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The Newberry herald and news. (Newberry, S.C.) 1884-1903, August 28, 1884, Image 2

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THE IIERILI AND NEWS
T. F. GRENEKER,
R. H. GRENEKER, Sr., EIToEs.
GEO. B. CROMER.
r. H. GRENEKEIR, JRR., Local Editor.
NEWBERRY, S. C.
THURSDAY AUG. 28, 1884.
A PAPER EOR THE PEOPLE.
The Herald is i the highest respect aFam
ly NewS r, devoted to the material In
terests of the people of this County and the
State. It.circulates extanaively, and as an
Advertstng medimn offers unrivalled ad
vantages. For Terms. see first page.
Democratic Nominees.
FOR PRESIDENT,
STEPHEN GROVER CLEVELAND,
Of New York.
FOR VIC*PRESIDENT,
TROXAS A. HENDEICSS.
Of Indiana.
FOR GOVERNOR,
HUGH S. THOMPSON.
FOR LIEUTENANT-GOVERNOR,
JOHN C. SHEPPARD.
FOR SECRETARY OF STATE,
J. N. LIPSCOMB.
FOR TREASURER,
J. P. RICHADSON.
TOR ADJUTANT AND INSPECTOE GENERAL,
A. H. HANIGAULT.
FOR COMPTROLLER GENERAL,
W. E. STONEY.
FOR ATTORNEY GE'ERAL,
C. B. NM f.
FOR SUPERINTENDENT OF EDUCATION,
ASBURY COWARD.
FOR CONGRESSMAN THIRD DISTRICT,
D. WYATT AYIEN.
FOR SOLICITOR SEVENTII CIRCUIT,
D. E. DUNCAN.
For the State Senate,
J. A. SLIGH.
For the House of Representatves,
S. POPE.
0. L. SCHUIPERT.
W. D. HAHfDY.
For Sheriff,
For School Commissioner,
G. G. SALE.
For Judge of Probate,
3.3. FELIERS.
For Clerk of Court,
3. Y. KeFALL.
For coroner,
3. N. BASS.
- - For County Commissioners.
E. C. LONGSUORE.
3. A. CE0OMER.
A. 3. LIVINGSTON.
For County Auditor,
W. W. HOUSEAL.
For County Treasurer,
HOW THEY STAND.
* We feel that a statement of ti:e
attitude of our candi1ates for the
General Assembly towards the
State University and the lien law,
as alrea'dy declared b)y themselves,
will not prove uninteresting.
Mr. Sligh, candidate for the Sen
ate, thinks. that the institution
whicb goes by the name of the
"South Carolina University," is not
in fact a university, but is simply a
college in competition with the de
nominational colleges of the St'
He thJinkF, tberefore, that the
clanse of the Constitution whieb
says that "the General Assembly
shall provide for the maintenance
of the State Unniversity'' does
not require 'the representative to
support the university as it now
stands. lie i'ould vote for an ap
propriation to make it a univerai
ty in fact, as well as in name,
if ho could se' his way clear to do
so.
He thinks that the reason which
originally called for the enactment
of the lien law no longer eists,
and he is, therefore, in favor of the
repeal of that law. He opposes 'ho
law principally on acount of the
high rate of interest that is often
exacted under its operations,
Mr. Pope. candidate for the
House, would not be opposed to a
real university, fif the State could
support one, but he will not vote an
appropriation to the present "so,
sled' University. Ills view of
the Constitutional provision is sim
Ilar to that of Mr. Bligh.
Hre is in favor of the repeal of thme
lien law. HIe thinks that the law
L bas, from the time of its enaictinept,
been a cnrse to ont peopis apd a
disgrace to our statute books.
Mr. Schumpert, eandidate for the
House, will feel bonnd to vote an
appropriation to the State Unilver
sity as long as the ConstitiLtion di.
rpets that the "General Assembly
sall provide for its maintenance."
The niversity gow in existene
was the only one in existence whmen
the Constitution was adopted, and
the Constitution must refer to that
r.institution. IIe is williIng, how
ever, to refer it to the people,
nbiIue ~th Coaditatlon shall be
altered. in this particular. He is
in favor of the repeal of the lien
laW.
We have not heard Mr. Hardy,
candidate for the House, declare
his pinions on these subjects, but
we think that he is opposed to
both the university and the lien
law.
It is likely that our repre.enta
&ives will have an opportunity-to
make themselves heard on these
questions, at the next meeting of
the General Assembly.
THE STATE HOUSE AND THE
LEGISLATURE.
We wonder if our next Legisla
ture will have the time and the will
to take into cousideration the com
pletion of the State House. We
think it about time for this matter
to be acted upon, and !before the
buildings fall into greater decay.
We have but little hope of a con
summation so devoutly wished,
still we throw out a hint. Too
much time is wasted in matters of
little importance, and it is time
one of such moment be thou;:ht of.
In saying, last we(k, tiat the
primary canvass in oar cou:ty b:d
not been managed at all, we meant
no reflection upon the Executive
Committee. It has not been re
garded as one of the duties of that
committee to manage the canvass.
We hope that the next canvass
will be managed and that the Ex
ecutive Committee will appoint a
meeting at each voting precinct in
the county, in order that the peo
ple may bear . the candidates
and the candidates may meet
the people -without going to in
numerable barbecues for that pur
pose. We think, too, that there
should be an appointed time for the
opening of the primary canvass.
Even "linked sweetness" may be
too long drawn out.
If we had our way, and it is a for
tunate thing that we have not, there
would be only one box at each pre
cinct, and all the officers would be
voted for on one ticket. The tickets
would, of course, have to be printed
with blanks.
Cleveland's letter of acceptance
contains many elements of strength.
It is marked by brevity, concise
ness, clearness, and manliness. The
sentences go straight to the mark,
and the document does not at
any point betray an inclination to
dodge the leading issues of the
day. Whbat we most heartily ap
prove in the letter is the sugges
tion the constitution should be so
amended as to r'-nder it impossi
ble for the President to be his own
successor. Until that is done, we
shall hope' in vain for practical and
beneficial civil service reform. So
long as the President hopes to suc
ceed himself, he will use the presi
destial patronage for personal and
'political ends, and the one hundred'
thousand place-men who hold office
by his appointment and at his will
must obey his behests.
We -state', .as a matter of infor
in'atIon, that the college in Colum
bia is not the South Carolina Uni
versity, as some persons onppose
In 187$. the University was divided.
into two branches-the South Caro
lina College, in Columbia, for white
boys, and the Clafin College at
Orangeburg, for the negroes.
Cleveland is 'a great man. A Ik
publican 'editor says that he buys
his trousers by~ the acre lia ne,
too, is a great waan. He buys his
railroad stocks by the thousand
at the price of his official integrity.
Editor Crews, of Laurens, has
come to the conclusion tbat the
result of a primary electio~n is as
doubtful as the verdict of a petit
nury. ______
The Greenville Ketce very point.
edly remarks on the attitude as
samed by the--negroes in Chailes
ton, Sumnter and other parts of the
State, in reicM4on to the killing of
Prince Bowet~ and Mose William,
by policemien -while endeavoring
to arrest them, Indignatisou meot
jugs and conventions are held, and
all manner of in8animatoryuspeechts
ol' the most threatening charact.er
tire ma~de Tihio.X.a says t
"<[The only effect of such foolish
and incendiary proceedings will be
to put the colored people in the po
sition of friends of law breakers
a.nd oppi.nents of. the law, and do
paoe them~ of public sympathy and
attention whern they have i-eal
grievances tc.e.aumplain of.''
JRowen was one of the mosti no
toriously bad negmoes that ever
ohti aged a'cotamnity.
All the'Sbtt'swill le presi
dential elector~ on Tuesday, -.
ve'niber 4. 'The electors then cho
sen will meet in their respeotis-e
Sfate capitals on Wednesday, Dee.
3, a:nd ca'st their baiots for Presi;
THE MAN OF THE PEOPLE.
GROVER CLEVELAND'S LETER OF AC
CEPTANCE.
A Cordial Endorsement of the Demceratic
Platform-A Masterly View of the Labor
Quastion-An Honest, Simple andPlain
Government the Need of the Coun
try--One Term a Guarantee of
Parer Administrations.
ALBaxy, N. Y., Augu.t 19.-The
fol'owing letter was received to-day by
Col. Lamont, Secretary to Governor
Cleveland, who is at upper Saranac
Falls, with instruction to make it pub
lie on its receipt :
ALBANY, N. Y.. August 1S, 1,84.
GENTLF%ir:. I have received your
communlication tiated July 18t h, 1834,
informing me of my nomination to the
office of President of the United States
by the Natio al Democratic Conven
tion lately aesembled at Chicago. I
accept the nomination with grateful
appreciat ion of the supreme honor con
ferred and a solemn sense-of the re
spothsibility which in its acceptance I
assume.
1 have carefully considered the plat
form adopted by the Convention and
cordially approve the same. S > plain
a statemnuent. of the Dttnweratic failh
and principles upon wlhi.-h that p:ir:y
appeals to the stiffm-ges of the people
neels no supplement.. or e.l)lanat iIn.
It hould be remembered that ih:
oii.-e :f Preshlent i< e s-e:tialiv cx -
cutive i i its inattr+". The l:tw-e-tvel
by the legisl itive br.t m-h of t he- g? %
er,oi-it the Chief Exeenl i l, h :n'l
faithfnliy to e:forc', atnd -wiwa the
w's lom11 of the 1 o.it.iral party wiielh
selects one f it- eie:h,r .:s its uotn
inee for that office h.Ls outline i:s pol
icy and declared its principles, it seems
to me that nothing in the character of
the office or the necessities of the ease
requires more from the can(lidate ac
cepting such nomination than the sug
gestion of certain well known truths
so absolutely vital to the safety and
welfare of the nation that they cannot
be too often recalled or too seriously
enforced. We proudly call ours a gov
ernment 6f the people. It is not such
when a class is tolerated which arro
gates to itself the management of pub
lie affairs, seeking to control the peo
ple instead of representing them. Par
ties are the necessary outgrowth of
our institutions, but the government
is not - by the people when one party
fastens its control upon the country
and perpetuates its power by eajoling
and betraying the people instead of
serving them. Government is not by
the people when the result which
should represent the intelligent will of
free and thinking men is or can be de
-termined by tire- shameless' corrup
tion of their suffrages. -
When an election to office shall be
the selection by'. the voters of one of
their -number to assume for the time n.
public tr.;st, instead of his dedication to
a profession of policies when the hold
ers of the ballot, quickened by a sense
of duty, shall avenge truth betrayed
and pledges broken, and when the
suffrage shall be altogether free and
uncorrupted, a full realization of the
government by the people will be at
hand. And of the meana to this end,
not one vould in my judgment be
more efective than an amendment to
the Constitution di-qualifying the
President from re-election. Wheu.we
consider the patronage of this great
oflice, the allurements of Its. powers,
the temptation to retaini pulblic place
on1ce gained, andl, more than all, the
availability a party tindls in an incunm
bent whom bor-des, with zeal born of
benefits received and fostered by hope
of favors yet to come', stand ready to
dild with money and trained political
service, we recognize in the-eligibility
of the President for re-electiori a most
serious datnger to that calm, deliberate
andl intelligent political action which
must characterize the government by
the people.
A true A merican sentinetnt recog
nizes the dignity of labor. andl the fact
that hmo.nor lies in honest devotion to it,.
contented labor is an element of na
tional pro;pVrity. The ability to work
constituts 'the capital an~d the wage.
-of labor is the incone~ of a~ va:it onber
of cur po1,u'a-' n; ar.d this interest
-houl: be jealo ily .protected.-. Our
workinmen are not asking ini.reas
opab!e indulgetnce, butt as itntelligenit.
Stud ma:nly ciuizenms they seek the same
con1itie:-at ion~whrch those decmanid who
haive ot her interests at staike. They
shzould receive their fnll shaare of the
care and-a-ttention of those who make'
and execute the laws, to the end that
the wants and needs of employers and
employed shall alike be subservient
and the proaperity of the eQnn-try, thles
common heritage of both, be advanced..
As melated .to. this subject, while we.
should not discourag~e the itmmigrat ion
of those who conic to acknowledge al-'
ieghit:ce to our government and add
to our citizen popnition, yet as a
means of. protection to our working
zmn, a .diffetrenit rule should prevail
concerning those, who if -they comte,
or are brought to our land, donct i:.
tend to bccamc America:ns butt will
injuriously compete -with those just ly
entitled.to our field of labor...
Ia the letter.aeeptinig the nomin,a
tion to thme oficee of Governor of New
York nearly, two years ago I ma de the
following -statement to which I have.
steadily adhered:"The laboringclaisses.
constitute the main part of our popu
latIon. They should be protected in
their efforts peaceably to assert th'*ir
rights whzen endangered by aggregated
capital, and all statutes on this sub
ject should recognize the care of the.
State for hontest toil and be framed
wvith a. view of improvi the condi
tion .of the wvorkingman. 'A proper
regard -for the welfare of the wotking-'
-mani being inseparably c-onneecd wIth
the integrity of our instItutions, none.
of our citizens are more interested
than they in inaugurating a war
against any corrupting hrifluence which
seek to. prevent~ the benefleent pur
posea of our governmtent, and none
should be msore,watehful of the artful
machLnati.ons of those who allure them
to self..inflected iujury-.
In a free country t.he eartalhnent of
the absolute Hlghts -of individuals
should only be suek as is essential to.
the peace and good order of the cons
munity'. The limit bet ween the proper
subjjets of governnment at control and
those which can ho moro ittIngly left
to--the moral ~sinse and self-imposed
restraint of thec citizen, should be care
fully kept in view. Thus9, laws tt;
necessanly ltiterkering wIth the haibits
and customs of any of our is' ople,
which are not offensive to the mom-al
sentiments of the civilized world, anud
which arc conslstent with good citizen
ship~ and public welfare, are utnwise
axuatious.
-j The comm~eree of the nation to a
great extent determine.s its supremacy.
Cheap anmd easy* t ransportations shoul1d,
ther'efor-e, be liberally fostered with
in the limita of g~e coast itution.
Th-e general govern'ment should so im
prove and p)rotect Its natn.ral wvate'r
ways as will enable the:'jrodteers of
the country.to reach a profitable mar
ket. . . -.
l'he people p)ay the wages tf the.
public employees and they are entitled
to the fair and' honest wor'&whic'i the
money thus pai should command1 It
it the duty of those eurito4i With thIe
managenrent of these affairs to see
that such public service is forthcoming.
The selection and retention of subor
dinates in- the government employ
shonuil depend' upon their ascertained
fitness ant the value of their work,
and they should be teither expected
nor allowel to do quiiestionable party
service. The interest of the people
will be better protected.
The opportunity of public labor and
duty, with improved public einplc.y
ment, will be open to all who can
deinoustrate their fitness to ctitnr it ;
ioseemly scramble for plaae uIiler thero
governimnit, with the consequent im
tunity which embitters official life, will
cease, and the public departments will
not be filled with those who conceive
it to be their first duty to aid the party
to which tliey owe their places, instead I
of rendering a patient and honest re
turn to the people. I believe that the
public temper is such that. the voters
of the land-are prepared to support the
party which gives the best promise of
administering the governmentc in the.1
honest, simple and plain maii:e:r which.
is eonsistent with it.s character and
purtoses. They havc learned that
mystery and concialment in the man
agement of their affairs cover tricks
anil betrayal. The statesmanship they
require consists in honesty anct fri
gal ity, a prompt response to the. needs
of the~ people :tS they arise. aud.a vigi
.lant protection of all their variid in
terestg.
If I- simld be called to -time-+hief
magist.racy of the nation by the sut f
fra,;es of my fellow-eitizeits, I will
stuite ti:u: ' of that high ola c.-it t
tite .s,l.-ti <It. ri n :iin : ii . o'<th" irate
imly v.-rV eo. t- to I he eoitry's foodf.
aMd wu ith anl humble rel;anee tpt hi.th
f:tvor and support of that S-i,reine
Being. who I believe will awavs bliss
honest hinan endeavors in the co:i
seientions discharge of public duty.
GROVER CLEVELAND.
To lion. Win. I. Vilas, Chairman, aIad
D. P. Bestar and other members of
Notification Committee of Demo
cratic Nation:al Convention.
UENDRICK'S LETTER OF AC
CEPTANCE.
A MODEL OF BREVITY AND DIGNITY.
INDIANAPOLIS, IND., August 20.
The followingis a copy of e -Governor
Hendrick's lettei of acceptance of the
Detnocratic nomination for the Vice
Presidency :
INDIANAPOLIS, Ind., Auglust 20,
1S84.-Geiitlemen : I hd've" te ho:ior
to acknowledge- the receipt of your
communication notifying me of my
nomination by the ,Deneeratic Con
vention at Chicago as a candidate for
the office of Vice-President of the
United States. May I repeat what I.
said on another occasion, that it is a
nomination which I hird neither ex
peered -nor desired, and 'yet I recog
nize.and appreciate the-high honor
done me by tfe Cotvpntiou. 'The .
eholee of such s olody? pronotinuCl with,
such un usual unanimity, and accom
panied wyitjh so generots an exipression
of esteem and confidence, ougt.t to out
weighi all merely personal desires and
preferences of my own. It is with this
feeling, and .. trust also-from a deep
sense of. public dutys -that I now :tc
cept the nomination, and shall abide
judgnent of my countrymutean. 1 have
examined with care the declarafti -f.
principles adopteid by the Convention;
a copy of which you atbnuittedl to mae.I
and in t-heil- sum antl substance I
heartily entdorse and approve the
saine, I am, genttlemen, youIr obeidient
servaent, -
THOMAS A. -HENDRICKS.
To) the loin. Willianm, F. Vilas,
Chairman, Niccols B. Bell, Secret:try,
anid others, .of the Committee.of the
Narionail Demiocraitic Convention.
THE STATE SUPREMIE COURT.
BONMTEAD--TEUMt.NATION THERO-tO-EMBEz'
ZLEXMENT NY OFFIcEE--RENEwAI. OP-OBLr- --
OsA iON--PA RTNECiSHIP &As:iT.
Chalmuers, Ministrator, vs. Turnipse?d, ext
eentor--o. 1,560.
Thec Circuit. Jujtge deciatl: that although tihe
ordlers unster which -Mrs. Sewart ithtineill
Ihe-homestead were mani ifewtly. erroneous. yeit
having been allowed by the Couirtit having
been paid out in the pro ieka-orthe case fioin
which~ -there wans-no alfpeal, md havLng re
mai.ued unquestioned for more than six vears
suid until thme deathI of Mrs. SRewart, the~cltaim
was barred by tha.S?atute.
The Supr(nie Voiurt concurs in thtis j:idg
nment, snryeg: -although flie Circuit .Judgd
trarseeii ( his jutrisdiction at the allow
a:ce orf t he homnesteasd was illegalI, yet the or
ders having been pasned by the cotirent of.aR
parties interested in Ihe rnattermthen. before
the Court,' creditors and all, and the property
turned over ts3Mr5. Stewart and accepted and
ts ola te tcim tht lwhoIe thing was
a nullity and void. .Ont the contrary, we mnust
regard the proceeding as legal, so'far as It ap
plies to this esse? thatt it gave Mrs. Ste\vart a'
om.extead such ca the Jaw provided for wid
ows and' children, and the parties on all sides
are. est opped from taking any other position.
lland vs. Savannah Rairoad, I . S. C., 3 a.
The homestest! having t rmlitert by .the
death of Mrs. Stewart, there i-eing.no. chiliren
srviving her. the ihiLitlon f:nam enforced
sate- termninates, ard tthe tirne or estate therein
of the party not haiving. rum in .any way
ciagedior af:eted, it would be governed by
the laws pt desenmt. devtie d-istr'ibutinn. dow
er and sale fo.r pas meat of debts, as applicab:e
to any- other pirop)eriv; and acidordnigly the2
$l,(00 (as c'orpus, shiouid belong to thes est,ate
o icobert Stewa t o., the death of' his widow,
dienumbered ol -the hiomeste-nd. HIaving~
Jeen set apart. however, to Mrs. Ste wat t aq.a
homestead. she liaed the right to em-Joy itassucha,
and, .therefore, the ae'nua interest or inerime
was tiers. Nor should her estato .e held re
ponsi1ble for any diminution in' the~ carpus
ocssione'd by the legitimateuse thereor, or any
los -br detruction not the t eulIt of fauit on
her parr. -
The Acts of 1878 and 1580h provide thntwhen
the homesteld ts-et off as the Act directs t o the'
head cofthefamuiy it. shall be forever diseharg-,
edt from all debts of the debtor then extta
or therefter to t6econtrt.cted. But this mire
vision was Dot inooeporsted in the Act of 1872
What efrect it wIll have on homiesteeds set off
under -lhe Act now of force has not been con
sidered
The 'proceeding in -this case. nnder which
1he ;mroperty~ was toktl, wau in-time nature of a
creito's ul,and prcceeda weiein this handis
of the Court awaiting an order Oftdistrihbufinn.
w Idle inm t his conditin the amesant. lpeaeble
to time Harris naortgage waS emibde 'bv the
sheriff -who had cleted the same, butifore
the Court had determinaed finelly as to t be appi.
antimon. Ub,d'r auchasate of facts U .rris.euin
not be held responible on accont or-nestl
gence atnd his meatgage ereitted- wiehl that
amount. See Sims et airYs. Caampb' it Ot a1, 1
MceC., Ch. 51; t*'Yasa i.Ookr 3- Ball.220.
WThero a oredior takes' an 'itligation of an
inferler or equal sanik a fh the'm'!d ddbt,
whther- it shall be regarded a payment or
tnewa?, is a queat Ion r-ffact, depending tipon
the Intention of the parties, thme burden of
proof being upa,u 'has debtor, Where a.higheor
seenityia tak-a, tn the abserce f testimony
to the contrsmy. the law witl imply a pay -
rent. Gardner rs- Hurst. 2 itich. L.. 0 8.
Ohn' ereditor haa no priority over another
to thio assets of their debtocr, except in eases
of intetaey, or w hero he has secur .1 a lien.
Jn lhis case thme debtof&:lreeth did not occup
either of these positonsmais t o t he assets or te
lirm of Stewart & Coete. -Afthough both or
the p1artnera were d,ad as ? dividua.l. and lo
t state, yet itcamu-t be 1-akithat the copart.
nrahip was initetate. It is by arelal set that
debti of anm intestate are paid in a certain or
der: but this act does not apply to fie distri1
butiou -of the assets 'it a diasolvcd or extinct
oJudment erslow modified. Opinion by
- Mess. Y. J. Pope, L. J. Jones, Moorman Jr
Simks,for appelant. Alessrs. George John
stone, hower, Suber' .1 Caldn'ell, for respon
tents . -
The first copy of the U7nited Skuies
Democrat, Brick Pomueroy's new.
piper, is ouL. -The-. entire eight
pages bristle with so-und dernoeratd
iii connselI 6d 'good"poi'ts.' In Mfr.
'unel oy's bandk the p1per .will do1
most eI)eLllnt work.It,.is published'
i New Yorki at 82 per Iane#a I
Ihe Langley Mill Sends Greeting to j
the NevherryCotton Factory.
E<itors Newben-j. Ierakl:
Your town will soun have a fine cotton]
actory in oreratios, and I do hope it will J
wove a success, witit Mr. R. L. McCaughrin e
is:President and Mr. Hiol-rook a" Superia- !
:cndent. Mr. Holbrook und-rstands his
Jusiness ar -i knows how to control the ope
ratives, whi,<i is one half the battle.
I will say tu. all those white reopic who
ire loating around corners and bar-rooms,
that they can find work in this factory, and
ry advice to all ucb is, to .ta':e work in it,
tbett tag41 gr a to switts in:. i a?chltob I
ractory, not fas 'uch as luaflng. drink'- c
ng and gam-bling around town, and saying
that there is nothing to do. I do hope that
lewberrv County will be able to tarntsh her
ractory with one half at least of her own
eli, astt th1l South aroliaa and "Go ,, A
)peradlvb ake'tte bestitands -y :idvce
to poor widows and dependent girl< is to
work in the factory and- make their living; a
they will be as much thon;it of as if thev
wete working at the sewing machine, and I
im sure can dreii much neater and finer; in t
proof of which tre girls here; at Lag-ey,
iress in the fa>rhion cnd our men all diess
ell, and, taken togc!.er, are ai fine a set of
)pcra ives as [ have ever seen.'
One word' more : a cotton factory will be (
omeihing new,jn sour midst, and I know
these are. people it your county, who will -
ook upon f:c*oty hands, especlally the girls,
r; a c'as' a ;re integrity is weak, tut;they
ii find t}rtt it are it. ni:take. It is bnt,ju=t
iant r:tht.to give itiGm all pos-ib:e encour
sgemeL't, so ihat the fittory was~ be run h
tood, honest. an.1 firar-c'as opera'ie. I
Alilh the Newlerry Cotton, 1-:actoy to be at
trand suce ss,- beca dse Ncwbtrry is my na
ive County. .
l.-ngley is a be.autifu: village of nine hun
lied int:abitants. I' i; on the South .Caroif
n+ l ih.in, ei tit nii'ecs from Au:stta, Ga.
the L itag;_- M I i- tuiirng ful tin:c, uuder
w' o t met of NIr. M F. Foster.
the I.:,gley p'n'd] of w" it-r a ic vi uns the
r,ill civer- -ix- bundred 'and '.e ty-'ti>e
,eres tirartun1d . It. iirs betwe-n th+- C. C &A.
anad tbr S. ( Jt.usjroad;. The dai is a halt
mite khng The former road has 'a trestie
across the pond one mile from the dim -
hedatn cost the Langley Cotppanv thirty
housand dollars, and is the best dirt dam in
hc South.
PIolitic. is easy in' Aiken- County; there.
as been a little grunting, bat everything is
ill righ. Aiken County will roll up.i tasge
lemocatic majority on the 4th day of I
uext November, for the State and County
ticket. Respectfully,
WILLIE M. RISER.
Langley, S. C'. Aug. '84.
CULTURE IN THE COTTONSTATES
From the Columbia Register.
The Journal of Education, u weekly pub- t
lished at l!oston, contains in a recent num
her an' interesting article from Rev. J. E.
Bushnell, of Prosperity, S.C., on "Cultare in
the Cotton States.".' Mr. Bushnell has of
late, in .several readable articles, shown a
,ommendale desire to advance the moral
nd inteliectual Interests of our people. He
tays of our schools:
The echaols of the Cotton StatCs incline
to the use of the rod when necessity, which
knows no law, demands; btnt it is a mistake
to suppose that nialt boys arc pitched bead
long out " t our school house window-,or
that book, are thrown recklessly at thick- ]
headed pupils. Good order is the rle. ]
The tendency of education is turning in
favor of p-<ctical training. Manual traifhing
is sure to conie We need scientfic'farmers '
who can raise a hale to the -acre upon an av
rage, ata ninimum cost. We need skilled.
labor..'We aced industrial education of a
igr order. Directive, intelligwnre is the de
ma'nd non ; but the mass of our teachers
mn-;t be taught in these things. Carelessness
i the sin of the South.which needs most at
tenion- The careless feeling which di-coura
ges' exdct scholar>hip is, however, a mere
custom. Thp false notions about work which
binder indu<trial enterpri-es ond di cour:+ge
skilled labor are a mere habit of thou;ht.
The aristocratic pr-ecnsions, which are noh
ing wiailc ther boast everything, are a sim
pie way of life.
A bettes way is before ua, anud a new era
lawfas. E,i'aea:ors like Soperintendent Or r,
Psesidetit Ilaygood,- and Dr. Carry, repre
tent the progressive atnd conitiolling spir,it or
he South. Tue intel'igenrt CI,rist ian pecple
if the Cott.,n States at e in full smpsathay
wish intellectual and mnorasl reform.a The -day
nar' coine whten studenats from- the seveac
iira'c in se North will pursue their winter
dudies isr the-'universinies of .-ite Mou:h.
ex:a msa' become an Emipire Stare n .the
wrk of edneation.
We should build our henase ttpon a rock,
and lay a brson.d founndation.
SCHOOL OPENING.
TlE OLD MALE ACADEMY
hiIS~S Nr,gA COFIELD'S. SCHOOL will
:omm:enit$s nextsession Mondsay, tthe 15 h
f, Septet.icer,. and. parents anud -gardians
ire -equecsed to send their chi:dsetn:prompt-.
y on that .bi in order that a ciassitication
ny lbe nn de, and.pupils have all rte adv::n~
ages of the beginn'ing.
Sept 28 - ---
it) II10FIIM F SG100OL CUL:IS,
-A LL hoslrrof'tinapproved School Claims
r this County wil.piease present the same
o thie tidersigned on or. before Moniday,
3eptember 1st, next.
Notice is also hereby given iba t this office
vii b>e co ed from thatdate until 4rh Octo
er. -J. C. BOYD,
Au:t 28 35 1 . School Cumnmi,sioner.
Due West
FEMALE COLLEGE
NEX r Si2SlON be,:is Mondag.Oct. G h,
ulerof' pupils pasts ear 187. Numnbec of
-ueecrs 12 FacIlities for Frcpch; Muslceatd
?din'ing' usurpassed; Cost of.bossrd an.djseg
sir ttit-ion for year, $165.00. For Cata-e
ague uayt so the Pae,idens
J. P. KEN NEDY.
-Ang 28-32m ' Due Wecst, S.C.
rake ParticularNotice.
I can prepare a remedy that will prevent'
he cotatasrion of cert..in specific discuss s.thue
sames of' which It is not tseces'ary to mnen
on.- A wsord to the -vi<e Is suffieient.
Aug 28 3 1 P. B. RUFF, M D.
A NEWSUFY
-OF
SCH OOL. BOOKS
JUST RECRIrED
~IIE IIIiIAUB O BR D8 0 ORB,
-:0:
STATIONERY-ALL KINDS:
--:0:
MusIc 3 coats.
Ppe:.eri (0;.15, 20 and 25 cents .
B[3.oks w-aleha eost 10, 13, 23 and 50 couts,
ur Oand 15ecouts..
I.want to make room for Fall Stocks
I rep"e.fulille t.a et'll'from mny t. lends,
ed a shiate of custom.
Aug 28 3ir- IWS. T. F. GRENEKER.
AND
PACKED.
I will t e p'epared bf lie 1st of September
Gin ami t'asek Cotton itt the most stsfac
ory lnan. r.
I propsoe so give a
ood Samnple and Clean Seed.
Ternrf adill be as reassonabic as any, and a
Isei of 5.i:ronsage-is most respectfully sol-a
d.. (:a at mny ne:w shops opposite d. 5, I
1NDERSON MILITARY SCHOOL
Anderson, S. C.
3 F.OiNS Sept. 1st. Tuition .81C to
i)'36 per year. German and Fretch
ach 810 per year. Board, inciuding
ne1, $,2 per month. For a catalogue
uddress LIGON & REED. Ander-on, S.
Trespass Notice.
All persons are hereby.notiiiedthlt
Will allow. nottspassiaig of :ty fiind .
ni my plantation. All trespassers will
c dealt with according to law.
Aug 143 D. T. DOMINICK.
OTICE IS hEREBY GIVEN IN
l pursuance of S-etiou 1,417, Re
ised Statutes of South Carolina, that
t the next ensuing session of the
eneral A sembly of South Carolina
i -November, 18i4, application will be
nade for a Charter for the Incorpora
ion of THE MIDLAND RAILROAD
:M1'ANY OF SOUTH CAROLINA, to
e granted by the Legishture of South
arolina.
Dated 'August 13, 188 f. 1m-3m.
EXCURSIONS.
-OL V3 B I A TO SUILLIVAN'S
.i ISLAND, EVERY SATURDAY. 1 ia
[TLAN'IC COAST LiNE, via Sum
er and L:ines. Roi Trip Oaly 83.
'iekets good to return thr followin
londay. 1
T. M. EMERSON,
General Passe ngr Agent.
C. M. SMITII, Agent, Col::tnbia.
GREENVILLE
Female Co llge,
GREENVILLE, S. C.
L'he Fal Term Begins Sept. 10th,t884
Faculty of 14 Instruetcrs. No. of put
ysll in at'endanee last year 187. Rea
o1nable indulgence granted as to iirst
>ament. Send for the new Catalogue.
A. S. TOWNES.
Aug. 7 4 President.
TAX NOTICE.
OFFICE COUNTY TREASURER,
Newberrf, S. C.
Notice is hereby given that this of
lee will be open for the tollection' of
axes from the first day of Sept. next
o the 20th day of October inclnive.
For State purposes . . . 5 mills.
Ordinary County purposes 3
' School .. . 2 '
Special tax.. . . . 11 "
Total for all purposes . . 11 "
In addition to the above, a poll tax
"ili be levied on persons between the
iges of 21 and 50 years, except those
xempt by l:w. Those who failed to
ay the first installment of taxes (one
alf} in May will be charged 5 per
ecut. additional thercou.
I will attend at the following place
)>l the (lysfpeqinfd, for the collection
>i ta)es .
Dead Fall . . September 3
Wiliams' . . . " 4
Longshore's .
.JaIlapa .' 9
Cromer's . . . " 10
Gibson's . . . . " 11
'Matybinton . ." 12
WCaltont ..t " 1r,
Poiaria . 17
Jollc Street . . . 18
Pro.-perity . . '. 19
Oa all other days I will b. found in
ny offiee at .Newberry..
M1. HI. GARY,
Treasurer N'ewberry Cot:nry.
Aug. ::1.
* -FC R
BER,I SOA W1Tll, IINE
Being-centrally locared- and .with a large
st.k.of Good-i we ca.n alIways sati4fy the
'rad6; and give our customecrs
Fresh. Goods.
We hindle nothing but the
FEST QUALITY OF BEER,
Tivoli and Philadeiphie,.
N PATENT STOPPER'BOTTLES.
EXPORT BEER.
&1' llER.R WA1i!S IN SIPilON B0T
IIEN, C.X.\NOT- BE SURPASSED.
sODA WATER AN.D GINGER ALE IN
PATE ST STOPPER 'lOTTLES.
*ICE,'
t good goality as any in the market. Pri
c3 vecry low Give as a trial. Full Stock of
- ALESJ WINES AND LIQUORS
)o hand.
C. C. HABENICHT,
COLUMBIA, S. C.
FOR SALE !
ineanid a Half Miles I rom the
Town of Newberry.
B EINGDESIROUS OF MAKING A
cJhange. I wi1l sell that valuable
>lantation known as the O'N'eali and
it.ewart Lands.
Tract No. 1 contains 10's aces, upon
hich Is a good Frame House and two
renant Houses, Blacksmith Shop, a
Ie Fish Pond stocked with German
ap. About 60 acres of th1is land is
n. a high state of enltivation. Some:
In bottom land in the tract.
Tract No. 2 contains 200 acres, upon
hich Is a Dwelling, together with all
ieessary outbuildings, Ginhouse.-'Sta
les, etc. ; a fine Orebatdl ofmore than
i30 select fruit trees. grapes, etc.; a
ie garden. About 150-aceres of this
aid Is in a high state of cultivation
40'aeres of ine river bottom.
Tract No. xt contains about 175 aes,
apon which are -two Frame Houses,
wo Cabins, Stables, etc.; about 90:
Leres in ai high state of culaivatlon.
Soie fine river bottom land 0on this
ract.
Tr-act No. 4 contains 200 aceres, and
a known a the Stewart Tract, upon
ihich is a Frame Dwyelling. Tentants'
louses. Ginhouse, Stables, e:e.; about
50 aces in a high state of cultiv'ation ;
Lbout 25 a('res of fine bottom land.
.Tra6t .No. 5 lied on the we'st side -of
lush Riv'er and con.tains about 40
eres, 30 of which have just been
leared and well ditc:hed. It is fine
arming lan d.
This is a rar'e char.ee to b'ei. Call
ud( see me, and( I will take pleasure
r.s'o,ig these lands.' Terms easy.
A'ldress
. . THOS. F. IUBON,
- - . . *
To be C Ose ut At and Below.
NewYORH COST*
Immense bargains, never heard of be'
fore in this market :
Gents' FINE LOW-CUT Custom-Made Cal
Shoes reduced from $5.00) to 83.00 a pair~
FAR BELOWOCOST.
Ladies', Misses' an Children's Fine -
Opera lippers, reduced from. g25 to 75'.
pair. ULadies you can't afford to let this
ortumty slip:
ALMo~(sT1 GIVN A.WAIY
----0000- --
They mu1st go if we only get 50c. on the
$1.00.
-We will do all in our power to bei1ent
you these hard t'ies, and if you do not
lke advantage of our bargains then i4 is
~oir own faultS
Wd call tihe attUntion of EVEYB4)Df to.
our .
* - wI~J * -
where yo will.see with your own eyes the
IMMENSE B'A RGAINS wmoffer. Every.
thing in the way. of: Bargains sold stricttl
fr CASH;
CLOUD
The"'Nwert
And Leaidceep of Fashm id Lo
rtwel's New Buildiug
Main Stre e'w~y

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