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The Newberry herald and news. (Newberry, S.C.) 1884-1903, October 02, 1884, Image 1

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A Family Companion, Devoted to Literature, Miscellany, News, Agriculture, Markets, &c.
Vol. XX. NEWBERRY, S. C., THURSDAY, OCTOBER 2,1884.
GOODS
-AT
REDUED PRICES.
Lucy 1liti:tt Th.teco. l5c. per Pltg
Salmnoni. t're-h, 15c. t>er can
Ilo.,fttrd'. Bread 'twlers. 15c. per pkg
Spi-"nditl itio Collie. 15c. per ib.
Dorh:ii Smokiii Tobateo 40e. per lb
Several new brands of Tobaeco. viz
Mavgie M1 ibell
M:aggie Spencer
Fir-t Pick
The Rex, d:rk
Several new br:ind- of Cigars:
The Alaska. The Scnsation, Laureate
and the Gem
An extra fine lot of Pickles and Sau
Chow-Chow. Mixt'i Pickles. Celery
Sauce and Pepp>er Sauce in large bot
ties of a novel p:ittern
Fresh lot Potted 11am. 12 1-2 per can
The -elebrated Aurora Roatsted Rio
colree
Extra tine large Lemons
Extra fine Assorted Jellies. 12 1-2e. per
gla's.
A large lot of enn goods. jn-t reeeiv-l
A fresh Itivoice of ('andy, wel1-assor: e I
New Layer Rai-tns. and
A Geuer:al Stock or G:oo,'. at low fig
nires for Ca-h only.
B. I. LOVELACE.
C;NT R ACTORS
-AN D
BUILDERS.
-AND
Lumber Mill Men
Tlie undersigned respectfully inform
the citizens of Newberry and the
surrounling Counties that. having loca
ted :at Helena, they are prepared to con
tract for. antl build. Churches. Dwell
ing- a:id other Buildings. We guaran
tee s:tisiaetion both in the quality of
our work and in the prices charged for
it. Having an excel!ent saw mill we
are also prepared, it short notice. to
saw :ind diress lumber. -Orders solicited.
SHOCKLEY BROS.
March 14
TRADE MARK REGISTERED.
1109 *, pA"
A New Treatment
Fur Consumption, Astlinia, Bron
cliitis. Dvspepsia, Catarrh, Headache.
Debility. Rheutmatism, Neuralgia. and
all Chronic and Nervous Disorder8.
A CARD.
we. the undersigncd. having received great
anat >ermanent benefit from the use of "COM
POLND OXYGEN." prep:tredt and admini:terett
by DRs. STAliKEY & PALEN. of Philatlelphia.
and being satisfied that it is a new discovery in
medical science. anit all that is claimed for it.
consider it a duty which we owe to the many
thousanls who are suffering from chronic andI
!o-called -incnrable" dt1ea-es to do all that we
can to make its virtues known and to inspire the
public wttb enut:tence.
We have peronal knowlieige of Dra. Starkey
& Palen They are eunentel, intelligent, and
conscientio.i- pbysici-tns. who wolf not, we are
sure, make any statement which they do not
know or believe to be trne, nor publish any tes
timonials or reports of cases which are not gen
tiine
umWIx. D. KEU-EtY,
Member of Congress from Philadelphia.
Editor and P'ublisher "Arthur's Ueme
Maganne," Philadelphia.
V. 1,. Conirad.
Editor "Lutheran Observer," Philadel
phia.
rfH L,ADELPHIA. PA., June 1, i8s.
In order to mieet anatuiral inquiry in regardi to
our protess'oual and personal st.aing, and to
give increased confidence In oar statements and
the genuuinoness of ouir tethnounlna and reports
of cas'es. wre prmnt the :uboive cardt froin gentle
j#en well and Iwidely known and of the highest
gr.aon.IJ chiaracter. Our "Treatise on Compound
Ihygon,". (iautainIig a history ol' the discovery
of amit mo.le of action of this remarkable cura
tve agent, andi a large record of surprising
eures in Cnnsuiption, Catarrh, Nieuralgia. Bron
chiti., A.'thma,t eta.. a I a wIde range of chrun10
diseases, will be sen't bee,
Addiress Drs. SI UI KEY & PALEN,
U00 and 1111 Giraid Street, PhIladel
* phia., Pa.
P IAN S
n,Upright and Square.
ie superIority of the '- STIEFF"
-os Is recognized and acknowledged
e highest musical authorities, and
mand for them Is as steadily In
aslng as theIr merits are becomIng
gnore extensively known.
JIighest Honors
over all) AmerIean and many European
rivals at the
I:ave the Endorsement of over
100 different Colleges. Seminaries and
Schools as to their DurabIlity.
They are Perfect in Tone and Work
mnanship and Elegant in
Appearance.
A larP-e assortment of secondl-ha:id
Pianos atlways on hand,
Genieral Wholesale Agents for
Bardett, Falace, Sterig, New Eag
gland, and Wilcox and White
OR G ANS.
AN OS and ORGANS sold on EASY IN
STALLIENTS.
P'iarnos taken in Exchange, also thor
o 4ghly repaired.
i'Send for Illustrated Piano or Or
gan Catalogue.
Chas. M. Stieff,
>IO, 9, NORTH LIBERTY-STREE~T,
BALTIMORE. MD.
t'Wear .. Aaent, Netberry.
heap ! Cheaper I I Cheapest !!!
WRITING PAPERS.
DOWN
THEY
GO.
Commercial Note 5, 10 and 15 cents per
quirc.
Billt Note, flue, 15 cents per quire.
Gilt-edge Note, 15 cents per quire.
Envelopes 5, 10 and 15 cents per pack.
-AT
TIIE HERALD BOOK STORE.
A NEW SUPPLY
-OF
SCHOOL BOOKS
JUST RECEIVED
-AT
HE HERALD BOOK STORE.
- :0:
STATIONERY-ALL KINDS.
- :0:
Music 5 ceu ts.
Pape:crie 10, 13, 20 and 25 cents.
Books wnicii cost 10, 15, 25 aud;50 cents,
it 5 and 15 cents.
I want to make room for Fall S,ock.
I respec:;ully solicit a call from my f, itnds,
ad a si.are of castom.
Aug 28 ,5 if MRS. T. F. GRENEKER.
110' TO SAVR . .
$16 FOR $10.
$20 FOR $13.
$25 FOR $15.
WATCHES :
ELGIN OR WALTHAM WATCHES
IN SOLID SILVER
DOUBLE CASES,
ST ABOVE PRICES
FOR 60 DAYS ONLY.
EVERY WATCH WARRANTED.
GENTS' SOLID GOLD WATCHES
FROM $25 UPWARD.
FOR PARTICULARS WRITE TO
I C EL I E E'S
JEWELRY PALACE,
CHARLESTON, S. C.
Nov. 15-1y.
NEWBERRY
EIEALtEACADE11Y9
A. P. PIFER, Principal.
r HE NEXT SESSION WILL BEGIN
on 17th of September,1SS4. Course
>f instruction as thorough as at any
?emaie School in the St.tte, while the
)rice of Tuition in the Academic,
lusic and Art Departments is corn
>aratively low. For particulars in
Iuire of the Principal, or of S. P.
7oozer, Sec'y, Newberry, S. C.
Aug. 31-2mn.
0 .
BR NHUi
DmueWest
FEMALE_COLLEGE
NEXT SESIION~ begioa Monday. Oct. 8th.
~umber of pupis past year 1S7. Number of
eachers 12. Failities for French, Music and
'antitng unsurpassed. Cost of board and reg
lar tuition for year, $165.00. For Cata
ogue apply to the President.ENEY
Aug 2835 2m Due West, S. C.
Hides Wanted.
Green and Dry Hides wanted. High.
~st market price paid.
JAS. SINGLETON,
Sept 4tf .Stall No. 6.
Liver, Kidney or stomach Trouble.
Symptoms: Impure blood, coetive bowels,
rregutar appetite, sour belchin, pains in
sde, back arnd heart, yellow urine, burning
,rath. n desrel f redk,chills, fevrs
izyheaI wih dul i n back par,ls
f memory. fogg sight. For the.se troubles
SWAYN 'S PILa" are a sure cure. Box,
30 Pills), by mail, 25 eta.. 5 tor St.00. Ad
ress, DR. IiWAYNE & SON, Philada., Pa
Sold by Druggists. Jas. S4-ly.
TiE IIEIWJD AND EW,
15 PUBIIH ED
EVERY THURSDAY MORNING
At Newberry, S. C.
BT
THO8. F. GRENEKER,
EDITOR AND PROPRBIETOB.
TERS-S2,00 PR AINUM,
Invariably In Atlyance.
Done at this Omeie.
A t Law FtIS for Mukb.
Democratic Nominees
FOR PRESIDENT,
STEPHEN GROVER CLEVELAND,
Of New York.
FOR VICE- PRiESIDENT,
THOMAS A. HENDRICKS
Of Indiana.
FOR GOVERNOR,
HUGH S. THOMPSON.
FJR LIEUTENANT-GOVERNOR.
JOHN C. SHEPPARD.
FOR SECRETARY OF STATE,
J. N. LIPSCOMB.
FOR TREASURER,
J. P. RICHARDSON.
FOR ADJUTANT AND INSPECTOR GENERAI.
A. M. MANIGAULT.
FOR COMPTROLLER GENERAL,
W. E. STONEY.
FOR ATTORNEY GENERAL,
C. R. MILES.
FOR SUPERINTENDENT OF EDUCATION,
ASBURY COWARD.
FOR CONGRESSMAN THIRD DISTRICT,
D. WYATT AIKEN.
FOR SOLICITOR SEVENTH CIRCUIT,
D. E. DUNCAN.
For the State Senate,
J. A. SLIGH.
For the House of Representatves,
8. POPE.
0. L. S"HUM PERT.
W. D. HARDY.
For Sheriff,
W. W. RISER.
For School Commissioner,
G. G. SALE.
For Judge of Probate.
J. B. FELLERS.
For Clerk of Court,
J. Y. McFALL.
For Coroner,
J. N. BASS.
For County Commissioners.
E. C. LONGSHORE.
J. A. CROMER.
A. J. LIVINGSTON.!
For County Anditor,
W. W. HOUSEAL.
For County Treasurer,
A. H. WHEELER.
APPOINTMENTS.
The following is a list of the ap
pointments that have been made b;
the State Democratic Committei
and the dates on which the severa
mass meetings will be held. Eaci
mass meeting in the State wil
be addressed by Senator Hamptoi
or Senator Butler, several of thi
candidates on the State ticket, th,
candidate for Congress in the sev
eral districts, the candidates fo
Presidential electors, the candi
dates for Solicitor and other emi
ment members of the party :
Newberry C. H., Friday, Oct. 2
Winnsboro, Saturday, Oct. 4.
Laurens C. H., Saturday, Oct.25
Abbeville C. H., Tuesday, Oct. i
Camden, Tuesday, Oct. 7.
Lexington C. H ,Thursday,Oct .9
Edgefield C. H.,Thursday, Oct. 5
Aiken, Friday, Oct. 10.
Barnwell C. H., Saturday, Oct. 11
Orangeburg C. 11., Saturday
Oct. 11.
Chesterfield C. H., Tuesday
Oct. 14.
Walterboro, Tuesday, Oct. 14.
Hampton C. H.,'1 hursday,Oct. 16
Bennettsville, Thursday, Oct. 16
Darlington C. H., Friday Oct. 12
Marion C. H., Saturday, Oct. 18
Beaufort C. H., Saturday, Oct.1l6
Cor way, Tuesday, Oct. 21.
Georgetown C. H., Thursday
Oct. 23.
Kingstree, Friday, Oct. 24.
Sumter C. H , Saturday, Oct. 25
Manning, Tuesday, Oct. 28.
Charleston, Wednesday, Oct. 29
Mount Pleasant, Berkeley Coux
ty, Thursday, Oct. 30.
Columbia, Friday, Oct. 81.
LOVE FROM THE SECOND
STORY.
The particulars of an interestini
love escapade near Glouceste
Court House, Va., is given in
recent Baltimore dispatch as fol
lows: The participants were Clat
ence Jenkins, aged 30 years, ani
Miss Jessie Blake, aged 17, daugl
ter of a prosperous and highly re
spected farmer, residing nes
Gloucester. The couple have know
each other many years, and thel
friendship gradually ripened int
love. Owing to his daughter'
lover being a poor man, the fathe
of Miss Blake objected to the int
macy, and a few weeks ago tol
Jenkins not to come to the housi
The lovers met clandestinely. Fina
ly arrangements were made for a
elopement. On Wednesday nigh
soon after midnight, Jenkins ei
tered the yard of the Blake dwel
ing, placed a ladder against th
house and ascended to the portic
in front of Miss Blake's windov
The young lady, attended by he
elder sister, was in waiting. Whil
the bride-elect was in the act<
descending upon the ladder, it fe
out of position, and she narrow]
escaped injury. Jenkins was cot
pelled to reach the ground by
rope made of the bed clothing. Ti
lovers went to the river landing
where a rowboat was in waiting
They then went to Yorktowi
where they took the train for Nei
port News, thence to North Carol
na, where the marriage was sole!
nized. The newly married coup:
returned and were forgiven I
Blake.
A ebeulaas=h gbeItai pIasap
"oetray.
A DREAM OF HOME.
Take twe to the dear old farm, when th
clover' is in bloom;
Let me wet my feet in the dew-bathed grass
and breath its sweet prefume;
Give me a seat 'neath the o1d roof-tree, t
draught trom the homestead well,
A rf-inp in the meadow or up on the hill
where tie echoes used ti <dwell;
And in one hour of calm delight, I'll liv(
again the years
Whien the t.ittcrest grief was swept away in t
flood of transienit t-ars.
I se e again the vine-clad porch, the rose
bush by the gate.
Where the brightest gleams of sunset seemee
to love to linger late:
The gmay barn in iit' distance, the sprinl
housae near at hand,
Th.: crystal spring, rutid the limpid strean
with rustic bridges spanned:
The orchard and the garden, the fields o
waving grain,
The cattle in the meadow, the pet lamb i
the lnne;
And [ hear the reaper's voices, and scythi
blades, ringing sweep.
The whistle of the meadow-latk, the bleat
ing of the sheep;
The tuneless troning of the bees that rol
the jassdine.
The buzzing of the summer fly, and all the
farm-yard's din;
Discordant sounds to others' ears, but not
they come io me
More welcotne than the dulcet notes o
sweetest harmony.
It was a dream. No more for me those sighti
aad sounds so dear;
My hotue has b-en a sranger's for this man3
and ina((y a year
The house is gone, and on the spot wher
memory sees it stand
Looms up a towered mansion for a cl.ild o
tortune plannsed.
And art has changed the orchard,. th
meadow an<d the fe-ld
To"grounds" that but the rarest fruits ani
choicest flowers may yield.
I would not know the spot again. but har(
by is the grove
Where rest thc mouide" ng fo:ms of thoa
w oseltneiory I hove;
Anid i:i be r-,rv'e, ard by the- side, beneat
the locust's abiade
Some cay, em many years, perhaps, my bod'
wi' be laid.
-G.:h B iitle, in De nores's Montb'y.
fistUIants.
BItOADBRIYI'1 NEW VORB
LETTEIR.
A traveller passing along Madi
son Square looking in at the differ
ent hotels could not fail to noticf
the extraordinary change that hat
taken place there in the last tw<
years. Two years ago the Fifti
Avenue hotel, which was alwayt
respectable, was comparatively
plain house-that is to say, tha
i while the traveller could find ther
every substantial comfort that i
reasonable man could look for ther<
was but little of what fashionabl<
r noodles call style, but plenty o
what sensible people call comfort
But as I said a change has comt
over us, and now "Solomon in al
his glory was not arrayed like unt<
one of these."
When Ed. Stokes was releasei
from States prison he started foi
Leadville, and there in the fusl
time discovered the goose that lait
the silver eggs, and secured the eggi
and the goose too. Though hi
might not be fortunate in his lov<
affairs, he inherited the Stoke's finan
ciering ability, and they were i
race of money getters, and wha
they got they kept. The famil'
was one of the must respectable ii
the city, and ranked with the ol1
Iblue blood. Th y have been mer
chant princes an ibankers for ser
eral generations and occasionallj
they have f irnished an eminen
lawyer and p;reac'.er, but most o
the Stokes were marchants or finan
ciers, and they were almost univer
sally successful. The first gres
shadow that fell across the familj
pathway was one afternoon severa
years ago when New York wal
startled with the intelligence thai
Jim Fisk had been shot. It is nol
often that the death of any man ir
a great city like ours, makes mued
impression on the passing hou
The tide is too mighty and the cur
rent too swift for one man's life t<
be of much account in its dalil
record, where hundreds die. Bu
Jim Fisk was not an ordinary man
From a peddler's wagon in nly
years he had worked,his way up t
the head of one of the greatest rail
roard corporations in the world, and
he then deliberately sat down t<
plunder it. What mystic inniuence
was it that drew him to an insi~
r ificant little man, between him an<
whom it would seem thieve neve
could be anything in common?
rThis little man was Jay Gould
.a name destined to be beard il
S fnancial circles throughout tly
*world; a name before which Bull
.and Bears should tremble in tI
zenith of their power; a name 1<
conjure with as with a magicia"
spell, and which in its day shoul<
-represent a vaster railroad interes
than any other man in thia grea
globe, among the living or the dead?
rNothing could be conceived mor
ropposite than these two men. Fisi
was an obese giant, turning the seal
at 278 and sometimes reaching nes
i300. Gould was an attenuated ant
tomy, scarcely reaching ninety-fi
pounds and who considered himsel
corpulent at 100. Fisk was a di
bauchee, a spendthrift and a raka
Mr. Gould was a pattern of cot
.jugal continence; he loved his horn
,and when not engaged in makin
.money was generally to be foun
.there. Fisk was a loud monthe
braggart and a boaster, tellin
eeverybody what he was groing to d
Gould seldom if ever spoke of hl
affairs and never trusted any on
with the secrets of hit busines:
*FMaI askehtAA Ia sal aeahI m~
the belief of those who know the
leaders best that Tammany will
knife Cleveland at the jolls.
Patrick Egan's lrtter to the Ne
braska editor has .au-ed an im
mense sensation The Indepen
dents, though tew, are working like
l-avers and asking themselves
--What will the Harvest be." An
swer-Nix. Their gran has fallen
on the rock and the winds blew it
away. They are a lot of weak
sisters.
Stocks and oil are still on the
ragged edge.
Yours truly.
BROADBRIM.
THE HURSTS ON THE ROAD.
Miss Lula Hurst is at this mom
ent in San Francisco, unless some
accident has happened to the train
by which she has been traveling
Westward for the past week. Miss
Hurst is due to open in the princi
pal city of the pacific slope this
evening. So is Mr. Paul Atkinson.
Mr. Atkinson will open his mouth.
It is incinLated that Miss Hurst
has recently developed some new
and rather startling characteristics,
which are more or less shared by
the interesting family party of
which she is so ornamental and use
ful a member. Before the Hurst
family began to gyrate through the
country in pursuit of the dollars of
the inconsiderate they had been en
tirely content to feast. upon a plen
titude of that Southern delicacy of
all seasons, which goes by the tech
nical though not involved name of
hog and hominy. It is still further
given out that they were perfectly
satisfied to partake of it from a
plain board table, or a log, or even
a shovel. But up to a month ago,
since they began to make money
with the entertainment at their com
mand, the ordinary, everyday table
of the ordinary hotel has not been
good enough for them. on the
other hand, their meals have been
consumed entirely in their own
rooms. Since their recent vacation,
however, they have assumed a hor
ror-stricken view of useless expen
ditures, and some of the perform
unces of the people on the way to
San Francisco have been highly
edifying. In the first glace, they
were unwilling to go, ostensibly be
cause under their contract they
were expected to pay their own
fares, but in reality because they
had understood that the manager
had received a large certainty for
their appearance on the Pacific
coast by which he was likely to
make as muck money as they did.
That obstacle having been ever
come, they set about getting their
tickets, the formula being some
what curious. First, Mr. Atkinson
went to the agent of one railway,
brought his double-edged smile to
bear upon him, and secured a rate
Then he reported to Miss Lulu, who
repoted to Papa Hurst, who report
edi to Mamma Hurst. Mamma
Hurst told Ptapa Hurst it was too
much, Papa Burst told Miss Lulu
it was, altogether too much, and
Miss Lulu told Mr. Atkinson it.was
outrageous. Then Mr. Atkinson
arose and girded up his smile, and
went for the agent of the opposition
line, who gave him a slightly lower
rate. The same process of report
ing was again gone through with,
the same system of replies was fol
lowed, and the same smile was once
more wrapped about Mr. Atkinson,
who again went to the original
agent. This business was carried
on for the best part of a day, and
it ultimately saved the Hurst fam
ily some $20, though it produced
wear and tear on Mr. Atkinson's
smiles to an extent largely in excess
of that amount. Finally, Mamma
Hurst gave the ticket money to
Papa Hurst, who gave it to Miss
Llu, who gave it to Mr. Atkin
son, who gave it to the agent. For
several days the Hursts traveled la
the day coaches in order to avoid
paying sleeping car fares, but they
fnally capitulated after an unsuc
cesful attempt to exchange their
tickets for others giving second
class accommodations, with the
proviso that they might ride in
the Pqllman cars at night, Absurd
as this story seerus, it is, neverthe
less, an exact record of actual
eemts; and it goes to indicate that,
it there is no error about the cher
ished declaration that economy is
wealth, the Hurst "boodle' must be
in an exceedingly opu!ent condi
tion.-New York T imes.
EQUAL TO A REGIIENVT,
"Pa," said a little Kentucky boy,
"what is the title of a .man who
commands a regiment?"
"Colonel, my son.'
"Do you command a regiment?'
"Yes, somewhat, I don't com
mand a regiment of soldiers," the
colonel explained. "We. are ha,
ing times of peace. nowt I only
command your mamma."
"Is my mamma a regiment?'
"Yes, indeed," he replied, with a
sigh, "your mamma is a regiment
a whole regimeont."-Call.
Th e girl whose face invariably
wars a sweet smile must he cone
good suppers. and was never so
happy as when surrounded by a
dozen harlots and a few friends as
loose as himself; he indulged in
those costly and lavish feasts at
which New York stood aghast four.
teen, or fifteen years ago. The fact
was. that we were rushing headlong
to shame and degradation, when
suddenly the pistol of Ed. Stokes
awakened us from our dream. What
depth of infamy we would have
reached if it had not been for that.
- God only knows, for in the wake of
t this notorious man were following
thousands and thousands of young
men who were led to believe that
money was the "Open Sesame" to
r every good thing. The Ninth Regi
ement of War Veterans had dis
graced itself by making this pol
troon its Colonel-a man who had
never seen a battle and knew no
more about the duties of a soldier
than a horse. On the fourth of
July before his death, Tammany
Hall had received him with open
arms, and standing beside the great
Sagamore Tweeed, Jim Fisk made
his first and last public speech, but
the pistol of Ed. Stokes dissolved
the firm of Fisk & Gould, and hence
forth Gould, as the M an of Destiny,
was doomed to tread the wine press
alone.
For two mortal years of agony
!7d. St.kes stood under the shadow
of -the scaffold. Twice the sentence
of the Courts was affirmed, and
twice the gallows was erected on
which he was to swing. Once only
a few short hours seemed to inter
vene between him and a shameful
death. No wonder that his hair
turned white as snow when he
thought of the priceless treasure he
had thrown away forever for a har
lot's smile. But his lucky star was
in the ascendant. The Court of
Appeals gave him a new trial. The
grade of his crime was changed
from murder in the first degree to
the third. He served his term out,
made another fortune in Leadville
and returned to New York. Many
people circumstanced as Ed. Stokes
was would have avoided observa
tion, but he did not ; he sought it
in the most public place in the city,
and took the Hoffman House, just
above the Fifth Avenue Hotel. His
first attempt at notority was his
bar-room, which was admitted to be
one of the most magnificent in the
city. Costly statuary, magnificent
bronzes, rare articles of vertu and
ornaments, met you at every turn,
and finally New York was amazed
at the purchase of a Bongerou-the
price was said to be $40,000. No
such picture had ever been seen in
r America before, and there are few
such in the world. It is not such a
picture as one would like to see in
any public gallery (and I believe it
was denied a place in the Grand
Salon at Paris), but it is a marvel
of art and has drawn thouaands
of visitors to Ed Stokes' bar. All
the appointments are costly and
rich, and it is the central place in
1town where you can meet all the
fast young men-fellows who drive
their fast cracks on Harlem Lane,
antiquated rovers who take their
Ssherry and eggs. and sporting m3n
from all parts of the country who
drop in to chat and get the latest
tips from Jay I See or Maud 8.
When the Fifth Avenue Hotel be
gan its alterations, Ed. Stokes wait
ed till they had finished and then
went them one better. I dropped
into the Hoffman the other day and
was struck with wonder at the
Schange. It is the headquarters of
the Democratic National Commit.
tee, but there is nothing Demo.
cratic about it. Gold, gold, gold,
is around you everywhere, rich
Sarmoire, carvings, frescos, and
Se verything else on a scale of lavish
extravagance, wonderful to behold.
As far as display is concerned the
SFifth Avenue Hotel and every other
Sin town is distanced and eclipsed.
Who will be the next aspirant for
fame? I know not, but in the midst
Sof all this bewildering beauty Ed.
SStokes stalks about, a spectre gloom
seems to hang on him like a pall.
SPerhaps it is the shadow of the gal.
lows, the memory of which will not
pass away. If so, I do not envy
- him all his splendid surrouzndings.
g The-intense beat which made us
a think that the earth's crust was
e growing thinner and that a possible
y volcano was under New York, has
a passed away. It was dreadful. It
j was calculated to exercise a whole
t some influence on sinners, for they
t said if it is as hot as this here what
must it be in Gehanna (latest trans
e lation), but it did not. I heard
Smore profanity in those five days
e than I usually hear in an average
r three months; but a change has
come, delightful and refreshing, and
e now we are fairly launched into the
* pleasant fall Business is improv
. ing, notwithstanding the roar of thE
. coming election,
Both parties are now fairly in the
, field and each day sees increas&
activity at the different headquar
d ters. Tammany has spoken, hui
d there are many here who think it Ii
g not much of a speech after all. Thi
>. great body of the people here arn
5 in as much of a fog as they wer4
e before the pronunciamento. Fev~
s. el ee aemc stoch ii
EVIIs OF 'Ti'E t'iEDIT ,IS
TEN.
Among newspaper publishers in
this country outside of our leading
cities, there prevails an almost un
iversal credit system--a system
that is as old as the newspaper press
itself, and a system that is fraught
I with disadvantages and difiiculties
in every direction. We believe we
hazard nothing in assuming that no
class of business men in the com
munity suffers to so great an extent
from the evils of extended credits
as the newspaper publishers. In
stead of decreasing with the rapid
growth and general prosperity of
the whole country, the system ap
pears to be getting a stronger foot
hold from year to year, and it would
seem high time that publishers
should take cognizance of the fact,
and cut loose from its pernicious
influences and demand from patrons
the same consideration that other
tradesmen receive. The average
country publisher takes subscrip
tions on a year's time. When due
perhaps twenty-five to fifty per cent.
pay promptly, twenty-five per cent.
pay when .it suits their convenience,
and the remainder never pay. In
the latter instances the amounts are
so small and the chances so slim
that the publisher does not care to
take the risk of paying out more in
the effort to force collections than
he is likely to get back again. He
eniures the imposition until he can
stand it no longer, and, finally cuts
off the "dead beats" and relegates
their worthless indebtedness to his
profit and loss account. What
greater right has a man who sub
scribes for a newspaper for one year
to ask or expect credit from the
publisher than he has to -ask his
grocer, hardware or dry goods deal
er to trust him one year for $1.50
or $2.00 worth of goods? Custom
is the only excuse for it, and we
feel fully justified in denominating
it an abominable custom-the un
doubted curse associated with count
ry newspaper publishing and the
one that keeps many a publisher's
"nose to the grindstone" year in
and year out, It's baneful efects
are visible everywhere in his busi
ness. He cannot afford to furnish
as much reading matter, or as large
a paper as he would wish; neither
can he afford to make needed im
provements in the mechanical de
partments of his office to sustain
his paper in typographical appear
ance to the standard of metropoli
tan sheets with which he is obliged,
in a measure, to comypete.- He buys
only what he cannot get along with
out, and frequently runs in debt for
that, thereby paying considerable
more than he would if he could go
into market with the cash for his
purchases. In short, he is placed
at a great disadvantage, no matter
in what direction he moves, and his
lot is a discouraging one. Thus,
also, those who force him into :this
position by asking credit, not only
strike a blow at tlsir county paper,
but at themselves as well, and
would reap part of the beneOts of a
reformation. Very freqnently those
who subscribe for the home paper
also take one from abroad. They
never think of asking for credit
from the foreign 1publisher; then
why from the home publisher? ,The
practice is onethat should no long
er be tolerated, and publishers who'
have their own welfare at heart
should lose no time in abolishing
it. In our judgment a list of 500.
advance paying subscribers is of
greater advantage to the publisher
than a list of 1000 on the credit
plan. The adoption of the advance
pay system would doubtless :result
in the loss of some subscribers, but
we Imagine the loss would only be
temporary. Those who subscribe
for the county paper take it, as a
rule, for local news-news that can
not be obtained elsewhere-and as
soop as they learn that the publisher
conducts his business on business
principles, they will tall into the
habit of paying' him as they do the
publishers of foreign papers. It is
a correct saying that if you place a
low estimate on the valae of your
own product (and crediting sub
sriptions to Tom, Dick and Harry
on their own time is doing just that
thing) others are apt to- place a
lower value. The editors of the
different states meet in convention
once a year, and we sincerely hope
and would recommend that at the
various meetings to be held this
summer the subject be discussed
and some united action taken to
eradicate the evil If is old enough
and has done mischief enough to
be placed on the retired list.-The
Trype Founder, Chicago.
BOTfl WERE BOSS.
A guest entering burriedly sur
prises a man and wife flushed, in
dignant and dishevelled.
"What's the matter?" he asks.
Husband (triumphantly)-" We
are settling as to who is boss!"
Guest-"Have you settled it?"
Wife-(victoriously) -"We have!"
IGuest-"Which is it?" Ma
zine.
Thme best muisle for a dog 1s a
Ivove maia
NO KISSES ALLOWED.
It was at the Northwestern R il
way uepot the other day whp- a
number of young ladies stepped out
of a passenger car that had just ar
rived ani were ardently reeeived by
long line of waiting kinsfolk, lov
-rs and ft iends They wer" all
young and pretty, but : they shook
hands with their people in the tuost
melancholy and subdued fashion.
and I noticed that some of d,hem
even gave a too impulsive friend a
little push, as if to ward offEan un
welcome embrace. But this was a
case when
--The eyes speak most when the lips move
not;,
And some of the fair young
things were evidently just ready to
cry. They were "sweet' girl grad
uates in their golden hair," and
they dared not kiss their -friends on
meeting them at the depot, be
cause it was against the rules of
school; .too public, not. a proper
place. Now isn't that positively
awful'"
"How do you stancl itr" asked a
Chicago friend of a seminary girl.
"Oh, we don't live in dipots,"
she said, with a merry twinkle of
her eye, "and when we get home
we just make up.for lost time."
"So do we," chimed in one girl
who bad a blonde lover with her,
"don't we, George?"
"I should- blush," said G :orge,
and he did.
"You see they won't allow us to
kiss up there," iaid the prettiest
girl in the crowd; "think it demo
ralizes the brakeman and" conduc
tors and passengers. We don't care
much when it's only -ourselves we
have to practice on, but when it
comes to visitors, it's pretty hard."
"Don't we make it up, though,
when we get home, echoed another
of the crowd; "we just kies and kiss
again. Oh, ms!"
This piece of scholastic severity
is only equalled by the stir which
has recently been made in this
city over a two-hours' session in
one of the public schools on the
sentiment of love as defined in
Longfellow's Evangeline. The su
perintendent of the school came to
their defense, and the irate tai-pay
ers, who feared they were being de
.iauded in their educational rights,
were soothed again. It reminds
tge of the time Charles Wydham
first rilayed his elegant parlor
comedies in Chicago - "Caste,"
"School" and others that will never
be forgotton. Well, if my memory
serves me-right, one of the questiond
in "School" is: "What is lover"
and the various definitions that are
given by big and little girls are
amusing and entertaining. To
6nd such salad freshness among
the parallelograms and byputhen.
uses is refreshing, even if it is not ed
ucational in a book sense.-Chicago
Cor. Detroit Free Press.
11181I EGS WERE SAFE.
M. Boutibouse,'the French sav
ant, -served in Napoleon's army, .
and was present 'at many engage.
ments. At the battle of W1agram,
in 1809, he w as in the heat of the -"
fray. The ranks around him hal l
been terribly thinned by shot, and
at sunget' he was nearly isolated.
While reloading his inMktt he was
shot down by a cannen ball: 'IHis
impression was that' the bail? had
passed througth his legs. below his
knees, completely severing them,
for he suddenly sank down, shor.e
ened, as h'e believed, to the extent
of about a foot in meastirement.
The trunk of the body fell back
ward on the ground, and the man's
senses were paralysed by the shock.
Thus he lag, motionless, among the
wounded anid deadf all night, not 2
daring to move, when conscious
ness partially returned; teet the
loss of blood should be fatally in
creased. Thast he felt .no pain he ~
attributed to the stunning effect of
the shock on his 'nervous system,
and his faculties - were still too
numb to reason why .he .had not
bled to death.. At early dawn he
was arousedl by one of the medical
staff, who catae round to help the
wounided "What's the mnater with
you, my good5elov?'said'the sur
geon. 'fAli touah me tenderly, fi
doctor,'' replied Mi. Boutibouse, "a -
cannon ball has capiedsff both of
my legs." The surgeon eumwined
the limbs refered 'to, and then giv
ing him a good shake, said with a
loud laugh, "Get up with yous
there's nothing the matter. with
your legs !" M. Boutibouse sprang
up, in utter astonishment, and spod
firmly on the legs 'which he h.a4
thought loot forever. ej-felt~ more
thankful," said he, "than i had ever
felt in the whole course of my lifeY
before. I had not a wound about
me. I had, indeed, been shot down -
byz an immense cannon ball, but
instead of passing through my leg
as I firmly believed it had, the ball
had passed under my feet and had
ploughed a hole inthe earth beneath
at least a foot in depth, into whiich
my feet suddenly sank, giving me
the Idea thatlIbad been thus shor
tened by the loss of my legs.
Good walsb~I~ t

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