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The Pickens sentinel-journal. (Pickens, S.C.) 1903-1906, October 19, 1904, Image 3

Image and text provided by University of South Carolina; Columbia, SC

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn93067659/1904-10-19/ed-1/seq-3/

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A SERMON FOR SUNDAY
AN ELOQUENT DISCOURSE BY THF
REV. C. L. PALMER.
/s ^bjocls What fliA Crnntlon Mcnim?Only (
mo AlmigHty Could Mnho Such n
World?Tliere 1* No Itlditle of tlio UnlTerae-Tlio
Answer In Immortality
KINGSTON', N. Y. ? In the Reformed
Church of the Comforter, at this place, on
Sunday morning, the Rev. C. L. l'almer
preached the following sermon, entitled
Wlmt t'ne Creation Means." He took his
text irom I'su'.m 104:24, "O Lord, how
manifold are Thy work*, in wisdom hast
Thou made them nil, the earth is full of j
Thv riches."
Von Humboldt says: "That this rsalm
represents the image of the whole cosmos. '
It is astonishing to find in a lyrical poem !
of such limited compass the entire uni\
Verse, the heavens and the earth, sketched |
with a few bold touches. The calm and |
toilsome labor of man from the rising of i
the sun to the setting of the same, when I
his daily work is done, is here contrasted
with the moving life of the elements of
nature. Thia contrast and generalization
is the conception of the mutual action of
natural phenomena, and this retrospection
of an omnipotent and omnipresent invisible
power which can renew the earth or
crumble it to dust, constitute a solemn and
oxaltcd, rather than a glowing and gentle
form of poetic creation.'
It is thus a hymn of creation, written by
whom we know not. In the Sept it is
ascribed to David, but is anonymous in
the Hebrew psalter. The phraseology and
spirit are not unlike David, and the subject
matter may hove been ?.-ranged in his
day as well as at any time. In the authorized
edition of the English Jlible the au- j
thorshin is accredited to David. 'Die English
ana American editions of the Revised |
Version made no mention of its writi-r
but many and potent, are the reasons which
lead us to the conclusion that the hymnologist
of Israel composed thin song for the
people of God. It was fitting that it
should he used in the temple, and it is
etill consistent to employ it, since it expresses
a truth that time cannot change.
Unlike many of the Psalms this one is
capable of analysis, the natural and logical
plan being a reproduction of the six 1
creative periods. This is not only evident !
to the careful reader, but is confirmed by |
the most reliable sources. And this is not .
unimportant, since it i.s another argument I
in favor of the unanimity of opinion eon- '
corning the i)!nn that (iod followed when !
He created the universe. The work of the j
first and second days, light, the sky. clouds, j
winds, lightning, occupy verses 1-4. The j
original chaotic .state, and the separation j
of land from water on the third day, verses J
/> $). The third creative day continued that >
which had,been commenced on the prcced- i
ing. The growth of plants and trees. I
which implies irrigation l>y clouds anil
streams. Here tlic ^oct introduces bird* i
and creatures of the field and forest, which I
do not apnear in the Mosaic narrative un- i
til mucli later, verses 14-18. The work of
the fourth day, the sun and moon, hut with |
special reference to men and animals, :
verses 19-26. The poet having already wo- |
ven into his song part of the work of the j
fifth and sixth days, now returns to it, and j
describes the sca with its living creatures,
theso with all else, the whole visible creation
in absolute dependence upon (2od,
verses '24-30, In verses 31-35 the I'salmist j
describes his longing to see the bright orig*:
inal restoicd.
The text being the 24th verse is a part of :
the division including verses 19-20, which j
treat of the fourth day's work when iho j
sun and moon were made, but referring '
particularly to men and animals. Thero I
can ho 110 doubt respecting the interpret.".-!
tion. because the literal translation reads: j
"O Lord, how manifold are Thy works, in }
vriftlom ha*^ Thou made them all, the earth '
:.w / r vfhy "Won tures." i
l. i'lie l'salmi^t Recognizes (!o;l as tho i
Creator?"O Lord Thy w.orks." Writing
by inspiration does not necessarily pre-'
elude the use of provincialism, provirh <1 j
that such correctly describe facts. And'
thev*may he enlarged or modified in order j
to no accurate. The doctrine taught in
_ this l'sa' in str^t accord with notions
.*.i'CValI!iig W. ?,the time of its composition
'and Mince that thero was a time when only
* Cod existed, and that there came a time
when the universe was formed. It is tho
teaching of all the ancient faith* that the
universe did not spring into existence of
its own VOiitioil. bllt was made n'lt of linl'n.
ing by Almighty 'fori. Often, however, tho
conception i.s vague c?nd con fused and cv< -n
meaningless, because destitute of tlint, light
which lightcth every man coming into the
world. 1c is the clear implication of the
Scriptures that there was a time when
Cod wan alone. and that the time eamo
when He employed His power to fashion
the heavens and (he earth.
Only the great tJod could conceive sueh ?
compilation and. complication of organic
and inorganic matter. Since creation many
wonderful thoughts have occupied th<;
minds of men. hut none have suggested
themselves. Thev have been wafted in'.o
and born through the channel of Innnnn
thinking by the appearance of some suggestive
oceurreiue. We think our thoughts
after God. tl thus follows that we could
r-" not think of tlto universe without seeing
something to siiRsesfc it.
I Only the Almighty could design Hie universe.
Architecture is a science to he acquired
under the instruction of one who
^ lias mastered this branch of learning and
is therefore able to impart it to others
Designing a dwelling is possible beeausf
thero are those who have been instructed
in the art. Designing the universe is possible
only to Clou, oinoe no other has been
or is able to surest a plan of Micit scope
and grandeur. ITe holds the key which unlocks
the mysteries of this sublime conception.
Granting for tlie sake of argument that
there are minds of adequate scope to comprehend
the fact of a universe, we cannot
eee any advantage, since a conception with- i
out ability to cxccute must remain dor* (
n.ant. For a Moses who co?!d smite a ,
lock, and a Joshua who could arrest the
sun, would he baffled in attempting to [
create a universe. Men have done great
things, but Ciod has done greater. Man
can no more make designs for nature than
he can cause the u><>ss to grow and th<!
(lowers to bloom. It is all within the abilI
L itv of r:~,i -c '
. ui hiiii (none. "U liOid
J I . Thy works." ,
t,, If. Tho Variety of God'a Creation "O
\ \ T..ord how manifold arc Thy works," which
\ is simply the biblical form of cxnressinq .
V\ (the many organized typos of tho (creator's
*Ti\ lhandiwork. These are denominated kintt- ,
Idoms. The mineral kingdom is constituted
| V |of inorganic species. It has ever enlisted 1
I the labors of the naost brilliant intellects
j J and devoted students. Every decade of
0 \ 1 research has disclosed some relic of the '
\I I ?(jes, while even greater fields remain \m- '
i u |cxPl?rcd. What will be disclosed in the
< \ I future no one can tell. We cannot but be- (
>UO*V I )'evp *',at more renmitm ennonnio/' ?i?
been discovered. "6 Lord how muni 1
te V>| fold are Thy works."
The vegetable kingdom in filled with life. '
From the smallest plant to the largest tree '
are varieties innumerable. This is another
field in which investigation lias not been i
?l wanting. Great numbers of grasses, flow j
? er* and herbs of all kinds are being dis
covered. The massive collection is a surety
ffo ever greater discoveries. And we be
&> ' - llfeve that every coming century will dis \
&<* .cloy ">mi new form of life. "O Lord how
are Thv works."
|p^.KU ? ^ fyumal kingdom possesses s|>ccicr I
low lv\ ji" 'Mfmber. The most, minute niKeet 1
| asifjlO as the humon family belong to it. ]
| Cerlaiyi forms have become ex'.inct, other?
?ro passing away. It is in this field that
1 evolution has made some of its greatest
"I tfidea and met its most discomforting dc
| feats. Evolution is not to he set asidi i
without due consideration, for it holds *
I position in the minds of thinking men that ,
t rnnnnt h* icrnnroft 1?
I Hut it ia only as evolution recognize* God,
1 His character and work, that it can giv?
any light to a doctrine ?o mysterious. "Q
I Lord now inanifold'are Thy works."
I There is still another kingdom. It it
1 the kingdom of God, the kingdom of
J heaven. It is one in^ name^hut^occupies I
saved by the one Christ. All pardoned by
the one Creator, all re-created in the imago
of the true (Sod. " Lord how manifold are
Thy works."
III. The Wisdom of Creation?"In wisdom
hast Thou made nil." Each kingdom'
is complete in itself. How natural to think j
of the spiritual as being perfected, and of |
iiiv iiuiivniii ns unperiecteu. Tins is true
or not according to our understanding of
tlie word "perfected." It is wrong if by it
we understand that God lias completed
one and not the other. lie lias perfected
both, one for our life here, the other for
that life which follows this. There is a
most glorious display of the wisdom of j
God in the most minute of all Jlis work.
No one is capable of making anv improvement.
lie has made everything beautiful
in its season. A skilful artificer when he
has finished his work makes a thorough ex?
animation to satisfy himself that it is well
done. Often it is found that some serious
defcct cxisto. But when Jehovah had completed
the universe and inspected il divine
wisdom pronounced it pood. There was
110 higher power to which appeal could be
made. The ages confirm the wisdom of the
decision then rendered. It is impossible to
think of any improvement that would be
in harmony with cxistiiiR laws. In creation
wo can make 110 suggestion, in preservation
wo arc silent, and in the divine government
amazed at the goodness and love
of God. "I11 wisdom hast Thou made them
all."
IV. The Extent of Creation?''The earth
is full of Thy riches or creatures," each
kingdom being filled to overflowing with
its own kind. No room for more animals,
for that kingdom is full. Nothing to add
to the vegetable kingdom, for it supplies
the needs of all living creatures. The
kingdom of God is also filled. Filled with
(hose who onee know nothing of its joys,
but were re-created bv the grace and power
of its founder. Tts dimensions increase as
more room is required. It is not a poorhouse.
but a palace. The Creator has not
placed His creatures where the necessaries
of life are wanting, but where plenty obtains.
Heboid, the provisions of the children
of God are within our reach.
Nor with necessaries only, hut with
? '
>i?iMtRn, iiiMiiics, neauues nnu
treasures. In the earth are hidden mines
of wealth, and on her surface are teeming!
harvests of plenty. All tliei-e are the
Lord's. "The earth is full of Thy Helios."
We should not think of them as the property
of nations, of the possessions of individuals,
hilt as the wealth of CJoil. Not in
one elime are these to l>e Imd. hut everywhere.
The cold Arctic has its precious
things, which it requires great Hardship to
obtain. The burning sun of the equator
furnishes food that cannot he grown elsewhere.
They all belong to (!o?l, but are
t'.m-ii iim 10 use aim enjoy tor the fiver's
glory.
The other translation of the word. namel.v,
tli.it of "ereaturcs," is too significant to
brnore. Not only is tho earth filled with
the Holies of Ood. but it is tilled with His
creatures. All belong to Him as His chib
(Iron. Some nre obedient, some arc not.
Some love to serve Him. others not. Tliey
nre lli.s and Ho loves them, though they
in?v be disloyal to Tlim.
The conclusion of our interpretation of
th? text is that Cod Almighty frented a'l
things, that the great variety of His handiwork
was imperative to display His power,
that fresh evidence of Ilis wisdom is constantly
being disclosed, and Ihat the whole
human family belong to Clod, to be saved,
prepared for life and for immortality?to
whom be all oraise.
rilO.MI N KXT rKon.E.
Xolsnil A. Miles til's! went to wort- In
a i-rookery store.
The King of Spnin is passionately
foinl of horseback riding.
.T. I'ierpont Morgan shirted life with
$10,000,00!) left liin! Iiy liis father.
Among New York's successful lawyers
is .Mrs. diaries Truax. wife of
Jml go Truax. whose practice brings in
a handsome ineom \
Jolin 1">. Itoekefeller hogan his business
eareer as a ?-I??i*k in a commission
house in Cleveland, Ol io.
Mrs. Annie (5 corse. widow of
Henry (Seorgc, died :?i her iionie. Merry
Wold, Sullivan County, X. V., of heart
disease.
It is snid of King Kdwnrd that he
can keep constantly on the move from
morning 1 il\ night ,'iml is never in a
hurry to sit down and rest.
Tlio richest spinster in New York
City is Mary G. l'inki;oy. Sho is saiil
to have iiioi'i1 money than Mis. lletty
(Jroon ami certainly more than Helen
< Jould.
Senator Dcpew Is credited with the
statement that "a man who has acquired
his business qualifications in
a railroad oSlice will make a success
anywhere."
(Jeneral Iioolh. of the Solvation
Army, is touring Kuglatid mid Scotland
in a motor ear, in order to visit his
soldiers in towns wot readily accessible
by rail.
l'adcrewski used to spend much j
time on horseback, hut gave up this j
diversion some ti.'.e nito because of >
the risk of in.jurit.g liis hands. (Jar-j
deniug is now his pet occupation.
Robert Loekhart, the man largely responsililc
for the introduction of golf
in this country, died a few days ago in
Kdinburgh, Scotland. lie was n. linen
importer in New York, and organized
the llrst golf club in the I'nited States i
at Yonkcrs. X. V., in 1S>>S.
, r ..
i linn iiouuiiK ueuer ior nver <ie angoinont
and constipation than
'hamberlain's Stomach <'nad Liver
Patriots.?L, F. Andrews, Dob Moines,
owa. For sale by Pickens Drug Co.
WOUI.IVR FAIR NOTKS.
A pnrly nf 200 Italians. bended by |
Italian nobles, visit?m! the Fair.
The Itussliin section !n (he Art Palice
was thrown open to visitors.
Two thousand cattle entries for Iho
World's Fair Live Stock Show have
jcen received.
Karl Koni7.uk. of Vienna, Austria. !s
vniduef! the Kxposition orchestra at i
lie World s Fair.
Tlio process of making turpentine 1
ind rosin is shown in the ( corgi a sec- |
tion of the-Palace of Forestry.
The openwork tablecloths in ecru
.'ico nnd white damask of French man- j
iifacluro arc particularly bountiful.
Tlio (Jronadier Onnrds Ttand. Kng- |
In lid's foremost hand, is now playing
in extended engagement at the Fair. j
Xir?? Chippewa Indians from White
Farth, Minn., i ave joined (lie camp of i
[lie lied Men, near tlio Indian School.
Bibles in nearly every human lan- j
Ullage in the world nro shown in the ;
exhibit of the American Hlblu Society [
in the Palace of Liberal Art*.
A model brick factory in operation, I
showing tlio manufacture of sand-cc- j
mcnt bricks, is an interesting exhibit j
In the Palacc of Mines ami Metallurgy. I
Figures carved out of elephant ivory, |
executed bv the best Japanese mas- I
- < ? *
rer r>, ;i itruiiiiiii'iii pnnr 111 me
exhibit of Japanese art in the San
Francisco building
A United Stales flag made entirely
of eorn lutsks, the work of the High
School girls of Atchison County, Kansas,
floats over that State's exhibit in
the Palace of Agriculture.
Governor's week nt Ihe World's Fair
will probably be a feature of the latter
part of September. Tho influence of
the Individual commissions will be exerted
to persuade each Chief Executive
to arrauifo his affairs so lie can
participate. \
:.>%r a'\/z3SUL
i JL-J?1ENCE ' > ,r:
Willi his rubber life-preserving suit,
Joseph Probst, of Geneva, lias rcniaiued
in the water a month at a
time, subsisting 011 food carried in tin
suit.
It is estimated that there are in the
United States 1115 pulp and paper
| mills, with an annual output of
(XX) tons of paper, the greater portion i
I of wliicli is made from wood pulp.
During a farmers' convention in j
i Knoxvillo one of the local papers .
I turned its sheet over entirely to the
i visiting farmer."., the local agricultural j
college furnishing the editor ami all the |
copy for the edition.
As the result of eight ecu years of |
experimenting with fertilisers the Ag- I
! l'i/MlHlii?nl l)AonnK/.?? ~ ?* C3 'I ? 1
iivi.iiiiun ivcokiiv.ii nwi_il*ltV <11 Ol'U 11*111(1
conHi'ins the generally accepted belief
that the only mineral elements essentia;
to plant growth are nitrogen, phosphorus
nnd potassium. The inlluer.ee
of sulphur, calcium ami magnesium is
very slight.
! Kven the "embalming fluid" man
i who sells to tht< adulterant practices a
like deception on his clients. The authorities
in North Dakota had a number
of analyses made, which show
that the formaldehyde sold on the market
was below normal strength, and
that the packages were often short in
weight or measure. ,
I The belief that temperatures are
highest during sunspot minima is opposed
by Mr. A. K. Mael>owall. who
limls evidence (lint <linMM.ii tho last j
sixty yours sur.spot maxima have boon j
| accompanied In England I?y the higher j
I temperatures. Tho same moteorolo- j
gist attempts to prove* a commotion bo- |
tweon barometric pressure and Hie
I moon's phases ami hot wren reianve
! humidity ami tho moon's phases.
Tho Department of Agriculture lias
just issued an index of the suhjeel matter
of the experiment station work tlnit
has been done in the country during
tho last eleven years, and covering
technical papers on allied topics appearing
in foreign journals during 1 lie i
past few years. 'J'he work consists of j
(!7t pa ires, embracing some Itin.ooo cn- I
tries. This monumental index should |
prove invaluable to the agricultural I
writer and teacher.
A JOVIAL JUDGE.
A Tnrkcy Mix-up <'a\isc?l l?y n (. 'iiriscil i
I nit ten.
When Police Judge l'ritx. is on ihe j
bench lie is dignity personified. When
lie is oil' ho is as fond of :i practical
joke as any man. One of Ills jokes j
recently caused 110 end of excitement j
for some hours at the llall of .Justice. 1
Colonel Cj'onin, of the property clerk's
itliee, haul bought a turkey for hi^
Sunday dinner. lie took it to the
otttee and placed il at an opt n window 1
near the corridor. The .Judge happened 1
to visit the oilice, and when leaving
he espied CronPVs turkey. He quietly
seized it unobserved and carried it
to his chambers. lie telephoned to
Captain Martin that some one had
stolon n lurk y I'roin tin- property |
clerk's ollice, anl Detective lMuau was
detailed on the ease.
.Meantime Attorney Shorlall had soon
the turkey in the Judge's chamber;,
and thinking it belonged to the .bulge,
he carried it to the bond and warrant,
lerk's olliec and hitl il. The Judge had
noticed him, and soon had the gobbler
hack in his chambers. tie rang for a
messenger boy a1.id sent, him with the
turkey to Otto Ileyncnmun, stenographer
in the chief's ofiice. A note accompanied
the turkey, purporting to
come from Johnnie Kreiss, saloonkeeper,
and wishing lleynemanii the
conipiiinents of the season. Heynemann
called Kreiss up by 'phono and
said: "I am awfully obliged, Johnnie;
many thanks.' Kreiss replied, not.
knowing exactly what lie meant, I
i nili mi riK'H.
The Judgo (lion telephoned to Martin
(lint ho thought Hcyiiciuaun had stolen
Cronin's turkey. Dinan and Cro:iin 1
rushed into (ho chief's olll.-o and Cronin !
grabbed hold of the turkey. "What
are you doing?" yelled Ileynemann.
"I.et my turkey." Cronin and
Iloyneniann hung to the turkey, each
vociferating it belonged to him. Dinan
asked Ileyuemann whore li.> got it and
Ileynomann replied. "From .lolinny
Kroiss." Dinan called Kroiss up by
'phone and Kroiss answered Unit he?
know nothing about Hoyncmanii's turkey.
Iloyneniann collapsed and Cronin
inarched proudly away with his recovered
treasure. San Francisco Call.
Nnlil lit* 8arm;?>.
"Judge" M. ?A. Hurley, of Wnusau,
dropped in at tlio Hotel IMistor this
morning on his wny back from the
Adirondack*, where ho spent a few
weeks in rest und recreation. "As I
told a man at a hotel down iu Tennessee
some time ago," lie said, "this
is the Hurley, but (ho 'Judge* par( of .
it hasn't coino along yet. I am not a
judge, never was anil never will be, j
but somehow oi oilier Hie title has
tixcd itself upon me ami 1 cannot j
shake it off. It may be annoying some
day, like the tit . of general was to
a man who was introduced to an old j
Indian chief. 'Utnpli,' said the savage, i
'are you general of Fort WiiniebagoV
'No,' said the military man. 'Uiuph, !
are you general of Fort HowardV 'So,'
he again he replied. "What are you
general of/' 'I am general of 'he militia,'
was the reply. 'Oh, sh^ot,' said
the Indian and turned away.?Milwaukee
Wisconsin.
Korrn a Itari i'lncn I'or llnrlierii.
The Korean never cuts his hair or
beard. To do this is considered a mark j
of dishonor to his parents, whom he
strongly reverences. Any hnlrs that
may happen to come out, and even
the paring* of his linger nails, are
carefully saved niul put into the eoflin
with him, in order that ho inny go
back to mother earth intact.
A H?mor?bl<i K?rnt.
The 2T?0th anniversary of the coming
if Father J.o Moyne, the Jesuit missionary,
to Onondaga County, New
York, was celebrated in an elAbornta
manner at Pompejf Hill on Auffu*t 15.
CZAREVITCH ALBXI3.
(n Line of 8ucocsslon to the Crown
of Great Britain.
That the recept birth of tho CznroVltch
Alexia, who la not only heir to
the throno r?f All itm
w. V..W imooiaa, UUl)
likewise, as a great-grandchild of
Queen Victoria, In the line of succession
to th'j British Crown, should
have .been hailed as the beginning of
a now era in Russia is net surprising;.
Superstition is rife in the domains of
Emperor Nicholas, and by the vast
majority of his subjects the advent of
the infant prince is regarded as an indication
tbat its parents are restored
to Divine favor. This they were believed
to have forfeited, and every
misfortune that has overtake n Russia
during the last fow years, more
especially since the beginning of the
war with Japan, has been ascribed !
not only by the masses, but also to a
great extent by the classes, to the
fact that their rulers were "unlucky"
and objects of relentless anger an the
part of Providence. So widespread
has been the impression that had the
Czarina again disappointed the nation
by presenting it with a fifth daughter
Instead of with the long and eagerly
expected sen, there is no knowing but
the safety of the Crown might have
been endangered by a popular revolution,
designed to remove from the
throno sovereigns so manifestly accursed,
and, therefore, destined to
bring still further disasters on the
people.
Thon, too, the little birth of tha
Czarevitch, by furnishing a guarantee
of the continuity of the Emperor's
policy, will encourage henceforth the
officials of high an* of low degreo
throughout the empire to accord to
him an obedience and a loyalty which
they have until now withheld. As.
long as Nicholas remained without a
direct heir, the Tthlnovicks?that in
to say, the servants of the state, from
the highest to the lowest?have been
under the impression that in the 1
event of any sudden demise of the 1
Crown the successors might complete- I
ly reverse the present autocrat's pol- '
icy, and regard with disfavor all of j
iuoso who naa laenuneu themselves" i
therewith. That is why so many ofi
the decrees of Nicholas II. have remained
a dead letter, and why tho
progressive and enlightened measures
which he lias instituted have remained
stillborn. The statesmen and
officials upon -whom he was compelled
to depend for their execution were
afraid to fulfill his behests, to incur
the ang?r of his successor In tho
event of his death. The birth of tho
Grand Duke Alexis changed all that,
for even if anything untoward should
happen to the Emperor in his boy's
minority, it will be found that he has
made provision for intrusting his
widow with tho guardianship of tho
new Czar until his majority.
Bridge and Tunnel Combination.
Since a French engineer named
Game ml planned a submarine tunnel.
In 1S5T, various projects have been
advanced for connecting England
with the Continent. The latest is
the suggestion of Bunau-Varilla, who
wants to build a tunnel to within
three kilometers of England, and
thence a bridge, which England
(which has not favored a tunnel)
could destroy at any time in case of
danger of a foreign invasion, thus
rendering the tunnel useless.
SHIPWRECKED.
A. man stood on a "lond'y isle,
A shipwrecked, sailor he,
While all about him roared and
crashed
The angry, restless sea.
The waves dashed high, as rose tho
tide
?v mi uenn'iiiuK, aiauueiung ?'
"AJas!" exclaimed tho shipwrecked
man,
"I guos.* It's up to mo."?Collier's.
DISCvH'' iAGINO.
"Going with any particular girl
jk>w, Ohump'.ey?"
"Yes, too infernally particular. ;
She 1ias refused me on an average of |
three times a week in the past |
month."?Detroit Free Proes.
WOIUjD'8 PAIR sr. IjOUIS.
liOiiisrlllp n nil Nn?livlllo Kntlroad.
If you are going to tho World'fl I'alr you
want the beat route. The L. A N. la the
hort?Hst, quiokont and bent line. Three
trains dftlly. Throntrh PulJmim
Care and Dining Care. Low Rat? TlolceU
old dally. Get rate* from your looal agent
and tvslt for tlokota rla L. & N. Stopotem
illowm ay MAMMOTH CAVB.
All kind* of hrformat'.on furnished on application
to J. O. IIOLLENBEOK,
Dlst, Paws. Agont, Atlanta, Oa.
Ab lut lor j of Certain Ants.
A natural^t haa been making certain
obserrMtlons, on tlii toilets cf
certain anfw, and has discovered ?acn
iimect. go%s through moat olaborato
ablutions, Thoy aro not only performed
Kf herself, but by another,
who actn for th<> tinia as lady's maid.
The assistant starts by washing tho
face of her companion, and then goes
over the whole body. Tho attitude of
tho ant that in being washed la one of
intense watistfaction. She lies down
with all her limbs stretchad loosely
o.jt; she rolls over on her side, even
fcior back, a perfect plcturo of eaard.
The plaaawro tho little insect evinces
In being thus cctnbed and aponged
is really anjoyable to the observer.
ANCftENT, BUT IT OOE3.
Peebles (about to be operated upon
for appendicitis)?Doctor, before you
bvgln I f?l?h you would send and have
our patftor, tho Rev. Mr. Illanic, oomo
over.
Dr. Hawaro?Cortalnly, If you wish
K, DUt??h?
P9?bla??1*4 like to be optn?d wltlj
prajror.
To euro, or ?nc
^ '
ALL BROKEN DOWN,
N? HUep-No Appetite?Juat a Continent
liaofciioh*,
Joseph McCnuley, of 144 Sholto
street, Chicago, Sachem of Teeumseh
i<vu^u, du/o. j avu y vurs hro my
health was complete)y
broken down. My
back ucbcd and was
\ po 'n,no that at times
\ was hardly able to
f * ^SSk & Idress myself. I lost
111 y npp<dite and was
unable tosleep. There
W^w\j?^r^y/// seemed to be no relief
lMlt" * took I)o;ui'b
&, Kidney 1*1.Is; but four
boxes of tills remedy effected a complete
and permanent cure. If suffering
humanity knew the value of Doan's
Kidney Pills they would use nothing
else, as It is the only positive cure 1
know."
For sale by all dealers. Price 50
cents. Foster-Mi!burn Co.. Buffalo, N. Y.
BATHS OF RADIANT HEAT.
Pain Banished by F.lectrlc Light
T reatment.
A heat, nntl liciit tr?ntm<mt
has caused much comment lately .
anions scientists, says the LQndon I
Express, is the Dowsing system, that i
consists chiefly In directing electric j
heat rays or the body of the person j
subject for treatment. The system i
Is used In cases of rheumatism, gout,
sciatica, lumbago and similar diseases
and certain forms of tubercular
troublco. These rays are claimed to
be the nearest approach to the sun's
rays obtainable by artificial means.
The groat advantage peculiar to this
treatment lies in the ability of the
electric rays to penetrate the body
going direct to the part or parts of
tbe trouble. To undergo this treatment
the person is first placed upon
a bed, after removing all clothing,
and wrapped snugly in the covers,
with the head only outside. The
.?ic- men iiuuvfii uu, unu (lie auoJect
Is literally bathed in bent. The
patient by this system is subjected
to a temperature of 1500 or 400 degrees.
The person does not experience
any discomfort, notwithstanding
this great heat. Ordinary heat of
this high intensity would cio the human
body to a turn, but these electric
rays, being dry, evaporate the excreted
perspiration. This method just
mentioned is for general treatment.
For local complaints there are detached
reflectors, which nre held a
little away from the affected part, so
that the heat plays upon the place
and searches out the disease. The
Dowsing system has also bven used
with some success in the treatment
cf tubercular Joints, and it is believed
if the heat rays could be made to
penetrate the patient's lungs they
would kill the bacillus of consumptiou.
An apparatus of this character
has been installed in Buckingham
Palace, for the use of the King, and
when Mr. Clmmberlain was suffering
rrom a recent attack cr pout this
treatment was resorted to with sue*
cess.
fi Co tell AVlndoiu.
The fountain of content must spring
uj) i'i the mind; and he who lias mo
little knowledge of human nature as
to seek happiness by changing anything
but his own disposition, will
waste his life in fruitless efforts and
multiply the griefs which he purposes
to remove.?Scottish Itefonncr.
S100 it?-vrar<l. SIOO.
The renders of this paper will be pleased to
learn tlmt thcro i.-? at least one dreaded disease
that seieneo has been able to cure ia all
itsstages,and thatis Catarrh. Kail's ( atarrh
Cure is the only positive cure now known to
the medical fraternity. Catarrh beln^ a i-onstltutional
disease. require;! a constitutional
treatment. Hall's Catarrh Cure is taken interr.iilly,noting
directly upon the blood and mucous
surfaces of the system, t hereby dest royinxthe
foundation of the disease, and niviir*
the patient Strength by building up tie-. *nStitution
and assisting nature in doin;.* itwork.
'J'ho proprietors haveso much faith in
its curative powers that they offer One Hundred
Dol'ars for .my eas<> that it fails to cure.
Send for list of testimonials. Addrem
K. .1. Chunky A Co., Toledo, O.
Sold by Druxfjists, 7o<\
Take Hull's Family Pills for constipation.
(trdnred u Ciih 1'ar Out to Hps.
A Chicago traveler, looking for pastime,
utilized the wireless telegraphy
equipment of one of the ocean liners,
on his return trip to New York, to order.
while he was yet 2(>0 miles at sea,
a coupe to meet him at the wharf at a
eertalu hour.
TWO GIRLS.
She?Ho said my arras were like
Ivory.
Her ITatwful ! ' r i o n il?Perhaps ha
meant thpy were nothing bu*. bone."?
Dotrolt Free F'rr.-ss
Bulla fn a Hospital.
Two bulls opoapod from the arena
at Valladolld, Spain, and mad*- their
way into a hoapital, where they upset
several beds on which patients wore
lying, and gored tJirei persons.
Around the World
"I have u?e<] your Fl?h
Brand Slicker* lor year*
in tno Hawaiian Island*
and found them the only
artldo that suited. I an
now In this country
(Africa) and think a great
deal of your ?paU"
(HAUI ON wnKMnwl)
The world-wide re put a- ^ilfPIKk
tlon of Tower's Water- ^"^(3
proof Oiled Clothing ? a? ?
assures the buyer ifl
the positive worth of "
all garments bearing fltu
this blgn cf the Fish. K
A. J. TOWER CO.
Boeton, U. 3. A.
TOW BR CANADIAN CO., IJMITOD
Toronto, Canada
??i
uj In Urns. Sold hr drucslite. ? f*f
BoJiortBllndHon KM ,"?? lt??H
on Xrea. hm/ 0?, Iowa CUjr. l*-,hu>? ?ui* cure
> X-, , A
W' ' '
AT A DISADVANTAGE.
"You weather prophets inako a
grrcat many mistakes," Bald the man
who 8"n?0TS.
"Yes," answered the observer, "and ;
if other people had all their mistakes
published In the daily papers as we
do, I suspect tliat our record would
I seom pretty good."?Washington Star ;
HELPING AliONO THE JOKE. j
"Those," said the epicure to the !
bright Philadelphia girl, "are Biiailrf. \
I suppose Philadelphia people don't I
eat tlrrm for fear of canniba'lam."
"Oh, no," was the answer; "it isn't I
that. We couldn't catch them."? I
Washington Star.
T1io other day 50,000 pigeons were '
tfclcen in severa' trains from I,an- ,
rashire and Yorkshire, England, to ]
lialf a dozen distant points, to bo re ,
leased.
1
FITS permanently cured. No fltH or nervousness
after II ret day's use of Dr. Kline's Great
NervoKestorer,$2trlalboUleand treatise freo
| lJr. Is. ii. KuNK,Ltd., 'Jul Arch StVhlla., 1'a.
The number r?f Austrians in the United i
States is 1,020,000.
J do not bellovo I'iso's Cure for Consumption
has unequal for coughs and eolds. -John
F.Boyf.r, Trinity Springs, Ind., Fob. 15, l'JOO.
The United States linhthou.se otrvice
coats $-1,500,000 a year.
J (At42-'04)
iH I 11^1 I
j "Mrs. L. C. Glover, Vice-Pres-"
idcnt Milwaukee, Wis., Business
Woman's Association, is another
one of the million women who
have been restored to health by
using Lydia H. Pinkham's Vegetable
Compound.
" Dkak I'inkham : ? I was married
for several years anil no children
blessed my home. The doctor said I
had a complication of female troi Hes
and I could not have any children unless
I could be cured. He tried to euro
me, but after experimenting' for General
months, my husband became distrusted,
and one night when we noticed
the testimonial of a woman who hud
been cured of similar trouble through
the use of Lydia K. Pinkham's
Vegetable Compound, he went out
and bought a bottle for me. 1 used
your medicine for three and one-half
months, improving steadily in health,
and in twenty-two months a child
came. 1 cannot fully express the joy
and thankfulness that is in my heart.
Our home is a different place now. as
we have something to live for, and
all the credit is due to Lydln
K. Pinkham's Vegetable Compound.
Yours very sincerely, Mas.
L. C. tii.oviCR, 614 Grove St., Milwaukee,
I Wis." Vice President, Milwaukee
Business Woman's Association. ? $5000
forfeit If orlqlnal of above letter proving genuineness
cannot bs produced.
HONA11CII STUMI? I'll I.I.Kit.
Will pull 1'. font slump Willi.>i;l
tw'Wm ! 1 oli?. (iimrnntfO<l touiaiiil 11 stnuu
?.f AiO.OOO 1? s?. Catalogue 11 nii .'If.
< lintH a.l.l r???s MnvtMr'ti
Cltt'liliKK CO., I.out' Treo, In.
Bfa.il CD
WE SEND SAMPLES OF SI
KNEE-PANTS SUITS
All you lift vo to (lo is to ti>ll us what x<
will mail sainjilcfi at om:n. Tv/i'lvi* yi-ars (
what you order or, if you prefer, *i>tiil yo
to invest, anil it \v<' ilon't souil you what y
>v? will rufiuul tli;' 1110:1 >y.
M -h*m Suits, fan. #T.r.o, Hit., Ki3.no,?
S'-i.fiO, w:t, S? ami H.V l'.ciyH* Kn
fer> 11ml tmi.ntl, Kvorytlilnj
THE GLOBE C
SO WlilThllAl.l, !
[QUARANTINED CURE for *11 bowel troubl
blood, wind on the Momtch, bloated bowels,
paint after eating, liver trouble, allow akin *
regularly you are alck. Constipation kills nu
starts chronic ailments and lone year* of ml!
CA8CARRTS today, for you will never get v
right Take our advieo, atart with Caacaref
money refunded. Thn gnnuloe tablet stamp
bookWt fr?. Addr? Sterling Remedy Com
M Jdtfr
i
ESIH&B 11 i T"1bI m Li 11 '
W A M "T" C rf^. x
vw mi bM .
i,000 Tien and Women to Try $6.00
Worth of Samples Free,
Send no monov. Only 8?>n<! jrour name to
W. C. HUGHEN. Atlanta, Ga,
Avery & Company
8UCCKSSOK8 TO
avery & McMillan,
51-M South Forsyth St., Atlnnt.*, Ot
?ALL KINDS OK?
MACHINERY
Reliable Frlck Engine*. Boilers, all/
Size*. Wheat Separator*. /'
BliST IMPROVED SAW ON HAR1H.
Large Engines and Boilers supplied
promptly. Shingle Mills, Corn Mills,
Circular Saw3,Saw Teeth,Patent Dogs,
steam Governors. Full line Engines <&
Mill Supplies. Send for frrc Cata'ogue.
C&d ORICHTOW'S //^j
lati .i/tsultlia'' &cmctttqn k?/
Phorttinnrt Dnpt., K. C. CilcMon. F.oofckeeplng
Hejit., 1). IS. Sli?mukrr. C:italoRuc frre.
j E. Ci. Criclitou, Piu;>., Kl?rr Itldg., Atlanta, G*.
7?** OrODSV "'r ?
Remove"! all rwellinjf in Slo jo
?>-< " / days; effects a j>cr:iiauent \;re " -y
./? /K. in j.oto todays. Trial treatment
I /.Riven free. NothiiiRcan be fairer
' vfejKijklfV?!v1 Write Dr. H. II. Oruan's Sons.
] . ijW1' Snichllsts. (;o< u Atlanta. Cis*
JM PAN3 T A HT71XK are lha boftrtj*
jfpf.innliriuo i-v'T tando. A linn<i
rt-* 1 v.iftllionBoC them Lave l.?en **>M
A\i I ii. :t y.*ur. C'??ii8 lijv ?t ;?)H, hoftrt(t-ii?-^/t.
tcv '' rn* di7./.lne?>. i?a.i
I^SiW??ollVy bri-r.tb.f-oro MironJ nix) uvcr.v Mines
WjKjraitar-'''^ r? isi:iu from a r'iiorclon'd rtcma^h
inW. <?nf will j/CMPi-nlv k?vo relief
I vrit'untwi*ntr mln>;i?'S. The f.v cmk prvcUH?<i is* notitfh
t for ivq ordinary Oceanian. A'.. drutfplrts toll thorn.
JITS, OVERCOATS, BOYS'
5 OR MEN'S PANTS.
>11 wan'. ?ivi?u siz<'s and j ri'-ee. and wo
>f pra-'tiCf lia:- Imi^'lit tif how to scud you ?
ur or.lcr, < in-lof- thi? amount you desire '
on want, .-'-tid it hack at our f*X) < ns<i, and
15 rti><? tf'-SO. Men's I'nnts, $t.30, S3,
( -rants SnltH. <fc t.50. SI, H I,
* ill lints Mini I'urninltliiXM.
LOTHING CO.,
i'r., AT I. A NT A. ( A.
' I Ef^AIIAI A O
$3.50 SHOES MEN. fv j
'auf/j'ao makoa and sella mora men's '
uhooa than any othor manufacturnr
worldt I I.t ii-rsoii W. . Uouttlns $.v.v> slinos ure lh? V
i vv. It' rs 111 t lie w or III :> Ik-iuiim* of tln-.r excellent *:>;e,
lim/ A'i I sur?<Tlot wearing yiuiltlirs. IT 1 eculil ?lu>vr . *
? "llifoi' n..o rciwn n (Up ?lio> k niail<' In my (aelory hik! ^
>f oMiit infiKt'S and tli? IiikIi (trails lealtaT* ilUfrt, you/
I iiikIi iv.an.l why W. I.. I>i>;inlft? 53.{o pIiopi -out inoiu
ia*e, \thy Dipt hold (hi-!r Miaik-, lit It-tier. wrai IrnuHi
iin- ticairr InuiiiMi' valur thin any other ft.to M10S
lir in iikei lo .luv, anil wliy the Mies 101 Hie umh riuiina >
I, Hvrc
$G,263,0<GOuOQ. lu
.. Ontmlaa KiiMunt.'ea ilielr value liy ulainpmK h!j r.ain#
prti-e '<11 tli>- liotloin. look for it take 110 iilislltuie.
I ny nlioe dealer* tviirfwlntf. J-ntl t'vlcr I.veUtt tutd
lu mWt/.
Superior In fit, Comfort nml Wear.
tuMVicorn IV. A. /)<iiiglnA #' >. VI t ftofs for the lull tltrlre \)Hlrl
lA aOtolute tatm/nrtion. /Jim! Ihrn ?<jpi no r in Jlt,coni/orl
>id irrar to others cutting urn {.'/!( tc } f>0."
. .S. .l/i-Ci'A', hept. Col.. 1 . '< /ut. Utttnvt, Itirhmond, d?.
I.. Dou^lftH imc8 Corona ColUUIn in hlft IW.50
a?>. Corona Colt i* coiiccdcd to be tlifl ftiionfc
I'utcnt LcAthfr nuulo.
8KNI> I OK CATAI.OOt'l. GIVING r; T.I. INSTRUCTIONS
v HOW TO OiJlOH BY MAII..
' W. L. DOUGLAS, Brookton, Ma*9.
. CANDY jf
fov.t mouth, hc*d?chr, indication, pimples, I ?
ino ciiciinoas. W >-?n your bow?lo don't mov* ,
>rc people than all.otner dleeaaea together. It mjuvh&B
rrlng. No matter vhai aila you, otart tr.Uing
veil and etnv well Until you get your bowela j-j/xaf. I
la today under nbtol'ite guaranty to cur* or B
ed CCC, Never aoid lo bulk. Sample *o4 a
mi'i^i'^?iiia^i?iiiiaiiitiY"im'in ? 9<? ^
i1

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