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The news and herald. (Winnsboro, S.C.) 1877-1900, April 14, 1877, Image 1

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TillWEEKLY EDITION.] ' WINNSBORO, S. C., SATURDAY MORNING, APRIL 14, 1877. [VOL.1. NO. 82.
NEW ADVE T'I8SEMIENTS.
20 Ladic',1tvoritj Gards, all etylof,
with name, 10: Post mh"t' J B
IIuowrrzo, Naysau, ,1.19ns. Co., I. Y.
You will agree to distribute some of
I circularrs, we will Rend "you a
IN OILT FIIAME, and a 16 page
6t column illuistratda pper; free for 3
months. Inclosgq 1) cents to pay los tgo.
Agents wanted. KENDALL & CO.. Bos
ton, Mass.
TRIFLING
With a Cold is Always Dangerous.
USE
W ELLS' Car bolic Tablets,
a sure re y C* 1 ,an;AU1 .
Mueodl;'11 irflno..
PUT :P ONLY IN DLU .JOXES.
Sold by all Druggist: ' -
C. N. CIIITTENTON, 7 Sixth Avenue, N. Y.
I I Vii '- rCC ( a month. AGENTS WANTED
nsoona. '1%e o ~ 1 1 7
11o0 , a full account of this great mys
tery written by his father, boats Robin
son Crusoe in thrilling interest. The
Illustrated HIANo-IooI< :to jill .. -rImU s1. a
Complete account of ail .dliollnintltibas
and sects. 300 Illustrations. Also the
ladies' medical guide, by Dr. Pancoast,
100 Illustrations. Theso books sell at
sight. Male and femalo agents coin
mney on 1iheim. Particulars free. ioies
by nalil $2 each.' Jons E. 1o-rrir &og
Philadelphia. - , i
A HOME AND FARM
OF YOUR OWN,
On the line of a great railroad with good
markets both East West.
Now is thg.gne.to S u n .
3ild Clintito, r'rtile Soil, beAt Noifntvf
for Stock Raising in the United States.
Books, Mnpi, full i foirtI'ntA; alSo,
"T E PIONEEW"
Sent free to all parts of the world.
Aadress. C. "P. T'>a/-71.0,
Land Com. U. P. R. R.
OMAHA, NEB.
N~OTICE. WAo have
lisa Iflrgsst.nnll heaRt
isollig Statlonory,
i'sehsug6 In tq
World. It contAins
I fl h~ota of hllr, 11 0 (fl~atfp3s, poro'II, pahhllor,
o d t 'u. i i a l s eolry. Cotiloto
to se n h otobuttouas
nu wis'foltninlo Cltyo pin kijtI ds1 p ost
all, 25~ cuuale par u- titI nnr cauory,
BRIDE & OO., 709 Broaciwa , N. Y.
TWEL E
sp ar~tces in ono. Th l.V CO IDINATO i'Can bo
5Osdas i P C ?1"CiPuhn itfnn n ra o.Po nlf
inolp cpltror. i1e lter. ituhb - Sett P.~c iu
rEa CO. 7n 9 BurIad w, un Y
L ADD BROS.
V E havo now eoniplod one 'of
the best stocks of a
DRY GOODS,
BOOTS and SlIORS,
HATS and OAP'8
'YANKEif NO' IONS,
CROCwRY, &c.
IN T oIR COUNTY.
We will not be undersold. Lot us
say, however, thapuva
Calidioes 1ia tb outs a
yard. We-cannot
sell them lower
aLnD h'ave
uniform profit on agod
1 ---
TO OUR COLO-ED 1-.n.
As you have always put conl
dence in us, we will sta~te that you
may depend on gettinig good1s at a
regular oven price,.
No baits held o t~ o'any~ one
niGnnD
CONGRESS STREET
f
0
~~s 6
WI IS 3RO, S. C.
NEW GOODS
AT
U. G. DESPORTES'
AND
IN
DRY GOODS,
CLOTHING,
BOOTS AND SHOES,
WINES,
LIQUORS,
Eto., Etc.
CALL ATTENTION
TO their large and elegant assortment
of
GLASSWABE,.
eipt ly li ler> Fr i n r$dioa
-ALSO,
To their variety of LAMPS, which, for
beauty and cheapiiess, excel.
.s.
-ALSO,
To their large stoclk of CROCKE IY, which
they offer at low prices, to closo out their
GOODS in thii line.
JUST RECEIVED,
A ll stock of Plain and Fany Gro
qories, wh)1~ih wijl be sol d at low 3t price
for the Cash.
A LSO,
A fine atock of liquors, such as
WHISKEY,
BRANDY,
WVINES in great variety,
etc., etc.
The patronage of the public is solici
ted,
fb B. ROSEPIHEIM.
fo 1 0--tf
I,. CLENDINING,
Boots anid Shoe Manufacturer,
WINNSBORO, 8. 0.
THEI undlerigned ro..
spectfully announces to the
citizoena of F"airfield that ho
-fhas removedl his Boot and
Shioo Manufactory to one door below Mr.
0.Mullr's. I am prepared to manufacture
bill styles of worc in a substantial and
orkmeniiko ihanner, out of the very best
materials, and at prices fully as lowv as the
same goods can be manufa tured for at the
North or4 else~ivhord. I keep constantly on
hland ti good Stock of Sole and Upper
Loather, Shooe Findings &e., which will be
sold at reasonablo prices. Repairing
promptlattended to. Terms stricty Cash.
lO IedHdeas bought.
-eot 19 J. CIjENDINING.
ET -our Job Printin gdono.at
NEWS A!D MERLD OeOa.
IMPORTANT
-TO
C~- .dl XL ]> +0 W M L Itf
--AND
AGCRICULTURISTS!
Emperor William Cabbage,
r1 1[E best, largest., hardiest and most
.Lp rofitable variety of wINTER CASnAOE
known in Europe, and imported to this
coilntry exclusively by the undersigned,
where, with little cultivation, it. flour
ishes astonishingly, attaining an enor
mous size, and selling in' the market at
prices most gratifying to the producer.
In transplanting, great -care should be
used to give suflicient .spaco for growth.
Solid heads the size of the mouth of a flour
larrel. is the average run of this choice
variety. One packago of ,the seed sent
post paid on receipt of 50 Cents, and one
3 cant postage stamp. Threo packages to
one address $1 00 and two 3 cent stamps.
Trwelve packages sent on receipt of $3 00.
pml Read what a well known Garrett
Co. Marylander says of the EMPi~bon WIL
LIAM Cabbage:
BLOOMINOTON, GaRuET Co.,
Md., Jan. 22, 1877.
Mn. .JAMEs CAMPrihi.L, 66 }Fulton St. N. Y.
Dear Sir:--I bought sonic seed from you
last spring, and it was good. Your Em
peror William Cabbage suits this climate
,well. On a mountain side the seed you
sent me produced Cabbages weighimg
thirty pounds each.
Very truly yours,
JAMES BROWN.
-0
;/' I am Solo Agent in the U. S. for
the famous
Maidstone Onion Seed
from.Maidstone, Kent Co., England, pro
ducing the most producing the most
prolific and finest flavored Onions known
and yielding on suitable soils from 800 to
1)00 bushels per acre, sown in drills.
Mr. Henry Colvin, a largo inirket garden
er at Syracuse, N. Y., . writes, 'Your
English Onion Seed surprised me by its
largo yield, and the delicious flavor of the
fruit. I could heve sold any quantity ir.
this mart, et at good prices. My wife says
she will have no other onions for the table
in future. Send me as much as you can
for the enclosed $5.00.'"
One package of seed sent on receipt
of 50 cents and one 3 cent postage stallp,
three packages to one address $1 00t' and
two 3 cent stamps. Twelvo.paokagessent
on receipt of $3 00.
My supply is limited. Parties desiring
to secure either of the above rare seeds,
should not delay their orders All seed
wARRANTED F'iiESi AND To GERMINATE.
Cash must accompany all orders. For
either of the above seeds, address
JAMES CAMPBELL,
mar.1--xt0im 60 Fulton St., N. Y.
THE BALL STILL ROLLS ON
-AT THlE
GRAND CENTRAL
Dry Goods'Establishment
-or
l Creery & Brother
COLUMBIA, S. C.
T HE success attending the disposal of
orM~(INIFIcENT sTOCK, which we put
upon the market early this season at such
lowv figures, convinces us that the public
appreciate our efforts to mupply themi with
the newest and most stylish goods.
. iuying as we do from the first hands
and for casH, enables us to oter
SUPERIOR INDUCEMENTS,
We are now receiving a new and elegant
stock of
SPRING AND SUMMER
D 'EL Y Gr- O) O "D S
BOOTS, SHOES,
which will be sold at the same low ruling
populhar prices. We expect to do a r~ryx
rUsuING BUSINE~s, and bargains will be
offered daily.
"A wqrd to the wise is sufficient."
.MP Samples sent on ap~plication and
exprssag pai onbills over $10.
McCRERY& BROTHERI,
Grand.Central Dry Goo da Establishment.
T. A. McORnnuY. B. 13. McOREERnY.
B. A. RAwrJs.. WM. HORKAN.
feb 20
IE. J. McCarley
]3 EGS to caln attention to his. now
L)Stockc of Boots and Shoes, all sizes
ad styles, at unprecedentedly low prices.
ALSO,
An entirely new Stock of Groceries..
Sugar of all grades, Coffee, Rice, Hominy.
Meal, Boap, Starch, Soda,Pepper, Tea,ete.
Fine Seed Irish Potatoes.
Choicost Brands of Flour.
. Bst Corn tund Rye WVhiskey in town,
Tobacco and Cigars, Molasses, Lard,
Bacon, llams, &c. Lowest market price.
or cash.
mar 2 R1. J. MotARLEY.
VISITING THE PRESIDENT.
110W PEOPLIE ARE INTRODUCED AT
TIIE WJIThE 110 U'E.
A Subject of interest to everybody, and
more especially to the Army of Offce
seekors.
Correspomdence of the Philulelphia Times.
I went up to the White House to
see how the Executive machine is
run under its now management.
The old door-keepers and ushers
employed by Grant are still there.
They are former soldiers for the
most part, to whom Grant was so
much attached that he thanked
Hayes the other day for not turning
then out. The old proverb, ",Like
master like man," is exemplified in
their cases ; for they are now all
smiles and politeness, whereas up.
der the old regime they were rather
surly and disobliging. In the ante
room, at the top of the stairs, where
Brother in-law Dent presided over
the card basket in Grant's first
term, sits a tall, sandy-headed West
ern man, with a big inkstand and a
stack of blank cards before him.
The carpet and walls of this room
are of a sickly green, and seem to
have taken their color from the ex
haling hopes of the leg ion of office-,
seekers who have occupied it while
waiting to get access to the "foun
tain of honor and preferment."
Every morning this apartment
fills up with a miscellaneous crowd,
so large that it overflows into the
adjoining halls. The scene is
worthy the poncil of a great charac
ter painter. Nine tenths of the
people are evidently office .seekers.
These are easily recognized by their
anxious look, restless, nervous man
ner, and the pallor of their coun
tenances. They reminded me some
what of the gamblers at Baden
Baden, who sit around the green
tables and silently watch the turning
of the cards, but they embrace a
much wider range of social position.
These eager applicants for places
are of all ranks, from the ex-senator
in black broadcloth seeking to
conceal the humiliation which he
evidently feels under the haughty
air with which he used to Atalk
about the Capitol, down to awkward
countrymen after village postoffices,
dowdy widows in rusty black, and
weak-faced young men longing for
department clorkships-ycs, even
lower, for in the throng are fellows
so shabby and forlorn that they
would probably be - glad to got a
pair of the President's old boots.
The tall man with the sandy
beard is little better than a snare
for the unwary. Few of the cards
which he so politely asks the hope -
ful callers to write ever reach the
eyes of his Excellency. The truth
is, this patient and considerate
master of the ante-chamber is a
breakwater to keep the crowd away
from his chief, while they think he
is put there to help them to the
wished-for interviews. Across the
hall, guarding a door, stands; a
dapper little fellow of unmixed
Ethiopian descent. In his kooping
are entrusted such cards as come
from persons who appear to L:ave
any business that the President
might reasonably be called upon to
give ear to. He takes them in and
delivers them to Mr. Rogers, the
private secretary.
Mr. Rogers is the second break
water. He told me that his or'ders
were to keep all office-seekera. away
from the President, and. that if any
slipped past him it was by strategy,
"Gen. Hayes and I were schoolboga
together," said he, chatting with me
during a shott lull in the -pressure
of callers, "and we wore law pern
ners in Cincinnati, IHe wanted ta
to corne on and help hima in~ cantying
out his ideas ofl civil service i-eform,,
and I felt that I ought to mahn. a
saorifice te do so.. I had no. ideai
that my duties: would be so ardnuous.
The President hopes that. in the
course of four years he can educate
the country so that we shall no
longer be a nation of ogice-seekers
He. is detorminod to make, no re
mnovals, except for good. osuse, and
to appoint the best men ho can find,
wvhethen.the politiciana like them or
nlotA" t'
Occupying a desk at~ Mr. Bogera'
elbow iB usually to be soen Webb
Hayes, the President's oldest son, a
smooth-faced young man, with a
large nose, who wears glasses and
looks like a divinity student. He is
intelligent and polite, like all the
~family. Between him and the
Ph-aident there apnears to exist. a
mutual confidence and affection too
rarely found between father and
son. A third desk in the room is
used by a hard-working clerk, who
attends to the correspondence under
the private secretary's direction.
On one side of this room, which by
the way is handsomely furnished
and has a lovely outlook on the
lawn and the Potomac, is a smaller
apartment, where other clerks are
on duty. On the other side three
or four stops lead from an open
door down to the President's re
ception room, a large square room,
with heavy green rep curtains, hung
over lace, at the two windows, a
bright carpet, two desks, numerous
bookcases and an abundance of vel
vet cushioned~ohuirs. At a lArge
desk, in the middle of the room, e
President receives his visitors. All
who are members of Congress or
Cabinet ministers come directly in
from the hall after giving their
names to a messenger at the door,
and do not, therefore, have to run
the gauntlet of the private secretary.
Every morning, between ten and
twelve, the senators and representa.
tivos come in a steady stream. Mr.
Hayes has a chair placed facing his,
to which he motions each caller by
turn, rising to shako hands with him
as lie advances, and then resuming
his own seat. Sometimes, when the
conversation is designed to be
especially private he gets up and
takes his visitor aside into a window
alcove, and sometimes, but very
rarely, he goes out with him into
his reliring room, adjoining.
Carolina Redeemed.
NEW YoRK, April 10.-The WorJl(,
in view of the removal of the Feder
al troops from South Carolina to-day
takes occasion to refer to the
excellent conduct of the citi
zens of that State under the most
exasperating provocations, and wel
comes them back again from their
thraldom. It says :
During the canvass of last sum
mmor and the exciting contest which
followed, South Carolina portrayed
conclusively that the welfaro of tho
State, and of all its people, white
and black, was safe in the hands: of
its best citizens, and no whore- else.
Firmness, the devotion to duty,. and
respect for law, which South Caro
lina has exhibited under the- feader
ship of Hampton, have convinced her
bittorest enemies that she: is fit to
take charge of her own interests, and
that lessons learned by the- Ehglish
speaking races through ages: of ex
porience in the management of free
government have not been forgotten
in the commonwealth of Rutledge and
Lowndes. She has so far overcome
the animosity of the North , and so
far won its respect. by her wise and
temporate bearing;, that, something
of the old fooling of: fellowship will
come back to-day,, wchan the news
flashes through the, country that the
Federal military no. lbn ger dominate
in Columbia, and that South Caro
linians have once'more assumed the
full stature of'Amarican citizenship.
We bid a hear'ty welcome. home to
the State o~f Marion, Sumter, 1'inck
ney and Laiurens.
While the Times would.have pre
ferred a compromise taar~ smrrender
in the removal of the-tr'oops, it goes
on to say the Presidenk is acting
within the limits, of hia. constitution
al authority, and with, a full sense of
his responsibiliieu.. Hie has decided
that there is no. p roper warrant .
under the law ftna the uses to which
troops bave been~ put in South Caro
lina and Lpnisiana, and with the con
entrence of lam~binet he resolved.
to withdrea- lhem.
Their wibbdrawal from Columbia
takes plaae to-da, and their con,.
tinwuo in New Orleans from this
mnint becomes impossibles Hew.
ing been content with Wade Hamy
ton' personal guratees in the case
of South Carolnhe is nok in a
position to enforce stringent terms
in Louisiana. Lookmng' the mats.
ter ia the light in whichh sees it,
ha, has no right to tittemnpt to exact
terms. "If the task assigned to the
troops is, as he maintains, unconsti
tutional, lie obeyed the dictates of
duty when ho transferred them to
another place, irrespective of the
consequences to thie rival claimanta
for ofli'a position. We state the
position, not exactly as we should
be disposed to have it, but as it pre,
sents itself to the President, in the
sphere of action which belongs peon
liarly to himself."
The Black Hillers are rejoicing
over, the birth of the first girl baby
in that wild, Indian..hamited coun
try.. The aparents ought to call her~
Sinnnan (Chavenno.,

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