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The Newberry herald and news. (Newberry, S.C.) 1884-1903, October 25, 1893, Image 2

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ELBERT H. AULL, Proprietors.
Wi. P. HOUSEAL
ELBERT H. AULL, EDITOR.
NE WBERRY, S. C.
WED3ESD1Y, OCTOBER 25, 1S'3.
THE ANALS OF NEWBERRY.
We have a few copies of the Annals
of Newberry left which we desire to
sell. Every Newberrian should have a
copy of this book. Only a limited
number were printed and there will be
no second edition, at least not for a
good many years. if you want a copy
now is the time to secure one. The
price is $3.00 and the book will be sent
postpaid to any address.
We will sell the book and give you
one year's subscription to the Herald
and news for $4.00 provided you pay up
arrearages on subscription. This gives
you one year's subscription for $1.00, as
in no event will the book he sold for
less than $3.00. If you are not now a
subscriber to The Herald and News
you can get the book and the paper one
year for $4.00
Send your orders or call at our office
and secure a copy of this book before
the supply is exhausted.
The book contains a reprint of Judge
O'Neall's Annals with an addition of
500 paget by Mr. J. A. Chapman.
Do not put this matter off but come
while the money season lasts.
A COMPROMISE.
It is said that a compromise was
agreed upon last week in the much
discussed silver question. Congress
has been in extraordinary session since
the first of August, especially convened
to legislate on the financial question.
It is time something were done. The
compromise, as we gather the propo
sition, is not much of a compromise.
It is still the unconditional repeal of
the Sherman law, only it postpones for
one year the time when the repeal bill
shall go into effect. This it seems to
us should not be objectionable. The
silver men will have time to find other
markets for their money than the gov
ernment and in that time some other
legislation on this question can be had.
Possibly some international agreement
on the question can be reached by
which a silver dollar will be a dollar
any and every where.
Now Congress should go ahead and
carry out the other provisions and
pledges of the Democratic platform.
Repeal the tax on State banks of issue
and arrange so that we can have a lo
cal currency that will be as good as our
greenbacks and we can h:Lve a currency
In sufficient volume to do the business
of the country.
The latest report we ..d in yester
day's papers was that :.3r. Cleveland
would not hear to a compromise. He
blim~ I he majori'y should rIAe: and a
maj-.z i vor repea], and t'.. Zi)use
ha's r,-p.-aed by a large majority. It is
unconditional repeal with him or noth
ing. President Cleveland has the cour
age of his convictions, and when he
feels sure he is right he believes in going
ahead. __ _ _
FOR REVENUE.
Gov. Tillman, in an interview, states
that "Dispensaries will be closed where
they are not profitable to the State."
How does that sound for prohibitiorn?
If they are economically run and are
not profitable it must mean that not
much whiskey is sold. If the whiskey
is sold in large quantities so as to make
them profitable with the expensive
machinery necessary to run them, then
how shall they be considered as prohi
bition measures? One of the arguments
In Judge Hudson's opinion is that the
law is to raise revenue. The attorneys
for the State in their appeal say that it
is not a measure to raise revenue, but
to regulate the sale of liquor.
There seems to be something wrong
some where. Some one has got things
mixed. In the courts the purpose is
not to raise revenue but to regulate.
The head and chief of the whole busi
ness com- along and says that if any
dispensary is not profitable it shall be
cut down and cast into the fire. The
two things will not work together
they will not harmonize. If it is a
financial success it is bound to be a
moral failure and vice versa. We said
that long ago. There might be some
profit in the business if there was not
such an expensive machinery con nected
with its enforcement. We shall soon
have some light.
A few days ago we heard a gentle
man in Lexington County talking
about the beauties of the Dispensary
law. How it had reduced crime and
soon he thought our criminal courts
would have literally nothing to do.
He believed that the decrease in crime
had been at least 75 per cent since the
first of July. The Dispensary law was
a great promoter of temperance and i
blessing for the morals of the country
from his standpoint.
This gentleman was a minister. He
called attention to the fact that at the
last two terms of court at Lexington
the criminal business had been almost
nothing, and attributed this state of af
fairs to the Dispensary law.
He should have gone a step further
In this line of argument and inquired
the status of aff'airs in the Lexington
jail at present, as he was using Lexing
ton as an illustration. If he had he
would have found out that it has more
prisoners awaiting tria' at this timie
than have been there in several years.
We made the inquiry but do not now
recall the exact number, but it is either
sixteen or twenty-six, at any rate a
pretty big number. We do not charge
it to the Dispensary law, but it certain
ly acts as an explosion of the argument
used by this gentleman.
Mr. Van Alen has been confirmed as
embassador to Italy. Can't the New
York Snuffer and the Atlanta Sneezer
now take a rest?
The Indian summer and the United
States Senate we still have with us.
The Herald and News is somewhat
in the dark as to what the Senate is
doing. 'Lhat bright luminary, the Con
gressional Record, has not shed its re
fulgent beams in this sanctum a single
WHAT THE-COUNTRY -NEEDS
The following is from a recent letter
from Rev. Sam Jones, and has so much
meat in it that we give it to our readers:
Talk about an honest difference of
opinion! Where do opinions come
from? A man's opinions are only
worth possessing and maintaining
when they come of research, experi
ence and wisdom.
You hear men say "I follow my con
science," or "I will die by my opin
ions," or "my principles are the correct
ones," etc. My conscience is like my
watch, it can only be trusted when it
is carefully regulated, and has proven
itself reliable. So no man can trust
conscience, principles or opinions until
they have been regulated and tested by
right standards.
Or, rather, conscience is like a tar
bucket on the bind axle of a wagon.
It's about the last thing to come up.
Some men may die by right convic
tions, but surely they won't live by
them.
I want to s-s a wise strong man
turned loose, untrammelled by fear
and unourchasable by rewards, and
unterrorized by enemies, and un
swerved by friends-just to see what
he would do.
The nation never needed such men
in Congress, in editorial chairs, in pul
pit and in society as it needs them to
day. Such men, in the majority,
would regulate and run this country
grandly.
A man's conscience is only valuable
as a guide of right living when it has
been properly trained and is enlight
ened. Still the voice of conscience
should not be hushed, and thereshould
be more heed given to it. We do not
know that we agree with Mr. Jones,
that the conscience is always the last
thing to come up. It may be after it
has been pushed aside and driven back
for many years. By constant treat
ment of this kind a man may put it so
far behind that it will not even be as
near to the front as the tar-bucket on
the wagon.
But the point that we wanted to em
phasize in this extract is the need of
just such a man, or a lot of them, as
Mr. Jones wants to see turned loose.
"A wise, strong man, untrammelled by
fear and unpurchasable by rewards,
unterrorized by enemies and unswerved
by friends." It would be interesting to
note just what he would do. His con
science would not have to occupy the
place of the tar-bucket on the wagon.
There is great need and much room
not for one such man-but for many of
them in this country in every depart
ment and vocation in life.
But pity it is that in these times the
demagogues and politicians seem to be
on top and running things, to suit
themselves. Maybe it will not always
be thus.
The demand is here for big men.
Men with big hearts and big brains
and big consciences. We need to be
rid of so much narrowness and bitter
ness and selfishness. We need to rid
ourselves of that idea, "Every man for
himself and the devil take the hind
mo't." No man can live to himself.
We are dependent upon each other.
f there were a clearer realization of
this truth, rand there were more sym
pathy, -ed i:.cse who are strong would
lend a t?eiug hand to their less fortu
nate neighbors, the world would be
better for it. We need broad-minded,
liberty-loving, patriotic men in public
places. The country needs more states
manship and fewer selfish demagogues
in high official places.
The New York Press, a Republiesn
newspaper, says that when President
leveland was inaugurated he was
worth something like $500,000, not
more. When he was inaugurated the
Press says, "In order to avoid even the
appearance of evil, the President-elect
had all his securities disposed of and the
proceeds invested in such a manner
that no official policies of his could
either increase or decrease their value."
wing to the fact that Mr. Cleveland
has given all his time and attention to
:ublic business, his private invest
2ents have been neglected and he has
received nothing from his property
and to-day it is not worth more than
20,030.
This does not look like he was using
his official pc-ition to build up his pri
vate fortune.
We hope those persons in this county
who were told last summer that the
President had made a million dollars
n ne day will take note of this. In
stead of making money, he is poorer
than he was when elected.
Judges Hudson, Gary and Iziar have
ll decided the Dispensary law uncon
stitutional.. ~They find no provision in
the Act for punishing the offender
even if he be found guilty. Solicitor
Bellinger is quoted as saying that so
far as he could find, a man might get
him a wheelborrow and peddle liquor
2 and down the street so long as he
did not have it shipped to him for the
purposes of sale. Judge Wallace, if we
remember correctly, sentenced a man
to one year in jail and pay a fine of $100
for violating the provisions of the Act.
Gov. Tillman says if the judges don't
know the law he can't help it. But he
promises to have the Legislature to
onstrue and interpret it and make it
plain when it meets. It has cost the
State a good deal of money, and still
we do not know where we are at in this
busess.
The papers are being filled with dis'
cussions and wrangles over t be sena
torial election next year. We agree
with the Grrenville News that we had
better wait awhile, it is too soon to be
iussinr candidates for next year and
faiig dges and predictions. There
may be a great many changes before
the campaign warms up next sum
mer. Let us watch things for awhile
nd not be troubling ourselves about
this man or that man. There may be
new men in the field, men who are not
now considered in the discussion. At
any rate there is plenty of time to dis
russ these matters.
The Herald and News acknowledges
the receipt of Congressman-Talbert's
peeci on the Federal Election bill. It
is the only public document we have
received in a long time and we thank
r. Talbert for thus remembering us.
)ur own Congressman, the Hon. A. C.
L6atimer, forgot to send us a copy of Lis
peech, and also the Congressional
lcord. We say forgot, for we do not
d cannot believe he would intention
lty -A wilfully slight us.
can be inserted under the head of
"remarks."
Your prompt attention will greatly
oblige yours respectfully,
B. R. TILLMAN, Governor.
WANTS SOME 'G USH' FOR THE MESSAGE.
There are sixty-six dispensaries in
operation in the State, and whatever
information may be given the Goverr or
will probably be used in his message,
as he believes the reports will show up
in favor of the dispensary system.
THE MAJORITY SHOULD RULE.
Cleveland Thinks the Rep3al Bill Should be
Passed. and is Evidently Opposed to
Compromise in Any shape and
Would Veto Such a Bill
if Yassed.
WASHINGTON, October 23. -- The
statement made public lrst night as to
the attitude of the Administration on
the pronosed compromise came from a
source entitled to full credence. The
President, in response to direct ap
peals from Senators, has discreetly re
frained hitherto from making any state
ment which could be construed as in
dicating a desire of dictating to Con
gress, but, in view of what has taken
place, he has fully expressed his views,
and the announcement made last night
is understood to be a reflection of the
views so expressed.
He believes a majority of the Senate
to be in favor of unconditional repeal,
and that means should be devised to
enable the majority to give effect to it3
opinions. This is a clear indication
that the propo3ed compromise, if
passed into law, would probably be
met with Executive opposition. This
will add new elementg of difficulty to
the situation, and almost another week
of tiresome talk seems unavoidable.
CONFLICTING RUMORS OF COMPROMISE.
There was an air of uncertainty about
the Senate chamber this morning, and
Senators who were confident of a solu
tion of the financial question when the
Senate took a recess last Saturday until
this morning were looking very gloomy
over the prospects, and, according to
opinion freely expressed by some Sena
tors, any idea they may have had of a
recess has vanished.
The dictum of the President was re
ceived in various ways and was not un
looked for in some quarters. It is said.
for instance, on one band, that this
has effectually dispelled the lest hope
of compromise, and it is said, on the
other hand, that compromise will go
through regardlers of the attitude of
the President. The Democratic con
fer'nce committee went into secret ses
sion this morning again at half-past 10
o'clock with orders that no one be ad
mitted. After a half hour spent in de
liberation other Senators came and
went, and it appeared as if Democrats
were being consulted upon the new
situation that confronted those in
charge of the bill.
SENATOR IRBY WAS OPPOSED TO THE
COMPROMISE.
WASHINGTON, October 23.-Senator
Irby is being roundly condemned by
some of his Democratic associates be
cause he refused to sign the compromise
proposition. The junior senator from
South Carolina did not withhold his
signature from the petition because of
his desire to uohold the President, but
because he dit not consider the com
promise a just recognition of silver. It
appears to-night that the compromise
is aead beyond resurrection and the
indications are that a vote on uncondi
tional repeal will be reached before the
week cIoces. So strong is the feeling
among the silver Democrats at the
failure of the compromise that they
threat2n to read out of the party those
Senators who refused to sign the peti
tion. Senator Harris undertook a part
of that task to-day when he had a
lively personal colloquy with Senator
Irby on the subject. The South Caro
linian defended his action and there
was a sharp passage of words.
Notice of Final settlement.
N OTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that I will make a final settle
ment of the estate of Henry C. Robert
son, deceased, in the Probate Court.
for Newberry County, on the 28th day
of November, 1893, and immediately
thereafter anply for letters of dischlarge.
MARY E. ROBERTSON,
Executrix.
An Ordinance
To Amend Chapter VH1. of the
Ordinances of the Town of
Newberry, Relating to Regis
tration.
~EIT ORDAINED BY THE
-'-Mayor anud Aldermen of the Town
of Newherry, in Council assembled,
and by the authorityv of the same:
SECTION 1. That Chapter VII. of the
ordinances of the said Town be, and
the same is hereby amended by strik
ing opt the word "April" in Section I.
of the same, and inserting in lieu there
of the word "December."
SEC. II. That the said Chapter be,
and the same is hereby further amend
ed by adding thereto the following sec
tion:
Section V. A violation of any of the
provisions and requirements of this
Chaptcr by the Clerk and Treasurer of
the said Town of New berry shall ren
der him liable to removal from office at
the pleasure of the Mayor and Alder
men of said Town.
Done and ratified under the Corporate
[L.S ] seal of the said town of Newoerry,
October 19th, A. D., 1893.
E. C. JONES, Mayor.
By the Mayor:
J. S. FAIR, C. & T. T. C. N.
WOOD WORKING MACHINERY
BRICK AND TILE MACHINERY
BARREL STAVE MACHINERY
GINNING MACHINERY
GRAIN THRESHING MACHINERY
SAW MILL MACHINERY
RICE HULLING MACHINERY
ENGINES AND BOILERS
State Agency for Talbott & Sone' Engines and
Boilers. saw and Grist Mills.
Brewer's Brick Machinerv.
Double screw Cotton Presses.
Thomas' Direct-Acting Steam Presses-no
belts.
Thomas'Seed Cotton Elevators.
Hall and Lum mus Gins.
Engeberg Rice Hullers.
H. B.Smith Co.'s Woodworking Machinery.
Planers, Band Saws, Moulders. Mtortisers,
Tenoners, comprising complete equipment
for Sash, Door and Wagon Factories.
DeLoach Plantation Saw Mill, variable feed.
Belting, Fitting and Machinery Supplies.
Write to Me before Buying
V. C. BADHAM, Manager,
COLUMBIA, S. C.
A Powerful
Flesh Maker.
A process that kills the
taste of cod-liver oil has
done goo<d service-but
the process that both kills
the taste and effects par
tial digestion has done
much more.
Scott's Emulsion
stands alone in the field
of fat-foods. It is easy of
assimilation because part
ly digested before taken.
Scott's Emulsion checks Con
sumption and all othe~r
wasting diseases.
Trespass Notice.
I FORBID ANY ONE TRESPASS
ing on my land in the country or
town. PROCTOR TODD.
TRESPASS NOTICE.
A LL PERSOFS ARE HEREBY
notified not to trespass upon the
lands of the undersigned by fishing,
bunting, or in any other way.
M. E. DICKERT.
C. 0. BUZHARDT.
M. U. BUZHARDT.
ANTINE BUZHARDT.
Probate Judge's Sale.
STATE OF SOUTH .CAROLINA
COUNTY OF NEWBERRY-PRO
BATE COURT.
John M. Kinard, Administrator, etc.,
of the estate of Barriet Hubbard, de
ceased, Plaintiff, against Silas John
stone, Defendaut.
Complaint to sell land to pay debts, etc.
BY ORDER OF COURT IN ABOVE
stated case I will sell at public out
cry before the Courthouse at Newberry,
on the first Monday in November next,
that lot of land in the Town of New
berry, in the State aforesaid, containing
18-100 of an acre, more or less, and
bounded on the North by lot of Octavia
Young, South by lot of Silas Johnstone,
East by Caldwell street, and West by
Hunter street.
Terms: One-half of the purchase
money to be paid in cash, the balance
on a credit of twelve months, with in
terest from day of sale, with the privi
lege of paying all cash, the credit por
tion if any to be secured by the bond
of the purchaser and a mortgage of
said lot. Purchaser to pay for papers.
J. B. FELLERS,
Oct. 12, 1893. J. P. N. C.
STATE OF SOU IH CAROLINA,
COUNTY OF NEWBERRY
COURT OF PROBATE.
J. Gillam Senn, as Administrator, &c.,
of James Speer, deceased, Plaintiff,
against Nancy M. Speer et al., De
fendants.
BY VIRTUE OF AN ORDER OF
the Probate Court for Newberry
County, I will sell at public outcry at
Newberry Court House on the first
Monday in November next during the
legal hours of sale all that tract of land
ituate in the County and State afore
said containing fifty acres, more or less,
and bounded by lands of James Adams,
Decatur Boozer, W. P. Johnston and
Nancy M. Speer.
Terms of sale: One-third of the pur
chase money in cash and the balance
on a credit of twelve months with
interest from the day of sale, to be se
cured by the bon : of the purchaser and
a mortgage of the premises sold, with
leave to pay all or a larger portion in
cash. Purchaser to pay for papers.
J. B. FELLERS, J. P. N. C.
Oct. 14, 1893.
STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA
COUNTY OF NEWBERRY-PRO
BATE COURT.
John M. Kinard, as Administrator of
Reuben Harrington, Plaintiff against
Nicey Harrington et al., Defendants.
BY ORDER OF THE COURT
hereia, I will sell at public outcry
before the Courthouse at Newberry on
the first Monday in November, 1893,
the following lots of land situated in
the town of Newberry, County of New
berry and State aforesaid, to wit, one
lot cont.aining two acres, more or less,
and bounded by lots of D. H. Wheeler,
James Cannon and M. L. Gauntt, and
Vincent street, and one lot containi ng
one-fourth of an acre, more or less, and
bounded by lots of M. L. Gauntt, Sarah
Hailtock and Gauntt street.
Terms: The purchaser will be required
to pay one-half of the purchase money
in cash, and to secure the balance pay
able in twelve months, with interest
from day of sale, by a bond and mort
gage of the premisas, with leave, how
ever, to the purchaser to anticipate pay
of the purchase money in cash. Pur
easer to pay for papers.
J. B. FELLERS,
Oct. 12, 1893. J. P. N. C.
Master's Sales.
STA TE OF SOUT H CAROLIN A,
COUNTY OF NEWBERRY-IN
COMMON PLEAS.
Mary U. Buzhardt, Plaintiff, against
Sallie C. Brown et al., Defendants.
Foreclosure.
BY ORDER OF THE COURT
Bherein, I will sell at public outcry
before the Court House at Newberry,
S. C., on the First Monday in Novem
ber, 1893, all that tract, plantation or
par.el of land, situate in the County
and State aforesaid, containing Two
Hundred and Eight Acres, more or
less, and bounded by lands now, or
formerly of the estate of Daniel Buz
hardt, B. F. Cannon, Mrs. Margaret
Wilsn, H. H. Folk, Estate of Chan.
Job Johnstone and Archy Sloan.
TERMS: The purchaser will be re
quied to pay one-third of the purchase
money in cash, and to secure the pay
ment of the balance at twelve months
with interest from day of sale, by a
bond and mortgage of the premises,
with leave, however, to pay all cash.
Purchaser to pay for papers.
SIL AS JOHNSTONE, Master.
Master's Otlice, Oct. 10, 1893.
STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA..
COUNTY OF NEWBERRY-IN
COMMON PLEAS.
The Newberry Building & Loan Asso
ciation, Plaintiff, against J. Percy
Mahon and others.
BY ORDER OF THE COURT
Bherein, I will sell at public outcry,
Iefore the Court House at Newberry,
on the First Monday in November,
1893, all that tract of land,' in the
County and State aforesaid, containing
One Hundred and Thirty Acres and
16--100, more or less, and bounded by
lands of D. H. Wheeler, J. D. Mahon,
estate of Mrs. Mary N. Fair and others.
TERMIs: The purchaser will be re
quired to pay one-third of the purchase
money in cash, and to secure the bal
ance, payable in one and two years,
with interest from the day of sale, by a
bond and mortgage of the premises.
The purchaser has leave, however, to
anticipate payment in whole or in part.
rhe dwelling house on the premises
must also be insured for One Thousand
Dollars and the policy assigned to the
Naster. Purchaser to pay for papers.
SIL AS JOHNSTONE, Mast (r.
Master's Office, 9th Oct., 1893.
STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA
COUNTY OF NEWBERRY-IN
COMMON PLEA S.
ilas Johnstone, Master, Plaintiff,
against L. P. WV. Riser, Defendant.
In Foreclocure.
B Y ORDER OF ,THE COURT
herein, I will sell, at p ublic outcry,
efore the Courthouse at Newberry, on
.e first Monday in November, 1893,
l that lot of land in the town of New
erry, and in the County and State
foresaid, containing twenty-two hun
lredths of an acre, more or less, front
ng thirty-four fcet and three-fourths
>n Pratt street, e d forty feet and one
bird on Friend street, and bounded on
he East by lot of the estate of Henry
alfacre, deceased, and on the West by
ras. F. Todd's lot.
Terms: The purchaser will be re
iuired to pay one-half of the bid in
ash, and to secure the balance, pay
ble in twelve months with interest
rm the day of sale, by a bond and
nortgage of the premises: with leave,
mowever, to anticipate payments in
hole or in part. The purchaser must
nsure the premises and assign the poi
ey to the Master; and pay for all the
>apers.
SIL AS JOHNSTONE, Master.
TRAXLER EXCOMMUNICATED.
The Baptists Dismiss the Chief Dispenser
-Rather than Foment Discord he
Waives Examination.
[Special to News and Courier.]
COLUMBIA, October 23.-Another
church member has been made to fall
out of ranks on account of being asso
ciate-1 with the dispensary. This time
it is the State commissioner, Mr. D. H.
Traxler. The charges against him, as
is known, have been hanging fire for
some time, and Mr. Traxler, rather
than occasion excitement and confu
sion, asked the church to expel him.
There are twenty-six membeis of the
church at Timmonsville, and he says
that he could easily claim 50 per cent of
them as being favorable to the position
he takes. Mr. Traxler is still of the
opinion that he is doing no wrong in
taking hold of the dispensary, and
thinks that it is the only thing that
can be done towards drilling the prohi
bition idea into the people. He considers
that he has acted thoroughly con
scientiously in the entire matter, and
that he can continue in his work with
a clear understanding of his duty.
DISPENSING WITH THE DISPENSER.
When the case came up Sunday
night at Timmonsville Mr. Traxler was
prepared with a long defence, but
thought it unnecessary to make it as
he had decided upon another course.
He then had the following letter read:
TIXMONSVILLE, S. C , October 21,1893.
T;mmonsville Baptist church-Brethren: It
is with heartfelt regret that I am forced to
sever my church relation. I leave you with
best wishes for the advancement of our Mas.
ter's work. I assure you no prejudice is en
t 3rtained against the denomination, for I can
never be anything save a Baptist.
My views have not changed from those ex
pressed in previous letters. I have received
thirty or more replies from able divines and
Christian gentlemen all over the State touch
ing my position, and the majority express
themselves i ) my entire satisfaction. This
suffices me. I have, therefore, decided to
abandon any further defence of the charges
agpinst me.
The result of a long trial, whether in my
favor by a few votes or not, would do me no
good, and the little gain it would afford mijht
involve my denomination in endless tronule
a'l over the State, which I do not desire to
Eee.
Under these circumstances I would rather
suffer individually at your hands.
I thank you all for the courtesy shown me,
and ask that my name be dismissed from the
roll by a motion without further trial.
r'raternally,
D. H. TRAXLEB.
The sudden turn of things was not
altogether unexpected. Prof. Smith
moved that the letter be accepted, and
without any debate or discussion a vote
wastaken, and Mr. Traxler was excom
municated from the Baptist Church of
Timmonsville. This will probably be
the end of the case.
BUTLER-TILLMAN.
Some Remarks About the Senato) i1 Con
test and a Third Candidate.
[Special to News and Courier.]
COLUMBIA, S. C., October 22.-A
glance over the political field of this
State just at this time gives one a brief
insight into the most remarkable con
glomeration of affairs that has ever
been known, perhaps, since the advent
of the Tillman Administration, and one
can but wait and watch results. It
would be difficult indeed to foretell
anything with aty degree of certainty.
The men who are leaders in the domi
nant political party at present are
looking ahead into the future and
watching their chance to better their
own interests.
Governor Tillman, by his remarkable
campaigns in this State, the pushing
of the dispensary law, and other things
of a like nature,- and his recent open
bid for the leadership of the proposed
new National party, has succeeded in
achieving the National reputation that
he cravea, and he is now looking to the
future, with evety energy on the alert.
It has been frequently intimated that
he would seek a third term as Gover
nor, but there Is absolutely no likeli
hocd of him making any such move.
He is
AFTER BUTLER'S SCALP
with a whole belt full of tomahawks,
and he and his lieutenants are smiling
with satisfaction at the course Senator
Butler is now pursuing in the Senate.
That is a plain unvarnished statement
of a fact. The Governor is priming his
guns and getting ready for the big
fight, and dces not sram to have the
slightest doubt as to the result.
Up to tbe past week or so it has
been pretty well understood that the
race for the Senate would be only be
tween Senator Butler and Governor
Tillman, but the Senator's course in
the Senate during this time has caused
many of his friends to marvel, and a
great many of them do not hesitate to
say that they will desert him. The re
sult is going to be, so it appears now,
that Senator Butler is going to lose a
good proportion of the Conservative
vote. To-day I had talks with several
well-known Conservatives in regard to
the coming fight, and they all seem to
be down on Senator Butler. One of
them, a man who has long been re
cognized as one of the most observant
politicians in the State, thoroughly
acquainted with the politics of this and
other countries, said very plainly that
he regretted to see Senator Butler take
the course he has adopted, but was
morally certain that "Butler will not
get over 40 per cent of the Conservative
vote, and possIbly not that." He went
on to say that t here was a great deal of
talk about running.
A THIIti CANDIDATE
against bot hi Tillmaan and Butler, and
said that he had heairr Judge Hudson's
name aggested and' fatvornIbly consid
ered. He thiniks i ba: .Judge~ H udson,
commanding the re.n~ et that he does
of many men oni both sides, would
make a strong e~ aididlate. I have also
beard Congressmian Brawley's name
suggested. Of~ course, no one can tell
what the future holds, considering
recent developments having a bearing
on tbe Senatorial nice, but just n.ow it
looks like a three-cornered fight is very
likely. It also sems that the third
man in a primary would get a portion
of the vote of both sides.
HAS IT DECREAsED DRtUNKENNESs?
Governor Tillman is Trying to Prove--The
Dispensary Law a Great Moral
Agent.
CoMunIA, October 19.-Governor
Tillman wants to get the official facts
and figures as to the operation of thbe
dispensary law. It has been claimed by
its friends t hat the law has decreased
drunkenness and crime, but no official
data have ever been collected or pub
lished. So far as Columbia is concerned
the police officials say that the number
of arrests for "drunk and disorderly"
has not decreased, bu t, on the contrary,
has kept up its u-ual number. Such
reports come from other towns also, but
there has been nothing officially given
out on the subject.
TRYING To STEAL TEMPERANCE
THUNDER
With a view of getting at the facts
the following circular was issued to-day
to the heads of the different city and
town governments where dispensaries
are in operation:
DEAR SIR: As head of your city
government I beg that you will make
or have the proper officer or to make
an examination of the records and send
me a comparative statement showing
the number of arrests for drunkenness
or for disorder occasioned by the use of
whiskey for the periods of July 1 to
September 31, 1893, also for the month
of September alone during this and last
year.
My object is to obtain correct infor
mation as to the working of the dis
pensary law as compared with the
iense system. Any remarks of a
general nature indicative of your views
on the restraint of the whiskey evil
Master's Sales.
STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA,
COUNTY OF NEWBERRY-IN
COMMON PLEAS.
Cole. L. Blease, Plaintiff, against
James S. Adams and others, Defen
dants.
BY ORDER OF THE COURT
herein, I will sell at public outcry
before the Court House at Newberry,
on the First Monday in November,
1893, all that tract of land in the County
and State aforesaid, containing Fifty
five Acres, more or less, and bounded
by lands of James S. Speer, Decatur
Boozer, and of George Boozer, and by
the Public Road.
TERMS: The purchaser will be re
quired to pay one-half of the purchase
money in cash, and to secure the bal
ance, payable at twelve months, with
interest from the day of sale, by a bond
and mortgage of the premises: with
leave, however, to anticipate payments
in whole or in part. Purchaser to pay
for papers.
SILAS JOHNSTONE, Master.
Master's Office, 9th October, 1893.
STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA,
COUNTY OF NEW BERRY-IN
COMMON PLEAS.
John M. Kinard, Clerk, and Adminis
trator, Plaintiff, against George W.
Feltman and others, Defendants.
BY ORDER OF THE COURT
herein, I will sell at public outcry
before the Court House at Newberry,
on the First Monday in November,
1893, all that tract of land, in the
County and State aforesaid, on waters
of Heller's creek, containing Three
Hundred and Sixty Acres, more or less,
and bounded by lands of Thomas Hut
chinson, Miss Idella McCants, Jacob
Wicker and Jemima J. Suber.
TERMS: The purchaser will be re
quired to pay one-half of the purchase
money in cash, and to secure the bal
ance, payable in one year, with
interest from the day of sale, by
bond and mortgage of the premises,
(with leave. however, to pay the whole
bid in cash). Purchaser to pay for
papers.
If the purchaser fails to comply with
his bid within five days the property
will be sold at his risk by the Master,
on the succeeding saleday.
SILAS JOHNSTONE, Master.
Master's Office, 9th October, 1993.
STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA,
COUNTY OF NEWBERRY-IN
COMMON PLEAS.
Frances G. Lyles, as Administratrix of
John L. Lyles, Plaintiff, against
Abram G. Lyles, as Administrator
of John V. Lyles, Defendant.
BY ORDER OF THE COURT
herein, I will sell at public outcry
before the Court House at Newberry,
on the First Monday in November,
1893, all that tract of land lying partly
in the County of UniQn and partly in
the County of Newberry, and State
aforesaid, and containing One Hun
dred and Sixty-six Acres, more or less,
and bounded oy lands of W. V. Lyles,
W. D. Hardy, B. S. Lyles, D. A.
Thomas and others.
TERMs: The puachaser will be re
quired to pay one-half of the purchase
money in cash, and to secure the bal
ance payable at twelve months, with
interest from the day of sale, by a bord
and mortgage of the premises; with
leave, however, to the purchaser to an
ticipate payment in whole or in part.
Purchaser to pay for papers.
SIL AS JOHNSTONE, Master.
Master's Office, 9th October. 1893.
STATE OF SOUTH CA ROLINA.
COUNTY OF NE WBE RRY- IN
COMMON PLE AS.
E. P. Chalmiers, Administrator, against
C. WV. Kinard and others.
BY ODEROF THE COURT
heren, dted19th August, 1893, I
will sell before the Court House at
Newberry, on the first Monday in No
vember, 1893, (unless previously dis
posed of privately,) all that tract of
land, the property of the late Sparta C.
Kibier, in the County and State afore
said, called the Cureton Place, in three
or more subdivided tracts as shall be
indicated by plats thereof, containing
Three Hundred and Sixty Acres, more
or less, formerly bounded by lands of
estate of James Cureton, P. H. Dennis,
T. T. C. Bunter, John Whitman, S.
A. Hunter and Y. C. Myers.
Terms- The purchaser will be re
quired to pay in cash one-half of the
purchase money, and to secure the
balance payable in one and two years
with interest from the day of sale, by
bond and mortgage of the premises.
Purchaser to pay for papers.
SIL AS JOHNSTONE, Master.
WIn the meantime the Master is
permitted by the said order to negotiate
with persons desiring to purchase at
private sale the said lands, or any por
tion thereof, to be laid off by a surveyor,
the bargain to be confirmed by the
Court.
SILAS JOHNSTONE, Master.
Master's Office, 3d Oct., 1893.
STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA,
COUNTY OF NEWBERRY
COURT OF COMMON PLEAS.
Thomas V. Wicker, surviving Ex'or,
&c., against James L. Kennerly, Ad
ministrator, and others.
Foreclosure.
BY ORDER OF THE COURT
hereiu, dated 9th January, 1893,
I will sell before the Court House at
New berry, at public outcry, on the first
Monday in November next, that tract
of land in Newberry County contain
ing Three Hundred and Sixty-T wo and
a Half (362k) Acres, more or less,
bounded by lands of Hillary Suber,
Mrs. H. C. Caldwell, Smith L. Davis'
estate and others, and known as "The
Dr. Kennerly Residence."
Terms: The purchaser will be re
quired to pay in cash one-third of the
purchase money, and to secure the bal
ance, payable in one and two years,
with interest from the day of sale, pay.
able annually, by bond and mortgage
of the premises. Purchaser to pay for
papers.
Upon the failure of the purchaser to
comply with his bid in ten days, the
premises will be resold at his risk.
SI LAS JOHNSTONE, Master.
Master's Officc, Oct. 3, 1893.
STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA,
COUNTY OF NEWBERRY
COURT OF COMMON PLEAS.
Thomas V. Wicker et al., Executor,
vs. James L. Kennerly, A dministra
tor, &c., of Thos. B. Kennerly, d
ceased, and others,
And
Thomas V. Wicker et al., Executor,
&c., vs James L. Kennerly, Admin
istrator of Thos. B. Kennerly, dec'd,
and Moreta E. B. Kennerly, dec'd,
et al.
Foreclosure.
B Y ORDER OF THE COURT IN
the above stated cases, I will sell
at public outcry, before the Court House
t Newberry, on the first Monday in
November next, all that tract of land
in Newberry County, containing Two
Eundred and Eighty-Eight (288)
Acres, more or less, and bounded by
lands of J. K. G. Nance, Hardy Suber,
estate of Charles F. Sligh and Hillary
Suber.
Terms: The purchaser has leave to
aftici oate payment in whole or in part;
>therwise he will be required to pay in
ash one-third of the purchase money,
mnd to secure the balance payable in
ne and two years, with interest from
bhe day of sate, payable annually, by
ond and mortgage of premises. Pur
caser to pay for papers.
Upon the failure of the purchaser to
omply with his bid in ten days, the
>remises will be resold at his risk.
SIL AS JOHNSTONE, Master.
AT
MOWER'S
You Will Now Find
a Fall Line of
Noveilecs iu
DRESS
GOODS,
AMONG THEM
The Latest Importeo
Styles in All the
NEW GOLORINGS.
MILLINERY
--AL80O
We are Showing
EVERYTHING NEW.
". Our efforts in all
Departments shall, be
to please.
COE AiD SEE US,
MOWER' CO.
WEDDING- AND BI
COME AND EXA
WATCHES,LEWELRY, C
SPECTA
Watoc.es anc. .Te
A SP E
ED UAR)
WATCH MAKE
lNew Fal d I
Clot hiu
NIC]
NOE
GO0
EV ER SO LD |I
Suits to Order a Sbecialt
Fit Gua
BROWM
Blalock's Old Stand
ACIDENT )
4 PRO VID
Wa Reprasenlt Strang Can
fluarai
Brokers and Pro
Prompt attention given to
HIPP &
SHOESI
SHOES;
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BAY STATE CO.'S
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GOOD WEAR
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PLANTATION
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RTHDAY PRESENTS
MINE MY STOCK.
,0CKS,
ATEDAND EYE-GLASSES.
wr'y Repaix'ing
IA LTY.
L & CHie.
)SOHOL1TZ,.
2R AND JEWELER.
6. _sue_Tkn_n
m. m. w mo
ChRACEst
AginlosfthBin.
lv a srs ke and
rance. rcans
Jl business rseom Bus. .ss
WILSON.
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