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The Laurens advertiser. (Laurens, S.C.) 1885-1973, November 11, 1885, Image 1

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LAURENS C. H.. S. C., WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER ll, 1885.
NO. 15.
A Candid CoiifcsHion.
You ask ino, lovely Kthol, why I caro for
Yourself, mid why I ii HIV your I.I to own.
You're very rich, you know, my dour, nud
therefore
I lovo you fondly for your wcixlth nlone.
I know that I should i>ny lt ls your beauly
That o'er my dot luir heart n spoil hits thrown,
Hut I mn franki I doom lt ls my duty
To say I love you for your wealth moue.
I ought to swear your eyes had wrought my
capture,
That lovo was wakouod by your voice's tono,
That but to ?azo upon your faoo was rapture;
Hut no; 1 lovo you for your wealth alone.
Suppose. ? 6iild I loved you for your manner,
lt m lr li i bo true: you fascinate, 1 own;
Hut rvs enlisted under Mammon's banner,
1 lovo you fondly for your wealth ulone.
My constancy I claim ls thus n/tcstod;
Love based un beauty goes whon youth has
How n;
Hut ir your money ls but well Invested,
I'll love you always for your wealth alono.
-Humbler.
A SPRING CLEANING.
For a whole week Nunibor two bred
gar Vila8, Camberwell Now Road? had
been turned ''upside down and inside
out," aa poor Mr. Clayton declared,
..till thoro was no rest for the solo of
ono'u foot," and each morning as ho
started to catch his train at Kenning
ton Church with his son, ho vowed
that Hover again would ho undorgo tho
agonies of "a spring clean." But tho
afternoon of tho last day at loiigth ar
rived, and Mrs. Clayton and Wini
fred, hor daughtor, with thoir ono
8orvaut, woro busy ns boes putting tho
liuishiug touches lo tho household a
rangements, though it must bo said
that Winuio, who liad just finished her
last term at boarding-school, and who
was not yet fairly domesticated, was a
moro ornamental than useful element.
However, shu had not been idle, and
ut last all was tinlsked, and rather tir
ed and Hushed with her exertions,
Winnio wont upstairs after a somewhat
makeshift dinner willi tho bust inten
tions possible of clearing out tho closet
in her room.
If it had boen a linon-closet, or a
ehina-elosot, or a preservo closot, or
Anything but tho closet it was, there ?3
no telling what Winnio might have ac
complished.
Hut thoso four rows of drcssos,
bauging smoothly down from thoir re
spectivo pogs, provod fatal. They
woro dresses of her ante-boarding
school period, and she had had hardly
a gliuipso of them for two years or
moro.
Trying them on carno next, in tho
natural eourso of affairs.
It was an amusing process. They
woro woefully out. ot' stylo, most r?f
thom buttoned bel iud, nono of iii.MU
readied below tho tops of hor shoes;
but it was vory absorbing, and sho
could hardly belies e her ears when sho
heard her mother calling to her up tho
stairs to como down to lea.
Sho was arrayed at that moment in
a white spotted muslin, which she rc
membered to havo worn for tho first
timo on hor fourteenth birthday.
lt had a i-nsh which lied in an impos
ing bow behind; it had a row of whito
pearl buttons down the back; and it
was several inches shorter than-sup
posing lhere had been anybody to ob
sorvu-would have boon strictly desir
able.
Winnio giggled. A sudden idea had
struck hor. Shu pulled out her hair
pins hastily, braided her hair ia a long
tufl, nud tied it with a blue ribbon;
shu had discovered a string of coral
bo?d" in her drawer-sho had worn it
nt tho ago of six-and put it on; and
thoa sho giggled again delightedly, and
wont downstairs.
Uer lune plan ssas, to a certain ex
tent, highly successful.
lier father looked at her with exact
ly tho degree of bewilderment sho had
anticipated; her motlier set down tho
teapot and gttfcod at her in just tho as
tonished, half-reuionstraling way sho
had kiioss n she would do; her brother
George emitted tho explosive chucklo
?ho had expected, but thole her tri
umph ended.
l'or next her own vacant place,
spreading lui napkin across his knee,
and regarding her calmly from a pair
of handsome bluo oyes, (hero sat a
young man whom sho had never scon
boforo.
Under ordinary circumstances Win
nio woidd have boon rather gratifiod
than otherwise nt tho unexpected np
pearunc? of a nico - looking young
man.
but now the blood rushed to hor
faco in torrents, her breath carno in
fa ps the light fairly danced boforo
tor e\es.
Thro was nothing to bc doue. Sho
was half-way across tho loom; thoy
wero all looking at her; tho precip?
talo Hight which she had meditated
for a wild moment was not to be
thought of.
Sho clutched a friendly chair to
steady horsolf, darted n tiorco glanco
at Goorgo, who wus studing his napkin
into his mouth, nod advanced ns ma
jestically BS hor limited skirts would
allow.
"My friend, Tom Brad loy. You'vo
heard mo spoak of him, Winnie. My
sister," said Goorgo from bohind his
napkin.
Mr. Bradley turned his bluo oyos up
on the tiguro nt his side.
lt had twisted its chair away from
him as far as possiblo; it was bending
low over its plato; lt was evidently
bashful.
The young man smiled paternally
"Do you go to school P" ho bogan, la
the patronizing t< n" young men as
Bumo toward small girls.
Winnie murmured something inaudi
bly:-Goorgo gavo a violont sniokor,
and covered lt hastily with a cough.
Tom Bradioy, being a kind-heartod
fellow, and unwilling to soe anybody
uncomfortable, talked industriously to
his timid neighbor. In tho hope of re
lieving her ombarassroout, though sho
waa certainly tho most dlflidont child
he bad ever ?con. But ho observed
and ll was an unusual thing, ho said
to himself, In girls at. that interesting
ago-thr.t she was decidedly pretty.
"Well, we're very good frionds al
ready, aren't wof" ho said encourag
ingly, aa they arose from tho table.
There was no responso other than a
sodden swish through tho air of a
brown braid tied with a blur, ribbon,
and a gUmp.T of a ?hort, white skirt
?ylC? through ibo door,
"f hat a peculiar halo girl tho wssl
ko tad seen ber et dun womour?
probably bo WOUIQ -
liioru peculiar,
i She had rushed upstairs and into
her own room, locked the door, thrown
herself on the bed, and commenced
what the girls at school call a "good
cry."
If ho had been old. or ugly, or disa
greeable-if ho had boen anything but
tho soft-voiced distractingly good-look
ing follow ho was-sho could have
horno it with fortitude.
Why had George brought him at
that dreadful lime? Why had she hit
u)i>n this particular day for that idiotic
Performance? Why waa ho not rod
haired or cross-eyed, or-something?
She would not have minded it in tho
loast in that caso.
There was a tap at tho door, and
shu hoard George's voico, not yoi quito
composed, bogging ber to let him in.
Mis mirth disappeared bolero tho
woo-begone little person who opened
tho door to him, and stood mopping
her eyes.
"Ob, well, now!" ho bogan, com
fortingly, "you don't moan to say
you're broken up like this about a lit
tlo thing like that?"
"A litllo thing!" cried Winnie, chok
ingly. "Dh, Goorgo! what-what will
he thinkP"
"Never mind what hu'll think,"
said George, calmly. "It was a good
joke, and that ought to bo enough for
you."
That ?lid not scorn lo cousolo Win
nie. She only sobbod into ber hand
kerchief thu moro wildly.
"Why did you bring him?" shu mur
mured, iu a hoart-brokou way. "Why
didn't you bring somebody that wasn t
so- so nico?"
"Oh, well," he obsorved, trying to
speak in an off-hand way, "don't wor
ry about it! ho's-he's married!"
Tho sobs ooascd. Hut, strango to
say, tho face which lifted itself from
tho handkerchief was not exactly ra
diant. It seemed disappointed.
"Marriod!" Winnio rcpenlod in au
injured tone.
"Good gracious!" said tho bewilder
ed young man. "Don't that suit
youP"
"Don't be rudol" said his sister se
verely.
The s i ; 'hi of so much dignity, in
combination with tho coral nooklaoo
and I he juvenile dross, was too much
for George. Ho clung to tho door In
another paroxx sin of mirth.
'.You'vo got to como down, you
know," he gasped, wiping his eyes.
"Put ou something decent, and como
down and paralyzo him. What du
you carcP"
Winnio wavered. After all, what
did slio careP Ho was married!
Half au hour later. Tom bradley,
leaning against the piano in the draw
ing-room, and listening to George's
rondoring of tho latest popular air,
was roused by tho sound of a footstep
ou tho ti,?carpeted Hool, und startled
by tho appearance of a graceful and
extremely protty young holy in a blue
dress.
Ho was astonished at tho familial
smile she gavo him; ho was astonished
at tho way in which Goorgo whirled
about ou thu piano-stool, and grinned,
without introducing thom; and then,
as ho lookod moro closely at tho prclt)
apparition, ho became aware of tin
startling truth.
Winnie's composure, which had bo
gun to dosort ncr, roturnod in ful
forco, as tho young man dropper
his eyes and studied tho baro Hour it
evident confusion.
She sank on tho sofa calmly, ar
ranged tho folds of hor dross bocom
ingly, and bogged her brother, sweet
ly to continue Ids song.
"I'll let him know I don't care," sin
soul to horsolf triumphantly. "Mar
ried-tho horrid thing!"
"Aro you as fond of music as of
dolls?" tho young man ventured
breaking tho silence at last.
"Almost," said Winnio, with i
laugh.
And tho conversation, with tin
small start drifted on gayly.
It struck her, as thoy talked on
that Mr. bradley, for a married mau
was-woll-not woll-boliavcu.
Ho kept his eyos fixed on her in ai
admiring way; thu tono of his remark
-half bantering, wholly compHmonta
ry-was highly improper undor th
circumstances.
Ho had edged nearer and nearer t
hor, until thoro was no apprcciabl
space botweon them.
Winnie felt that soniothing must b
dono. Sha wont to tho piano hast il)
and played a few meaningless note
With desperate speod.
Mr. bradley followed promptly, an
lee lied over her With au ail' of pl >
found enjoy nient.
"Doos Mrs. bradley playP" sal
Winnio, frigidly.
"Mrs. liradloy?" hor companion ri
posted, smiling inquiringly, and Icu
ing rather lower.
"Your wife I " said Winnio, sovon
"Oh, but I haven't ono!" said tli
young man cheerfully.
Winnio looked up at him quickly
and immediately lookod down again.
"I haven't ono," Mr. bradley ri
nested softly; "but I've been thinkln
for tho last twenty minutes that 1'
Uko one immensely, if-"
Tho recollection that sho had know
Mr. bradley barely an hour and a ha
caused Winnio to turn away from bli
hastily and oomraonce a noisy polka.
but when sho got up to hor rooi
that night, at a rather luto hour, an
sank on tho edge of the bed, starla
with unseeing eyes at the white mu
lin, Wing where sho had left it in
heaj n the floor, the thought did rv
vaguely through her mind that pe
haps she bad helped, or hindored, hi
mother for tho last time.
And Tom Bradley was of tho san
opinion.
W. S. Conant, au inmate of tho Co
cord, N. H., Asylum, was made v!
lently insane, it is behoved, by roinoi
beeauso he dosertod from the army
tho war. His doctor recently wroto
President Cleveland, asking the mai
discharge, and bas just received lu
is thought tho news will save his life.
Tho cram lo Suntu barbara. Cal.,
to grow Kngltsb walnuts, lt. ls nt
ilea fottr-litih i of the fruit trees u
ibig wp, and walnut tn i
tholr slc:.d.
A BOO -KI -TAN.
An Annual <Vr? III ny Am int; thc Crock
IlllUtlll*. IN lUl'V.
A Museogoo, 1. T., correspondent cf
tho New (.hie .ir; 'linn$. Democrat
write-;:
Th" Creek Indians of iii.: Hickory
Ground town or neighborhood held
their annual "IJ.MI -ki01" ?asl week.
This is commonly t: dieil "bask," and
is thooccasion when all of the Indians
of a certain section,Under a I?mal chief,
meet for the purpose of tilkl'ig their
..pOssan", ur blue- drink. Thu ground
is selected by the town chief near some
running stream, ami a brush siled is
constructed iii the form ot a cross, ono
end to the north, one to thu south and
thu others to thu cast and west. Tho
chief occupies tho wost end and his
subordinate officers tho ends to tho
other points of tho compass. After
ovcrything is got in roadiuoss, a com
mit tee is appointed to go out and bring
in four round logs about four foot long,
which aro placou with ceremony in tho
center of tho arbor, tho outor onds
(minting to tho four cardinal points,
mt all touching together in the co?
ter.
Firo is produced by friction, which is
then placed in the center of this cross.
It is estimated with a slow lire these
logs will last four days, tho usual length
of tho busk. After tito black think is
mudo tho women, who are fasliug,
dance around tho tiro, and from 12
o'clock lo tho middle of the afternoon
tako draughts of thc medicine, which
is a powerful emetic, and also wash
their faces, bauds, and fuel with it.
When tho women all get through tho
mun join them anti thuy
DAXOE ALI. MU I IT,
tho women wearing terrapin shells
lilied willi gravel, anti tied together
with buckskin thongs, fastened to Iheir
legs or ankles, willoh rattle anti aid in
keeping time in ibo dance. They sing
their peculiar songs, interspersed with
yells by the men, and it is wonderful
the aniouul of labor that is endured
during these exercises. Tho Women
are tastefully ami brilliantly dressed
ami decorated with their ll nest clothes,
ribbons, and ornaments. The next day
the men go through pretty much the
same ceremonies, and tako their med
icine.
After this, on tho third day, the wo
men bring in thu children, who aro
matlc to drink. They aro washed in
it, scratched on the arms and legs with
a scratcher of many points,so the med
icine can the sooner penetrate. Theso
scratches are usually made of garfish
teeth, or in the absence ol' those they
are made by sticking Humorous pins
through a f out her. After each class
get through willi their linties of drink
ing and dancing they arc permitted to
go to tut; stream ami bathe, when they
can reit rn to thu camp amt partake of
food anti preparo for tho dance at
night. During all these ceremonies tic,
women and children occupy ono camp
and the men the other.
On the fourth day thu ashes aro all
cleaned up,and naen participant sprink
les smut! ot it un kiimself.
TUK riKK IS BBB KW KD,
and then begins the final dance. Tho
men all eome in with sticks,in tho omis
of which are inserted four white feath
ers. With these they koop timo in all
sorts of motion during thu dance. All
this is the ceremony that has to bo
gone through with before any of tho
members are allowed to eat groen corn,
and is, properly speaking, thu "groou
corn dance."
In some towns of old standing those
ceremonies are kept up eight days with
much formality and strictness. In
Tookabatchu town Ibero now oxist
brass plates that huvo boon handed
down from ono generation to another,
probably for hundreds of yours. Thoy
aro now in possession of old Captain
Tookabatchu Hajo, ono of tho Quest*
looking old Indians 1 havo yet mut,and
is said to be one of the best meu
throughout tho Territory. Theso meet
ings aro not altogether for tho purpose
ot laking medicine, but nre productive
of much good. Thechiofs of theso claus
tako occasion to call together all the
young men and explain to thom the
Jaws of tho country, and oxhort thom
to bo obedient to these laws, to main
tain friendship among themsolves and
neighbors, and all return thanks for
tho blessing of tho past your, and ask
tho Groat Spirit to continue thom for
tho year to come.
Tho i,1/viii oin;-. Ticket Mellor.
barnum used to carry round with
him his famous "Lightning Changor,"
an individual whoso mechanism was a
sido-show in itself. The mun sold tho
fifty-cent admission tickets. Ho would
recoivo thc coin, make chango und do
livor tho tickots to half ado/.en persons
at a limo. Tho rapidity of lils hands
was so groat that their movomonts
could not bo analyzed. It seemed to
tho da/.ed observer as if ho did notion;,
but inuko a continual "scooping
movomont of tho money into tho wagon
behind him; but with all his swiftnoss
ho never mado an error in chango.
Tho struggling, fighting crowds would
swarm about him, thrusting in their
halves and fonding oil* tho press about
'hem. Mon would cling so tightly to
ooin that ho would havo to bring his
fist down "bang" upon tho fingers to
wrench it out.
There is a story relatod of him that
a man onco shoved in a pilo of pennies
to him for a ticket.
"Yon don't cora? that," said tho
"Lightning Changor," glanoing at the
{ide. and showoring out tickets to other
lands.
"Tako that away, will youP" shout
ed tho changer, sending tho pilo in a
scattered shower among tho crowd;
"thoro's only forty-nino couta in that
pilo!"-Ingleside.
Among tho flints of chalk formation
ls occasionally found one that omits a
Blear musical sound when struck with
another flint. A Frenchman has jost
inccoodod in making a "piano" from
lhasa musical stones. Tho flints aro
impended by wires above a sounding
board, and are played by two other
Slots. The stones of the piano mu?
?an twenty-six, forming two chromatio
Hjtavos, aud wove collected with muon
patient labor, during a period of thirty
fears. Thorn KOO ni? to bo no /elation
ixitwcun tho sizes ot tho stones and
4?e4r tuue*
Professional Jokers.
Among til" frequenters of a woll
known Parisian restaurant was a cor
tain methodical personage, who dined
thoro every day, and always at tho
samo table, which the proprietor, with
duo regard for so regular a eustomor,
especially reserved for him. On co,
howovor, by somo .mistake of tho
waiter, ho found on arriving his usual
placo already occupied by a stranger;
and, inwardly fretting at thu disap
pointment, entered into conversation
with tho mistress of thu oslablislimunt,
who presided at the counter, and
awaited tho intruder's departure as
patiently as ho could. Tho lattor
seemed in no hurry, for, aftur consult
ing tho bill of faro, ho ordered anoth
er dish and a fresh bottle of wine, see
ing which the habitue, who would
rather have gone without his dinner
than taken any place but his own, re
solved at all hasards to get rid of the
unweleomu guest, and addressing thu
dame du comptoir in a low tone, lu?
quirud if sho knew who the individual
at his table was.
"Not in tho loast," she repliod;
'this is tho lirst time hu has been
hero*"
'And ought to bo thu last," he sig
nificantly remarkod, "if you knew as
I do."
"Why, who is he?"
"Tho executioner of Versailles!"
"Mou Dion!'' exclaimed tho terrified
dame du comptoir; and, calling hor
husband, imparted to him thu informa
tion she had just received.
"Mako out his bill," hu snid.^and
counter-order what he has asked for.
Ito must not slay beru, or wu shall
lose evury custoiuor we have."
Whereupon, armed with tho docu
ment in quoslion, he presently crossed
tho room to whore tho stranger was
silting, and Inq ired if ho were satis
fied with his diuner.
"Pretty well," was thc answer,
'but tho service might bo quicker.
Why don't they bring what I ordered?"
"Monsieur," replied the truUeur, as
suming au air of importance, "I atu
compelled to say that your preseuce
here is undesirable; and that 1 must
request you to leave my house as soon
as possible, and on no account to sot
foot in it again."
"What on earth do you moan?"
asked his astonished guest.
"You must be perfectly aware,"
continued the other, "that your being
seen here is most prejudicial to me,
and-"
"Speak plainly, man!" impatiently
interrupted the stranger. "1 insist t n
being told what you imagine mo to
bo."
"Var bleu I you know as well as I do.
Tho executioner of Versailles!"
"Ah! and pray who is your authori
ty for this?"
"That goutleman," replied tho pro
prietor ot the restaurant, pointing to
the habitue at the counter, who was
beginning to feel uneasy as to the re
sult of lils "joko. "
"Indeed!" said the stranger, raising
his voice so as lo bo distinctly heard
by every ono present; "that gentleman
has informed you that I nm the execu
tioner of Versailles. Well, he ought
to know, for two years ago it was my
painful duty to brand him!"
With these words, uttered ill a tono
of complete luditturonoo, hu left thu
amount of reckoning on thu table,
leaving Ibo other mystifier to dino os
ho might. - Tcm?>lc Liar.
An Anecdote of tho Barefoot Ac
IrOMN.
I heard rather an amusing story tho
other day about Miss Kstollo Clayton,
who has just sailed for a short trip
abroad. A talented clergyman of
New \ork was dining at tho house of
one of thu most devout and oau of the
wealthiest ladius of his congregation.
Ile seemed to tako groat pleasure in
entertaining the handsome young lady
who sat next lo him, and was evident
ly much impressed with her charms of
faco ami her conversational powers,
i Tho amusement question carno up at
tho dinner, and the yoting clergyman
mounted a favorito hobby, and began
to speak with warmth and fooling
about tho immorality of tho stage. Ho
had committed himself beyond re
demption beforo ho noticed that his re
mark was received with somo degree
of coolness by tho company, but tho
face of his neighbor only wore an
amusing smile.
"Do you often go to tho thoatro?"
She inquired.
"No, indeed," was thc energetic re
ply, "it is enough for mo to see tho
posters on tho fences, and tho photo
graphs in the shoo windows. Why,
only two days ago 1 saw tho picture of
an actress who appears on the stago
absolutely barefoot. For my part. I
am not surprised at tho low social
standing of theatrical peoplu, and I do
not woudor that they are never seen
in tho house i of respectable people."
A chill seemed to fall upon tho com
pany, bul tho young lady's faco woro
an amusing smile. "Let us talk of
something elso," said tho hostess, and
by that time tho young elorgyman
nady foll that ho had put his foot in it
Thu party broke up, and as he was
walking homo in company with anoth
er of the guests, he asked, "What was
tho name of that young lady who sat
noxt to mo at tablo? 1 did not catch
it."
"Miss Kstollo Clayton," was tho re
ply.
"ls teile Clayton," roplied the young
divine, "it soems to mo I tuivo hoard
that name beforo. Who is shoP"
"She's the actress who appears on
the stage barefoot; her mother is an
old friend of our hoste-s to-night"
A si lc no followed.-Ihiladelphia
/'ress.
Tho most reoont volean it eruption in
tho United States WAS that which half
filled Feather Lake, Northern Cali
fornia, in or about tho year 1850. This
locality has lately boon visited by the
eminent platonist, C. K. Du lan, who
says that tho lava sheet poured out
WAN ovor 100 foot thiok, and covers a
space about I by 3} miles in extent. In
ttie center of willoh a cinder cone 600
foot high covers the rent. The lava
sheot ls rough und jagged in tho ox
tremo, he says, but shows as ,yo^niy>,
traco of Withe-;',,,;? .'K, u?n-r?i *'*.?
400 to WX) ^ . , e I vniCV
A Negro Flogged to Oeatli.
Somo timo ago George House was
lynched at Vionna, tia., for tho murder
of Mrs. Doles. Tuosday last, House's
cousin arrived and, inquiring thc
whereabouts of somo of tuc lynchers,
said lie would cut some of their wives'
throats beforo thc week was out. This
fas reported to these men, whereupon
party was organized. They seized
thc negro, took him to tlic woods, and
flogged him to death.
Medical Students Amuse TheiiiHclvon.
After a boisterous procession last
Saturday night in celebration of Hal
loween thc students of Trinity Medical
School at Toronto suspended a male
corpse from a hook ou a butcher's
verandah. A policeman found thc
body at three o'clock in thc morning
and it was removed to tho hospital.
Two corpses were also found in thc
hospital yard.
COLUMBIA & GREENVILLE lt. ll.
PASSUNG BR I )KPA HTM KNT.
On and after July 19th, 1886. Passen
ger Trains will run as herewith indi
cated upon this road and its branches:
DAILY, EXCEPT SUNDAYS.
No. o.'l-Up Passenger.
S C Junction A 10 .'50 a tn
Columbia (C G D) 10 66 a m
Ar Alston 11 66 a m
Ar Newberry 12 58 p m
Ar Ninety-Six D 2 11pm
Ar Hodges 3 IG p m
Ar Holton 4 24 p m
Ar Greenville 0 46 p m
No. 62-r-Down Passenger.
Lv Greenville 10 00 a m
Ar Helton ll 21 a m
Ar I lodges 12 84 p in
Ar Ninety-Six 1 23 p m
Ar Newberry 3 08 p tu
Ar Alston t 10 p m
Ar Columbia 6 16 p m
SPART ANDU HG, UNION AND CO
LUMBIA.
No. 53-Up Passenger.
Lv Alston ll 58 a m
Ar Union 1 59 p m
Ar Spart 'g, S U & G depot 8 27 p m
Ar Spart'g, B ?fc D Dep H :l 37 p tn I
No. 52-Down Passenger.
Lv Spart'g li & I) Dep II 12 06 p in la
Lv Spart'g S U & C Dep G 12 ll p m I b
Ar Union 1 18 p m
Ar Alston I 05 p m :
LAU BENS BAILHOAD.
No. 3-Up Passenger.
Lv Newberry 3 16 p ni
Ar Goldvllle 4 16 p in
Ar ('linton 5 10 1? m
Ar Laurens G 00 p m
No. 1-Down Passenger.
Lv Ltiurons , 9 10 a m
Ar Clinton 9 66 a tn
Ar Newberry 12 00 nt
ABBEVILLE BRANCH.
Lv Hodges 3 20 p tn
Ar Abbeville I 20 p in
Lv Abbeville ll 26 a ni
Ar Hodges 12 26 p m
BLUE RIDGE AND ANDERSON
BRANCH.
Lv Helton I 28 p m
Ar Andel son 5 01 p m
Ar Seneca City G 15 p in
Ar Walhalla ' G 46 p m
Lv Walhalla 8 60 p Va
Ar Helton ll 02 p ni
Trains run solid between Columbia
and Hcndcr.soiivillc.
CONNECTIONS.
A Seneca with It. & D. li. lt. for
Atlanta.
A. With Atlanta Coast Lino and
South Carolina Railway, from and to
Charleston.
With Wilmington, Columbia and
Augusta from Wilmington and all
points North.
With Charlotte, Columbia and An
gusta from Charlottco and all points
North.
B. With Asheville and Spartanburg
from and for points in Western North
Carolina.
C. Atlanta and Charlotte Division
H. & D. li. li. for Atlanta and points
South and West.
G. H. TALCOTT,
Superintendent.
M. SLAUGHTER, Gen. Pass. Agt.
I). CARDWELL, A. G. Pass. Agt.
J?
o
MAGNOLIA PASSENGER ROUTE.
Qt. L. and S., A. and K., and P. R. and
A. Kail ways.
BLUE TIME-GOING SOUTH.
Lv Woodruff *7 50 a m
Lv Enorec 8 22 a m
Lv Ora 8 52 a m
Lv Laurens 9 32 a m
Lv High Point 10 10 am
Lv Waterloo 10 34 a m
Lv Coronaca 11 07 a m
Ar Greenwood *U 86 a m
Lv Greenwood 6 50 am 2 00 p m
Ar Augusta 10 25 am 7 00 p m
Lv Augusta ?10 60 am ?10 00 pm
Ar Atlanta 5 40 p tn 7 00 a m
Lv Augusta * ll 20 a tu
Ar Chalesston G 00 p m
Ar Beaufort 6 05 p m
Ar Port Royal 6 20 p m
Ar Savannah 7 00 p m
Ar Jacksonville G 16 a m
GOING NORTH
Lv Jacksonville *8 50 p ni
Lv Savannah G 55 a m
Lv Charleston 7 00 a m
Lv Port Royal 7 36 a m
Lv Beaufort 7 47 a m
Ar Augusta 1 65 p ra
Lv Atlanta *8 20 p m
Ar Augusta 6 10 a m
Lv Augusta *2 30 a m *6 16 p m
Ar ( ? reen wood 7 00 pm ll 40 am
Lv Greonwood 2 00 p m
Ar Coronaca 2 28 p m
Ar Waterloo 8 01 p in
Ar High Point 3 23 p m
Ar Laurons 4 08 p m
Ar Ora 4 48 p m
Ar Enorco 6 18 p m
Ar Woodruff 6 46 p m
.Daily. Connections mado at Green
wood to and from poluta on Colombia
and Green ville Railroad.
Tickets on sale at Laurens to all
mmvtT I 1 f,'r'ditrh rates. Baggage
TWnt. . Oct D. i?io?.
?Iren , 1LTON, G. P. A.
., Augusta, Ga.
j.
AT GOODYEAR'S
CARRIAGE REPOSITORY,
Can always bo found a full lino of Medium and Cheaper Orados of
OJPJEW ANO TOP BUGGIES,
At lower prices than at any other house this side of cincinnati. This work
is all made to order, is lighter running and better flnlshed than tho olass
of work generally sold as standard Vehicles. But I have just received a full
lino of Fino Family
Carriages, Phaetons and Cabriolets !
Just received, another shipment of those Fine Open and Top Bugglos,made
upon special orders by tho best manufacturers North and East. Nothing be
ing used In the construction of theso Vehicles but the best materials, and in
quality, style and finish, aro unequaled by any others now In tho markst?
In stock a full Uno of
SADDLES AND HAltNKSS,
All grades, which I will offer at lower prices than havo over boforo been
known In thc history of tho business. Milburn, Studebaker and Standard
Plantation Wagons, all sizes. Oak and Hemlock Sole Leather, Calf Ski ns,Shoe
Findings, Carriage and Wagon Materials, Harness Leather, Belt Lacing of
suporlor quality, Rubber ana Leather Belting. Also, a full lino of
HAR D WAR E,
Guns, Shells, Powder, Shot, Table and Pocket Cutlery, Plow Points for all
makes, Nails, Axes, Hoes, Picks and Mattocks. Pitchforks, Shovels, Spades,
Steelyards and Scale Beams, Grindstones, Itakos, Padlocks, Carpenters*
Tools, Files, Hinges. Window Sash. D.)ors and Blinds, Farm and Church
Bells, which 1 am offering at lowest cash prices.
A. It. GOODYEAK, A OK NT,
(Successor to R. H. May & Co.,) at tho Old Stand, opposite Georgia Rail
road Bank, 704 Broad street.
BEST GOODS! LOWEST PK1CJ?S!
AUGUST DORR,
TAILOR, HATTER
AND
FURNISHER,
tfler to thc public ut large, thc largest and handsomest stock of Cloths, Cassi
icrs, Moutaignacs, Beavers, Worsteds, Meltons, etc., ever brought South,
hese will bc made up into Suits, Overcoats, Trousers and Vests, at Prices
nprecedenled in this or any other market. Perfection in fit, and handsom*
3t trimmings, as well as Lowest of Prices shall be our motto.
Sole Agent for Dunlap, Knox, Vounuin's and other celebrated Hats.
Also, a thoroughly complete line of Underwear, Neckwear, Suspenders, Col
irs and Culls, Handkerchiefs, Umbrellas, and undoubtedly tho cheapest and
est stock of Shirts in the city. The best S 1.00 Shirt in the market.
The choicest stock of Overcoats in the market-ouro-vn make.
Wedding outfits a specialty, and satisfaction guaranteed.
All of the above arc oflered to the public, and lite prices guaranteed.
AUGUST DO I* Ft,
Tailor, Hatter and Furnisher, 718 Broad Street.
THEO. MARKWALTER,
Sica HI, Ularbie & Granite Works,
* 7
Manufacture all kinds of
Home & Eastern Granite Monuments,
529 Broad St., Near Lower Market,
AUGUSTA, GEORGIA.
THE CHEAPEST CAUPETS IN GEORGIA.
Stock Larger, Prices Lower than liver Before,
Carpets and House Furnishing Goods, thc largest S:ock S ?nth, Moquet. Brus
ds, 3-Plyand Ingrain Carpets, Rugs, Mats and Crumb (Moths, Window Shades,
/"all Papers, Borders, Lace Curtains, Cornices and Poles, Cocoa and Canton Mat
ngs, Upholstery, Chromos. |2F*Wrlto for samples and prices.
JAMES G, BAILIE & SONS, Ag'ts.,
Mar. 17, 18S5.-15 711 Broad S .. Aueusta, Ga.
THE LAURENS BAR.
MIX C. HASKELL, H. B. DIAL,
Columbia, S. C. Laurens, S. C.
11 ASK ELL & DI AL,
A T TOR X E V S A T L A W,
LAURENS C. II., S. C.
J. T. JOHNSON,
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
i a UK-Fleming's (loi ina', Northwest J
side of Public Square.
LAURENS C. IL, 8. C.
J. C OAKblNtiTON,
A TT O RN E Y AT LA W,
LAURENS C. H., S. C.
Office over W. II. Garrett's Store.
V
SAVE
.C. BENET,
Abbeville.
1'. C. M (IOWAN,
1 .ann ns.
BENET ?V MCGOWAN,
ATTORNEYS AT LAW,
LAURENS C. II., S. C.
W. FERGUSON. GEO. P. tfOUNO.
FERGUSON & YOUNG,
ATTORNEYS AT LAW,
LAURENS C. If., 8. C.
YOUR MONEY
By buying your Drugs and Medicines,
Fine Colognes, Paper and Envelope?,
Memorandum Book?, Face Powders,
Tooth Powders, Hair Brushes, Shav
ing Brushes, Whisk Brujios, Blacking
Brushes, Blacking, Toilet and Laun
dry Soap?, Ten, Spice, Pepper, (Huger,
Lamps and Lanterns, Cigars, Tobacco
and Snuff, Diamond Dyes, and other
articles loo numerous to mention, at
tho NEW DRUGSTORE.
Also, Pure Wines and Liquors, for
medical purposes.
Xo trouble to show goods.
Respectfully,
IL F. POSEY ? BRO.,
Laurens C. IL, S. C.
. r. TODD. W. ll. MARTIN.
TODD & MARTIN,
ATTORNEYS AT LA W,
LAURENS C. H., S. C.
. J. HOLM KS. ll. Y. SIMPSON.
HOLMES & SIMPSON,
ATTORNEYS A T L A W,
LAURENS C. II., S. C.
Dr. W. H. BALL,
iiiMisr.
?FFIOE OVER WILKES' BOOK
AND DRUG STORE,
lillee days-Mondays and Tuesdays.
LAURENS C. H., 8. C.
CINCINNATI
rYPE* FOUNDRY
- ANO -
PRINTING MACHINE WORKS,
tOI Vlaa Street, CINCINNATI, 0.
August ?, 1885.
ty
Tho typo aMd on thu poper WM oatt bf the
??\m<hy.~l??p,
Pelot & Cole,
PHOTOGRAPHERS
628 Broad Street,
AUGUSTA, GA.
Pictures made in any kind of weather
by the
Instantaneous Proceso*
Special attention given to copying
and enlarging Photographs.

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