tiitus;
making the reports t conplete show
ing of the Jroduetfon and clnsum)ptIom
of dlomlletis cotton.
AFTER TilE HOLIDAY R[CESS
Congress (iet. Dlownl to Wotk O'iv,
flore.
\\horn the ierar " re("o'vened Nfond'ay
atfer the huoiuv re("(.,-. few Senators:
Wlv. a 1 sent. Ahlno(si immledliately a.
dlis, usyi')nt be'l'u r(";;artling the coal.
Sit(ra ti((r. .\Ir. fd)clge Prefacel his intro
dti o4)mn of a hill isu4penhinl: for 90 days
on 'oal. with I.hle at.atemnt that in.
New 1t1inlct there was n teh distress
owing to the sca'("lty of 0(:1i and that
nln( 5 relief was aff'ord(l at once, a.
unh1 er" of factoriesz wotti h .r(' to shut
(owl. lie Was aWare, he aaid, that
S uhl a ilI should originate in. Ihe
lIonse of I(epretientatives. t.tt it was
his desire to cnll the attention of th'3
linnlce cc tlnntittee to the state of af
fairs. Mr. ('alherson followed witir .t.
resoluttiont providing for the removal of
the duty on anthrrlc"ite coal and asked.
for its illediate cousideration. Mr..
PlatI. of ('onnestient, objected. saying
it was his un11dersianding that there
was no (luty on anthracite coal. Mr.
Vest took exception to this stattement.
and said that the board of general :ap
prailsers and l'resident Roosevelt had
decided that such a dity is imposed.
MIr, Vest also introduced a resolution
on the subject. Another resolution
bearing on the subject of coal, intre
dulce(rd by .Mr. .Jones. of Arkansas, refer
lug to the charge of W. R. Hearst that
there was an illegal combination
among certain railroads to control th
shipment of anthraclte coal and calling
upon the Attorney General for the evi
denee vhich it was alleged had been
secured by him, caused a lively debate.
In which s("veiral Rlepublicatl Senators
vigor ulsly resentei1 what they thought
Was a reifect ion on the Attorney (en
eral.
i' iiltssion colntinued until 2
o'clock. when the resolution went over
beling listplaceId by the omnibus state
hood bill. MIr. Nelson, of Minnosota,
a(iressed the Senate in opposition to
the bilt and fit voted single statehooi
for Oklahoma and I dian Territory. At
-1 o'clock the Senafe adjourned.
House on Military Bill.
The i louse retsuned its work Mon
(ty after a reeess of two weeks, but
within t wo b(tl1-s the machine'y broke
down for lack of a (tuorumn. The bill
to1 ereate ct gentral staff in the army
w%"as 1hw issue. .\n at.temlp was made
to I ass it uIn(i>r ti(1st enusion of tit'
1ules, whicth rt-quires a Iwo-thirds Ia
ffl4the l4'd rried18 Iat''r in hicitwa
Wheni ' i he b)11ill wl as41 en 'l ti4), .\lv
14)i)hardson.l of TeinesseeI)) )3 . 1 144nor
,ir l ofr ide hilitrv nb litee tl-c
tishrel bit un op' iuton n (ltao ndt he,fllye
''i. o i' G r!I:L . .lr. 14il. .said Nha t'.h
:1)m J'ltal of he 'attnyIat prese lieu
Inyt! b.hi .lr.ll' f \'r i h, e -
4m414) t het1llt m ilit'r con1 nite, i n sup-- tI
Ill'i of tIe h''id'll.C t detalhd te c toil
Al.a ih y ''r 1win 30to th' I e o iie of
athrity 5 e:That isndition he aid,
"I wo' ub)1 cl Il(e 4 Ql I to ak, a t 1r
44 .ii i-. f (iltl: a o "iI tahise hi(l(lJ4does
noe t"'pra'lcalof04y 3 ehnIa he 4lieuten-40
a4u.1)4 ged.a tmviunn.Te101
'Enntye-as an tche fsafu
d eqr to bei" ss''Tissrag
.\tlr.('1t,iay: " 1111oub the dtail ed l ays
<an nder il oflihe arey cetIn eli
w'ao i I lt h l' e t' IC ent c e ail
tlr. net''s :r ' t'To A r Ishle t shnas
s'in an od l'/.to th coun.s taul ofath
i little.wA csubet oa thus t t he
ch(o'l10tie. pticetamy inet'Wsarein
.\rec .('la: "Do yttean itheta Peyi..
ont"vit thbeyt to'fe th?" stffr
.r. St't iee "hay vt ti ha l'lZ meurt'
The ll-echal resu0te o08 teo' c9 omea
Sh pseln e of. olycatt0 itmbs st
aboioum, and hatvecl the l VClotha
:EyIgofgses anatahies. i
"A muastach prn,otIetsthte timeight.
men ithnl me wt smouth-sa
"that note coce ith he upe
11p ad vey im the l is have
th evs r ut Aih shave,

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