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The news and herald. (Winnsboro, S.C.) 1877-1900, March 27, 1877, Image 1

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TRI-WEEKLY EDITION.] WINNSBOIIO, S. C., TUJESDAY MIORNING, MARCH 27, 1877. YOL 1. NO.2
NEW ADVEiLTISEMENTS.
5 FANVV VAJ DS,15 styles with
naio,' lots. post paid. J. B.
HUsTaD, Nassau, Rens. Co., N. Y.
TRIFLING
With a Cold is Always Dangerous.
USE
WELLS' Carbolic Tablets,
a sure remedy for Coughs, and all 1)is
eases of the Throat, Lungs, Chest and
Mucous Mombrane.
- PUT UP ONLY IN BLUE DOXES.
Sold by all Druggists.
C. N. CRITTENTON, 7 Sixth Avenue, N. Y.
00 a month. AotN-s WANTED
.. o Our TIpEE (IIEAT $2
zooms. . The Mosy Af- 'Clsa 'ley
toss, a full account of this great mys
tory written by his Father, beats Robin
son Crusoe in thrilling interest. The
Illustrated RAND-BOOK to all RELIGIONs, a
complete account of all dernominations
and sects. 300 Illustrations. Also the
ladies' medical guide, by Dr. Pancoast.
100 Illustrations. These books sell at
sight. Male and female agents coin
money on them. Particulars free. Jopies
by mail $2 each. JosN E. POTTER A Co.
Philadelphia.
A L UV R A TI V I,
BUSINESS
fue We want 50 1 more-first-class Sew
ing Machine Agents, and 500 men of
energy and ability to learn the business
of selling Sowing \Machines. Comspensa
tion liberal, but varying according to
ability, character and qualifications of the
Agent. For particulars, Address
Wilson Sewing Machine Co.
CurcAbo.
827 & 829 Broadway, New York, or New
Orleans, La.
A HOME AND FARM
OF YOUR OWN,
On the line of a great railroad with good
markets both East West.
Now is theTitme to S cure it.
Mild Climate, Fertile Soil, best Country
for Stock Raising in the United States.
Books, Maps, full information, also,
"THE PIONEEli"
Sent free to all parts of the world.
Address, CO. "Ee. 'E a,'U'ME ,
Land Con. U. P. I. It.
OMA HA, NEB.
Wonderful Success 1 25,000
or' Tn
CENTtENNIAL EXPOSITION
DEsCRIBED AND ILLUSTRATED,
Sold in 610 days It being the only
complete low-price work (7711 pages only
$2.50,treating of the e- tire history ,grand
buildings, wonderful exhibits.curiosities,
great days, etc.; illustrated. and $1 cheap
er than any other; ever% body wants it.
On. new agent cleared $350 in 4 weeks.
8 000 agents wanted. Send quickly for
proof of abov i, opinions of of cials,clergy,
and press, s'a iple pages, full description,
and our extra terms.
I HUDEAaD Bnos., Pus., 783 Sansom St.,
Phil., Pa.
Caution. Beware of faliely claimed
offiial and worthless bovas. Send for
proof.
on Gold Jewel
- .rf combina
don out. Con
C nting of el,
ant w a tel
shain, ladles
san deomue
urooch and ear
tons, set spiral studs, collar button,
heavy plairi' waigrnand gents'
Parislan diamond pin. The above articles
sent, post-p~aid, for 50 cts, have been re
tailed for $8. Bakutsokand ms
he' sold. Solid .. il ton Gold Watches,
$10 each, for -specultive pusr
poses, goo d timers, equal inappearance
to a $200 g fnu inie gold. "JIl is repuntion
for honesty, fair d~id jb liija
unequaled by' Any' advrter 'n ''thl a
elty. '-Net York Day Book, Dec.16, 1870
JPostage stam ps taken as cash.
F. STOCK MAN, 21'Bon'd St.;N- Y.
DI. RI. Flenilel
K(E!Pse.stantly n handa fuanup
ply of Choice FAMILY GROOERIES and
PL ANT'ATION SUPPLIFA, Nis stoRl lat
recently been rEplensh., and IIe is pow
Pea4y to supply-the wanta of ? 1
J, le MogARbEY.
B1.3EG(S to inform the citizens of Wiinns
boro and the public in general, I hat he
has on hand the largest and best sob cted
stock of
WESTERN RYE, and N. C. CORN,
in town.
ALSO,
Brown Porter, Cream Ale, and Cockney's
DoligMi, Alf and 'A:If. Smoking and Chew
ing Tobacco,
CIGARS, &c.
J. C. SEEGERS' Palo Ber always fresh
on draught.
--ALSO
A lot of patent ALARM CANDLES.
suitable for family use.
CALL AND SEE THEM.
mar 17
lTOTIO.E.
TAE undersigned, having %itlhdrawn
ortirely from the mercantile business,
gives notico that his notes and accounts
are in the hands of a lawyer for co lection
without discrimination. Prompt atte"n
tion will save costs.
mar 17-tx2 JAS. R. AIKEN.
THE BALL STILL ROLLS ON
-AT THR
GRAND CENTRAL
Dry Goods Establishment
-OF
McCreery & Brotier
COLUMBIA, S. C.
r HE success attending the disposal of
our MAoNIFICENT STOCK, which we put
upon the market early this season at such
low figures, convinces us that the public
appreciate our efforts to supp y them with
the newest and most stylish goods.
luying as we de from the first hands
and for CASH, enables us to offer
SUPERIOR INDUCEMENTS.
We are now receiving a now and elegant
stock of
SPRING AND SUMMER
3D . Y a- C> 4 D s
BOOTS, SHOES,
Bat" ancs. daps
which will be sold at the same low ruling
popular prices. We expect to do a IVE
PUSHINO nUSINESS, and bargains will be
offered daily.
"A word to the wise is sufficient."
fl- Samples sent on applibaticn and
expressage pail on bills ever si.
McCRIEERY & ]ROTIHERL,
Grand Central Dry Goods Establishment.
T1. A. MoCRExanY. B. Ii. MClF.ERY.
D. A. IIAwlM. WM. HORKAN.
feb 20
. MARk 4e*A
tat. 5nw 3s, teni.
wEonLAIM FOR TUn IMPROVED
WHITNEY
SEWING
1YZAOZ~fli S
The following speoific points of sup..
riority:
*I-f4reat hatingeldcly In Con
2--DutIty.
3-ExiceeInugly Light Run-t
nilsag.
4-Mill Iluanninag. NolsetlesM.
g5-Perfor.'aus tfal Varmeties or
O- etaIy or Finish anid
Wemship.
TV-GIt AT RIEDUTOIVl LV
Single Machines sent on orders direct
from 'thie'actory, written guarantee with
each Richino.
WtI1Y PAY OlD PBIOESI.
'end -for ciroulars and particulars.
'Address,
T, Whilatney Mr'g.Co.,
feb 17 Paterson, N. J.
fETyoi) ob Printin do ie at
n.J*Ta WE av MD004
IMPORTANT
-TO
--AND
AGRIOULTURISTS I
--o
Emperor Will'am Cabbage,
rI IE best, largest, hardiest and most
Jprofitable variety of WINTER CABDAGE
known in Europe, and imported to this
country exclusively by the undersigned,
where, with littlo cultivation, it flour
ishes astonishingly, att~ainmig an enor
mous size, ani selling in the market at
prices most gratifying to the producer.
ln transplanting, great care should be
Lused to give siient simco for growth.
solid heads the size oftihe mouth of a flour
barrel is the average run of this choice
variety. One package of the seed sent
post paid on receipt of 50 cents, and one
3 cent postage stamp. Three packages to
sne address $1 00 and two 3 cent stamps.
Twelve pacakagcs sent on receipt of $3 00.
,A,4' Read what a well known Gar ett
Co. Marylander says of the EMPEROn
LIAM Cabbage:
BLOOMINOTON, GaITRET CO.,
Did + 1i. '2, 1877.
Mn. JAMES CAM1'DELL, ti6 ulton St.. N. Y.
Dear Sir: -I boughtsone seed fron You
last spring, and it was gqod. Your tim
perar William Cabbage suit. this climate
well. On a mountain side the seed you
sent iue produced Cabbages weighing
thirty poUnd each.
Very truly yours,
JAM1ES BROWN.
o
all I am Solo Agent in the U. S. for
the famous
Maidstone Onion Seed
from Maidstone, Kent Co., England, pro
ducing the most producing the most
prolific and finest flavored Onions known
nid yielding on suitable scils from 800 to
!:0 bushels per acre, sown in drills.
Mr. Henry Colvin, a large narketgarden
er at. Syracuse, N. Y., writes, "Your
English Onion Seed surprised me by its
large yield, and the delicious flavor of the
fruit. I could h- ve sold any quantity ir
this mar et at good prices. My wife says
she will have no other onions for the table
in future. Send me as much as you can
for the enclosed $5.00."
One package of seed sent on receipt
of 50 cents and one 3 cent postage stamp,
three packages to one address $1 0i ani
two 3 cent stamps. Twelve packages segt
on receipt of $3 00.
iy supply. is limited. Parties desiring
to secure either of the above rare seeds,
should not delay their orders All seed
WARRANTED FRESH AND TO GERMINATE.
Cash mu:t accompany all orders. For
either of the above seeds, address
JAMES CAMPBELL,
mar 1-xtGm 066 Fulton St., N. Y.
CONGRESS STREET
N
E
w
G
0
0
D
SI
WINNSBORO, S. C.
NEW GOODS
AT
U. G. DESPORTES'
AND
B AURG A I1NS
IN
DRY GOODS,
CLOTHING,
BOOTS AND SHOES,
WVINES,
LIQUORS,
Etc., E~to,
J. OLENDI.NING,
Boot and Shoo Manufacturer.,
'WINNSUORUO, 8. C.
1,1 THE underaigned re.
WJspectfully announees to thma
~U citizens of Fairfield that he
Shas removed his Boot and
Thee Manufactory to one door below Mr.
D).Muller's. I amn >repared: to manufaeture
d11 styles ..of; wor~ ,in a substantial And
orkmnanlike manner, out of the very best
innterials, and at prices tully as low sth
mmne goods can be manufaetured for at the
NIorth or elewliore, X keep constantly on
hand a good Stock of Soie and 0oppr
Leather, shoe Findings &ei, whieb will be
mold at reasonable priqes, o pairing
promptly attended'to. Terms striotly Cash.
mfe-rad Hides bought.
THE BLOODY ALAMO.
--o
l A8T DAYS OF TRAVIS, 10 WI 'IL A
DAVY CROCKETT
& Mexican tells the story of the siege
How the heroes met their death--Hilt
to hilt--Glorious in death.
As long as the world admires true
courage, so long will the story of
rho Alamo be told, and the heroes of
that bloody siege will be enshrined
in glory. However rough their
characters may have been, however
lawless and godless lives they may
have lived, the halo encircling their
beaths will render all their defects
invisible. They will go down to
History as martyrs to the causo of
liberty.
Whi e the general outlines of the
iege are familiar to all, the details
ire but meagre. the following
graphic description purports to be it
true story of the scene of that
blood day, when Santa Anna achiev
id his triumph, and sealed his victo
ry with the blood of his prisoners.
The facts are narrated by an old
Ifexican sc1dier, named Francisco
Bu[rraf who was born in Guana
junt i,ni151. He became a soldier
in 189, was of the army that storm
"I- l;Alamo in 1836, and was
Lip npu13d by the Texans at San
Jacirito: He became a citizen of
TexaA, seived in the war of 1846-7
igainst his Native country, and in
tlh Qonfederate army in the war
between the States. He is now
in honored and aged citizen of
Brownsville.
Santa Anna was joined at Laredo,
where lie crossed the Rio Grande,
by General Cos, who, in violation of
the terms of his recent surrender at
San Antonio, was forced to join
Sata Anna and return into Texas.
The movements of the Mexican
army were greatly retarded by fires
on the prairies, which rendered the
horses of the whole force almost
useless. Deaf Smith, a famous
Texan scout, was the author of this
mischief. Santa Anna halted a day
at Medina, when he was met by
Senor Novarro and a priest, who
gave the General accurate informna
tion as to the strength-268 men in
the Alamo-of the Americans in
San Antonio. A sudden rain storm
and "norther" m:tde the river im
passable, and a forced march and
immediate assault impossible. Next
day he resumed the march, Gen.
Mora in advance with orders to
seize the mission of the Conception,
a massive stone structure doomed by
Santa Anna a more defensible
stronghold than the Alamo. A
cannon shot was fired when the
head of the advancing column
reached the cemetery. The town
was not defended, and Colonel Mora
was ordered to take a position north
ind east of the Alamo to prevent
the escape of the garrison. This
was late in February, 1836. Santa
Anna led four thousand men and
awvaited the coming of General Taiza
with two thousand more. A bait
talion crossed the San Antonio
river and took possession of houses
below the Alamo to build a bridge
across the river. Thirty men of
two companies sent the next day to
make a reconnoissance wvere killed.
A light earthwork was thrown up
above the Alamo. The firing fronm
the fort, nowv invested on every side,
was ceaseless. An earthwork
nearer the fort was constructed at
night. On the third day of March
General Talza arrived, and the plan
of assault was defined and made
known to the division commifanders
On the 5th of March scaling ladders
were distributed. At 8 o'clock on
the morning of the 6th, ever memor
ible in Texas song and story, the
Battalion Matamoros was moved to
i point near the river and above the
Alamo.
They were sup~ported by twvo thou
sand men under Gen. Cos, this wing
of the army being commanded by
Gen. Castrillon, Gen. Talza leading
that below the Alamo. Sant'a Anna
spent the night in the earthworks
near the Alamo. The whole fore
was to move silently upon the
!ortress at the-bugle sound, and not
to fire till in the trenches of the
l'exans.. The bugle was heard at
four o'clock. Gen. Castrillon's di
vision, after half an hour's desperate
fighting, and after repeated repulses
ad. un hpard-of losses, succeeded inl
sffecting an entrance in the upper
part of thie 4lamo is a sort of out
work, jio'W a ou4rcar.: The fight
ing ha~d Qnly begun.' . The doors and
windows of the Alene leriding wen
barriMdd'dind guarded'by bsig. o1
sanle~pedup as higi s a -man's
p houlders, and on the roof wert
rows of sandsbags, behind which the
Texans fought as men never fought
before--muzzle to muzzle, hand to
hanl. Each 'exan rifle shot ex
hausted its force and spent itself in
suceossive bodies of Mexicans pack,
ed together like a wall of flesh.
Muskets and rifles were clubbed,
and bayonets and bowioe-knives
never wrought such fearful carn
'age.
The ceaseless crash of firearms,
the shouts of the defiant, desperate,
beleaguered Texans, the shrieks of
the dying, made the din infernal and
the scone indescribable in its sublimo
terrors. Each room in the building
was the scone of a desperate strug
gle with fearless men driven to des
speration and consciouls that escape
was impossible. 'Ti'hey fought even
when stricken down, and when dv
ing still struggled, not with death,
but to slay Mexicans. In the long
room used as a hospital, the sick
and wounded fired pistols and rifles
from their pallots. A piece of
artillery supposed to be that which
Crockett had used during the siege,
was shotted with grape and canister
and turned upon the desperate occu
pants of this apartment.
After the explosion the Mexicans
entered and fcund the emaciated
bodies of fourteen men, torn and
rent and blackened and bloody.
Forty-two dead Mexicans lay at the
doorway of this room. Bowie,
whose name tells of his fearful knife
and deeds, lay stark and stiff on a
cot in this room. He was helpless
and in boil when the place was in
vested ton days before.
Eleven Texans tired with terrible
effct from the roof of the building,
where they used three or four field
pieces, which they charged with
nails and pieces of iron. - Buerra,
like all others, gives his peculiar
version of the story that recounts
the facts affecting the death of
Travis and of Crockett. These two
weredound living, yet exhausted by
death dealing, and lying among the
dead. -
When Travis was discovered he
gave a Mexican gold, and while con,
versing with him General Cos, with
whom Travis had dealt most gener
ously when San Antonio was captur
ed by the Americans, appeared.
Cos embraced Travis and induced
other officers to join him in asking
Santa Anna to spare Travis' life.
The President General sternly ro
fused. Then Crokett, from among
the corpses, stood up, utterly ex
lansted by weary, sleepless days and
nights and by five hours' constant
fighting.
Santa Anna enraged beyond mnea
sure that his orders were not execut
ed. He directed the soldiers near
him to fire on the two Texans. Travis
was shot first in the back. He fold
ed his arms across his breast, and
stood stiffly erect till'a bullet pierced
his neck. He fell upon his face,
while Crockett's body was riddled
with bullets. The corpses of two
thousand Mexicans were buried;
those of the dead Americans were
gathored andl burned, a holocaust
whose fires lighted tihe way to Texan.
freedom.
The Hampton tax collector o
Abboville, Capt. Perrin, has issuoR
up to date two thousand, two hun
dlredl and sixty-six receipts. IHis
total collections amount to $11,
,070.7-of which amnount $7,641 86
goes to the Hamnpton government
lunder tihe ten pe'r cent. call, and
$3,428 90 to tihe county. During
the past week there has been a
marked increase in tile issue of me
ceipts, and there is a disposition onl
tihe part of all the people1 to pay up
their share of the contribution. The
colored peop1)1 are acknowledging
the rightful authority of Hampton,
and on Monday, out of twenty re
ceipts twvelve wore issued to colored
taxp~ayors..
John D. Lee, thoe instigator of
tile Moun tailn Mead ows Massacre,
of emigrants in Utah over twenty
rvearsmago was excuted on Friday.
.fhe laws of Utah provide for execu..
tion by shooting andl at the wnrd
five balls pierced tile body of the con
Idemned'' man. Be fore execution,
ILee made a speech denying com
plicity in the massacre, but the
evidence against him was complete.
Lee had over a dozen wives and
six ty -oight chlidren, but none of
themn attended the executcon.
Springfield, Ull., hams a fema ,
dentist. Silo is said to be. a ladya of
gentle extraction .-Areto York
Commercial Advereiser~ Such a
woman Is bound to pull through
life'.'peaceably if she can, forcepely.
if she must.-Norristowen 11erald.
.Objllblanes can be cured, but
imblainesecannot be.

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