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The Newberry herald and news. (Newberry, S.C.) 1884-1903, February 24, 1903, Image 4

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn93067777/1903-02-24/ed-1/seq-4/

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A RORROR IN NEWARK, N. J.
Eight Children Killed and Twenty or More
Injured-Trolley Struck Express Train.
Newark, N. J., February 21.-A
fast express on the Lackawanna rail.
road out through a trolley car
crowded with school children at the
lifton avenue crossing Thursday.
Eight of the children were killed and
a score of more of them injured.
The motorman of the car, who atuck
to his post, will die, and the engi
neer of the express was so badly
hurt that there is little hope of his
recovery.
Both the express and the trolley
were on steep grades, going at right
angles. The express was signalled,
and the crossing gates were lowered
while the trolley car was yet half
way down the hill. The motorman
shut off the power and applied the
brakes, but almost immediately the
car b-gan to slip along the icy rails.
It gained tremendous momentum at
the bottom of the hill, crashed
through 'he gates, directly in the
track of the oncomning train. The
locomotive plunged its way through
the trolley, throwing the children in
every direction.
The acnideit happened within
thrree hlocl.s of t he high school build
ing em I in he car at the time were
1101l oneo hunired pu:ils. At,
tiany as tliirty othe-ra had managed
to t hrow t horisHlves froi the ear be.
futo i e h i t'nt"ili ( tle.
Peoter Brady, the motorman,
p1 1riptIly shurt Il' the, power aneld
a11)1ie tIhl brakes 'l'h speed of
thIe car wts ellevced, hut it crnt ineuil
to ;TloV*+ slowly down the incline.
There was no tIought of danger
Then it Ibe'gten, to nove fastor and
fastor. Thn ice covored rails afforded
no holil frr tle whetl4 and, although
Brady jmn.el hIIi., Irake harder anud
tit eo rwnng on till, reverse, the rwe.
nenltnu1 of the car grew at evi ry
yard and the' ear shot down toward
the railroad. When it was right at
the gates the express thundered into
view. Warnled by the cries of those
afoot lend by their own sensel of dn
ger, those on the platform lbegant to
throw themseives off into the snow,
antd as the car sped along the few
re+mairning feet toward the rails per
haps one third escaped deatih or n
jury in this way, but there was no
time for those within the car to d1
rmore th an cruish t oward tIre roar
door. The gaites were swept aside
like toothI picks aind before the craick
ing oIf thle gates dlied ont catme thre
crash. For t hi rt v5 secondus before theII
air was tilled withI frantic (ries (If
those who saiw death di(ashing douwn
upon01 thremr.
The wrelk oIf thre trolley car was
cormplete. The poiant of the erngine'
st ruc k it ina thle middolle aind tu rued it
partly~ atrounid and theti thre ponrr
01onuenuie (eut in I wo. Thre uppe
prt o)f thte troll11ey was rednrieed to1
fragmo nt s tilder thIe dive rs oIf thle
locomotive. One half iof t ho car was
throwni tio onei .sid' and1 lay orrn lie
t racks. TI 0theot. spetiri wuas Ihurlted
somlie (listuanee( awany. In every di.
re(elion1 ltav Ihe dead tatnd injurined.
Thre erg inil was b rought t o a stanocd.
still and from11 the t rai.i arid fromr
tnear hy houses rren rushred to thre
rescue Th e spect nceh- wais aplpalhn rg
and( mnuy who started to work had
to give njp, unnrerveid.
Over fromi t h' high schioor, whrere
the( ertash hatd been heard, aind from
thre wvinrdows of wvhichi 'otme had1( wit -
nressed thIe accidenrrt , came puipilIs ando
terchiers to aid inr succoring their
conmpan ions. A lad, who had been
hurled to stafet y in a snow banik
thirty feet from the crossing, arose,
brushedl the srnow out of his eyes
and, with a shriek, rushed uip the
street to ta fire box and1( turnedl in anD
alat im.
HAMP'TON MONUMENIT COMMISSION.
WIll Have in Charge the Erection of Momu
ment to Memory of the Great Leader.
The governor has arinourrced thle
membiers of t he joint commlit t e from
the General Assembly to compose
thie H tamptoni muornumetnt commissiorn.
This commrtit tee is composed of Senta
tors C. S. McCall anrd J1. Q. Mar
shall, with lIepresentatives Altarmont
Moses, B. A. Morgan rind E. M,.
Seabrook. This is a generally
represenitative committee, combining
among ot her qualifications the nece's,
sary business ab)ility with sound
ju dgm errt.
HlBSTR'S COTT0N STATMBNT.
For the 173 -Days of the Season the Aggre
gate Is 142,000 Bales Ahead of
the Same Days Last Year.
New Orleans, February 20. ----Sec
rotary Iester's weekly cotton state.
ment issued today shows for the
twenty days of February an increase
over last year of 133,000 bales and
an increase over the same period
year before last of 104,000.
For the 178 days of the season
that have elapsed the aggregate is
ahead of the same days last year
142,000 bales and ahead of the same
time before last (47,000.
The amount brought into sight
during the past week has been 199,.
465 bales, against 207,256 for the
same seven days last year and 100,.
9060 year before last.
'1'he movement since September 1
shows receipts at all Unite-l States
ports to be 0,430,949 bales, against
6,279,654 last year; overland cross
the Mississippi, Ohia and Potomac
rivers t0 Northern mills and Canada
822,762, against 847,787 last. year;
interior stocks in excess of those held
at, the close of the commercial year
295,578, against 401,894 last year;
Southern mill takings 1,139,500,
against 1,017,084 last year.
The total movement since Septem
her I is 8,688,789 bales, against
8,54t6, 119 lat year and 8,041,734
year bt-foro 1:tst.
Foreign exports for the hweek have
ben 160,878 bales, against. 160,807
last year, making the total thus far
for the season 4,8)7,896, against
4,961,M)S9 last year.
The total takings of American
mills, Nort Ii and South, and Canada
this far for th season have been
2,730,0.1.1 bales, against 2,55.1,135
last year.
Stock4 at the seaboard and the 29
leaiog SoutherU interior centres
Iiive decreased during the week 73,
127 bales, against a decrease during
the corresponding period last season
of (5i,8 1f5.
Inclding 'tocks left over at ports
aitd interior towns from the last crop
and the number of balos brought
into sight thus far for the now erop,
iho supply to dato is 8,903,863 bales,
against 8,t)06,101 for the same period
last yaar.
Till: WOHIl.'S ViSIBLE SUPi,Y.
New Orlean1s, 1'e'brtuary 20. Sec
rotary lie'ster's statemont of the
world's visible supply of cotton issued
tolay 'shows the' total visible to be
4 ,034,1 43 bales, against 4,038,61II)
last week ltand 4,49)3,84 1 last year.
O.)f ihiis the total of American cottIon
is 2,1)87,343, against 3,043,6)9 last
we''k and( 3,484,84 1 last year, and1( of
alt ot her kinds, incli.ding ICgypt,
1PJZ,00() last wveek anxd I ,00),0(00 last
-yearr.
( ) I thle world's visiblde supjply of
c itt on t.hero is now atloat and held
in (1reat Brit ian anid (Cont inrental
Iu ropos 2,02b,0t00) bah's, againsat
2,87 7,000 least ye iar; im logypt 18 I,
1)0)1, againast 278,00 fast y ar in
Indaia ,2,8,000), agajinst I 71,00(0 last
yei~iar, 'ad in~ the Unaird Sltates I .2117,
OOt), against I ,385,t00) last year.
All the PIg''s Fault.
One' of the best stories~ the bou-,
l)enanirats have heard this 5ession is
thre 't ry of a (Georrgia pig, a Ge'or
gia negre anrd " Ge'orgi a justice of
the' pe'a'e, sa. a thle Washiing ton Post.
ItIs amlbir is .Judge lartlett, otf( Geor
gill, who is athe jus5tict of thle peace
ini the story, and( whol is like3wise' 011e
of t ho el evitrest imiiit ators of the in
gro dlialeect thait, in the lanigunlg of
the spo~ rt ing frater'niit y, "'eve'r traiv
eled along thre dusky(3 pike "' Plaini
wordits in bl1ack and wiite are feeble
to explre'ss he lainirienit Ju rdge
Bart le'tt ini his soft Sout hern necenllts
pots into the telling.
Whlen t he judge was on the bench,
tire Georgia nelgro wvas brouighit be
fore him, atccused of stonl ig a pig.
The ~ negro's eonse is t hel pinit of
thre stors.
"''JEd(gel,' said~ hll, 'I warii down in
de maarshu with dbe Cxlin when I sawv
d is little pig comninrg. LittleI pig,
says' 1, dloan you c~omo) dis wy. [De
oxon will hurt you, little pig.'
"'Jut do little pig kep'coiing to
wvard thle ox6n, saying, "Go, 00, oo."
'De little pig keeps coming
st raight for dat big ox on1 t he off sidle.
I says again: ''Go away little pig.
D)at big ox on thle off.si<de will kick
ye' suah,'' burt dalt litt.le pig city,
- We, we, we'," and1( li got's straight
for da~t old off ox. D)on dait 0o(d off
ox kicks dat little pig, and lie lays
out stifT on the ground.'
'Well,' interposedl Judge Bart.
Slett, cut ting short thle testiniony in
this importiant and1 highly pictur
esque litigation, 'I line you $25.'"
HBLD 50 POLICBMBN AT BAY.
A Negro Desperado in New Orleans Be
sieged in a Room and Holds the Fort
Against all Corners,
New Orleans, La., February 20.
After holding half a hundred police
en at bay for several hourt, during
which scores of shots were exchanged,
Lafayette Sims, a desperate negro,
was killed by the police early today
in a negro boarding house situated
on douth Rampart street. The room
in which he was besieged had to be
set on fire and the fire department
called out before Sims could be
driven from his post. As he at
tempted to escape, still carrying his
gun, he was shot down. The body
was taken to the morgue without any
demonstration from a mob of several
thousad negroes, who crowded the
vicinity of the tragedy.
The origin of the trouble was
trivial. Sims occupied a room in
the boarding house, in which there
were seven beds. On retiring last
night he locked the door and when
the landlord early this morning
asked him to open it so that another
lodger might be admitted Sims re
fused. Thent the landlord sent for
the police. Efforts to persuade Sims
to open the door failed and a hole
was smashed in it. Through the
aperture Sims began shooting. One
bu'let knocked a pistol from the
fingers of Officer Windstern and a
seCOnd shattered the lantern which
the oflicer carried. Thereupon ad
ditional policemen were sent. for and
the house tiurrounded.
Vlen reinforceinents had arrived
the negro landlord and an oflicr
igain wont, to the room and pleaded
with Sims to come out and surrender,
"No I won't," ht. answered with
an oath. "I'll shoot if you don't
go away; I am not, going to leave
here. They'll burn me in oil. They'll
try me."
Sims piled some furniture in the
room aganst t ho door and was pro
pared to fight for his life. As the
landlord and the oflicer retreated the
desperado fir'd at. them without
doing any damage. All efforts to
indne.' the prisoner to surrender
having proved ineflective, Snperin
t'clt'unet. Joturneie lecideld that there
was nothing to ho done but to smoke
the negro ont. An alarm was turned
in and a po:tion of the fire depart
ment brought to tihe scene.
A quantity of cotton, oil and 81.1
phur was sent for, the cotton rolled
ito ballIs antd I..t u1rated with oil, a
note at pplied~ o andI thle blazing sub
staniee hlted into the room, every
aivenne io if escape being guarded.
The uiritture in thle room caught
gieikly, lillinig the plaice with smoke
ai Ilamre. Simis hung on to hiis hid.
ig place unitil he wvas neoarly suffo
coted anid then made ia brea1k to
ttscape. As he appeared at the dloor
pat~irolmain Fred Smith firedl at him.
The ntegrio staggered, mortally
woO ideud. I rst aintly other piolicemleni
i redh ont him arid be fell dead. The
Ii remeri ex'. ig nishdio t he fli,mes a nd
he body was d ragged oniit 'and takeni
t.hoghi a hire of excited negroes to
t he tolice st at ion.
lIxrtmmrat ion of thle room follow
ig i Iho t ragedy showedi t hat Sims
hiad got tot i posssiH55dn of Ofli.e r
Wa ndaternrr 's re.volvero aftert shoot inrg
A White Man's Country.
[ News arid Courier.]
Last Srunrday night t ho llev Dr.
Newell D)wight hitilis (ofleredl a re
matrkablo prayer in which he said.
"W ask Thme, ohi, I,.ord, that
Thon wonhI rst raise up meon and save
us froma this new arid dtarenable
heresy thtt this is a white mne's
(outry, andI that there ts rio pla1ce
here for the black imain."
Thi' is a white mani's country, and
no~ru nmhber of prayers, whantever
their n ewspaper valueo, will affect
thiis condiit ion - a comh t ion wvhich is
acknowledged by the IBrook lyn Citi
zon as follows:
"l'he negro, it is now evidlenit , will
have to accept the fact thiat inr SothI
andiu NoirthI alike t his is a white rman 's
governmiert t, was so at thle heginiirg
anid is likely to remini so far into
lie fatotre, such Ipart as lie may ob
tamr in it being wholly dependent
upon the friendly Mentimtent of the
cormnrity in which his lot is ciast,
and riot at all uiporn t he inrtervent ion
of outside polit ioisms "'
Inisteadi of pray ing against the
"d.amuniabln heresy''" thiat holds that
this is a white mart's country, Dr.
Hilli had better he t ryirg to culti
vato a better fee, ing bet wennt the
races in the several comuntit is itn
which the ive togethr. iti w.-u
NEW 'CifBI CONStABLB.
Mr. U. B.' Hamnlet,of BarnWell, Gets the
Place Just Creatd by the Gen
eral Assembly.
[The State.]
A few days ago the legislature
passed the not creating the new office
of chief constable of the State liquor
constabulary, who will have the ap.
pointment of all the other cotsta
bles in the State, subject. to the ap
proval of the governor. The gov
ernor having approved the act, that
official has ended all speculation as
to who would get the place by an.
nouncing the appointment of Mr.
U. B. Haimet, of Barnwell. Mr.
Hammet is a man about 85 years of
age, and was recommended as a
man of the highest character, pos.
sessing peculiar qualifications for the
position.
It was stated last night that the,
appointment had given satisfaction
to those who had been endeavoring
to have others appointed.
More than Half
the banking business of the
United States is done on
capital less than one-third a
large as the assets of The
Mutual Life Insurance Com
pany of New York.
Over 67 per cent. of total bank clearances ofr
country in rrru VaFsed through New York
Clearing House.
Combined capital NewYork CityClearing House banl.
$103,202,500
Aets The Mutual Life Insurance Co. of New Y1r
$352,838,971
Your life insurance policy
is not protected by such secur
ity, unless it is in The Mutual.
Write to-day for "Where Shall I Insure?"
THE MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCI
COMPANY OF NEW YORK
RICHARD A. MCCURDY. President.
F. H. HYATT, Maiager., Columbia, S. I.
C. P. PELHAM, Agent, Newberry, S. V.
Full O L
Bottles O L
PDURE
OLE C OLD
LINCOLN Nw
We, the Dlstillers,ganaranton iil
old Nonen het t atany pric. We
atddress.EXPRESSPREPAtD,a
1 5 Full Bottles $3.45. t0 Full Bottles
15 Full Bottles $9.70. 21
Free glass anet corkrerew in ev , ox. Y.,
AMk:JRICAN .1l:PPLi ca4.. 652
THE SOUTHEP
The Great Hlgjhway' of Ti
THROtUGH THE SOU1
Excellent Service Quick Tim~
Any Tuip is a Pleasure
Tiravret via THE~ SOUTH
The Finest Dining-Car 5
For detailed haersaan as to Tickets
tatlens addreee the nearest Agent o
W- A. TUR R. S. Ht. 1EA RDW
Tl 11
Fl or ida -
A passenger service
and comfort, equipped wi
Dining, Sleeping and Th<
[For rates, Schedule,
tion, write to
WM.IJ
doubtless find considerable mieaion.
try gionrd in lils own town of Brook.
lye., and in hia ^wa Plymonth church.
How nuutey tim-groes are imembers of
that chuurch ? Does its pastor enr
courage them to join it? Does he as.
sociate with them, visit them at their
hotmes, invite them into his home,
live with them, make no difference
between them and his white neigh
bors? How are they treated in his
own community ? Are they preferred
for any employment? Are they
given a fair chance in any of the or
dinary occupations of life? Is there
a single store in Brooklyn where
there are colored "salesladies" or
colored sale3men ? Are the conduc
tors and motorman on the street rail
ways colored or white? Are there
any negroes on the police force?
Are white men not preferred to them
as coachmen and butlers and wait
ingtmen ? Does Dr. Hills encourage
the intermarriage of the young white
women of his congregation with the
young black m en of his community ?
If he was really in earnest in his
prayer why does he not try to shuffle
off his own prejudices before invok
ing the Almighty to rem)ve the pro
judices of others? He would doubt
less explain his aversion to the u,.gro
as a matte: of preference, but ii it
not a mattor of prejudice?
Many years ago there was a man
named Henry Ward Beecher. There
was al viys sornething in what. he
said, whether it was in his preaching
or his praying, but B'echer is dead,
and there is a wide gulf fixed be
twoen him and his latest successor,
the present pastor of Plymouth.
A Pretty Marriage.
The following description of lie
marriage, at Little Monutain, of Mr.
J. K. Derricl and MisH Lavenia We a
singer, is from the Carolina News of
the 19th.
A petty marriage was solemnized
in the Lutheran church last Thurs
day evening the contracting parties
being Mr. J. K. Derrick, of Little
Mountain, and Mss Lavenia Wes
singer. of Chapin. The church was
tastefully decorated with ferns, ivy
and pot flwers and a horseshoe,
made of evorgreeis and flowers was
suspended in front of the altar.
Messrs. Wilbur Frick and Pickens
R-iof, of Newberry college, acted as
ushers, and Mrs. E. B. Roof, of Lex
ington, presided at the organ.
At the appointed time the bridal
p.trty marched in to the strains of
the wedd(ing march in the following
order: Miss Belle Boland, of Little
Mountain, with Mr. J. P. Wilson, of
Newberry, Miss Carrie Wessinger, of
Chapin, with Mr Frank Boland of
Little Mountain. The attendants
were followed by t wo little flower
girls, Misses Stella Wessiniger and
Mary Susan Roof. The l-ride and
groom t hen came dlown the aisle and
were umet front of the altar by
1R.vs. J. K id i rd arid 0. 6 Sirea
rouse, who uinit ed t hem in ibhe holy
bonds.- o f wed lock according to the
ceremoniy of thI'- ICv'ngelicasl Lutbh
eran church.
The bride was at ti red in a be comn
ing gown of white organdlie, trimmed
in real lace and( white satin, i'nd( -ar.
rie-d a beunchl of carnat ions w ith a
bnochi- of oranege blosioms; in her
h.er.
After the imupiressive cere-mo.y the
b)ridal party and1( a niunobeer of~ ii ed
guests repaired to the hoe'i of the
bride's pirrenits, Mr. and Mr.-. J . 8.
We-ssinge'r, where an elegant suplper
was servedc T he bost and hosti-ss
were assisted by Mrs. Liura Mini
nick, Mr. aned Mr.. W. 11. Williams,
Mr. and Mrs. H C. Bailey, Mr. and
Mrs H- P. Me-atze.. anid Mr Samuel
Roof, who saw t hat all were ser v'ed
withI the miany delicious vinnds(l pre.
pared for the occasion.
The bride received many he-anti ful
ande( costly presente , riot iceable armong
which were ai sugar dlish eand creami
p)itchter of solid silver li ned with gold,
wvhich were presentead by ('ongress
nii n A. le. L ever.
The bride is one of Chapin's mrost
accompjlished danughters and lias a
host of friends here whoe, while they
regret. to lose hier, wish hier a long.
prosperouis arid happy Ii fe.
The~ groom was formerly a~ resi
dent of Chuapini, but nowv holdc ia po
sition with the Columibia, Newherry
and Laturens rail road at Little Moumn
tain as agent and( operator. Heb is a
young matn whIo is est"emedl bty all
who know him on account of htis
steady habits arid st rict dlevot ion to
his dnties.
TAVE YOUR COLLARS AND
.A. Cuffs right up to the scratch. No
waiting, no disappoiintment at the
Newhnrry St.eam Lundry
Weak
People
It's not what we eat, but what
we digest that makes strength.
The trouble with most weak
people is, they can neither eat nor
digest good food.
Such people can't work success
fully. It takes fuel to make steam,
and it takes food to make strength.
A young fellow came in the
store the other day. He was
white and thin. " I'm afraid I'll
have to give up my job," said he.
" I'm tired before the day is half
gone. I seem to be losing strength
all the time."
The clerk said: " Fred, I know
something that will help you. It's
Vinol. The boss has got hold of
a way to prepare cod liver oil so it
tastes all right. He calls it Vinol.
There is iron in it, and it's just the
stuff for fellows like you. It'll
give you an appetite. It won't
hurt you anyway. Lots of folks
round here are taking it, and they
tell their friends, and they come
and get it. If it don't help you,
come back and get your money."
We endorse what the clerk said.
We wouldn't have put time, money
and reputation into Vinol, if we
hadn't known it was different from
the general run of medicines.
About ninety-eight out of one
hundred run down people, weak
mothers, pale children, and old
people find it helps them.
W E. Peiham& Sn
DRUCCISTS.
-THE
Naional Bank of Newberry S C
(E8TABLISHED IN 1871.)
Capital - - - - - $160,000.00
Surplus and Profits - 96,866.88
General banking business .ransatcted
with promptness. Special attention to
collections. Correspondence solicited
Savings Department.
Deposits allowed interc-st at the rate
of 4 per cent per annum from date of
deposit. Interest payable January lst
and July 1st of each year.
M. A. CARLISLE, Pre*t.
T. .S DUNOAN, Cashier. ,
.T W. M. SIMMONS. Ast. ("e
34w45 EXPRESS
PREPAID
EN AGE
I SKEY
em ds1)1 00~I p it ad 7 yena
the folnlowving distilor's pricos. J
S6,55. 12 Full Bottles $7.90.
Full Bottles $15.90.
ar inoney, bact< If not .a, rprosented.
.N RAILWAY
lADE and TRAVEL
'HERN STATES.
eConvenient Schedules
Trip to those who
ERN RAILwAY.
-ervice in the World.
,Rates and SIeeping-Car reser
PTHE SOUTHERN RAILWAY.
Ad.t. Aesimaag C... P oe engeAgent,
D c. ATLANTA. CA.
G1 HfARg ouTliVtt
nrhe
--Cu ba.
unexcelled for luxury
th- the latest Pullman i
>roughfare Cars.
~laps or any informa
.CRAIO,
eneral Passenger Agent,
M/Hlmlnnto., N. C.
BLUE RIDGE RAILROAO
I. 0. BEA' TIL, Receiver.
In EfIect June 8, 19l .
1setWeeL' Anderson and WAlha11a.
1A8 ToUNr. wasTBoUiIw
ARIVE. LHAVI.
Mixed Mixed
No. 9. No, 12 ritatione. 10. 11 No.9
P.M. A.M. P.M. A.M I
8 10 95 ...............Belton............... 8 20 10 80
2 48 933........Anderson F. D......... 8 40 1110
24 930...... nderson P. D........ 8 45 1111
........ 92 ........ W est Anderson....... 8 49 .....
........ 9 09...............Denver.............. 8 69 ..... .
.--..... 902...............Autun......... 4 05 ........
........ 8 1 ......... endleton ........... 4 11
........ 847...............Cherry............... 4 18 ........
........ 814...... .Adauil............421
... 8 28 .....Jo dania Junet ...... 4 83 ........
--...... 82).-.............sen c u .......... 4 bb ........
4 40 ....
........ 803....... ..W est Union ......... 6 04 ........
":'"._800... ..Walalla ........ 5 9...
All regular irulufro . Ilion to Waihala,
have precedence over trains of ame olard
n oving in tin opposite direetton unless oth
orwise speoled by train order.
Will also stop> at the following stations to
take on and let of passengers: Phinney's
Jamtes and Sand y Springs.
J. K. AN LAIWun, Superintendent
Charleston andAcstornaCorolina Rwv Co.
Augusta and Asheville Bhort Line
$ehedul., In tfet July 0, 1902.
leuave Augusta..........0 10 ain 2 55 p n
Arrive Ureenwood...........12 44 p m .
Anderson ...7 lOp in
Laurens.......... 45 p 1080 am
Waterloo (H. 8.)... 1 12 p in
Greenville............12 22 p m 9
Glenn Springs...... 4 46 pm
Spartan burg......... 8 80 p in .m .
Saluda.............588p m
Handereonville.....6 08 p m .
Asheville......... 7 15 p m
l,uvoAshevillo.........7 i '...
8t>artanburg ........12 0f am 8 80 p m
GTee n Sprt i g.....10 00 a m
Greenville . ......12 15 p m I 46 p m
Laurens.. .......... 2 0> p m 6 80p in
Arrive Waterloo (1. H.)... 2 33 pn ...,.......,.
Greenwood ............ 2 G1 p m 7 45 pm
Lr'..vo Anderson .................7 25 a in
Augusia.......... 20p m 11 85A m
lAv. ('olut bA.....,.- --... 1120 m
N..wberry .......... 12 42 pm
C i.ton . . 125 pm
Arrive Uroenville....--- 896pm
.pnar.anbu.g .880pm
(h enn 8prings.... 4 00 pm
Leavc lounn 8p.ings...... 1000am
Spartnuburg-........ 1201 pm
(reonvill .2 6 pm
Arrlv Clinton....------........ 2 22 pm
Newborry------.--..... 8 06 pm
Co l . bia..... .. ...- 4 3+ pm
I'asost, a.d He't Line between Newbory
and (reenville. 8. artanbatrg and G'enn
Springs:
Conneotlo a from Newb'e ry via Columbia
Newburry and ,atien liailway.
For an' Infol niation wr,te.
ERN ' ' WILI IAMiS, Gen. Pas,. Agt.
Aususta, da.
T. M. 1 Trafilo "ana.ger.
(E stern Standard '1 ir, e.)
Southbound. Not thbound.
ShiLdute in Effect August 2ith 1902
STATIO' 8.
8 40 am Lv Atlanta (s.A.L) Ar. 8 60 pm
10 50 an A thons 6 19 pm
11 65 am Elberton 5 17 pm
2 . pm Abbeville 4 0 pin
l 22 pmn Greenwood 8 85 hm
2 1b1. Al Clinton (D)in'r) lay. 2 46 pm
(o.&W 0.)
10 00 ant lv Glenn Springs Ar 4 00 pi
12 15 pm k3parianbur 8 80 pm
12 2 1.u Greenville 3 25 pm
(Harris Springs)
1 121 m Waterloo 2 85 put
1 4'41 0 a r Laurens (Din'r) Lv 2 (7 pu'
63 52
202 Lv L.aureia Ar 160
2(9 " Parks A r 1 42
22-. Clinton.. 1 80
2 34 Ooldville 1 17
2 43 .Kinard.. 1 10
249 Gary... 105
254 ..Jalape ., i'
3 10 Newberr) 124(1
3 24 Prosperit:; 12 82
3 84 ....81ghs.... 12 23
389 Lt Mountain 12 19
AM.
3 61 ...Chapin... 1269
357 Hilton 1202
4 01 W hite Rock 11 59
47 Ballontine 11 64
4 17 .. Irm o..... 1 46
4 24 ..Leaphart.. 11i40
4 45 ArOolumtbiaL 11 20
pim a~m
4 55 LvColun bia (A.o L.)Ar 1l 30
6 20 Sumntor 9650
9 20 Ar Charleston Lv 7 0
Traia 53 and 62 ari-ive anid depart from
now union depot,
Trains 22 ared 80 fr om A. C. rG. freight, depot
WVest Georvais stn et
For Rates, Time Tables, or further informna
Lion call on any Agent, or write to
W. U. CHILDis, T. Mf. EMERSON,
P'residuent. Trafile Manager.
I. I". LIVINUMTON. H1. M. EMERI80N,
. 80. Ait. '-nn'1 Frt. & Pass A gt.
5iwbu (. r . wmnpet. N C1.
ATLANTIC COA8T LINE !
(CONDEN6Ei' lJCHED)TTLE,
WILM INOTON N (,, l uly 21t ilg,,ag
Throu h Trains Chlarleston to Gr enyile
No. '2. No. 58.
7.00 am......Charleston, 8. C.A 9.26 pm
8.35 a n...u ... Lane.......... A r 6.?0 pm
9050 a o... ... mte .........Ar: 4B55pni
1ti.10) a'n .......Col um bia...Lv 8.45 pm
-.99 an... r Protpttr ity. ...Lv 2.24 pm
i2-4a p -.A r.Nwberry.....Lv 2.10 pm
.20 on..j...r. ...ln ton....Lv '.25 pm
.47 pn.. A r.......aurn...... Lv 2.10 pm
.'5 r'r.At1...Grenvill .... Lv 1J.22 pmn
C*i. .. r...8partant urg ....Lv 1215 pm
Fi'O it CO1.UlM ii1.\. 8. U.
rtivI ;t I.'t or o en'S'n ; 1 rli g Ont
t.;' p ta; W!V m'tutona :1.261) a.
ckstiy .\1 nt .i,s, ; we do .On an.
* tt r?M. On ; ieehn 1'!-. . 12 .n
.6 . i' ; Chtetaw 11.46 \
i l- P1hot 2 ' I' ; 4atavil e
- h . at -n -; 1 * .-' ' ; Wu ington
t0i i VII. itte'r le '20 11n ; Rooky
MI. to. I ' . . . in ;o ~, -5 -1 4 e t; yc
3. r... nytg .e -4 p..; Uichr, .' dl 1.41 pi
-WilI. m9r; Ne w Yot k 7.l .< am
Puiturn:i1n e'-ing U,-r NOw York to T'mr-a
Pttlirant D)tiu.g Unr:~ New York to Cavannsnah.
For ratos, ech dut' a, "te . write
w. .1. ('.alg on P a.. A t,., Wilmington
N C.
T. Mi. P.n erason, T1rr tile Ma'ager, illr ing.
ton &" C
11. M. 14Ctetrton, Aa.'i Traf'c Mat ager, Wil.
nI in15on N.i'
-W HISK EY
ALL F ALL
KIlN DS 2 PURPOSES.
"Special Brand" Corn Whiskey, $ 1.25
Popular Log" Corn Whiskey 1.50
"'Popular Log,"' Old, Smooth,
Mellow ---------... 2.00
"Private Stock," 4-gt. cae. 2.50
"Private Stock," 12-qt. case . .7.00
"HuntingCreek " Rye, 12-qt. case 7.00
"Old [lung Creek" Rye 12-qt.
case.... .. .. .. . .. ... .10.00
Apple Brandy.-.-.-.-... . .. . .50
Charge of 25c. for 1-gal., 85c. for
2-gal., and 45c. for 3-gal, jugs, and 75c.
for 4 1-2-gal. kegs; when returned pro
p)aidl, they will be taken back at cost.
J. C,jSOMERS & O,, Dis.,
STATESgILLE, North Carolina.
M cine or whiskley, a
large book f Far
ieulars on home".
AO SAilatorlum treat
Whiskey Cure ON. Proriet

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