OCR Interpretation


The Pickens sentinel. (Pickens, S.C.) 1911-current, August 03, 1922, Image 1

Image and text provided by University of South Carolina; Columbia, SC

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn93067671/1922-08-03/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

PICKENS--THE GEM lT 1 OFFICIA
(1 flTEOFCA
ANWPPRVTIACOSINE 1;21VOLUME 02-NUMBER 15 E nif e _ _ __.,R~"_..
OF THE FOOTHILLS SPAPER OF PICKENS
1.-PICKENS. S. C., THUlRSDAY, AUGUST 3 1922 r SUBSCRIPTION, $1.50 A YEAR
.E 'rLU'Im G SOUTH CAROLINA
MOUNTAINS.
Pendleton, S. C., July 2.-Possibly
very few know that some of the
brightest gem: in the coronet of sap
phire mountains are within the bor
dCrs of South Carolina itself, and al
'will be interested these warn, rosy
days of summer to know that the)
need ntot go to the North Pole nos
yet to the rich man's resoi't'of Nor'l
Carclina to find picturesque scenery
streams to fish and bathe in, colt
enough to sometimes daunt the hard
lest; cool mountain 2ephers 't'o fal
the tired bodies into sweet slumber
.and healing for sek :babies and worn
'cut mothers.
If one takes Anderson as a poin
of beginning he ecn 'have 'his choicl
of these routes.
Anderson to Pickens, 28 miles.
Pickens toward I3revarej, 11 miles
(This is the finished part of a mag
nificent road from Pickens to Bre
vard-27 miles-- which will shorter
the distance to the mountains, oper
some of the grandest scenery, and
penetrate into fastce.sses never be
fore entered.)
For instance, there are tents and
shanties within sight of this new
load -bove Pi c'kens which look as
cool and inviting as any in the aris
tocratic Adirondeks-, There is a na
tural r:-k-worn basin to the right of
this road, just hidden by some wild
craoi, where the water dashes down
ft om its wilk sources, forming a na
turral swimming place about ~chin
deep of clear, limyid -water. One can
take the shower or the plunge as he
likes-according to his endurance!
Enquiry of Mr. Earle Seaborn, at the
Sentinel office, or of any other well
posted citizen of Pickens will steer
you to these places. There is on
the read side a stream as pretty as
any French 'Broad, tumbling down
from the "Sapphire Country", and no
doubt full of fish. The new road has
paused in the very heart of these
mountains, and will follow thisitream
up in -its wmnding course. Eight more
riles will put it to the North. Caro
lina 1Tne, and connect it with high
waS.. Tiis eight miles is 'to be built
by contract which will be let August
''5th. That part already fin'shed 's
the fin st that can be built, and was
c'o:plcted by convict labor. One and
a half hours from Anderson will put
ynu in this area where there are
scarcely any hcusces as yet, and am
pI(e site for ~eamping.
This new route will bring Bre
v'ard. ('a( m 's Ilead, and highways
scadn to .Ashevile in one direction
and to li'i'lands in the other within
b5 mi-ls Of Anderson. Highlands is
al 'out -ev cnv -live mlles from And'r.
This , u? route will also bring
Knoxylle, Tenn., the Blue Grass of
K(omuk:y, and all western highways
r- ayd places 162 miles nearer than they
have. b n. With a little more work
between Ilot Spr'ings and the Tennes
see line one can go from Anderson to
Knoxville via Asheville in a Jlay-a
dilstane of' 2:10t.8 miles. The former
I oute has been by Atlanta and Chat
tanooga, throIugh the rough Cuniber
land mountains, and would require
two days-a d'.stance of 392-9' m'iles.
If One should go this short route
to Knoxville he may knowv that to
Marshall, N. C., he will have a turn
rilke. About seven mniles from Mar
s-hall to Hot Springs is as plictures
pue as any Rocky Mountain trail. It
is seven hundredl fteet high, encircling
a mnountain as high as there is in the
state, and the only mistake about
this is that it was built a one-wa"
roadl. The mistake wvill be remedlied
I-ot Springs is as efficacious as any
water in Arkansas or anywhere else.
and cures for rheumatism, gout and
other curable diseases are piled up to
its credit, though it is as yet a mod
est resort. From Hot Springs to the
Tennessee line-8.1 miles-the most
'V careful andl experienced drivin~g is
recessary until this short hn1k lin he
.hain of highways is built on mod
crn lines, but is wild and grand be
ytond diescription. -.Cataracts and cas
cades abound along the way, adlf~
'rhododendron forest seem almost im
re(netrahle.
The crowdl alwvays follows tihe beat
en track, hut if one ha.; a fancy for
getting out of it, and time andl a turr
for' invt .-tigat ion and roughing it h<
er i: ird all he~ wishig to engage hhll
~ \ in any cf the s(etorS deser'bae, hui
cf course no ene sh~old undertaki
tI'cwe wilder r( uies who expects eit;
L-. .nmn'.c.ke, f::r there are non'
TABLE ROCK COVE
One of the most romatic and pic
turesque places in the Blue Ridge
Mountains is Table Rock Cove. This
's tight where Mr. Wade Chastain
and Mr. J. P. Carey, Jr., are to begin
the crection of a large hotel in the
near future and expect to have it
completed and ocupied by text sum
mer.
The cove lies just to the north of
Table Rock, and is accessable by a
road which leads from Pumpkintown
and is only six miles distant from this
pace. It is the end of the road lead.
ing west, and there $s one called the
slicken road which leads north and
goes into North Carolina. It goes
right u the slicken creek, and no
grander scenery than is offered by
this route is in any of our moun'ta'ins.
At the foot of the mountain a large
beautiful pool if formed by nature
and Mr. Chastain has had the under
growth cleared away and hath houses
and seats bu:lt. Bathing suits are
Klpt by Mr. Abner Gilstrap who has
charge of the grounds and a (it) into
this clear, pure watr is worth a
doctor's bill. Thin the delightful
climb up to the falls, only cne and a
half miles, is worth a great deal more.
The scenry is grand beyond dIescrip
ticn. The ascent is miade near '.he
banks of the str am which goes h-ap
ing and pilungng down the hill wich
its clear water sparklim like dia
m1 onds.
The falls are grand, and are a fit
ting climax to the climb.
Visitors to this. place will find an
old l(,g cabin in which they may camp
near by the site of the proposed ho
tel. Going up the Saluda river a
mile and a half by path-way one sees
the "Big" tree. It is a poplar seven
feet and four inches in diameter. To
the south, about half a mile, looms
up grand old Table Rock. At night
the lonely owl's voice is heard all
around. Tle wild-cats are very shy
but plentifuh Some other animals
are in evidence, but are not very soci
able 'n their nature.
All together this is destined to be
one of the grandest summer resorts
in our mountains and we insist on all
lovers of nature to visit it.
A Mountain Lover.
SINGING
The annual singing convention of
Oconee countrwill mett at New Hope
(four miles north of Sneca) the
("th and 7th of Auguist. All singer.:
and lovers of nu sic a r invited.
WV. 31. Lenunons, Pres.
:. ?VlCr.S AT PICKl'NS BAPTIST
CHURCH.
'T'here will he services at the Pick
ers Baptist church next Sunday as
fol lows:
Sunday sebool at 10 a. m.
Prieach'ng by the pastor oin the
sub ject: "My Heavenly Record,, at
11 a. mn.
Talk by J. P. Carey, Jr., andl
ethers at 8:15 p. mn.
Prof. J. H. Rubuck, of Dayton,
Virginia will worship wvith us and
will have charge of the music at
bo0th services.
At both services the dloors of the
church will be opened to receive any
newv members into The church by ex
pericnce letter or promise of a letter.
Everybody invited to all serv'ees.
T H URISDA'Y AFT'ERNOON IBRIDEE
The menmbers of thq Thursday
afternoon Bridge club wvere the guests
of Mrs. A. J. Boggs, Jr., at a (delight
ful meeting this week. Bright colored
zininies were artistically arranged in
lovcly vases in the living room. Punch
was served throughout the games and
an ice ice course at the close.
The ekab had as its guests Mrs.
Orrison, Mrs. Hagood andl Mrs. Hen
The highest score was made by
Mrs. F. E. Armstrong.
alvl in some of the section's allud
"' te. O)ne is on his own resources as~
were tra'lppers and ex'plorers in t he
early days, withI t he advantage of a
trail which'the stetes hav'e provid!-d
through the wilds, andl chickens so
plentiful andl so cheap that one won
ders how he might bring home a few
mo'nths supply!-Anderson Daily
Mail.
RICE'S CREEK ITEMS
Rcv. J. T. Mann, the blind evange
!:.St, r eachod a very impressiv'e ser
me'.n here Sunday.
Mr. and Mrs. P. T. Nolson atten
ded the birthday dinner of Mr. Bub
Wilson in Anderson county on the
10th.
Mir Tind Mrs. Sam Burgess visited
thir daughter, Mrs. Marcus Rogers,
last week.
Mrs. Frances Rogers is on an ex
tended visit to --elatives in Easley.'
16'. Roy McCall, wife and sister
Aleen, of Pendleton, and Mr. Roy
Few and wife visited at 'Mr. P. T.
Nelson's last week.
Mrs. Dee Gillespie has returned
from the hospital much improved.
Mr. and Mrs. Otis Collins visited
thcir father Sunday.
The children of Mr. and Mrs. S. A.
Roper gave him a birthday dinner
on July 11. Mr. Roper is 72 years
old and has ten living children, all
ca whcm are married. To visit his
home is a pleasure to -anyone.
PICKENS CO3I1NG BACK
Creenville News.
The News vi glad to :'ee th a:
nuncuicemenit oflni I)2'O"'('ill( mipv n on. !a
hlp Rock, looking to tile dcvelopment
(.t a real pleasure resort and amuse
ment spot in the Great State of Pick
ens. :Many years ago Pickens coun
ty and that entire corner of South
Carolina was very popular with South
Carolina folks as a place to go for
recreation and rest (luring the hot
summer months, and there is no rea
son why it should not "come back"
ncw with greater popularity than
evet:.
Pickens county has been doing much
good work during the past few years
in improvement of its roads, and fur
ther work along this line is planned.
These roads will make its attractive
recrea t onal spots more accessible
than they ever were. and with the in
creasing number of automobiles in
use, there is no reason why the many
pleasure spots of Pickens county
should not be visited by numbers of
peonle from all over South Carolina.
The Table Rock dev( lopmcnt, we
trust, is only a starter. It is to be
hoped that the development will be
cenlarged from seasen to season and
that ether spots of interest -l that
secticn of South Carolina will also he
made available to visitors by in Ii..
lablishinhnent cf the neces nry eil
EASL.EY ROUTE TWO
halth in this section is very good
at present.
The stork visite(d the home of Mr.
Mr's. R. L. Perry Sunday and left a
ten iouind girl.
Mr. and Mr's. B. T. Smith and chil
dren splent Sunday in Greenville with
Misses Sadie and Roy Fisher and
Mr. Henry Holcombe of Andlerson
visited Miss Rose Holcombe Sunday.
Mr. and1 Mr's. WV. R. Ander'so and~
rlaughter Louise splent the (lay Sun
(lay with Mr. and Mrs. G. C. Griffin
and family.
Mrs. Maron Mahoney who has been
in the hospital in Greenv'ille has re
tinrnedl to her parecnts home, Mr. and
Mrs. C. 0. Perry. We hope) that she
wvill soon regain her strength.
Everybody invited to attend prayer
meeting at Georges Creek hurch
every Wednesday night at 8:30 o'
elock.
Miss Earle Holeombe has returned
home after' visiting hers sister 'n
Greenville, Mrs. R. E. Hlolcombe.
Mr. Lawrence Lenhardt visited his
parents a little while Saturday after
noon, Mr. and Mrs. B. D. Lenhardt.
Miss Victoria Morehead left Sunday
on No 12 to begin teaching in Union,
S. C. We wvsh her much success in
her newv work.
"Somoebodys D~arling."
CARD) OF- THANKS
I wish to thank the goodl friends
and( neighbors also Dr. Valley for
manny kindness shown me (luring the
sickness and d uath of my dlear' wife.
'rhe perisonail help wvas greatly helpful
and appre..iatedl as well as the beau
tiful flovral offer'ings. May the great
God in Heaven bless you all.
L. I4. Gravely, Children nna Mother.
HOW SHALL WE APPLY CAL
CIUM ABSENA'IE?
The Progressive Farmer.
How shall the farmer apply cal
cium arsenate for boll weevils, by
dusting or molasses mixture? We
have taken pains to get the best
thought and experience of sections
where they have had the weevil far
years and where both methods of con
trol have been tr:ed. Thcse results,
in our opinion, show that the molass
es may secm to (10 all right early in
the season and, consequently, seems
t( have misled some most excellent
men, but will not be effective in the
wind-up. Entomologist Franklin
Shearman of the North Carolina Ex
periment Station afttr reviewing all
the ev'dence sums up the situation as
fellows:
"Governmnent and state officia ,
who have no financial interest in any
mater als or im plenents whatever of
ugny kind, and whotsie re'putation Inl
standing vre dep ldent upon the
5(oundlne.*s of their alvice, lo not rec
ommend the molasses calcium :rse
nat(. Aceording to gover nment tests.
its pc;: .ille use Ilness is (oninied ti
1a i y a<,n ani very dry we.ather.
As the season a( t'diIlvances iad weev.:
be:ne ahuncianit. it he -ones useI less.
We are ('concen(ratingi' ollr interest
anid attt tion on the known and
I roved h(cst method which is, dustine
the plants with lure <h'y calcium ar
sinate with machines madtle for the
purpo~se."
HOME COMING DAY AT TAIBOR
The annual home coiing day at
Tabor church, 3 miles east of Pickens
will take place August 12th. All
who attended school there :n by gone I
(lays are invited to come and bring
their relatives and friends.
BIBLE CONFERENCE
The Seventh Annual Bible Confer
ncn will convene on Thursday, Sep
tember 7th at 11 a. in., and continue
through the 17th. All christian men
and women are earnestly requested
to pray for the presence anid power
cif the Holy spirit.
As we have fermerly announced
trSe meetings ar( held for the teach
ing of the word of Geld and it is for
d11 the l.('i)ple regardless , f creed, oulr
:hief aim is to reach thy' lo-! and
:uil up christians in our churches.
J. . 'I ayl.or, Pres.
NOTICE
All persi ns int'r-t'l in the c(em( -
kry at -econa cLurch p lease ((m.
pr( piaredl F riday mortning, .-ugust .1,
with suitable tools for clean aing ('11
I lhe ('emetery.
AT'TENT''ION, 1). A. R. AN) U. 1). C.
The meetings of these two'( pat riotic'
rirganizations scheduled for Ausust
will be 'onsodliatedl and held on thle
usual day for the U. D). C. meeting.
meondl Friday, August 11, at :8::0 (o'.
-lock, at the suburban home of 3Miss
Aurie K irksey. MIss Kirksey will lbe
assisted in entertaining by \l rs.
Robert Kirksey andl Mrs. Sheriff'. A
joint program \vill b e rendleredl and
in enjoyable occasion~ is ant icipatedl.
[Let every member of both o1(rganiiz/a
Lions be present.
P'ICK ENS CH1URCH D)IREC TORY.
BAPTIST CHIURCHI
Rev. F. T. Cox, Pastor.
Sunday School at 10 a. m.
Preaching every second and fourth
Bundlay at 11 a. m.
Preaching every Sunday night at
4:00 p. nm.
Prayer Meeting every Wedlnesday
it 8:00 p. m.
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Rev. IH. A. Knox, Pastor, Liberty
Sundlay School at 10:15 a. m.
Preac'hing every first and third
Sunday morning at 11:15, and ever'y
5econd and fourth Sunday night at
B:00.
GRA.~CE H ETHIODIlST (CHURCHI
Rev. .1. ('. Diggs, Pastor, P'ickens
Sunday Sceol at 10 ua. m.
Prea hing 11 a. mi.
Prcaching at 8:00 p. m. by the pas
tor.
Epwvorth Lenague meeting every
Sunday aut 7:00 p. m.
Prayer Meeting every Thursday
na, 8:00 p. mn.
1)1ar Iditov' I anai not at candidat I
for any office in this campaign, but
if 1 liv until the next one I guess I
will be a candidate for some officer in
Pickens e(tunty, as I feel like I owe ai
deb'lt to the good peolc of lPickens
county which .cain only be paid by
serving theme in a public office.
But the object of this letter is to
congratulate Mir. Foster for the re
mrks he male in his letter to the
public in regard to our schools anti
education of the country children. I
want to say right here that Mr. Fos
ter spoke ia mouth full when he said
that the compulsory attendance law
should be extended to take in egild
rcn sixteen years of age, for we all
knt(.w that there are not many chil
dren who can get sutficient education
by the time they are fourteen. And
I am sorry to ;ay it., but if it was
not for the compulsory school law
sume children who now go to school
wcull never get to see the inside of
a school house. Wihy (10 1 say this?
dust hecause I know that before the
law was made there Wile a lot of
rele ss parents who %vould not send
:heir children to school a day just
because they had a little work to do.
(r because tbhei r child n were not
ulres( I as well as sunte of the others.
In tact, it seims as if the pieople used
nlev( cr to think about the rtal value
of edlueatioin. They (lid- not st In to
realize the fact that the chiliren of
that day would soon have to tal.v
their places in business and conlut I
the world's affairs. They seemed to
think that if the children were kept
und r control until they were grown
that was enough education. But of
late years people have awakened to
the fact that their children must have
a goed education. And on accoumt
of some who (1o not seem to think or
care anything about the welfare of
the rising gcneration the compulsory
attendance law was pasNed, and
everybody with good, common sense
v'ill Sitppor"t it, and no0 manl who is
not. in favor of it is fit to hold public
office. So what I say about. the con
pulsory attenlance law is keep it. up
and enforce it, and if sixteen does not
scund good enough put it to eihteen.
IIenry Pike.
SNAN ES
F(Il(me ' pople cl181im thlat rk'!; ine
lhe i?:tulit :iIis ar e lI I the int Ca:( ,
ut we Inive it front gd. ,4( 1a11 rit y
St this is a mlistake. .lt r:. .1. l..
Ita~ul( t :':15 1w t1 ht ' I i
tnly saw .ne 'vlneo irept ile te
II Ie tille --th< ulhers we'V re (r a
rat! hi r which was a dlozen years it1
and' he wvas vecry gen1tle as evi
denwed by the fact that11 Mirs. ViallIey
had b(een ini close lprtximlity to him
for' some le'ngthI of Itime' be fore bein
awaire of his p'esenice. She naliiturailly
32ave h1im) mor ie loom andt calledl heri
loshiand, Dr. Valh y, who plroreeded
to tnd his unproitabille carceer.
(Of c'ourlse, we allI k now t hat the
long-nist d hogs 1ro1am atI will amlonig
nakes and there ale not vt ry~)1 many.
Ihut onlce iln aiwhilet somle lowIn de r
tels thr'lling adventuro s with snakes.
One younhg mian tetl ls about(3 bein13
it the sameil placle a fewv weeks ago
md one night his direams were dis
urbed by a cold slimy sensation
icross hiis face and the next morn
ng he saw~ a moi~ccasin lying in a
-rack of the wall. Hie at once got
iis pistol and shot Mr. Snge. Then,
:o the tail goes, one night pretty
mon after a wilj eat, or some wild
-ats, attractedl ' the odlor of beef
rrom the k:tchen came to call (on the
nitruders. But, snakes or wild eats
>s.ve seldom bcen known to harm a
'iumian in these beautiful, glorious
YOU AND)1.
If mien wVou1ld cease to1 worry,
And women eanse to sigh,
Andl all he glad to, bury
Whatever hag to dit';
If neighbor spa~uke to neighbor,
As love dlemarnd' t:f all,
The rust wIu~ o s .at thc sabrI",
The s1(1 r atl V <nl t ': wei;
Then e'very 'day woCuM' glisten ,
Anrd God1 wouhl pause' to list' n,
Andl life wvould he. divine.
CENTRAL NEWS
Revival servie(s are now in prog
es' at the First Baptist church. Rev.
W. Guy the pastor is doing the
irea chi g.
There is large talk of a Barbercue
SCo al ' ::1 the near future. We
ete yts cn it, for something good .to$
at wo uld change things with us.
Mr. Carlisle F'olge r and his wife of
New York City are visiting Mr. Fol
er mother and sister, Mrs. J. H.
itanmscur here. Mr. F'olg,,r spent his
early days in Central and he has
many friends here who are glad to
see him.
Dr. L. G. Clayton has gone to a
dodtor's convention at Saluda, N. C.,,
for ten days.
Mrs. Chandler of Macon, Ga., is
visiting her daughter here, Mrs. L. A.
Falls.
Miss Faith Clayton returned from
Asheville last we(.k where she has
been attending summer school.
Mirs. Bettie Ramseur of Washing
toil, ). C.. is visiting' here now. Dern
many friends are always glad to sec.
her.
Mr. D. .1. .lohnson, has set himself
up to a Foird Cune.
Mr IN".WV. ('layton has gone to Ga.,
to speni (d s Inc tine \ with relat.ivcsi and
frie'nd.
('cnt rl witnvssedl a sevre; atorm
la st Sundayi3. 5' veralI ire. . were
blowcn down and (uite a bit. eo hail
fell.
Ile Issa(1ueena Mill Store, begin
ning August 1st, will sell for cash
only. Everything will he marked
down to cash pricts and everybody
will pay cash, even the clerks in the
store will have to pay cash for every
thing.
SIX MILE CEMETERY
All those interested in the Six Mile
cemetery are requeste(d to come Tues
day morning, August 8th and bring
suitable tools for the purpose of
cleaning off the Cemfetery.
{ NOTICE
All p)ersc:ns who are inte'rested1 in
he Gap Iii II ('cemet ery are relu(estcd
o mee't next Satur'lay morning. Aug
ist 5th, to clean i f the grouncls.
RIU NION
'T'he annollI reunion. (f' the Porter's
nill heI b(hld cn Ar'utust 10 1922, at A.
'1 I''s Id ( im plae('' 'ur miles
h n I'i'h'is ein top soil roiad. lEvery..
dy1 int ed is winly the re(latitves.
I b:"1 Ikek1 school (.pened .lul~y 17th
ihl 1lt1 jt' ils. with l'ro f. It. M.
;(\wt( 1n as prinLil-:l, and Mrs. Mary
oss and Ml's. Maigg.e Orr as ass
Th hall te',iam of this school will
I:1\" Denver next Friday an flat
toe'k groundsI, andic issue c'haillenge to
ulay any school teami ini P icken~s ,ouni
F"OR ('OUNTYi COM MISSIONER,
Mrd:. ZI. N. Muliinax, a prominent
:mmer'P of nearl ~ihr, it y, has tiled his
-defrcounty c/(omml~issioner andl
lid of this pair. i Mir. Mullinax is
nell kucwvn over the counlty and is
olly (~Omlpetenlt toC dlischarge the du--.
id's of this office. ie p)ledges his
.'St ('lfim-t s andl soli('ts 5youri'5 support.
IIAMBONES MEDITATIONS
PEAM5 LAK( , IN DE
COUNTRY. D'EY WATERS
EN PASTURSS DE COWS,
WI4ILS' IN DE C ITNY
DE Y W AT E RS E.N P'ASTURES
L E MILK!

xml | txt