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The Laurens advertiser. (Laurens, S.C.) 1885-1973, July 20, 1921, Image 8

Image and text provided by University of South Carolina; Columbia, SC

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn93067760/1921-07-20/ed-1/seq-8/

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We have a high pov
power plant In Itsell
of six to ten Inen.
COLUMB
823 Gervals
And G
Yes, this is,,
letter file which
and utility of
OFI
It is a real k
only $39.50 deli
Your orders
Loose Leaf Del
ing, and "Ever;
our prompt and
Stati<
Phone 757
Sold only
give
at ti
34
NON-SKI]
$15.0
Reduct
A Ne
Known
CITY VL)
OLD
A
O W E N BROS. MARBLE
& GRANITE CO.
MANUFACTUBEMR8
EMcORS
Dealers in everything for the o 4me
tery.
The largest and best equipped mon
umental mills In the Carolinas.
GREENWOOD, - - S. C.
rer, fast cutting outfit forced feed-a conplete
for sawing logs to any length. Does the 'work
Lever control of blade while engine Is run
ing. f lave good assortment
O of Gasoline l'nglnes. All
eqipped with B1osch Mazg
neto and offored at facto.ry
prices.
Ler control starts and
S stops Saw.
IA SUPPLY COMPANY
Street, COLUMBIA, S. C.
$39.50
ood for 50 Years
L low price for a four-drawer steel
possesses the features of strength
ICE EQUIPMENT
ing cabinet, not a transfer, and for
vered.
for Office Supplies, Blank Books,
rices, Stationery, Books, Engrav
thing for the Office" will receive
careful attention.
6ED FREW
mer and Office Outfitter
Greenwood, S. C.
bdealers
Stire mileage
1e lowest cost'
in history
) RED-TOP CORD
0 $22.00 $27.50
ion on all styles and sizes
w Low Price on a
and Honest Product
~ISK TIRES
FOR SALE BY
LCANIZING STATION
EST--STRONGEST--BEST
T CITY FILIINGl STATIrON
WHERE lOB[RI I
By J. W. Daniel In Souti
John Duncan came to Laurens coun
ty from Pennsylvania. He built thc
first cabin ever occupied by a whit(
man in the territory now embraced
.within the boundary lines of the old
county. It must have been a crude
buildnirS, constructed without nails,
glass or boards. Most probably it
was a crude pen of logs covered with
boards rived fromt the giant oaks, witi
long poles laid the entire length of the
roof on top of the .boards to hold then
In place. Oak pns were used whert
nails 'have, since that dlate, becon
necessary. It is a fact that all nails
used ; late as the Revolution of '7
were made by hand in blacksmitl
shaps. The floor of the cabin was
doubtless made of large logs split in
the center and the split surface hew
ed smooth. These puncheons were
notched down on the under side of Lte
sleepers, making a floor as substantial
as could be constructed with timber.
One end sought in the cabins of these
early settlers was to make them secure
against the attacks of the Indians.
John -Cuinean may have cut port-holei
through the great ldgs through which
he might fire his trusty rifle If neces
sary to defend his hoie.
This pioneer settled on a tributary
of Enorce, in what is now .aeks town
ship. and the creek oil which he iuilt
his cabin afterward took his name.
i)uncan's creek. This settlement was
made certainly not later than 1775.
Having no neighbors it is said a very
friendly black bear paid him a social
visit one day soon after he had biuilt
his cabin. The bear walked in un
heralded, viewed th surroundillgs
for a few minutes and then beat a
hasty retreat. The woods were then
full of these animals and doubtless
bruin's curiosity was aroused by so
strange a sight as a settler's cabin.
and therefore determined to ilvesti
gate it.
This isolated Pennsylvania Irish
malln1 could not long have enjoyed the
distillctio of dwelling alone in tie
forest, for Logan says that iobert
Long was among the first settlers of
the county and that lit likewise lived
on Duncan's creek. 'long was (1)bt
less a carpenter, for the alutilhority
whii I have just quoted, says, "Itob
ert Long, one of the first settlers of
Duncan's 'reek, in th. vicinity of the
Old Church, was on1e, wilter's night
returning home 111rough the s waipn
with several 'arpileter's tools oi his
shoulder, wIlen ie heard behind him
the familiar howl of a park of wvolves
hilnlg ill a hoy for their prey.
.\Dpehending his danger he u ickly
thriew down his tools aid setiig off.
it is lot said how fast. "did not cease
to run111 until he found himisilf saf.
within tile door of his ho use." Though
I.ogall does not say so it is most proh
able that, contrary to well estahished
.(uthernl (ustoil, he closed the (oot
quick ly behind1( lim l. Such (x per
lenlces ,we not10 i uncommon1111 wi the
earlilest settlers. Two distinict sp~ec!i
of t he wvol f were foun td in thle for'est.
of I 'iper C'arolina, tile black and th.
grPay. Thei skinl of the.. former was
most15 highly pr ized biy thle ('le roki'e'
because~t oif its warm11 fitr. The 'A.ira)
wolf wa~s mlore vicious, fi.'reerp amd
hardier. They mlade thir(1 dells untdet
tih' g real rocks p rot rudinog ftomi thlC
hlillsiides an ba ecaine very t rube
some to thle settlers, feasting ' inl ti
w% ilter 0on thleirP hicis andl (attile. Theli
wolves, ho(wever, were rapcidly ext'r
mlin~ated whlenl the settlers began te
miulltiplyV. The governmienlt at Charles
10o1 inl I @G, 1700 alnd 17'% eniacted lawi
looking to the destruction01 of the wol
and (other wild atnimals. 'llounthi'
were paid for their skins. The1 ('her
ok ee 1 Indans alIso dlherishied an1 inlvet
crate hatred for, and a racial coin
temp~lt for the wolf, not (only biecatis
oIf its cowaridice, bu11t'(ecause it wa
one of Ithe greatIest eneie~1is to thiei:
favorite wild an imlal, th111 deer. Th<i
hiate which t he CThe rokeies chertishe
for tile wvolf is enishirinedl in toi. ir an
(ientl wvar-whoop101, Ec(ha -herro, tl,
Itl' wolf."
These capacious ran11imIals gath lere<
in great >acks illn winter~ when~ food be
camen searce? and ran dlown any ani
ImalI, or (venl manif, whose trail the,
sr&ented. If the Jpey was so unfor'tu
nalte as to be caughit it wvas voraciou 5
ly devoulredi with jaws like steel-trap~s
Such expleriences as itoblert Lo0n;
haIn were not u~ncomml~on. L0~anl re
cords another inlstance oIf a mat
(ihnsed bly wolves. Ill tis inlstanlce i
wias James .\osely, a piOneer on th
Pacolet, whlose cabIn stoodi near Grin
dal's Shloals. lie, It is saId, was;
famous hunter andi an experienlCet
woodsma~n, and1( lIved 1(o hecomie an In
tropidl scout in the secrvice of the par.
tisans from~ a hulnt in which he har
taken a stmalldleer that lhe carriedi or
his1 shlolder. The ivolves got a scent
of theo gamle and were soon hmowling
on the trail of the hunter. Hie heard.
them and know that an effort mtust be
made to save both himself and hlis
deer. M'urningr 8 lIttle from lia pathi
ONG MAD[ IRACKS
iern Christian . Advocate
he hastily sunk the carcass in a creek,
and running some distance further,
Just had time to climb with his rifle
into the branches of a post oak tree
as the pack came up In full cry. It
was now too dark for him to use his
rifle with effect, and he silently
watched them as they circled, Inces
santly yelping and -barking allound
hin. They bayed him in this manner
all night. At the apiproach of day,
however, their circle grew larger; and
as soon as he could see through his
sights lie sinigled out the leader of
the troop and shot him. The rest in
stantly ran off to their dens. Mosely
was afterwards asked why lie did not
fire among them soonor. life replied
that hie was perfectly safe in the tree,
but felt a sort of pride in .waiting till
daylight that he might pick off the
leader and the largest of the gang.
Perhaps there was another reason.
Those old pioneers did not waste much
animuinition; powder and ball were
precious articles. When they shot it
was for meat or execution.
Mr. Logan in commenting on this
adventure says, "The veneraibe tree
connected in this story is still a living
witness to the occurrence, and known
to all the stirroundlng- cointry a
Mosely's oak; no sacrilegious hand
"TIlE MONEY YOU DON
DOUBLE MO
Don't build or repair o,
job of it with genuine
Insist on "Tide Water"
Cypress - yout can iden.
tify it by this mark.
the wood that defies deca
saves your money.
"He who u:
Write us for list of FREE PL
and no substitutes" from yoi
SOUTHERN CYPR
YOUR LOCAL DEALER WILL SUI
ere
Bu
W
ox,
W
be:
Ar
thi
ski
CF
a n
ex
Te
isf
Get i
Carolir
Phone 404
rould dare approach it with an axe.
t stands Immediately on the road
Dading to Grindal's Shoals and a short
istance from the house of Garland
leng, Esq."
Logan's history was published about
C. B.'Kenn
UNDER
EMBAI
Motor E<
LAURENS,
'T IIVE TO SPEND ON REP,
NEY'S-WORTH
rer and over again. Make a'
Cd1R ESS
THE WOOD ETERNAL
r, lasts practically forever, avert.
ses Cypress builds
ANS for farm building.-%-buit in the meai
Lr local lumber dealer -no matter thr nhal
ESS MANUFACTURER
53 Graham Bldg., .Jaeksonvlle, Fla
PLY YOU. IF HE HASN'T ENOUGH CYP
Telep
Put It
a say that the Chalmer
less to run today tha
t we don't stop with t
e ask you to telephone
rner.. Put it up to him,
e say the Chalmers
autifully even perforn
id Chalmers owners
a same thing, willing
stically.
almers quality, Chahi
ce,, are the result
perience.
lephone any Chalmer
y yourself as tocst
*he Truth About
ia Auto C4
L
LM:
1850, the tree way be still standIng.
Our fathers, however, were Paulino In
some iparticulars, they fought with the
wild -beasts of Upper South Carolina
and lived in continual peril of the In
dians.
edy & Son
FAKERS
id...
LMERS
juipment
. . .S. C.
fIRS IS ALL PROFIT."
IN LUMBER
'one-time" everlasting
Insist on "Tide Water'
Cyprev2-you can iden
tify it by this mark.
i further repair billa and
but once."
itime insist on " CYPRESS
: purPo3C you buy. Address
S' ASSOCIATION
RESS LET US KNOW AT ONCE.
hon e,
kny
Limers
vner
Up To Him
s costs its own
n evrer before.
hat statement.
any Chalmers
gives a more
iance.
will tell you
ly and enthu
ners perform
of years of
s owner. Sat
and rdal value.
the Chalmers'
)., In1C.
aurens, S. C.
ERS

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