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The Easley messenger. (Easley, S.C.) 1883-1891, May 02, 1884, Image 1

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn93067656/1884-05-02/ed-1/seq-1/

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2_____ 64 _-_0227, XOiVE I07t 12'S S1100 12' &11.4VE.
VOL. 1.] EASLEY, SOUTH CAROLINA, FRIDAY, MAY 2, 1884. [NO. 30.
The Faithful Housewife.
I see her in her home content,
Theyfaithful housewife, day by day,
Her dudes seem like pleaspres sent,
And joy atfends her on her way.
She cares not for the loud neclaim.
That goes with rank and social strife,
Uer waysIde home is more than fame;
She is its queen-the faithful wife.
When suinmr days are soft and fair,
And bird songs fill the cottage trees,
She reaps a benison as rare,
As her own gentle ministries.
Peace Shrines Itself upon her face,
And happiness in every look;
Her Voice is full of charm and grace,
Like music of the summner brook.
In winter, when the days are cold,
And all the landscape deal and bare,
Ilow well she keeps her little fold,
How shines the fire beside her chair! I
Thlie children go with pride to School,
The fathers toil half tulr'ns to play,
,So faithful iA her fruxal rule.
So tel(y13' she molds tile day.
T.et higher stationq vaunt their claim,
Let others sing of rank and birth,
Tle faitlIfuIl hoiusewife's hionest fame.
Is linked to the best joy on earth.
-Wenuga.
BILL ARP'S LETTER.
'Ihe "Shycoon" DIIsscussed- -Ils Ef.
fort to Conasole, Etc.
I reckol the elemetnts are satis
lied 11w and will let us alone fo
a SeaISonl. We've got nothing to1
camllIain of at mniy house anI mnch
to he gratefiul for. nevertheless one
'f my props wave been knocked
rom Undert, for l've been sayinoI
8an(d thinking for seven years that
lese hills an( miiouintains that!
s1urroun1d us were like fortifications
agintstormS, andI temnpe-st and;
vyelonies anid silmoolls and torna
dtoes and all those sort of' things.
I thought that the high peaks and
ritlges broke them to pieces when
hey come and we were in no dan
ger, but the day we could look out
at our windows and see the raging
balloon on its winding way tear
ing upl things andl paying no re-I
sp)ect to houses or trees or' man or
beast. It lifted up the roof off ofj
Nahor Munford's nice dIwelling~
like the shingles were feathers, andl
len took hold( ot iis lbig two-sto
ry barin anid twisted it all t 1o piec
's, and then dropp1ed1 the frag
mlents about on nine mules and
Ivo horses and~ a (narriage andt all
sotst of mxachinies, and~ ninie ig
ger's to boot that wereC insidetile
bilding. No, those darkeys werej
het ini. Tnlfey saw the e'yelone;
looling r'Oundl tihe d1welling houses
and they run out of' tile barn just
as; thd~1fburb.s of the mfonster g'ot'
there. i
Says'iI, "John ' what .did those,
(larkeys do thlen?'
"'ood grnmcin, bhn, T tell you
-dem niggers just frow demsevei
]own on de groun', and holler 'O'h
Lordy-good Lord hab mercy oi
t poor nigger. Nebber be a ba<
iigger any more, oh Lordy -goot
Lordy'-and d!old shyeogn paj
1o 'tention'at all, but jes' if 'en
ip and twis' 'em ober de fence in
;o the red mud and Gim, my sou
wish you could hab seen Gim
.or as he gwine ober de fence'h
;truck a postis dat was stickin
ip, and gethered it with both arim
ind held on and hollered wtis thai
1er, 'Oh, Lordy-oh, my goo(
Lord. Blessed do Lord, hab iner
-y on a poor nigger,' and abou
bhat time old shyeoon twis he tai
'oun' and lif Gim's feet way ul
)ber he llead an(d his holt brok4
Ind olinced off o1 de groun' an(
lenl took alloder bolnce into (14
mud hole and dar do consarn le
"Arter de shyeoon gone cleai
1iway I run up to Gim, and says I
Gi, is yoU dedl or no.' Gimn ly
in' (bir in de imud hole wid nufih
)ut he head out. Giiii ieber sp1)oki
Ifary Word. alndU his eyes Wuz wal
ied like a ded steer, and so says
Arin 'I say G i yode gon
Aean1 ded,' for you so- I thougli
if' Gin ded no Iuse inl my wa din
inl de mu111d atter him, and Gim h
w:lle1i one eye atter 1m1e and whis
per, 'wharP is he.' -Wha's who,
said 1. 'Do dbbil.' said I. 'Doii
T(one, said I-gone le11nn away
)it u fromn dar-it ) up I sa.
i roan and say, -J ca't. I'll
lone (dead.' 'Git u) I tell you,' sait
, ut Gim nebe-r iwe. Rymeb)
[ frow ul) my htands and loo!
lown debig ro:ul and say 'my oo
or)d Almighty, of dat ole sh veoor
vint a comin' right bal( here.
Neber seed1 a. d0 lig'ger Come t(
ife like Gin. ie bouncled' outel
tat 1ld hole and start off up di
1oad a r'unnin' a( hollerin' for I
Ifuarter of a mile. White folk
-omne along ani stop him and lool
All oher him and nober find a
cratch. WhJ1enj lie got back W(
was all elittin' away de tiiher
[romt oflen (d0 mules, and it was :
half an hour before we (could g'i
Gimn to strike ary liek. TeolI vot
whatt boss8, we was all1 mighty I)a(
stkeer'ed, b)ut I neber01 see a nigge:
1is onrieady for judgemient as da
lebbil (10 g'it him hie raise a rump
is down in dem11 settlemnents sartim
rind shor'e.'
'Didn't the eyclone take off th<
r'oof 0f your1 c'abin, John?'
'Of' course$ he did1 boss. ie tak<
:le r'oof ofl all along ebrwhr h4
.go. Loo)k like cher'y housie hi
:'omel to hie dIip (down and say tak<
your hat oil; dlon't yo se mt
N0in~', aint *you g'ot no mfanner's
and zip lie str'ike 'em anmd take i
>ff hisselfI. He take do 'roof' offei
'Ie roof' o)ffen deo elhd scbool am
i offen de white school all de same.
, He no respeckter of pussons, bress
i God. Tell you boss what I tink
I about dis old shycoon. I tink he
I nufain but de old debil on a seur
r cion. Yah, yah, yah,' and John
i cackled athis own ideas.
Well, I was mighty sorry for
I Nabor Munford, for it tore him up
awfully, but it left him his wife
and his pretty little children and
good old mother and all, and he is
thanktful for that and said. to me
i that his gratitudel would be coi
I plete if hir ade trees had been
left, for he ald'nt replace them.
It was only a few days ago and now
1 you could hrrdly tell that the
storm had been there. In 21 hours
lhe had 75 hands at work repair
i ing the danages for he jusI called
for the hands at the niies close by
r and they came and it was livelY
times there fori a few days and
1 now everything is as good or bet
ter than before.
I wish all the suflerers could do
1 that way but alas, there are a hun
3 dred families who have lost treas
- ures that moniey could not replace
[ -treasures oft the( heart and hoien
a that will never return. What a
t terrible death. Verily these Cy
r clones seem like things of life, o
instruments of vengence in the
hlands of the ods we re.ad about
in old mythology. All that an
Cient roiaice iaft-- recorded otAja x
and.1 Hercules ald .Jupiter, or all
that the Arabian Knights tell us
k of the genii does iot surpass the
I plwer atd grandleur an desola
tion of the mo:lrl cyclone. It
hulmblles US m')O than i'prayer or
I preaching'. It takes us unia~iwar'e.
iIt is coistant dread of the tim'd
' de[ene-eless, an now it takes all
>I m philosphy to keep my house
I hold Calm and serene. 'There is
1the lbasemnelt,' said I, 'an(d we
11could all run downa staiirs and be
htbeneath the tract of the eyelonie,
for it iever was known to attack
I a basement that was below ti
011OU1 11 01' -1 ce-r i11 t Well.L'
'K'
Z"rond nor1 a1 clr nor] el
i rs. A 1) aid down her iitting
.--- n id, 'you don-- 't suppose for a
LI mlomenit that anybody in their
1 right mind would go down in that
I basemlent during a cyelone and
1r ha~ve all .the timber(2s of tile old1
t house crash in on1 them?' ' Why,
t my dear,' said1 1, 'thle timb~lers o1
- hshouse aire fashioned andi
i strong. D)o you kno1w that thesc
siils are 1 4 iniches squlare and1( all
a framed andi~ dra'w pinned.'
'So much the worseO,' satidt she:
' 'the heavier the timb~ler the heavi
a er' it would fall ou us. If'the hous<
Swas light it might blow clean
3 away and leave us unharmed, but
a these big sills you tell about would
,just 1)0 lifted up a little and drop
t ped~( haekJ into the ba~semelnt.'
1 'Well then there is the flowei
I pit,' said I. 'Thaft~i i agood nlac(
There are no- timbers over that.'
'But how are we going to get to
the fower-)it,' said the girls. 'The
cyclone conies before anybody
knows it, and while we are run -
ning to the flower-pit it catches us
and carries us ot*.'
'Not only that,' said MArs. Arp.
'b)ut the trees are all about and
they would be pulle(d up by the
roots and crush down on the flow
er-pit and ewen the sash framnes anid
the glass could kill us, and then
there is always hail with the cy
clone and that would beat us all
to pieces-nc) I'in not goigl0 inl the
flower-pit.'
'All righit ' said I. 'Ve wYill
stay right here ill the ftamily room
ald see it out. I don't think it
will do anything but take the roof
'Why, it tore Mr. Munford's hig
strong barn al1 to pie(cesO4 an( ki lled
his mules,' said she. 'It wouldn't
mindl this house rt all.'
'Then wv here are you goiniig,' said
I, aml there was silence for a seni
son. Finally Irs. Arp said she
wanted to move somewhere where
there were no storms or cvelone.
'There is no such place' said 1,
'Llis side ofiheaven.'
Last night my women folksIk
stayed up at niahol' Freemilan's to
tea and aloit ten o'clock lie came
downl alone anl said l he wantel
somebody to go up after my folks.
'Why didl't they coie down
with you?' said I. 'Afraid' said
h(. 'Afraid of what' said I. 'Cv
(lo11es,' sai(l he. 1 was abou IOt to
eXpresS MY ildignafltioll, Iwheni he
SaIi d thev had all beenl talking
al.oilt spirits and glhists ald his
Wife didl't want to he left alo1ne'
and so lie left my folIks upl) there
while he Camle down. It d()S look
like spirits aind:1 magnetism and cy.
clones are a1)ouit to talc this conil
tiy and a man don't hiardly know
whether it is worth while to phlalt
a crop or not, blit I reckoni we will
plant. We have 1beenI sowing Oats
all the week as ht-ar d( as we canl aml
are still livingo inl hope that sun1
shine and the seasons wIll contin
ue and the earth give its increase
anid this yeari be a better one thant
the last.
So mote it be. BiLr. Amr.
-Tie w'ho wouIld admronish oth
ers should above all things, be
ca'1refu of I( thiri r'epuitatio O and11(
senise oIf shonife. Th(ey who have
east off lnlshing are beyonUd
amnendm ient.
-Light-mindedl young thing ini
a 1bath inzg suiit: '"Surely, Anunt
Mlargaret, you're not going to
wearL y~our spectacles into theO
water!''
-Aunt M-"Inudeed I am. Noth
fig shall ind~uce mue to tatke A ofan
.other' thin')'." .

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