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The Pickens sentinel. (Pickens, S.C.) 1911-current, September 28, 1922, Image 3

Image and text provided by University of South Carolina; Columbia, SC

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn93067671/1922-09-28/ed-1/seq-3/

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Dressmakers of France Concen- |
trating on Novelties.
All Eyes Are Centered on Apparel for
the important Events Where
Fashion Reigns.
Paris dressmakers for somve time
Past have concentrated all -their ef
forts on novelties for the season at
Deauville, known to be the most chic
reso-t in Europe, writes a Paris cor
respondent in the New York Tribune.
Not one of them but is thinking of
beautiful dresses for the seashore,
smart restaurant gowns, startling
toilettes for the races and casino
dances, which will make the wearers
a cynosure of all eyes. For all their
be uty and novelty there is a refine.
ment about these summer toilettes
which cannot fail to win approval
among women of t'iste. They are not
so simple as last year's little black
. dresses, but they are discreetly or
nate.
Callot is making many beautiful em
broitdered dresses. The intricate, in
teresting patterns of embroidery are
done on a background of white satin.
These highly ornate robes are built
on the simnplest possible lines.
The all-white dress is anlost with
out rival as a sulInmer dependence.
Women do not hIes:tate to have from
six to a dozen all-white dresses. An
exquisite model in white satin shows
lovely embroideries in crystal beads
and silver thread. As an afternoon sk
casino toilette this is worn with a lit- te
tie cloche of white horsehair braid n(
draped with an ornamental masque ea
veil.
- With their simple cotton and crepe -
georgette dresses young women with cc
a love for the picturesque are using im
Ii
fo
thl
to
al
til
bi
o(
al
o)
. il
c<
01
b
n
Il
ti
B
New Girdle and Hat of Braided 'Straw
and Red Poppies, Worn With Sim. b(
pie Cotton Crepe Frock. at
flower girdlhes and flower toques. One lii
of JTudith Barbier's latest sets of tils at
kindl consists of a plaited straiv' girdle,
onl wileh arte mounted big red lpoppies, th
and1( a toqlue made of an open straw
britud with ai band of poppies, I
HATS.FOR MIDSUMMER WEAR
je
Contrast is the Watchword in Mil- at
linery That Makes Charming T~
Frames for Pretty Faces.w
For thle moment, the hats of mid
summaner are making cha rm ing fraimes
for charming faces, and they must
give to a summer fete tihe birdseye wl
loew of a great flower garden of 1mov1- we
ing bhlossomis, with a play' of delicate at
THE CORSET IS 1B
,Adjunct to Milady's Wardrobe Returns m
After Several Years of Doubt ci
.- and Hesitation. an
fut
It reqluires a careful analysis this
season1 to r'coneile several apparentlyw
diverse fatslii''n itndencies in Paris',f
asserts a New YorkC fashion authtority.
At hlet ics hav1e becometit a routinie paItt
of tihe Frncth womanlf's program.j~
Much of this is ii thless due to pure C
love of sports. but when we reliect
that thiose unaihtii to cottuete int th- N
lelies nbeverttheless dio Iphysilel exer
citees at home, we'. mutist seeIk at deepe)r
Conitratsted with t he vogue for athi
.leties, which ma kes for tt comptlete d
freedom of miot ion, Itere has1 cointe a fa
gradual but certain ret urn of thle (or- lh
'set. After severaul yearst' of waveinltg cl
besitation, the blamnce hast swung Cc
completely in its fav(or. it wouitht be p
openinug a timne-wortn subjtect to tdetali in
'the many arguments in its favor, butt t
,not even) its miost entt'hunsiastie ndher~t- s
ent can claim that the corset is tany- e't
thing but superfluous as atn athletie rc
aidjunct. t
It is apparent that the new corsets s
tend to give an insinuating slendert'- I
*ness to a figure clothed even int the
Stocking Heels. di
The heels of stockings'(vill not wenr ui
.out so quickly if you sewv a pie0ce of nl
halff-Anch tape along the center senmus, It
starfltng from the back of the heel.
The taipe should lbe about four incihes
tong and care should1( be taken to keep
s Modes
V THE NEW AUTUMN STYLES
:.
EWEm~ mmj'MM J
This is among the very latest draped
Irts. It has long tight sleeves, pat
rned In fine gold thread, with the
w long skirt of soft black satin for
ry autumn wear,
'lor such as somec giant kaleidoscope
ight give. It is the more delicate,
>Ier-lIke shades wtiht are chosen
r these picturesque hats, the mauves,
e roses, the cyclanen and fucha
nes, the clear leght yellows, with
mondt green, pale beige and biscuit
its, or dainty gray, with plenty of
hite and here and there a note of
aick for contrast. There is even nfl
casional note of clear light blue,
ways a dangerous color for anyone
er sixteen and even now, more often
en in the milliners' salons than on
e heads of their clients. The whole
age of golden browns is also seen,
r these shades are irresistibly be
ianng.
In great vogue is the light hat made
horsehail r, with the transparen
rini which is so fragile that the trim
lug whiclh is placed upon it it can b
lainly seen through it. from the un
erside. This effect is particularl;
sanning when the sunlight filter;
trough.
EWELRY STILL HAS CALL
racelets, Bangles, Earrings, Beadec
Belts, Among Decorations Wom
en Must Have.
Jewelry still is extensively worn
)th during the day and with evening
tire. g~eweled bracelets lii color aind
black-and-white effects arue very
shionaible, and are worn, six or more
a time.
Widle, jeweled bangles, half to
ree-quairters Inch in width, agauin are
vogue, and heavy carved gold
mngles, copies of the empire andl the
icienit Roman perlod, tire showvn.
Earrings in long pendant effects, of
wvels, jet andl~ cut steel, are fashion.
ale, says Dry Goods Economist.
lose ini cut steel are* freqIIuntly worn
ilh steel-beaded leather belts and
urses to match.
Homespun and Silk.
IHomespun dresses, not ably wh-iIte
th brightly embiroidlered sleeves, ar-e
irn as w~ell as white and colored
-iped summer silks.
ACK IN FAVOR
st bouffant (tress. It is equally
mr that exercise, lbe it competItIve,
ini tenis or golf, or- merely health.
I, as whencu done at homte, also tend1s
the acquisition and( retention of the
im-line silhouet te. So East meets
est, and the alparent caprices of
sioln are mierely sur iface mirages
anI uniderlyling con)tsistency,
IRCULAR SKIRTS FOR FALL
tw Feature for Later Apparel Now
Attracting Attention-Straight
Silhouette Holds.
The cir-cular- skirt is untquestionably
stinedi to makile a st rong bid for
v'or for fall and~ winter', aplpearlng in
th (lay antd evening frocks. Th' e. clir.
lar skirt is the most ntileieable new
ature of fall applarel so far dils.
ltyed, the general trend otherwise be
g in close keep~ing wvith styles ten.
redl tad approved (luring the last
veral seasons. The straight Bilhou.
te contmuerli to lbe the~ dlominant one,
galrdless of the circular skirt vogule,
1(d the straight slihoue-tte is emphn.
red by the gr-eatly inicreased skirt
ngth.
Buttons Are Liked.
Buttons are- again gaining fav-or as
'ess trimminigs. Ball buttons are
ele on crepe deC chines, anid tiny git
id fabric ones are used on heavier
aiterinils.
Designs li Cotton.
Cotton dresses have metrical or con
nt lonal floral designs.
IMlPROVED UNIFORM INTERNATIONAL
Sunday&hool
Lesson
(BY REV. P. B. I'ITWATEIt, D. D.,
Teacher of Englioh lible in the Moody
Bible Institute of Chicago.)
Copyright. 1922. Western Newspaper Union.
LESSON FOR OCTOBER 1
BIRTH OF JOHN THE BAPTIST
1.ISSON '1'IXT-I,uko 1:5-23, 57-63.
GOLDEN TEXT-Ho shall be great In
the sight of the Lord, and he shall drink
no Wino nor strong drink.-Luke 1:15.
I lIlel:It ICN(id MIA T IRIA I.g-Isa. 40:3-5;
Alai. 4:4-6.
Pi'IMIAItY TOPIC-An Angel Brings
Good News.
JUNIOR TOPIC-The Birth of John the
B3aptist.
INT1EItMEDIATIC AND SENIOR TOPIC
-1rcparation for the Coming of Christ. ,
YOUNG PIOPIn AND ADULT TOPIC
-The Place and Work of John the 113p
tist.
We are today entering upon ia six
iolnths' course of study in tihe Gospel
of Luke. whose general suiject is
"Jesus the World's Savior." Today's
lesson concerns the birth of John the;
Baptist, the forerunner of ('b rist.
1. The Parents of John the Baptist
(vv. 5.7).
1. Wlhein They Lived (v. 5). "In the
days of lierod the King." They lived
In a day when ungodliness Was rife.
The priesthood Wais' very corrupt and
the ruling classes were wicked. Zacth
arias and his wife lived in a timtle
when it was not so easy to be godly.
2. Their Character (v. G). They
were righteous before God. To he
righteous before God is a high tribute.
Many appear to he righteous before
meni who are not righteous before God.
..Their lives were so mated that they
walkOed in the commandments of the
4ord liihteless. low beautiful it is
when husband and wife are united in
the Lord and walk together in fellow
ship With God.
3. They Were Childless (v. 7).
Though this godly couple were well
muated and they possessed the Joy of
the Lord in their souls, there was a
real hick in that home.
II. The Birth of John Promised (vv.
8-17).
1. By Whom (v. 11; ci'. v. 1'). The(
angel (Gahriel appeared and iniaie
known the good newts to Zacharias.
'T'his exalted being, the special ie's
senger of God, was sent. to make this
discl osulre.
2. When (vv. g-14S). While olliehtt
lug as ipriest this good nhefws (e'ibl to
him. Zacluiias 1nust have been di ti
nitely priying about this very mnatter
(v. 13). As he burned incense, which
typitled prayer, the uultittide without
were praying.
3. Characteristics of the Child (vv.
15.17). (1) Shall be great in the sight
of the Lord (V. 15). Though the
people did not greatly esteem hiit lie
was highly esteemed by Ihe Lord. '[lis
is infinitely better' t 1181if he had been
greatly esleemed in the eyes of men
or in his own eyes. This is the esteem
for whlih We all should long and pray.
(2) Shual1l drink neither w.'ine nor
strong drink (v. 15). The child shall
become a Nazarite, separating him-ui
self from the sensuous things aind died
lentinug him tself to the service of the
Lord. (3) Be tIlled with the I loly
Ghost (v. 15). Theii energy of the dl
vlne Spirit would enable himi to leadI
the people to( repentaonce (v. 1 ().|
(4I) Shaill go in thle spirit sand power <
of Elijah (v. 17). In this power lieI
was to prepiare the people0 for th li
coming of ithe Savi'r and thle sal1va
tion which Hie was to bring.
tII. Zacharias Asking for a Sign<
(vy. 18-23).
Although thle aged1 priest was ear-<
nestly praying for thle saulvattion of I
Tsrael the grac-ious promise of the
angel, which was the begiinning (If that I
salvation, staggered his faith, lie was
uinable to believe that that for which<
lie fondly hoped andl prayedl would be I
r'eall'zed. Thei) angel gave Zacharias a
sign, 1ie was smitten wi'th dlumblness -
which wa.zs to continue until the ful
tiliment of..the promIse. liecauise he I
refused to praise God in faith for this 1
gracious promnise God causned his
tongue to be sIlent untIl the proise I
was fultilled uand his lips could open
in thaiinksgiv'Iing am1( pra'uise. Th'loughli
lie was thuos rebuked, at thle sam imIhe
his falIh was strengthened by the
manife's'tati on of the supernatural..
God wanits us5 to tru'ist Iiimi, to bel1iev'e:
his pr'oises t, no0 miattei' how~ contrary .
to i'eason' liey, miiay seoul,
iv. Tihe Promise Fulfilled (vv. 57.
o3).
When the timie caime fior the birthi
of John11, llizabel l broughit forthI a son
aind thle nleighboirs rejoiced with her.
On thle eIghth dhay t hey ciricu mel zed i
the child and( ga ve himi ai nameii acc'(ord-l
ing to t he instructhm'a of thle anlgel
(v. 13). 'The nameit JTohni was ('ontrary I
to the family custom. By means of I
writing Zao(haurhtis made known ther
name which lie would hiave by dlivine
instruetlion. At t his time God (opened
the mouth of Zacharias and lie offered
Up pra'iise.
Youth and Age.
Ini miy youth I thioughit of writing a
satIre on manikind ; but 1now in my
age I think I should write an apology
for them.--Wapole.
Lenity and Mercy.
Wheni lenity andl mercy pllay for a
kingdom, the gentler gamester is the
soonest winnier.--Shakespeare.
Heaven Often Smites.
Heaven of ten smnites in mercy, even
erhen the blow is severest,-Joanna
ilalta-.
Some More Truths..
WOULD you use a steam shovel to move a pebble? Certainly not. Implement
are built according to the work they have to do.
Would you use a. grown-up's remedy for your baby's ills? Certainly not.
Remedies are prepared according to the work THEY have to do.
All this is preliminary to reminding you that Fletoher's Castorla was sought
out, found and is prepared solely as a remedy for Infants and Children. And let
this be a warning against Substitutes, Counterfeits and the Just-as-good stuff that'
may be all right for you in all your strength, but dangerous for the little babe.
All the mother-love that lies within your heart cries out to you: Be true to
Baby. And being true to Baby you will keep in the house remedies specially;
prepared for babies as you would a baby's food, hairbrush, toothbrush or sponge.
et Contents 15 Fluid Drao Crn
t~
kf Acconiot-3 PER GNT
AVegelableprepratioforAs.
1 ingtheStomachs and BowseO TI E
Are You Prepared?
A doctor in the house all the time would be a good idea. Yet you
TherfulrcssotidRest.Contains can't afford to keep a doctor In the family to keep baby well or pre
& Cheerfulns n etCUaO
neierO dum,Morphinenor vent sickness. But you can do almost the same thing by having at
Mineral. oNAncoriC hand a bottle of Fletcher's Castoria, because it is a wonderful remedy
for indigestion, colic, feverishness, fretfulness and all the other dis.
orders that result from common ailments that babies have.
iinpkat' ~Fletcher's Castoria is perfectly safe to use. It is a harmless sub
t rastitute for Castor Oil, Paregoric, Drops and Soothing Syrups. Children
- icry for Fletcher's Castoria, and mothers recommend it because they
have found it a comfort to children and a mother's friend.
r . y: tfiiw+Ar If you love yotir baby, you know how sweet it is to be able to
A helpful Retnedy help baby when trouble comes. You cannot always call upon a doctor.
Constipationand Diarrhoea, But doctors have nothing but good to say of Fletcher's Castoria, be..
nd Feverishness an cause they know that it can only do good - that it can't do any harm -
Lesu Ot S anL . and they wouldn't want you to use for baby a remedy that you would
? fi rslattttfonitnac. use for yourself.
acSimile Si4nature ct MOTHERS SHOULD READ THE BOOKLET THAT IS AROUND EVERY BOTTLE OF FLETCHER'S eASTORIA
~. E nAUGENUINE CASTOR IA ALWAYS I
v YnBears the Signature of
xact .Copy of Wrapper.
Ea THE CENTAUfR COMPANY. NEW YORK CITY.
Gives Charming New Color Tone to Old Sweaters
PUTNAM FADELESS DYES-dyes or tints as you wish
REALLY VERY LITTLE CHANGE Height of Meteors. i dA A T r
1)111' 1g tl lat . f , ...r- b L MAN WAT ED
Passing Years Merely Create SlIght nn'tteors (9ne Atltlgust In F'rance 9 simul. -ta or .oo(l rep~uat an, cle'ant tabiis, an
Riffle on the Outer Skini of Iltun(eous2 observa1tion wer mad e in y 1,nent.*I, to n-nm-ta wornIe'rruilane
Earth's Surface. thuit 04,t1ntryP fromi lollintiabot xix an o ~~I ttmlt.1k otlttgr
--.. mihx IIIurl'. Poi'' I i he iiarailixesx thtus <'( nI -.l t a II nii ~ i lit nto prc
Lorig augo, in th Li'IAttle C hturch obta ine11( te e'levat 111 ion sever'a I on1- iirnt',m e in~' v19. No Inivest
*Aroutthe C w(ornter, at iniitr d i id alIt sh l oII'~ uwu nit ''rsl aoei thet cath was WIt I 1~A . iIt l g("'T 11 re1s,
he tialk Ing, the. dea.3constd ( t(11he plan.tO 1tlubted. Tlhe hight at the begin- Sot N~i.a xI* - Itfali .{
tljng and1( the work, thec nien with the lIlIg tf the Ilightl vtried 'ri ( 19 Uo to rclotace ota,
'tllecti l hiti es1 I gathered''t il up i jth e. l'i 1nhm, ' Indt at Ithe etwl from11 22 to1 a totia eco
ules, and1( the choirI headled the war*~ de 'liniles11. 1lTh loxis (distale tra- I wiate q ir om
mritnt'l. versxedl ! Ii the utnit p htere' was I' abo11 atcl eout aa t 0 o t tgatt 7 - t
Th'e world(i turnedard I and1(111( aroulu0, 15a I lhlls, 1aml( t shot'est 35 mik~ts. or diirect frome HESSIG-ELIiS. OCbmW, M.id p
1he city t1noved3 a few bloc0ks, antimes -------u --oono~l
-han Iged. He Knew. Wanted to ByCohud
A oton-icureplce ouht he "A!" haso~ietlyased'lh p e r oul I"e ram'an.(oilat:ti I telsig
hie xsin1t1 typeo as the 11 ii, thet pro. I 1a lItl htoy I klik th Ix191ne i la i t hin ig '' I l.a. .' 4 '(1.. ."u.liy " r al. ~ a9( CX
lucers 1ook (iare of' the butsinessx endt, "'I dlto," rel ied 1ttI( p1 .11,hnsonIl of Ion 111 ' 'rIa', . a tr -'. na, (r' 1 ren arbors
heo wimdow enslhiersx gal thered in Itthe 11us ort~i. 'And(1I Iftr o're91'( gi ot. PUm IOti- 1. 3,eiin n-sem.r1 jtin an0 lowest nasit
senile, ildt~e tutorsofthephy.9th th illerott o h t li tr ai en r t I an Vi ( te~ oui -
ahjected to telt iiages made10li in theIr fot' It.'----Kanlstas City Siar. I ' n Mt (aoonl i~alos ASionel ser, e
latsert('Ipts - - -* -
PTe cIty kept itovinig awaty, p)rIces ,, Women Lawmakers Assisted. 'I'hose.M whlo relliInheri aill the( mioney
Now, a garcage ia otn the si te. Th'e hohn1) is 01tiulhIt'll wI ithi '10~ 1 spelal uI'terwedl v'ery mutcha.
a ullor'd gets more prs ncxiotlecs thantof caoitxnc o the contve'nience ofQI thet
my staro, anad he gets tem free; th l ' oitu'la nnl'mhtersI' ofC the twed Ish na- It 1 ii hr to ( fte (a1f wom)an1's van.
nantlager talkes9 care of I the detilsI, Ite1)111 t tion l tmak Iing bodyt. ity on1 bradt an ld 1heese anld k Isses,
nochan1)( 1ietke In I the 1111 sma l tl age,- --
td the~ cus13tlIoers(1 conducti ai iet
Id itt nvisible war I ontthe14 pri'ies'
-hai trged. Evry~ genuine
So t he scener)y lxis merely (hanlIg'd, package Ud
md1( the1 same1 types~ ate do&ing .jut the cross and
lthutt theo stame ithings.---Ka lherinet circle printed
\egley, it .ltudlge. in red.
Why the Umbrellas?
A r'ither autlttsin2~~gk Wght was uta
.fotk besteh one01111: rainydy treven1tly,
vbeno a p'arty of hth ers iall readty for edcrtewt
ages (on their' way to lthe baeach till ltl rulls
arrtyitg open uiinbr'ellas 2. VII niis ts,
v'itntessing he pi'rcesioit tar l~hterepessndgete
pIproatchin~g the wt'ater all set for thlesasacin Ter .
duntige, wonderedi'cc 01 the theory of car
ylng "l~lhumlesh)oots"' 0 ato rotct I tem
el ves ftroim Ihe rahtlt when they wouldtod i.
hortly be dre'tncheId while Iakin~g their
ior'ning bathI.-New York Sun.
MelodIous Irony.
"aWhylid the( 1 ear com11 e C it nto your'
yes when the hantd layedI'' "Ill, the
hing's All Here?"
"In view~ of the factIonal fights we'veInt dof al mb U vIDv.t
enn htaving," replied Senator 8or- ~O
hum, "the tunet sMoundedI downright
Parasols Used as Pets.Al
Among the hates fashIon noveltietsS L
or' womten ar'e parasol handles spe.~5
'laily carved in wood and then enam- A
~led In the shapes of portraits of pet E R
lossone bestirdy
to dot it.V~ms 0 loi l. 9

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