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The Pickens sentinel-journal. (Pickens, S.C.) 1903-1906, August 17, 1904, Image 6

Image and text provided by University of South Carolina; Columbia, SC

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn93067659/1904-08-17/ed-1/seq-6/

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ST. LOUI
NEW YOF
FAIR
Addison Steele. After a
at Mahy Feature
H. ADDISON STKKLK, n
^ j. well-known newspaper ami
2 "If 7JT Z magazine writer, oi New
y IV| H York, recently spent a week
p at the World's Fair. R?s wov
turning liorne, he wrote thu
following appreciative ac/?AIin#
i-*f Kin > i - C 1 >? I- 1? 1 - ? ?
wui,l?' ??* iui diiujrivii liiic,
which should convince any reader that it is
worth his while to see this greatest of expositions:
In the expressive language of the day,
St. Louis "Idis the goods." 1 had expected
much of the Louisiana Purchase Imposition,
for I had kept in touch with tin;
making of it from its very inception, live
yearp ago; but after nearly a week of journeying
through this new wonderland I
must confcss that in every essential particular
it is far beyond my expectations.
The biggest ami best it was meant to he
and the biggest and host it is. The exposition,
rumors notwithstanding, is <|Uite
finished.
Those who imagine that the Columbian
Exposition remains the last word in the
way of a world's fair should remember
i. .
i\\
that eleven rears have rolled by since Chi
cago iuviicd all the nations of the earth t>
come within her i,ates. These having hot i
years of leni.ukaule progress the nv ie laei
that if, is up to dale would p.ace t h?
LfOtllS) 1I1.I Kvn.wil I.ill ill.. '-.1 II
not only the ('olnnibian K.xpo.sition or I v.:
but the 1 '.i l is rniv?T.-..il Kxposit ion of !:> '
?the oniy other world's fair ot the jierioi
mentioned. The great developnu nt o
horseless vehicles, eertiin wonderful a I
vanees in tlie licltl ot electricity, the wire
leRs telegraph, tli. submarine boat and tin
practicable living machine- all of wh:el
are special features .it St. Louis are, foi
instance, ma iters of the period tlit
Chicago < vi-nt. I'o my 111 i:t?I, howexer, tin
one distinctive feature which places il
ahead of a!! oilier world'.-* fairs if the coin
prehetiHive Philippine exhibit. Ahead a'.s<
of any pr< viotis showing are the iiidi\; !nt
buildings nt cs^ht of the foreign nation.aud,
taking everything into consideration
the archit< crural i i i landscape _a: deiiin;
aehicvineir > are ill iter i.s tlicy ought t.
be wit li the world older
One of the <ji. a test, ind cert a n!y one o!
the most agroable, <>f my many surprise.
was tho supremo beauty ot' t lit* main vroii|
of hiiildin/'i. For tho simple it i<>n thai
tin' camera ii< s inn exist which <-.tni<
take in flic vasi picture as tho eye s"os it
the early vmv- of tin- group a hi! hurt
an.I a l>it (hero gave a scan! idc i of tin
scheme as a whole. Nor did the < ar!\
views of the ten individual buildings wliiil
make up its component parts < 1<> justice t<
their nobility of ai n: t uie and jifii' s a
grandeur, Then a^rii in tlie ground plan:
a.id hirilVcye >!. !: 1 ! . ??iii> pt>ss.l>li
manner of showing r the fan-shaped u
raiiKen-erit of iius gi'oiip looked stil. am
unsatisfying. Far f>- >:>i that it is <pi:to a
remarkable i:i its way a^ the I anions Coin
of Honor of tin* 'oluinhian Kxpositioti. It
o'ir reapi-ci n is i-vi-ii more n iiaoiu, ior in
xtead of two gland \ si.is it nlrrtw a dozen
The mnIn vi?sf i is. of course, the one !o <k
ing ?|> the; I'laxn ..f St. LOui* wliosi
GOLDEN CHA NS.
41. Mux Worn <>otili-n II itliilcufT
Fur V? his.
It will lie remcmIjcred, says tin
Westminster tin/.. tic, that some year
ago M. Max l%< gis was present.d I?y i
group of Iaily admirers wish a |?ai: o
golden liamlciitfM, in commcmorati >i
of his arrest and Imprisonment in Hi
groat enuse of Nationalism. Tin1 An
ti Semite swore that he would wea
the manacles us souvenir hiiieeh-ts to
tlii! rem;)Int 1 it of his life. For s.?ui
time he kepi Ids promise, ami then i
was observed that lie linil abandon ei
his decorative fetters. Why? \\a- i
Infidelity to tlip cause, or what? I'er
pie wondered, anil could get n<> sati?
factory answer, until a few days ax
there was a public sale of unredeemed
pledges from the Mont ile i'iete. 'I'll
golden liand'iilVs (weighing forty tiv
grammes) were included in the eat;i
logne, M. Ke^is having deposited thei
with "inn Iillt!e" l'? relieve a tempi
rary indigence, and having tieglei tc
to recover tlii'in. To complete 111
Irony of the situation, they were pill
' '-> " I I ..'.f.,v\- vv till ' lluw Wl'.ll
i?.i ( i? .. .
thorn in !!< > str?ots of A tutors awl o
biliits tIhmii to Mil liis friomlx.
Or. !(:*!? mi I.I,. 1?.
Dr. I'Mwiint Kvorolfo IS11I0 is now . )
I.l*. I>. of Williams ('olli'Ko, fro]
w hioti liis faill"!' ijriiilmi I<I ji:< li
y<?ars auo. Tlw doctor r<>ail :in ? \t?-;i<
from liis paivnt's jcrinlna!i;i? aiMiv-s
ffhh-l) <l\Ti It with tin* rjuosti<?:i "II:
Thoro ll'-i-n ;> J Vo^r.'s.-'lvo Inr rov
inont in Socl'ly in tin' l-n*t l-'ilt
VoarsV" I)r >I:ijorosoty remark)
flint a oonhiry ago tlio hoys np|>oar
fo li?* w*r?-?!II:ii? with tlio smite pro
'" us ui nro now <!isrus->oil.
S "HAS THE
*K WRITER FINDS
BEYOND F.XPKCT A
l Week at tlie Exposition,
2S---St. Louis Cool and P:
crowning feature is the great Louisiana
Purchase Monument?ami across tlie Grand
Basin to the Cascade (ianiens. On the
right are the Varied Industries and Fleetrieity
buildings anil on the left the Manufactures
and l'.ducation, these -with Transportation
and Maohinery still further to
the right and Liberal Arts and Mine* bei
yond at the left?making up the body of
the fan. For its handle the fan has tlio
Cascade Hardens?rising in a grand terrace
to a height of sixty-five feet above the Hoor
level of the buildings mentioned and
crowned by the great Festival Hall, the
Terrace of States and the Fast and West
Pavilions-?and the Fine Arts building directly
behind.
n * w
In tlie architecture of the group there is
no uniformity of style. The very liberal
use of great columns g-vt\s the four buildings
fronting on the J'iazn and Basin a
'-ei-tain architectural kiiuliip, but the
Mines building, with its two huge obelisks
and somewhat Kgyptian aspect; the much*
i turreted and belfried Machinery building; ,
' the highly ornate Transportation building. |
| ?IUI no Kigaiini- (imir.i aim |?y umi |
, LACK OF MINKS AN I) MKTALLUll
i I
' tli-? Romanesque Liberal Arts building |
) 1 liavo pronounced individuality. Yet 111 tin: !
i k'<-'"''ia1 picture all these buildings biend
t finely.^ Nor is there .i: y clashing in the ,
; ease ?>f tin' I'V'Mioh Ionic styic of tlie buildi
ings i>t I .i.seaiii' (iurilrns. Twelve haiul>
some lirii! 'i's a.-ross i!i>- wati?i a vs. which
) form a tigiue eight by running from ihe
i 'Iranil I'.asin around l!io Kleeii it ity and j
i Ivlueation buildings, further contribute to
- j I lie architectural spiendor ot the scene. |
Vr
\ l!<n\s of (ill.*. l.ii'ue iii.ipies set <>IT lite
i | Imilding.s '.'1 the main vista. .t.I< 1;im- j
' me ts:i: e.ib'y the beauty ->; tie picture j
.mil tuniishiii/ one ot tho many liemotistra- i
'ions of the .superiority of this exposition i
L i in the mat lor of lumlscapo ga. leiiin^. j
rh..-n; are als-. many trees to -ei off the ;
i [ >ti:or buildings of the uroup, shrubbery
1 j ami .small trees Itavo been used in profa- |
sion around t lie entratm s ami til bridges 1
, ami then.' are i; .mlMinie .sunken ga i lens in
: , two piaees. Tho laml>ia;ie lr< itmonl of
> (ascado III!! is similarly lino
>
The Philippine foetion covers 110 has
t : than forty si-von hitch. has lllit buddings
< I ami some 7.*? ,<> )( I .catalogued exhibits, and
> | renrosenls tut olll'av of ovr a m:!lioti ilol
....1/ ......I i .. 1... ..i
I I > .1 ! van! Kntraiice in the M-ction i->
, free, iiui Iwenty-livo ci'iiis is charged to
inlo tMrli of ? !??? :'?>tir native village.., which
are intensely ;n?"i iiii;. The villains run
ilon/ Arrowhead Lake, ami .the iuh.il.i
i tants all have some way <u entertaining
their v -it'll s. 'I h?* l^nrotles, w ho wi .ir as
1 little clothing as tlu' law nt even savage
- lands allow ; llontoi s, Tiit^aiitlcs ami Suy
lire in ?>iie villain', t in? la U ? ?-< 1 \\ 1 hit
M il'ns and liogolios ill another; ill'- hlaek
1 Nt'ui'itos iii the third ami iIih civili/cd \'is*
im\ ins, who havi> i i atlmli'- t hiireli ami a
t theatre, in tin' fourth. \-. a in.it i ot < Il
Ucatinli thi.s jjmmI encampment. nt ' in* "little
brown men" is unit thing that nn American
can ali'nr.l to miss.
lCight of the numerous buildings of for
ONE HUNDRED FOR AN EGG.
* All 1 iiithin (innir Fowl That in Very
Viil tlllble.
14 Not often does tlie price of u sltiul:'
* egg <'!iiiiI> to $1(11), inn this I.s what was
offered for each of the eggs ot' a eor(
tain Indian inline lien, which was
1 | brought to Kngbtud sotno time ago.
i' I'm nturios tli?' I ml isi n i;;iiii", or
A/.ccl fowls, have boon tlio \ >-ry it pox
I' iif I lie j^liuo bro??il, for t lit* ptirenoss of
i' blooil ;iiii 1 poilitjroo Imvo been most
0 ruri'l'iilly prosorvoil for so Ion;; tiiiii
t i the (Into of tin' origin til' Iii > rnro h;is
1 been lost in t!io pnst.
i 1: is iilinost impossible to prorure
' spi'riiin>iis of !liii purest lilooil, lor t'toy
;ire tronsurod liy tin- Indian sportsman
" :i t l In" Iiijjflios! vjiluo.
>' A- i;;tmi" foul they nr?* scr??nt liyhte
?>rs. Those who have soon thorn in In '
ilia for tIn* line.>t biros nov< r roach
i our ooldi'v limati's toll of tlioir prow
n ess iiml un^OVe'-naMo oMioity in but
111'. >>1111 I 11 'J IJ II I a il I ?> .? > ^ > I' |?#| ,?
'1 or ilea! Ii.
0 In AnnTicM, however. the fowls
are seldom raisoil for li^'iiin;; pill
s poses, ! ut for show, anil as pets ami
1 hohhie^ of poultry fanriers. 'lountry
I. fe in Ameriea.
A Mmlont KiiijIIiIiiii in .
I.ike III.- ti\u!iti<ni;(| I'.uuli-Iifian. Ar
" tlitir Si;inl??y. j ??*.ifi <il' West minster.
>u -.vi.ro from his li.-; v.-it '.<>
! America an expression of amazement
s* wliU-li only time oiiNI oil in- lie was
'* a! onrO bosH I?y interviewers. wli
as'.ioil tin* usual questions. "What
N was tlio thing w li most impressed
' yon in AmoriciiV" was oil - of thoso.
'' Without a moment's liositatlon Dean
'' Stanley roplioil; "My own ijjiU/rnii
I Argonaut.
GOODS." t*
. - ; u1 ' ^
WORLD'S
iTIQNS ::
Fvnrp?5c:f>i Amnromprtf
rices Reasonable.
cign nations would ulonc form an exDorit
it?u worth the journey front New Yorn to
St. Louis. Germany's building. Das
Deutsche Hans, id a reproduction of Ciiarlottcnhurg
Schloss, 450 feet long and finely
located on an eminence overlooking Cascade
Gardens. '1 lie interior as well us the
exterior is a faithful reproduction of the
palace; Gobelin tapestries, the old Charlottenhurg
furniture and the Kaiser's wedding
silver having been brought over for
the superb apartments. Nearly a mile to
tlic westward France has reproduced, at a
cost of half a million dollars, the Grand
Trianon, the building and great garden
covering fifteen acres. Great Britain has a
copy of the banaucting hall of Kensington
l'alace; Japan, tno Shtshindcn Palai.4, one
of several buildings in a characteristic
nark, and China, the country seat of l'rince
I'u lain. Italy has a superb' Gracco-Roman
temple, Austria an architectural glorification
of Moderne Ivunst, and B&gium a
magnificent structure trom stit original ucsinn.
F..csser reproduction of note arc the
tomb of Ktinad-Dowlah. by Kast India, nnd
the new liangkok temple, by Siam.
PPPf
u;y.
The l'iko lias in tlie Tyrolean Alps the
liiuMt ?,uiici,s>ioi? tii.it I have over seen.
TJi-mv h .1 great S|iuro with many i)unint
, htii'flings, t iittli village >tnot, and above
'lie .-.now r!ad inoim'.ain* whieli look very
....i ... > , . .i'o 'i t...
laiiroad yet devi.-ed .11) >i Is several line j
<>t' the Alps, ami there is a very '
^I'tiuiiio1 exposition i>t the (theruimneruuu j
lu.-Mon pl.'.y ui the little ehureh. The |
t'iilV Dwellers' eoneesaon a!?o looks very j
n uistie .it niijlit Tail. It i< elaborate in ar- ,
i ;i affluent. : . 1 1 l In- eoiirMn^, snake anil I
i other il 'ii fs :>v t!f S > uhv.rsiern linliann j
iiu?l;e i' anoihir o:' the I'ike show* wliieli
-!: ..i.il ! "alien ;a by i la >.-vi!!" there ,
'.s a'i i(:? -m j ir.arioi!t-: ie i aire and some
,'ena:ne >;>a'i:s!i ia:ii in>;. I'\>r I lie r"st the i
IV.< oll.'is :ii>i t \a:i' iy, ami as a rule
thi' in!! money's worth is mven. The enormous
.b-rr.-alein ami I >o.'r War eoiicessions
are not on the I!;e.
It is a case of dine at the (lerman Pa- '
\ Mon aad ?!ie at the K^po.Mtion. In ii
! i.itll'li! .M . leriie Kims', i aiMin,; adjoiniii
i I) is I it'll!.-elie Il.ii's tin' best tood and
i I U. ... . I... ... ' .... I..
:i>1111 <I, I ho ta'.ile lunch and dinner '
instill;? S-J and St. r> HiK'.-iivt'Iy. l"i???r<? in .
also a !.i .ill" service. Kveiyihin^ eonsid- i
I'lvil the pi-1 ate (! > excessive, and at
' least ono 'in' ii *li.>uld he taken there lor j
the e\|h i en. e. Another should he taken
at the T v ) e hi A!;.s. eiihi r outdoors or in
'he j;oiV'' ais dining ronn in the mountain- !
de 'i)i.' i .1 Kn urli restaurant in at
i'aris, o:i 'lie I'iKe. Lower in prices and j
' in every ' . aiiinir io'e arc the two restau- ;
i ints ! ,?:. I'i I : Mr... IJoicr in the pa- ]
\ ilii.ns i- nle (iardeTi.4. The east one '
lias wai m1 no '""i and the west :
"i: v. u . i . " ' i ""] ' I
' iinmny. I'i iii 1 ill otter de- '
!:i'i.)in ;. i..t r\ :i '.Ik- A ? : !> ur.11 building.
riir.M! i>i"' nut ifci! .? !- . Ir.it time saving
t i!?< for tin? i;.i\ri .-t. r!i?'.i' aii- in> end of
ii'sl iii*1 ~ > lit .ii 1 in!i-.f- on tlii' grounds. ;
THE SiL. NCE. OF BUTTERFLIES.
TliU Invert Hi'iiriMi'tilH i> Truly Silent
World.
After ail. tlie chief charm <?f this rare
of win^' il (lowers ilo".s not lie in their
i varied :i!nl liriil'tani lieauty. not yet in
their won |< rftil >eri"s of tram forma:
tions, in th'?ir Imiiu' ami sordid caterpillar
life, t!i if lotij; slumber in the
i chrysalis, or the very brief period
which < miprises their lienuty. their
love ma!:ititf. their parentage and their
death. Nor does it lie in the fact that
we do not yet certainly know whether
they lia\>> in the < aterpillar shape the
In ulty of sij.;|it or not, and ilo not even
hi:u? i lit* |ii tTinc ii.v <11 11 - i luuni
m!;.-pinions (>ru:in in milturit.v. the ant
n11;i? . Nor do-vs it consist in this?
tli.it they of .-ill <T "Mtfil tilings huvo
furnlsho 1 n::in with the symbol of Ills
own Immortality. It rather lies in the
fact ilnit, with 31SI !Ii<>ii* varied life end
: activity. lii y represent :in absolutely
'silent \M>r).I. * \u ii,,. vnst array
of i o.lern kuowledij > lias found
i:o hullriflv which murmurs with an
audible voice and only a few species
which imn oven audibly click or rus11
* with t: * I r wind's T. \V. Hi>?;;ini
foil, in Atlantic.
i
'Mix IMuvh rlniii'* ''oiiiplitlni.
A popular author, who has lately
Inni'd to pla.N writing, has not sue
h d in impress!- intinaKcrs with
the availability of his productions,
Not loiiix ago, thinking to get some
useful pointers from the current drania,
lie made an observation tour of
lie theatres.
"Well," he remarked to a friend nt
the end of the evening, "I seem to bo
th" only man alive who can't get ?
poor play put on." Harper's Weekly.
An OrlglnHl Suhjach 1
Oneofthe subjects taken up the other
flay by the Progressive Health Club,
a feminine organization of Chicago,
was how to make husbands eat what
they dislike.
The Mmliuli NI jjht jjown.
The modish nightgown is of the
chemise order. It is made with low
neck and short flowing sleeves and
slips over the head. The neck is drawn
?il> with ribbon threaded through handmade
buttonholes.
Wom?n'? 'I rump Card.
A woman's winning card is cheerfulness.
She may be capable of countless
self-sacriliees, Infinite tenderness 'and [
endless resources of wisdom, but if I
slit- cloaks these very excellent possessions
under a garb of melancholy she
may almost ns well not have them, so
far as the ordinary world is concerned.
Wlirre \V??ii?t?n ? Heroic.
The determination to do her duty at
all costs inspires the society woman of
to-day as much as it did the defenders
of the British ting at Trafalgar. She
goes into action with a grim resolve to
dance and dine as all her friends ex?..w.f
Tlw.i.?l. 1 I !?'.*?
head splitting, ami she knows she is
grewsoineiy bored. she will heroienll.7
go through her (lay's program, fortllled
l?y the consciousness of having done
her duty.?Ladles' Field.
(I?ri;ninii I'lllow Top.
Given a square of art canvas and
some green, yellow, black and red^
braid one inny have a gorgeous pillow
top. The canvas should bear a design
of some kind in the centre, which can
be embroidered in outline or cable
stitch, and strips of the braid, which
should he about half an inch wide,
make a irav l>m*ilr>r Tliov mnv l?.? mi.
plied willi machine stitching. Where
the strips cross at the corners they
should ho interlaced. basket-work
fashion, ends throe or four inches long
being loft to form a fringe effect.
I.lngerln Hilt*.
The lingerie hats of exquisite batiste
or mull or lino Swiss embroideries and
Valenciennes lace are lovelier than j
ever this season, and innumerable
changes are rung upon combinations
of lace and flowers. Nets plain or
dotted willi large chenille wafers are
sinrrou ami pie.itcd into airy, hroad1
Nnnv.'d shapes and trimmed with Howers
and soft silk scarfs.
Shaded Hiraws ami straws of countloss
now weaves are shown. Linen
hats inset with law and picturesque ill
shape an; among the new oU'erinns as
woll as more severe linen models for |
outinK rtiul mournir.j? wear.
Cardan hum lies and llowor wreaths
divide the honors, and there are many
th-wors and hud fringes which are
used pro I'll? ly. ( o-Uados, choux, rosi'lt-'s.
mercury wings, enpid wings
and <iiti!Is arc willed into service for
the sailor hats.
'l'lie lWo<lt*rn Tioiisucdu.
.>!> <>iw 111111*\n oi K 'liiii.; u ir'MiRscnr.
nowadays to !:ist f? r years, and 11' they
contemplated such a thing it would )n?
21 dead failure. A modi :-iv bride gets
an out It t for immediate wear. In
divss wo live from hand to mouth, nnd
tin* gowns of three mouths ago arc like
the ". snows of ye?tor year." Women
of to-day reset thoir jewels almost a>
often as they order fresh garments.
There is ::<> saving in anything. They
spend the money in quality. and not
quantity. No bride nowadays has an
Snjinoiise number of dross \s; she is
content with her wedding gown, the
more gossamer the more fashionable;
a I envoi I ng costume for going away,
j with a stole nnd muff to match; four
j evening frocks, one black. <>i< > satin.
i one lace aiul one a tulle or thin ball
Kuirti; throe smart"!* day jiowiis and a
tailor-made or so would sut1i"e a do/.en
j of e.lch article < f underwear, and hall
j a dozen petticoats of various sorts will
pretty well complete tlio out lit.
It Womiin the K<|ou! of Mnn?
| Dr. Lynuia Ahhott. in the World's
j Work, says 11>;it doubtless tlx* enlarge.
I mont of woman's educational and in!
dustrial opportunities lias boon iicioni}
panlod by sonic Intellectual errors and
some practical ovlls. The most serious
1 of those errors is the opinion that
I equality of character involves Identity
of function; that becuu.se woman is
the equal of man, therefore she is to
do the same thinsrs which he does.
j Those of us who have >n i 111 rested
I in claiming nu?I pros dip? for woumn
tliis larger 1 ito il>> not deny tli<*? ?? are
distinctive fcmiiiin - ami masculine
spheres of artivit.v, a ad that oaHi sex
renders the bust s ?rvice to so-iely
within it s appropriate .* phere. Wiiat
wo object to is the endeavor of the
mala philosopher to evolve woman's
sphere out of his own consciousness,
and shut her up within it; what we
insist on is that holh sexes shall have
ofjual iiVM'lv and < <i*< > 1 largeness of
life, and il::it Mich shall Hud its appropriate
sphere for Itself.
'I lip Knu'litli Wlfo.
I J ' 111 .111- u 11:1... i; 1 > I 111.11 I \ 11; X ; l u
Englishman ae.'l making his country
yoiw country." sayx ail American girl
who has done this, "do begin itnme*
<1 lately to tak" an Intoi'ost in polities.
All the upper-class people being in polI
ties in Kngland, tho woman v.ho is
not posted shows h*?r.*elf n horr!b!e ig'
nonunus, aiul it i.s dillicnlt lo cuU.ivute
.11 ^
a tasto for public affairs when you
have never before given them a
thought."
Miss Rose Kingsley. daughter of
11.1^0 T.r:..?oi,M> oit.x ...no 1..
iv i ii j , u inn j>iiu ? ua til
this country a fe\y years ago lecturing
upon art, said that the least educated
of the English girls would be ashamed j
to show the ignorance of politics of ;
which an American girl boasts. All j
English girls of to-day are expected to
be well Informed in many linos, and
politics is one of them. A bright Eng- |
lish girl, .Miss I-yon, who recently mar- I
ricd I.onl Acton, was noted for her ac- \
complisliments?among them a knowledge
of art, music, languages and politics.?New
York Press.
1'iirlri Keening Gown*,
There are several dift'eront moile.* 1
for waists, some of which call for long
flowing sleeves, and others that have
oulv the hmul nvnr fl:i? slmiilili'is; ninl
then the short sleeve drooping below. '
The long sleeves must be of the linest
materials, unltned, a nil their length is
only regulated by what is becoming, j
The simplest of all evening gowns for
summer, and which can be made up
with very little cost, are the pretty [
dowered muslins and batistes that this ^
year can be bought for very little
money, comparatively speaking. While
a silk foundation is of course always
satisfactory, it is not absolutely essential
with these muslins, and many of
the smartest are made tin on thin underskirts,
either of the same eoior or
of some contrasting color. A charming
1 little model for a (lowered muslin lias ;
throe llounces with rows of shirring at j
the lo;> of each ilonnee, and hands of j
entre-denx and narrow lace on the edge
of each flounce. The waist is in baby
style with a deep bertha, the upper
part of the bertha made of six rows of
shirring, below which falls a square
bertha of tlie tinest batiste and lace insertion.
and the whole gown is exceed- !
ingly dainty and effective. Such a
gown can be made at home easily?
Harper's Ha/.nr.
llacliKlor'n Ti'a Dixit.
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a gown that cost twenty-livo cents a :
yard can look quite as stylish as cue
that cost ten times the sum.
Simplicity is tlio keynote of good
dress, Hccontricity is always lad
nste; do not strive for timisunl effec.s;
be content with silipie giliish
styles.
1 ;i linying n shirt waist, for instance,
it is far better to choose one of lino
lllillfl lill WUIIUUl JUIV I (HI Will H OJ1U |
tSimt Is of coarse;' material ami cover.
?d wiih cDjirso '.ace.
If you do your hair nealiy and never
wear a hair ribbon unless it is fresh
and unereaxvl; if your collars are
clean ami your shoes neat an.I your
dress couspiclt 'in only for its modest
harmony, yon can bo a very pleasant
object to gaze upon.
it is better to wear :: > ribbons at nil
than to wear crushed and soiled one#,
.lust at present so many girls wear
their hair turned tip in a braid and tied I
with a black ribbon. In many caves
the ribbon is dusty and shabby. The
stylo is protty and becoming, but if
you can't afford a fresh ribben don't
wear 0:10 at all
Miss Nettie Blackmore, Min-1
neapolis, tells how any young
woman may be permanently
cured of monthly painfc by taking
Lydia E. Pinktiam's Vegetable
Compound.
"Youno Womex: ? I had frequent
headachca of a severe nature, dark
spots before mv eyes, and at my menstrual
periods I suffered untold agony.
A member of tho lodge advised mo to
try Lydia E. Pinkhanj's Vegfetiiblo
Compound, but I only scorned
good advice and felt that my case was
opelcas, but she kept at me until I
bought a bottlo and started taking
it. I soon had tho best reason in the
world to change my opinion of the
modicine, as each day my health improved,
and finally I was entirely without
pain at my menstruation periods.
I am most grateful."?Nrttik IJr.ackmore,
28 Central Ave., Minneapolis,
Minn. ? 95000 forfait If original of mboae letttr
proving gtn jlnonats cannot b? produced.
If thnro anything about your
case anoui which you wouiu
like special advice, write freely
to Mrs. Pinkham. She will hold
your latter in strict conlldence.
She can surely help you, for no
person in America can Hpeak
front a wider experience in treating
female ills. She lias helped
hundreds of thousands of women
back to health. Her address is
l<ynn, Mass.: her advice is free.
FREE SAMPLE
Of "thk story of my tlFR AN3J
WOUK," By liookorT. Washington.
aBen.l tm yoor numo ?nd
uK'.rnrvn. Wo want you
to havo a copy of th1?
autobiography of th?
greatest Hvlnjc Negro
for tho purpowa of Introducing
it in yourt
community. It is ?
remarkable* oeilor, big
profit; agents are making
from S4 to $10 per
Rt onc<> t"*'
^0'W J * nictioi>3a co,t
Nulling Price 91.00. OIK Austell llutldlnsr.
M
i
. - . u>y> i tiieclS x |?rnu..<.?i turi;
Aw /V in joto 60 tl?>w. Trial treatment
//?Sk given free. Not hitii?can bo fairer
S# Write Or. H. H. Oreen'j $009,
? ' , SpaclillKi. Bo* B Atlanta,
WOllIiD'S FA I It ST. I<OU1B,
IjouNvUIa and Nanlivillfl Il'.itlrond.
If you are gains to the World's I'alr yoa
want the boat route. Tho L. .V N. is tho
hortest, quiokeat aa<i beat lino. Three
tralna dally. Through Pullman 8l??plug
Caru and Dlnlnv C.nr* I aw i>?*a T<iiiinfa
old dally. Got rates from your local ngent
and iwk for tlnketfl via tho I?. A S.
All kind* of Information furnished on application
to J. (>. HOLT-KNBEOK.
Dlst. Paw. Agent, Atlanta, (la.
? >4
Pincushion Swa!lovv?d Up 410 Needles.
A lady In Ibis city, roarilng that a
pincushion lliut 'nas been In vv for
Koine time, on boing opened davelop*
ad about 1 r?0 needles, had the curiosity
to pull apart a pincushion that
F,hc had been tialng for about twontyflvn
years. She found by autual count
<10 needles.?Hartford Courant.

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