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The Laurens advertiser. (Laurens, S.C.) 1885-1973, August 24, 1921, Image 1

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VOLUMt XXXVII. LAURENS, SOUTH CAROLINA, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 24, 1921. NUMBER 6
MMY LOS[ LIMES
IN HOTL FIRE
At Least Twelve Perish In
Macon, Ga.
ONLY FOUR
BODIES FOUND
As Result of Fire Thoug.t to have
OrIginated in. Drug Store jiasement,
Big Loss of Life and Property in
Macon, oa., Hotel Building.
Macon, Ga., Aug. 2.-Work of ex
ploring .the ruins of 'the Brown House,
which was completely destroyed by
fire at an early hour this morning and
where more than a dozen bodies are
'believed to -be burled, stopped at sun
down tonight.
Building Inspector F. Joe 'Bisliol),
In charge of the hunt for .bodies, an
nouncled that the search will be re
Sumed at de'liint ton-mirow morn
Ing with a force of 100 convicts from
the county and city chain gangs.
"We will know before noon," he
sald, "Just how many bodies are in
the debris. We expect to find at
least 12, possibly more. I can al-I
most put my -fingers on the spot
where I believe there are -two bodies."
Coroner Lee Wages announced this
afternoon that the coroner's Jury had
concluded that an explosion of es
caping gas In the basement of the
Brunner Drtu; company caused the
fire.
The blast cut a hole through the
hotel from the basement to the roof,
tore out the stairways and wrecked
the elevator after driving it upward.
Fire escapes at the rdar of the build
Ing were envelcoed in flames an In
stant later and fire also was burst
ing from every 'window in -the big
-brick structure.
It 13 understood thatiW0g"-A
marishal will arrive het e in th'e nor-t..
Ing to aid In the investigatitn' that
is 'unday away. Facts obtained by 1
cal city and county officials and .the
state fire marshal Will be laid be
fore the Bi1bb county grand Jury at its
next session- ,
Tonight, when Work of exploring
the ruins of the burned hotel stol)
sped for the night, four bodies lay
in a local undetaking establishment,
only three of which had been iden
tified. B1ight persons were in the
Macon hospital suffering from seri
ous burns and broken bones received
from the fire and in Jumping from
second and third floor windows.
Three other persons, whose na-mes
have not been obtained and who are
known to have Jumpled from the
-blazing structure, were attended by
private- physicians and left on the
train for Atlanta during the fore
noon.
The list of known missing mounted
tonight to seven, but there were
many inquiries from all parts of
georgia for perons whom it is foarI
were In the hotel.
Hobrace Weems, clerk at the 'Browvn
House, son of the proc)rietor, Said
that 88 of t,he 97 rooms in the hotel
weore fillied, some with twvo beds in
each r~oom. lie said that there werep(
more than 100 guests, many of them
tour i Sts wvho 'ivere passing through
the ci-ty. Thei tourists are the ones
that atre causing the most concern 1o
cally, for there is no way to0 obtain
a check on them, the hotel register cc
ing deQstrPoyed in the fire.
Th'lous~ands of spersons wiatlcedI lie
fire and( islted the scenle thirough
out the day. 'They refused to givie up
their vigl even after a thiunderstorm
'broke over them and rain began to
descenid in the late afternoon.
There was nothing left but a black
ened br1ick ivall at the front arnd
jaggod columns in the center of the
structure. 'The entire side wall on
the Plub street side had been com
pletely dlemoliIshcd b~y the force of
the explosion and b~y the colla-pse of
the floors..
Only a small section of the orig
Tialbultiing, built long -before the
Confederate iwar, renmained intact,
with floors still clinging to the side
wails, althourgh the ceilings had fall
en. It' was in exploring one of these
lediges, this morning that firemon
came upon tivo bodies, One of which
was identified as John L. Collins. The
other body, .which lay only a few' feet
away with bands clasped -and out
stretched, has not been identified. The
unidentified man is that of a person
weighing 200 pounds and above five
FRANCE UNVILS MONUMENT
TO U .S. DOUGH!BOY8
Marsral Foch, Louis Barthou and Em.
bassador Merrick Participated. Be.
sides the Speakers Many Notables
Present.
Firoy, France, Aug. 21.-Lorraine's
monument to the American Expedi
tionary Forces, the dedication of
which was one of the principal objects
of the present visit of the American
'Legion delegation to France, was un
veiled here today 'by the legion's rep
resentativos in the presence of the
whole coontryside. Marshal Foch,
Louis Barthou, minister of -the liber
ated regions, and Ambassador Herrick
-participated in the ceremonies. The
people of Flirey, who all speak more
or less English as the result of their
long association with the Americans
who held the sector, were deeply af
fected by the memories the unveiling
brought up, laughing and crying by
turns as they exchanged greetings
with their American friends, and in
tently following the press of the exer
omes.
The legionaires carme "in autoino
biles from Metz, stopping on the way
while Major John G. Emery, national
compiander of the American Legion,
who served in the First DIvision in
the war, -placed a wreath on the grave
of Lieutenant Jefferson 'Felgel, the first
oileer of the First Division killed in
France. Major Emery himself re
ceived from -M. Barthou the insignia
of commander of the legion of honor
and from .Marshal Foch the war cross
with l)a'Im, in recognition of his hav
in- been wounded during the fighting
in the Argonne, and being cited in
American army orders, Piesident
iiarding, General Pershing, Ambassa
dor Herrick, Major Emery, Marshal
Foch and M. Barthou were created
honorary citizens of Flirey.
The monument unveiled today,
which is a blunt, obelisk-shaped shaft,
bearing base reliefs of "two dough
boys" with appropriate inscriptions,
ttfltids beside thwe-ftd, faeing .te vil
!ago between the village and the old
fighting front. From the monument
the trenches and entanglements of
the former bttle' lines, are still visi
ble. Flircy itself, where every house
was destroyed in the war, -is now fully
half rebuilt.
Besides the speakers, many notable
Persons were present, including Am
bassador .Jusserand, Major General
Henry T. Allen, commander of the
American forces of occupation; Geo.
W. Wickersham, Mrs. Douglas Robin
son and Mrs. G. M. Minor, president
general of the Daughters of the Amer
ican 'Revolution.
Major /Eimery brought the mayor of
Filrey an au tographed photograph of
President Hlarding, inscribed:
"To the people of Flirey, with cor
dial greetings from the United States
to France."
This will hang in the one-room
wooden shack which at present serves
Flircy as city hall, school, ,iostoillce
and telograph olice.
After the ceremony the represenia
t i,ves of the legion went to Et~ain, the
hiome of former Pridencit P'olicare,
to dleicaite ai monument to t he e'ivil
l.:ms there who were executedl bly the
Gerumans. iThe former pres Id(ent re
eelved( themi in person.
f et ( ljit lnc hes in height.I ii's hair
was blackl.
Fl 'iremen workIled conltinuouisly on
the blaze fromi 15 o'clock this morn
ing until late in the afternoon. Tihey
wvere recailled( to the scone at 'i:3
o'clock when flames broke out again
in the ruins,
it was this heat which caused the,
:iecond fire, lBtilding Inspector Bishaop
statedl, that caused the abandionment
of the hunt for blodies tonight.
iHiarry Swansherg carr'ied a $1,000
dliamondl, his 'gold wvatch and a wallet
withI a ibig sum of money, leaving his
clothing bhehind, when he leaired
from a third stor'y window, sustain
ing injuries whIch later caused his
(leath, lHe clung to the ar'ticles
namedl(( (lolldeliered them to a doctor'
at the hospital with the injunction:
"Call my -wife from Atlanta; I must
see her before I die, but if I (110
befou'e she arrives, give these to her.,"
T1hen Swansber'g, surrounded1 'by a
small' grou'p of veteran engineers and
condluctors at the hospital, criedl con
tinuously for "Boss, hoss". That, it
was learned, nyas the favorite 'term
ho used in addressing hnis wife,
Swansberg died at 10:56 this mornIng.
Is wife arrived hero at 12:20 this
afternoon.
VOTERS DIVIDE
Bond Issue for Filtiation Sy
Sewerage and Streets are
The voters of the city divided yes
tenday on the three bond Issues placed
before 'them by the City Fathers. The
issue of $70,000 for water "ildrove
ment, includin'g a filtration plant and
settling basin, was voted down. The
issues of $20,000 for sewerage exten
sion and $35,000 for streets carried
by small majorities. A comparative
ly small vote was cast.
Superiltendent Philpot, of the wa
ter and light department, stated after
the election yesterday that tile suC
cessful outcome of tli sewerage bond
election Iwould be of no besefit to the
Laurens M-ill village as, without the
extension of the water system con
templated in the water extension bond
election, the water neessary for the
sewerage system would be lacking.
The election went off without any
untoward incidents, very little inter
est being outwardly manifested. The
women turned out In considerable
numbers at some boxes, it being esti
mated that they cast nearly one-eighth
of the votes.
The following are the results of the
three elections:
hIfEIEVE ALL MILLM WILL
800N BE RUNNING
No Troops will be on Guard Duty
in North Carolina When Mills Start.
Concord, N. C., Aug. 21.-Along with
the prospect that every one of the
eleven textile mills in this county
closed down by the general strike
June 1, will be in operation again
'before the week closes, there Is a
growing general belief that the three
companies of national guardsmen on
duty here the past week will be with
drawn within the next two or three
days.
TV -was officially announced today
tbat, in accordance with orders from
Adjutant. General Metts no troops
would be oi guard duty at the various
mills when they start tomorrow morn
-ing, not even at the three mills of the
'Cannon group, which are to resume
operations Monday for the first time
since June 1. liowever, tile -troops
will remain on hand, according to tile
announcement, pendll-ln further devel
opments, ready for any emergency.
Following tile opening of the Frank
linl, the Oaba rrus and tile Gibson mills
tomorrow, tile Norcott and Brown mills
will resume operntions sonic time dur
ing the week, according to announce
ment made today by the management.
rhese -flve mills are the only ones
closd by tile gcntal strike which
iaVe not beeln reopened.
Sheriff C alI Spears, it became
known today, has notified Geleral
Metts that le believes trools will not
be needed at the mills tomorrow
morning, an1d it is earned from of
ficial sourcees that tile military forces,
whil0 still her, will n1ot be 1sedl
agalin uniiless dlisordier,; develoip.
Mlrs. II. 0. Martin
M rs. Mar~y Sandersi M\ar inl, wifte of
lI. 0. Martin, mietnherci of the city po
lice forc'e, (lied at her home onl ilolmelIs
8t :-et Sundady afternloon ablouit six
o'clock. Mrs a. .\lain il asfl sudenly
si iik en while sitting on thle piaziza
and dIied1 before re vi v Iing (consciou:
ness. She was lburild Monlday after
noon at Frjiindshill ihiptist (churchh, the
seirvices blin g (0ondu Ccd by itev. Ii.
C. Martin, of Watts Mills. Mr's, .\ar
tin avas 25 years of age ad a niative
oIf I.inlion (ountaly. While aL residnt Of
iFounta in i nn, she jolnedl the liptist
chlrch l and 111(etaid h101Ier memberaship
there unti thI Ile t iae o f her deathI. She
is survIved by her hulsba1ndl and six
small child(1ren, thrnee boys and thlree
girls, the oldest of which Is ii years
of age.
4)eallh of ia Chailud
Eliziabethi lramulett, tile five year 01(1
daughter of Mr. andl Mrs. Carl IBram
iett, died at tile hlome of her parenlts
alonday after a ahidi liiess. 'rie fuan
erail was ihld at the 'Laun s cemle
tergf yesterday iafternoon. TIhe child(
had b~en sick but a tow days and its
ulnexectedl deaith wvas a shock to the
neighbor~s and friends whlo had learned
to loxe her on accounnt of her swveet
dlisp~ogftion.
Messrs. Mills Uunter andl ILudie
Wasson leave today by Ford roadster
for Hlendersonville, N. C., to enjoy the
mountain breezes and see the sighlts
for the rest of tho week.
ON BOND ISSUES
stem Lost While Issues for
Carried. Votes are Close.
Water Bonds
Yes No
Ward 1 - ............8. 31
Vnrd 2 --.--......... 8 26
Vard : -............73 6
Ward 4 ............. 6 26
Ward 5.. ............29 46
Ward 6 ................
Total --.--..........142 151
Newerage Bonds
Yes No
Ward 1 ---.......... 9 26
Ward 2 .. .. .. .. .. .. ...1-1 20
Ward 3 . ............74.5
Ward 4 ..-.......... 6 25
'Ward 5 ..............32 42
Ward 6 --...-........16 20
Total ..............15.1 .138
Street Bonds
Yes No
Ward 1 ............... 25
Ward 2 -............15 19
'Ward 3.. ............73 5
Ward 4 -............ 6 25
Ward 6 ..............27 45
Ward 6 ..............17 19
Total ..............147 140
BERGDOLL ESCAPE
CHAIRGD TO ANSELL
House Committee Charges ActJag Ad.
vocate General and Army Offilcors
with Conspiracy to Effect Draft
!Dader's Release.
'Washington, Aug. 18.-Samuel Til
den Ansell, former acting judge advo
cate General of the army and of the
prisoner's legal counsel; Colonel J.
E. Hunt and Colonel G. C. Cresson
were charged with conspiracy in con
nection with the escape of Grover
Cleveland Bergdoll, the draft dodger,
In a report - aigned 'by three of the
flve members of a special Investigat
ing comm-ittee, filed -today, 'with the
house.
Characterizing Ansell as "the mas
ter mind" in the plan by which Berg
doll was relcased from a military
prison under guard to dig up a pot of
gold, the majority report recommend
ed tht he be disbarred from practie
ing in the courts of the nation "above
whose safety and Integrity he has
placed gold."
A minority roport filed at the
same time 'held, however, that .there
wa soc testimony to sup)ort the
charge that Ansell, through 'whose ef
forts as counsel the prisoner was re
leased, "conspired to effectuate his
escape," or that his motive was im
prop'er.
One Republican --- Reresentative
I uhring, of Indiana.-and two Dem
wwrats, .Johnson, or Ketuecky, and
Flood of Virgin ia, signed the ma
jorley repiort. The minority views
were reented by Cha irman 'eters,
thur', Oregon, lipubllicanis. 'Thie ma
jority mndhag wvas the first of thie
mni~uy inives Ii'gating r'eports submit
ledi to the hon ue since the close of the
wVar, where a ileiblicaan membe'r
them11 to ille majoritIy views.
land 'Hergdloll, millionalre draft
dodger', now supposed to he in (Ger
noany, is writing a hook about his es
cape from thle Amne riun il itairy aui
TPhis wvas revealed today in the
repor't. of t he house commni tteeC,
which investigated hiis escape. i'0x
cerptsa from a letter from Bergdoill to
his mot her in Il'h iladelphia, which
was initerce(pt ed, are(' icludied in thle
relpott. These conclutded Bergdol l's
chlarges that there were several
grafters Involved in hisi: case who
i-hlould( ble e ):osed(.
''We are writIng a book which
gives awvay the swhole swindle from
heginnlng to end,"' Bergdoll w ~rote
from Fchorach, Glerma ny, "and the
American p~ublie will wvake up when
they read it in the near future. We
madle the Amnerieans look like a hunch
of hioobis before the whole world. They
arec all laughIng at t hem.''
Violin C'oncert at MIernia School
A violin eoncert wVIlI he given at
Morna school hou se Th ursday nIght,
August 25th, at 8:30 o'clock, by Prof.
Raymond Ray assisted by Messrs Reidi
'and Hunt. All of Greenville City.
OLD 80LDIE ItS
HOLD REUNION
Annual Reuniionl of Co. F, McGowan.c's
Brigade, Held at Langston Church,
Saturday.
The annual reunion of Co. F, Four
teenth Regiment, S. C. V., McGowan's
Brigade, Jackson's Corps, was held at
Langston church, nine miles east of
Laurens, on Saturday, August 20.
The company was calle-l together
in the church. Geo. M Hanna,
chairman, presided, and W. B. Clark
ac;ed as secru.vay.
"Revive Us Again," ws sung, after
Which J. L. Sinpson was asked to
lead in prayer. The song "America"
was then sung. The minutes of the
business meeting of the last reunion
were read. The muster roll of the
compny was calleol and only three
were found present: Geo. M. Hanna,
11. -P. Blakely and Johmn M. Hopkins. I
It is thought that about eight of the
veterans of Co. F, still live. t
C. A. Power and F. P. McGowan
made interesting addresses, reciting
the Justness of the South's cause and I
the sacrifices that our fathers and
mothers made In defending the prin
ciples of the new Confederacy.
-Resolutions of respect to the mom
ory of R. W. Taylor, N. C. Snead and
J. Wilson Blakely .were read -by Vet
eran Geo. M. 'lanna.
Survivors of o&tler commands of C. t
S. A., 'present, are as follows:
W. D. Watts, Co. .' 3rd Battalion. I
It. J. Copeland, Co. 4th Battalion.
J. N. Brown, Harnpt... Legion.
P. P. Woodruff, Co. B, 18 S. C.,
Hampton Legion.
R. -P. Adair, Co. A, 13 'Reg., Mc
Gowan's Brigade.
J. P. Caldwell, Co. C, 14th 11eg., I
MoGown's Brigade. t
M .M. Flemin-g, Co. G, 'Briars, Ker- 9
shaw's Brigade. t
B. Murf Hill, Co. D, Kershaw's Bri
gade.
J. L. Simpson, Co. 4, S. C. State Re- C
serves.
J. F. Waldrop, Co. E, Cavalry.
J. 0U. Mock, Co. E, McGowan's Bri
gade.
T. F. Milan, Co. F, 4th Reg., S. C.
State Troops.
J. H-. Abercrombie, Co. D,, 4th Bat., I
State Troops.
Isaac W. Adair, 4th 'Batt. S. C. Re
-erves.
1W. A. Simpson, Co. F, 4th State
Troops.
After "When the Roll is Called Up
Yonder" was sung, the assembly re
paired to the grove for dinner. Sev
eral hours were pleasantly spent. Vet- (
oral J. D. Mock thanked the ladies in
behalf of the old soldiers present for
the kindnesses shown them at this re
union. The next reunion will .he at
the same place August 19, 1922.
The following resolutions were read
by Chairman Geo. M. I anna:
Whereas,- God in His infinite wis
dom and mercy has seen fit to remove
from our midst three of our beloved
members since we last met, namely: t
It. W. Taylor, N. C. Snead and J. Wil
son Blakely, therefore, le it resolved:
Filrst, TI'hat while we shall greatly I
miSss t hese dlear' comrades, we how I
liihumby in submissoion to iilis will,
recognizing that lie doeth all t'r:Ings;
well.
Second, That a COPY of thmes' reso
lutions be sent to the family of each
0f th1ese deceased membersWI as a mues
sage of love, r'espect and sym pa thy.
Th ird, That these resolutions he0 re
('orded in our: minutes and a copty be 1
sent to our I'COunty newvspapers for pub-- t
liention.
Mr1s. 11. Earile Goodin
Mrs. Annie L. Gioodwvin, wife of R.
Earle Goodwin, a son of Sen. 0. I'.
Goocdwin, of thmis county, died -at the
Steedly Sanitarium, Chick Springs,
Wec~lfdnesda afternoon, The bmody w'~as
b)r ought 'here for' burial and interred
in the Laurens cemetery Thursday af
terntoon. Mi's. Goodwin was tavice
married, her' first husband being the
le Mr. S. T. Taylor, of Laurens. 'le
fore her marriage to Mr. Taylor she
wvas Miss Annie L,. Sexton, a sister of1
Messrs,. J.). and Robert Sexton, Be
sidies her husband, the dleceased Is sur
v'ived b~y two sons, Roy I'. Tfaylor, of
Gr(henvile, and J. Randolph Taylor,
of Splartanmburg.
Rev. Ranini Hoe
Rev. Chas. F. ilankin, former Ipastor
of the Presb~yterlan church here, spent
the~ week-endc in the city) and occupied
hisi fornmer' puilpit at 1)oth the morn
lng and evening servIces Sunday. A
large congregation greetedl hIm at both
services and listened to two ins'piring
sermons,
GOV[RNOR TA(ES
NEWSPAPERS TO ThAK
Dutraged at Charges of
Lawlessness
PIAPERS SHOULD
FURNISH CLUES
M'inks that Newvsapers shiould Give
Specific instances of Acts of Vie.
lence. Says He Is Trying to Find
Out, ''ruth About Matter.
Columbia, Aug.19.-Smarting under
he charges iade in different South
iarolina newspapers the last week
hat South Carolina had 'surrendered
o mob violence, Governor Cooper re
urned to Columbia today from Paris
lountain, where he is spending the
ummer and Issued a statement tak
ng the newspapers 'to task for their
itterances.
"These papers virtually charge that
mob of armed citizens has defied the
amw and the oficers," says the Gov
irnor, "has been holding up citizens
in the 'pu-blic highways and search
ng trains, and no steps have been
aken to prevent It, I am assured that
ome one connected with these pa
>ers is in a position to give specific
nstances of such acts of violence. I
Lave endeavored and am now endeav
ring through the only available chan
Leis to find out the truth about these
aatters.
I did not deem it advisable to pub
ish in the daily -pa)ers that an inves
igation would be made and the per
ons who violated the law brought to
rial; but since the newspapers are
etermined to have a newspaper trial,
feel compelled to ask for my (lay In
ourt."
The editorials to which the gdver
or took exception were published in
'ho State (Columbia), the News ann
'ourier (Charleston), and the Record
Columbia.) These editorials dealt
v.ith the so-called "hide and seek"
olicy of oficers who had chargeof
he prisoners who confessed to killing
Villiam Brazell, in Lexington county,
outh Carolina, on Sunday night, Au
ust 7, and the activities of the mob
a Augusta and near Columbia. Two
f the prisoners were brought to
'harleston from Savannah last Sun
ay morning and lodged in the
'haileston jail. Sunday night the train
n1 which Sheriff Roof, of Lexing
on was returning to Columbia, was
nvaded by members of the mob three
idles below Columbia. Five armed
n1emlbers of the mob with masks over
heir faces passed through the coach
a which Sheriff Roof was riding. A
epresontative of the Colunbia State
nd also a representative of the
.harleston Now and Courier were on
his same train. Another train was
one through by a mob this same
vening only a short distance away.
f the newsp9apers are unable to make
;ood theiir charges, the governor pre
umes they will apologize, lie says:
Wants Inaformatnfioni
"As governor of the state I call up
in every citizen, and1 espe'cially the
ewsipaapers,. to furniskh me any ini
Ormlat ion wivchl wvillI enable the iprop
'r cilicers to ascertain who compoed~
he perisonnel of any moh 0r aissemf
ilg:e of persons in connection wvith
he Birazell murder case. If the neCws
mpuiers who have made the charge
hat ., state government has abdicated
and surrendered to the mob ar un t -
Plo to make goodi the chariges, Iwhich
hey miak1, 1 presu me, of eonuse, that
hey will make due apology to the
tate which they have slandeored. If
hey enn fitrnishi the information de
ired0(, thoy shiould have (lone so andl
:iven the legal authoritiles an oippor
unity to act before charging them
lithI indifference and inactivity."'
The statement fur'ther says:
"It is not out of place in this con
mection, to say that the chief diflecul
y which the oflcers interestedl seem
o have had in (ealing with the throat
ft mob violence was the fact that the
towsepapers published to the wvor'ld
very movement of the oflicers, and
hereby enabled those who .would (10
'jolence to the law to have the ad
anitage of advance infoirmation. When
here ecemed to be0 danger' of violence
o iprisoners in logal custody my first
oncern naturally, uwas to prevent any
et of violence.
The sheriff of Lexington county,
vhere this horrible murder wvas comn
(Continued on Pago Eight.)

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