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The Laurens advertiser. (Laurens, S.C.) 1885-1973, September 07, 1921, Image 6

Image and text provided by University of South Carolina; Columbia, SC

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn93067760/1921-09-07/ed-1/seq-6/

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FIGURES ON ILLITERACY
IN SOUTH CAlOLINA
In Total Population Percentage Is 18.1,
Showing Decrease Since 1910 of 25.7
Percent. iore Illiterates InI Coun
try Titan it City.
IWashington, Aug. 2.-According to
the census of 1920, there are 220,667
illiterate persons 10 years of age and
over in .the state of South Carolina,
"illiterate" meaning unable to iw rite.
Of this number 3S,639 are native whites
of native paientage, 103 are of for
eign or mixed parentage, and 391 are
or foreign birth. The number of illit
erate negroes is 181,-122. In the total
popu1lationi 10 years of age and over
the nercen tage of illiteracy is 18.1,
which ,it. is gratifying to note, shows
a diminution since 1910, when it was
25.7. In the case of the tiegroes the
1ereentage declined from 38.7 .to 29.3,
and lin the case of the native white of
native parentage from 10.5 to 6.6.
There is much more Illiteracy in
the ru ral districts of the state than
in the cities, tite 'percentage being
20.0 for the rural population and 10.3
for the urban. Por the native white
populat Ion of native parentage the Itur
ban petrcentage of illiteracy is 2.8,
while the itral is 7.7. In the case of
the negro 01opulation the percentage
is 21.5 in the urbani population, as
against 30.7 in the rural.
Ily counties tle percentage of illit
eracy ranges from 3S.4 in Berkeley
county to 10.7 in Pickens county.
Illiteracy in Columbita
The cnsus bureau reports that in
the popitlation of Columbia, as cnum
erated in January, 1920, there were
3.558 petrsotis 10 years of age and ov
e' who wetre Illiterate in the sense of
being unable to avrite, inciiding 732
native whites, 51 forelgn-born Whites,
and 2,775 negroes. h'lle percentage of
illiteracy in the total poptIation 10
years of age and over is I1.1, which
shoVs a decrease since 1910. when it
was 17.1. For the native whiite tihe
percettage is .1.0, for the foreigtn-born
white 9.5, an dfor the negro 22.R.
That tle younger generation in Co
litmnhia is less illiterate than tie older
Is indieated by the fact that while
12.5 iet' cent of tle males and I 1.8 per
cent of the females " years of age an(d
over ate illitertel , ereentlage of
illiteracy it the p(,,.Iation 11; to 20
years of age is but 7.1 per cent.
illiteracy Inl ('har lestonl
The census bureau rtport thta t in
'Ite pp;ituIlion of .'harlstoin as vin
iitated in January. 1921). there weri
5,073 persons 10 years of age and overt
who ivere illiteta te inl the siense of
being unable to write, including 22t;
native w'hites. 71 foreig'n--horn .hites,
end .7711 neg.rovs. The pveetage- of
illitetran y in the totall poitlatin 10
years of 1age alj ov( : is 9.2. vwhich
1.%hieb) s-how.' a naar11ked decronse Since
was o5. r. 1i4 t native whit till'
percenitage is 0.8. for the for'eig!n-borntt
white 'I.:%. ald for tle negro 18.0.
That the younger generation in
Charlaeston is It'ss illite'rate than tie
older is indicated by the fact Iltat
while x.9 per cent of the males and
1:3.0 per cent of the females 21 vears
of age axnd oveir are illiterate, thte *'et
etntage (If illi teracy in the tolatitlon
10 to 20 years %)f age Is buit 5.7 tt(er
(enit.
Ilitlierac~y In Sitnrtantbutrgx
thte toptulatilon cf Spartantburug. as
nmertn.'a tld in' . anua ry, I1920), thetre
tserel. 1 ,i;s9 lersonts 14) yearxs of age
andI over wh'lo were illiterate in the
senxise of bein g untable to wi l. itcluld
ig :112 natIve wh'ites, 19 foreign-botrn
whites, ad 1,358 negroes. Thte oer
centage of Illiteracy In thte total ptoput
lation 10 years of age andl ovetr Is 9.5,
whlich shtows a mtarked decrease isne
1910, wvhen it was 15.7. For the native
w'hLe the 'ttercentage Is 2.8, for the
foreign-l'orin whtite 10.41, andl for the
niegtro 21.2.
Illiteracy it Greentvlle
The census bureaui rnporxts thtat In
the population of Greenville, as enui
erated In Januar~y, 1920, -tetre were
1,757 persons 10 years of age and( over
who were illIterate In the sense of he
Ing unable 'to 'write, ilding 1417 na
tive whites, 47 for'eign-born whites,
andl 1,461 negroes. The 'percentage of
Illiteracy In the total ttopuliationt 10
years of age and over Is 9.5, wichi
shows a dlecrease since t9i0, when it
was 13.7. For the native whites the
percentage is 2.2, for the foreign-born
whtites 15.3, and foi' the ntegr'oes 21.8.
Illiteracy In Anderson
Tht :ensus5 burieau repotrts that In
'the OQgpattlon df Anderson, as enut
mieratedi In January, 1920, thtere twet'e
761 plersons 10 years of age and over
who -were illtterate In the .sense of be
Ing utnable to write, includIng 233 na
tive wvhites, 5 for'eign-botrn whtites,
and 523 negroes. 'rThe percentage of
illiteracy in the total 'po:mliation 10
years of ago and over, Is 9.2, whtih
shows a decrease sInce 1910, when It
was 14.5. F'or the native white the
piercentage lis 4.0, anid for the negro
21.4.
Illiteracy In Fliorence
The census bureau repor-ts that in
the 'Population of IForence, as enut
meerated in Janutary, 1920, there were
~99 ?personsflf 10 years of age and over
erho were illIterate in the sense of be
ing unable to 'write. including 22 na
tive whites, 3 foreign-born whites, and
973 negroes. The percentage of -illit
eracy in the total 'population 10 years
of age and over.Is 11.6, which s-hows a
slight decrease since 1910, when it was
12.2. lFor the native white the per
Centage is 0.5, f'r the foreign-born
white 2.6, and for the negro 26.0.
School Attendance
According to the census of 1920,
there are 315,069 children 7 to 13 years
of age in the state of South Carolina
and of -this number 274,429, or 87.1
ier cent, were reported as attending
sclool. In 1910 the percentage attend
ing school was 67.6, tlhus indicating a
decided inprovement as regards school
atten(ance hetiwseen 1910 anid 1920. Of
the children 14 and 15 years of age in
1920, 78.0- per cent were attending
school and of those 16 and 17 years of
age 49.2 per cent.
Of the white children 7 to 13 years
of age 78.0 per cent were attending
school in 1910 andl 93.0 per cent in
1920. For negro children of the same
age the 'wercentage iII the same in
terval increased from 60.4 to 82.3.
The percentage of children. attend
ing schools was Colsideralbly larger
in the cities than in the country dis
tricts, the percentage for children in
the urhan population 7 to 13 years of
age being 92.3, while in the rural pop
tilation it was 86.3. "Urban," accord
ing to the census definition, includes
all towns or cities and other 1incor
porated places of 2,500 pool lation or
more.
A"".............................
i;
5NDA~
V0
iv. 4---m m
'Vi
MILL OPERATIVES
TO IETURN TODAt
Enployers Say Hours and Wages to
be Same as When Strike Witr De.
dared.
Charlotte, N. C., Aug. 28.-For the
first time since June .1, when a Picore
of textilie mills in M1eckleniburg and
Ca barrus counties .were closed down
by a general strike, 1l the plants
of the I lighland 'Park group of seven
mills, except one, -will be in operaltior
tomorrow, according to olicial an
nouncemen-t made tonight.
The exception is a very small mill
here which recently was struck by
lightning w-lilch, it .is said, 'put the
electrical machiniiery out of commis
sion telmporrlaily. Of the remaining
six mills, the list 'was completed by
the announcement tha't tei Anchor
mill at liuntersville, near here, would
reopen tomorrow, the strikers t'here
numbering 300, according to an
nouncemlent at the time of the strike,
having voted at a meeting Saturday
to return .to work Monday morning.
Tie Illighland Park, or Johnston,
chain is the largest grou p of mills
affected by the strike, approximately
1,700 operatives having walked out
June 1, it was announced at that time.
C. \V. Johnston, president or the
company, declared tonight that no
agreement had been reached( between
the strikers and the company and
asserted that no conference between
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... .. ..
that much f th t
, ... .. j
Tha uo he StnarailC
had long before glad]
this responsibility. It
mobilebuilders had 1I
the sale had beenf
those who b~oughit en
ure cars. Branch sern
their only p)oint of<
their equipment.
Refiners of gasoline.
have almost daily de
and chauffeurs. Ghi
been so far dievelope<
become almost mnor
- mechanical perfectio
Accurate understandi
STAN
the ofilcers and -the strikers' regre,
sonitatives- had 'been hold. He said
further that those who returned to
work IWould do s6 on the same basl
as to wages and 'working hours as ob.
tained when the strike .occurred.
No statement could be obtaindC
from textile union officials as to the
basis on which the strikers owill re
turn to work, except the brief asser
tion of E'dgar Smith, district managel
of the -local union, **in --which most O0
the lighland Park workers here hok
membership,'that anl "adjustment" had
Ibeen effected.
'hie Mecklenbuirg mill and two ol
the Chadwick-Hoskins group here wll
be the only mills of t'he score affectc<
by the general 4triko which will no
have resumed operations .by tomorrov
night, according to information avail
able tonight.
Plies Cured in 6 to 14 Days
Druggih.ti refund muney 1: PAZO OINTMINT fall
t.o cur, Itching, Blind Bleeding or Protruding liles
itistnnti y relieve~s Itching Ples' atid you con gel
'etfUl rleet aftcr the lat happlicotion. Price Go
6P6
Quickly relie -Ofoitipat[on, Bil
Jousness, Loss of Appetite and Head
aches, due to 'T'orpid Liver.
~flit,
lk ofintrutin mo- i
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............
Y At
ve..
7m he mauacuefrs
bricatingtruoi. o
mxpany (New Jersey).
y assumedl its share of
realizedl that the auto
ttle opportunity, after
made, to advise with
~ines, trucks or p~leas
rice stations furnished
sontact with users of
on the other hand,
alings with motorists
soline enlgines have
I that fuel qu'lihty has
a of' a pr1oblemn than
ri in the motor.
ng of the many deli
DARD 01
(New Jc
-We have a high power, fast cutting outfit forced feed-a complete
power plant in itsel-f for sawing logs to any length. Does the 'work
of aix to ten men. Lover pontrol of blade while engine is run
Ing. Have good assortment
of Gasoline Engines. All
equipped with .Bouch 'Mag
neto and offered at factory
prices.
COLUMBIA SUPPLY CO.
828 West Vervais St.
Lover control starts and stops saw Col1mbia, S. C.
The fIrst ten orders recelived for this engino 'will be furn
Ished for $125 each. Do not forget Bosch Miagneto equljp
110t instead of Battery.
O W E N BROS. MARBLE
& GRANITE CO.
DESIGNERs
MANUFACTURIRS
ERlDCTORS
Dealers in everything for the rome
tery.
The largest and best equipped mon
umental mills In the Carolinas.
GREENWOOD, - - S. C.
~e.
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... .... .....
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.Nii
- .. -.h.9
aer takes
Responsibility
ate considerations involvel in the making
>fa 100% motor fuel--i quantities sui
icut for every demand---has always re
trained this company from making claims
or "STANDARD" MOTOR GASOLINE
vhich could not be justified immediately
)y every purchaser of the product.
)ur Development Department is constantly
tudying possible improvements in the
luality of our products wherever the im
rovement in quality seems consistent with
omplete and dependable uniformity. We
re the largest refiners of petroleum prod.
tets in the world, drawing on practically
very section of the Western Hemisphere
or crude oil.
Our unhesitating advice to every motorist
B to realize the advantages of this research
vork by using "STANDARD" MOTOR
PASOLINE. This course will, in the long
un, insure engine efficiency more surely
han it can be secured in any other way.
L COMPANY
rsey)

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