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The news and herald. (Winnsboro, S.C.) 1877-1900, April 12, 1877, Image 1

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TRI-WEEKLY EDITION.] WINNSi3ORO, S. 0., THURSDAY MORNING, APRIL 12, 1877. [VOL.1. NO. 31.
NEW ADYERTISEMEN'1S.
O Ladies' Favorite Cards, all stylos,
2 with name, 10c. Post }paid. J. B3.
IHUMITJn, Nassau, [ens. Co., N. a.
You will agree to distribute some of
t circulars, we will send you a
IN 011/r FnlAME, and a 10 page
,"t column illustrated paper, frco for 3
months. Inclose 10 cents to pay postage.
Agents wanted. KENDALL & CO., Bos
ton, Mass.
TRIFLING
With a Cold is Always Dangerous.
USE
WELLS' Car bolic Tablets,
a spro remedy for Coughs, and all Dis
eases of the Throat, Lungs, Chest and
Mucous M onbrano.
PUT UP ONLY IN BLUX BOKEs.
Sold by all Druggists.
C. N. CIITTENTON, 7 Sixth Avenue, N. Y.
O 70 a month. AGENTS WANTED
O 0 on our TRnaEE GREAT $2
mooxs. The Story of Chitarley
Rols, a full account of this great .iys
tery written by his Father, beats Robin
son Crusoo in thrilling interest. The
Illustrated nAn-BOOK to all IILIOIOls, a
complete account of .all denominations
and sects. 300 Illustrations. Also the
lathes' medical guide, by Dr. Pancoast,
100 Illustrations. These books sell at
sight. Male and female agents coin
money on thoni. Particulars free. copies
by mail $2 each. JOHN E. POTTER & Co.
Philadelphia.
A HOME AND FARM
OF YOUR OWN,
On the line of a great railroad with good
markets both East West.
Now is the Time to Secure it.
Mild Climate, Fertile Soil, best Country
for Stock Raising in the United States.
Books, Maps, full information, also,
"THE PIONEER"
Sent free to all parts of the world.
Address, O. F'. T3a-gigig,
Land Con. U. P. R. R.
OMAHA, NEB.
m *~iNOTIC. We have
thentiie la.aad hee
>ffj ~ sellng gstationery
pcae to the
et f De Word It contains
Ii' I heets of paper 18 envelopes, pencil, penholder.
goTdou pen anda itrees of valuable Jewelry. Complete
sanwi pacaacelwtt clogant f id plated slrove buttons
and ladies' fae. ola,le 1 y. (inm and4 elmes, V
p.Ic, enorut erkhagon. wth as drtodlfe' ,
., Olaui t Paut entn Lever Vatc froo to alalgets..
BRIDE & 00., 709 Broadway, N. Y.
TWELVE
:j articles In one. 1hol.IAOYD COMBiINATION. Can be
used as a Poncfl.Pei !i or and Ien, Eraser, Penknife.
Envelope opener.Pa-orcutter Rubber, Sewing Machine
Trhreasd Cutter. andi for Iippi,ig Ilosms. Cutting err
hooks andi Eyes, Buttons. E~rasing Bllots. ic. Size of a
common pencil, is heavily nicke, plated, and vulil last
a liretitne. Agents are coining mnoney and say It is the
boat soiling ertico out. ani,:o 25 cent., Six for
SnE' tr aordlnarv inducemen, to Agents. Send for
samnie haif.,iozon and canvass your town.
BRIDE & CO. 709 Broadway, N. Y.
SIXSTATIONERY PACKAGES, andi
IoN for 0.O OLLARS.
095 Broadvay, N. Y.
L. sept 3
LADD BROSe
" HWE have now completed one of
S the best stocks of
S DRY GOODS,
BOOTS and SHOES,
HATS and CAPS,
YANKEE NOTIONS,
CROCKERY, &c.
IN THE COUNTY.
We will not be undersold. Let ub
say, however, that our best
Calicoes are 10 cents a
yard. We cannot
sell them lower
and have a
uniform profit on all Goode.
GIVE US A CALTL
:TO OUR COLORED FRIENDS
As you have always put confi
dence in us, we will state that you
may dopend on getting goods at a
regular oven pr'ice.
No baits held out to any one.
uyvn BOn
CONGRESS STREET
N
E
w
G
0
- 0
D
WINNSBORO, S. C. S
NEW GOODS
AT
U. G. DESPOBTES'
AND
BARG AINS
IN
RY GOODS,
CLOTHING,
BOOTS AND SHOES,
WINES,
LIQUORS,
fEtb3, Et
Collilor & Cladler
CALL ATTENTION
TO their large and elegant assortment
of
GLASSWARE,
Especially their Berry, Fruit anti Preserve
htowls.
--ALSO,
To their variety of LAMPS, which, for
beauty and cheapness, excoi.
-ALSO,
To their large stock of CROCIKE lY, which
they offer at low prices, to closo out their
GOODS in this line.
JUST RECEIVED,
A.full stock of Plain and Fancy Gro
eeries, which will be sol d at low st prie
for the Cash.
ALSO,
A fiuo stoek of liquors, such as
WHISKEY,
BRANDY,
4WINES in great vaariety,
ALE,
BEERI,
etc., etc.
eThe patronage of the public Is. soli.
fb B. ROSEFIHEIM.
fb 10--tf -
J. CLENDINING,
Boot and Shoe Manufacturer,
WINNSDORO, S.C.
THlE undersigned re
Sspectinlly announces to the
citizens of Fairfield that he
has removed his Boot and
Shoe Manfactory to one door below Mr.
0.Muller's. I am prepared to manufacture
'11l styles of work in a substantial and
orkmanlike manner, out of the very best
materials, and at prices fully as low as the
same goods can be manufaetured for at the
North or elsewhere. I keep constantly on
hand a good Stoek of Sole and Upper
Loather, Shoe Findings ko., which wvill be
sold at reasonable prices. Repairing
promptly attended to. Terms strictly Cash.
~Dried Hides bought.
oct 19 J. OLENDINING.'
/3R nr.o eniadn~t
IMPORTANT
-TO
-AND
AGRICULTURISTS !
-------
Emperor William' Cabbage,
r pHliE best, largest, hardiest and most
1 proltatble variety of WINTER CADBAGE
known in Europe, and imported to this
country exclusively by the undersigned,
where, with little cultivation, it flour.
isles astonishingly, attainihg an enor
mous size, and selling in the market at
prices most gratifying to the producer.
In transplanting, great care should be
used to give sufficient 'space for growth.
Solid heads the size of the Imouth of a flour
barrel, is the average run of this choice
variety. One package of the seed sent
post paid on receipt of 60 conts, and one
3 cent postage stamp. Three packages to
one address $1 00 and two 3 Bent stamps.
Twelve packages sent on receipt of $3 00.
;: Read what a well known Garrett
Co. Marylander says of the EMxPERo WIL
LIAM Cabbage:
BLOOMINGTON, GIURET Co.,
Md., Jan. 22, 1877.
Mn. JAMEs CAMIRELL, 60 Fulton St. N. Y.
Dear Sir:---I bought soine seed from you
last spring, and it wais good. Your Em
peror William Cabbage suits this climate
well. On a nount4in side the seed you
sent me produced Cabbages weighing
thirty pound each.
Very truly ours,
JA3IES BROWN.
- o
pm I am Sole Agent in the U. S. for
the famous
Maidstone Onion Seed
from Maidstone, Kent Co., England, pro
ducimg the most producing the most
prolific and finest flavored Onions known
and yielding on suitable soils from 800 to
900 bushels per acre, sown in drills.
Mr, Henry Colvin, a large maIrketgarden.
er at Syracuse, N. Y., writes, "Your
English Onion Seed surprised Inc by its
law e yield, and the delicious flavor of the
fr4 it. I could hove sold any quantity ir.
th s market at good prices. My wife says
she will have no other onions for the table
in future. Send me as much as you can
for the enclosed $5,00."
One package of seed cent on receipt
of 50 cents and or - 3 cent postage stamp,
threo packages to one address $1 001' and
two 3 cent stamps. Twelve packages sent
on receipt of $3 00.
My supply is limited. Parties desiring
to secure either of the above rare seeds,
should not delay their orders All seed
WARRANTED FREsH AND TO GERMINATE.
Cash must accompany all orders. For
either of the above seeds, address
JAMES CAMPBELL,
mar 1-xt6mi 66 Fulton St., N. Y.
THE BALL STILL ROLLS ON
-AT TIlE
GRAND CENTRAL
Dry Goods"Establishment
lMicCreery & Brother
COLUMBIA, S. C.
TJ H-E success attending the disposal of
.. our MArNIFI(:ENT sToe'K, which we put
upon the market early thia season at such
low figures, conv'inces us that the pulhic
app~reciate our efforts to supply them with
the newvest and most stylishI goods.
Bfuying as we do from the first hands
and for casu, enables us to offer
SUPERlIOR INDUCEMENTS.
We are now receiving a now and elegant
stock of
SPRING AND SUMMERI
D t 3" G- O O B.
BOOTS, SHOES,
which will be sold at the same low ruling
popular prices. We expect to do a LIVE
PUSHING DUSINEss, and bargains will Ie
offered daily.
"A word to the wise is suffient."
;.ei Samples sent on appliention and
expressage paid on bills over $10..
McCREERY & BROTHER,
Grand .Contral Dry Goo ds Establishmnent.
Tr. A. McCnEERY. 13. B. MoCREERY.
B3. A. IIAwLas. WM. HIORKAN.
feb 20
IL. 3. MZcCarley
BEGSB to call attention to his now
Stock of Boots and Shoes, all sizes
and styleos, at unprecodentedly low prices.
ALSO,
An entirely now Stock of Grocrics.
Sugar of all grades, Coffee, Rlice, Hiominy,
Meal, &' ap), Starch, Soda,Pepper, Tea) etc.
Fino Seed Irish Potatoes.
Choicest Brands of Fhour.
Best Corn anti Rye Whiskey in town.
Tobacco and Cigars, Molasues, Lard,
Bacon, iflamrs, &c. Lowest market prices
or cash,
mar 8 R.3. MbeARL3Y.
TILE DYING WAIL.
0
CH.1 31B1ERLAiIN'S \ A REWJELL TO 113
D UPES.
He says a good many things !.e has
often said boforo, and adds a fow now
ideas.
To THE REPUBLIOANs OF SoUTH CAR
OLINA : By your choice I was made
Governor of this State in 1874.
At the election on the 7th of Novei
ber last, I was again by your votes
elected to the same office. My title
to the office, upon every legal and
moral ground, is to-day clear and
perfect. By the recent decision
and action of the President of the
United States, I find myself unable
longer to maintain my official rights
and I hereby announce to you that
I am unwilling to prolong a struggle
which can only bring further suffer
ing upon those who engage in it.
In announcing this conclusion it
is my duty to say for you, that the
Republicans of South Carolina en,
tered upon their recent political
struggle for the maintenance of
their political and civil rights. Con
stituting, beyond question, a largo
majority of the lawful voters of
the Stato, you allied yourselves with
that political party whose central
and inspiring principle has hitherto
been the civil and political freedom
of all men under the constitution
and laws of our country. By heroic
efforts and sacrifices which the just
verdict of history will rescue from
the cowardly scorn now cast upon
ther by political placemen and trai
tors, you secured the electoral vote
of South' Carolina for Hayes and
Wheeler. In accomplishing this
result, you became the victims of
every form of persecution and
injury. From authentic evidence it
is shown that not less than one
hundred of your number were mur
dored because they were faithful to
their principles and exercised rights
solemnly guaranteedd to them by the
nation. You were denied employ.
n. it; driven from your homes ;
robbed of the earnings of years of
honest industry ; hunted for your
lives like wild beasts ; hunted for
your lives like wild beasts ; your
families outraged and scattered-for
no offence except your peaceful and
firm determination io exercise your
political rights. You trusted, as
you bad a right to trust, that . if by
such efforts you established the
lawful supremacy of your political
party in the nation, the Government
of the United States, in the dis
charge of its constitutional duty,
would protect the lawful Govern
ment of the State from overthrow
at the hands of your political one
mios. From causes patent to all
men, and questioned by none who
regard truth, you have boon unable
to overcome the unlawful combina
tions and obstacles which have op
p~osed the practical supremacy of the
Government which your votes have
established. For many weary months
you have waited for your deliverance.
While the long struggle for the
Presidency wvas in progress, you
woere exhorted by every representa-.
tive and organ of the National Reo
publican party, to keep your ale.
giance true to that party, in order
that your deliverance might be cer
tain and complete.
Not the faintest wvhisper of the
possibility of diappointment in
these hopes and promises ever
reached you while the struggle was
pending. Toaday-April 10th, 1877
--by the order of the President
whom your vots alcne ,rescued
from overwvhelming defeat, the
Government of the United States
abandons you, deliberately with
draws from you its supp~ort, with
the full knowledge that the lawful
Government of the State will bd
speedily overthrown. By a new in
terpretation of. the Constitution of
the United States, at variance alike
wvith the previon~s practice, of the.
Government and with the decisions
of the Supreme Court, the Execu
tive of the United States evades the
duty of. ascertaining which: of two
rival Stato Governments is the law-~
ful one, and by the withdrawal of
troops now protecting -the State
from domestic violence, abandons
the lavwful State Government to a
struggle with insurrectionary forces
too powerful to be resisted. The
grounds of policy upon which euch
action is defended are startling.
I[t is said that the North ja weary of
the Jong Southern troubles. It was
, w'eary, too, of the long trouble
w~hinh sprang from the stupendo us
crime of chattel slavery, and longed
for repose. It sought to cover
thom from sight by wicked compro-,
mises with the wrong whiclr disturb
ed its peace, but God held it to its
duty until through a conflict which
rocked and agonized the nation, the
great crime was put away sand
freedom was ordained for all.
It is said that if a majority of a
State are unable by physical force to
maintain their rights, they must be
left to political servitude. Is this a
doctrine ever before heard in our
history ? It is shall prevail, its con
sequences w1l not long be confined
to South Carolina and Louisiana.
It is said that a Democratic Houso,
of Representativos will refuse an
appropriation for the army of the
United States, if the lawful Govern
mont of South Carolina is main
tained by the military forces.- Sub
mission to such coercion marks the
degeneracy of the political .party
or people which ondur.ep it.A
Government worthy the na 'e, a
political party fit tb wield pdwor,
never before blanched at such a
threat. But the edict has gone
forth. 1o arguments or considera
tions which your friorids couk prow
sent hayo sufficed to avert the dis
aster. No effoctive inoans of resis
tance to the consummation of the
wrong are left. The struggle can
be prolonged. My strict legal
rights are, of course, wholly unaf
focted by the action of the Presi
dent. No court of the State has
jurisdiction to pass upon the title
of my office. No lawful Legislature
can be convened except at my call.
If the use of these powers promised
ultimate success to our cause, I
should not shrink from any sacrifices
which might confrotit me. It is a
cause in which by the light of
reason and conscience a man might
well lay down his life. But to my
mind my present responsibility in.
volves the consideration of the
Dffoct of my action uponl those:
whose representatives I am. I have
hitherto been willing to ask you
Republicans to risk all dangers and
endure all hardships until relief
should come from the Government
of the United States. That relief
will never come. I cannot ask you
to follow me farther. In my best
judgment I can no longer serve you
by further resistance to the impend
ing calamity. With gratitude to
God for the measure of endurance
with which He has hitherto inspired
me, with gratitude to you for your
boundless confidence in me,. with
profound admiration for your
matchless fidelity to the cause in
which we have struggled,. I now
innounce to you and to the, people
of the State that I shall no, longer
actively assort my right to- the. cflico
f Governor of South Carolina..
The motives and purposes of the
President of the United States ip
the policy which compels me to my
present lcourso are unquestionably
lionorable and patriotic. I devoutly
pray that events may vindicate the
wisdom of his action, and that
peace, justice, freedom and pros
perity may hereafter be the portion~
>f every citizen of South Carolina.
D. H. CHAMr~rLAzn
Governor South Oa~rolina..
A Washington livery stable keep
arn, named Nailor, bought a magnifi
sont carriage at great expense dur
.ng the campaign,. and vowed that no
oerson should ride in it until Tilden
wvas inaugurated, when it would be
presented to him. Though the dis
Ainguished reformer was not elected
the carriage was kept covered and
sacred. The other day wifen
Flampton visited the capital a smile
of joy illuminated the face of the
disconsolate stable ownem and he at,
once resolved to place it at the die
posal of his Gocvernorship. Blt
ugain the chariot brotaght disaster.u
A. Mr. Leadin mam has the 'right, to ,
!urnish carpage to guests at
WVillard's hotel, and 'when Mr.
Railor's cariage drove >'und> to
lenider 4, feo igle . to i Opemvor '
EFampton, Iaingham retp ft
is a perofilal ihult and~ assaulted
LiaIlor. Toi this '1i had"'W }i~
iftee*dollassg. ' *
Our ladly'rpadese wilibo int4xest'
and to learn that, siogne of the Paris%
an modisese have introduced a new
kind of trimming for lo necked
inirass bodices. It is called -"'
touchez-pas,"-and consists of vine
and other leavos, sometimes of a
prickly nature, woven garland fash
It is said that i'heoeash andl ;the
westa bank of tu lMwer' Msissinppi
enjoy- dif fercnt c limates, and that
ramns or frosts may visit one side
while the other in perfectly free.

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