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Orangeburg times. (Orangeburg Court House [S.C.]) 1877-1881, December 22, 1877, Image 1

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' 1 ? , ? . ? : i ? , , ... _ ,. . ??' - ? V"-1-!-?-~--??>-? - ? ? MB. , . ? - -
TWO DOLLARS PER ANNUM. \ GOD OUR COUNTRY. ALWAYS IN ADVANCE
VOLUME Y_ SATURDAY MORNINC?, DECEMBER 2% 1877. N?k?FS
DeTreville & Heyward
ATTORNEYS AND COUNSELLORS
AT LAW
Orangebarg C. h., S. O.
Will practico in the various Courts
<rf fie State
W. J. DoTreviHe, James S. Heyward
Jnno3 tf.
W. B.^READWELL
DENTIST
"Will attend to patients at their residents
cither in Town or Country. Address
through Post Office or call on me at resi
dent Conor Rusaol and Tread well Streets.
Prompt attention will he given and satis
faction guaranteed.
W. II- TREADWELL.
nov 3 1v.
DENTISTRY.
$
Dr. L. S. Wolfe can he found at his office
over Ezckiel's Store where he is prepared
to execute work on toe most im pro vat
Btylcs, at short notice and at rcasonab
prices* All work guaranteed.
iuno 30 tf.
Knowlton & Wanuamaker,
ATTORNEYS
AND
COUNSELLORS AT LAW,
Oruiigcuurg ?? ii., s. O.
A*g. B. Knowlton, P. M. Wannamnker,
Otangcburg C. IL - St. Matthew**,
ranv 5 1S77 tf
DENTISTBY.
OK. JL F. MITCKKXFUSS
Dontist Rooms over Store of Mr. Ceo. II.
Cornelson's.
JH?y** Charges Reason able.
NO MISTAKE!
take HEPATINE
Ttso Great Remedy for all Diseases of the Liver.
take HEPATINE
Tka Croat Cure for Dyspepsia and Liver DLvcase.
take HEPATINE
The Great Cure for Indige-*ion and Liver Disease.
take HEPATINE
*X*k> Groat Lure for Constipation and Liver Disease,
{flw Great Cure for Sick Headache & Liver Disease.
take HEPATINE
Qreait Cure for Chills, Fevers and Liver Disease.
take HEPATINE
Ifoo Croat Cure for Bilious Attacks and Liver Disease.
take HEPATINE
titty Mtmc Stomach, Headache and Liver Disco??.
take HEPATINE
8fe Female Weakness, General Debility and Liver
Disease.
ffl f? DYSPEPSIA?
I I \ A state of the Stomach in which
L JL ILj its functions are disturbed, often
?-W without the presence of other
diseases, attended with loss of
it*, nausea, heartburn, sour stomach, rising of
! after eating, sense of fullness or weight in the
h, acrid or fetid eructations, a fluttering or
J at the pit of the stomach, palpitations, illiuion
' fhe senses, morbid feelings ana uncajine?* of vari
es kind*, and which is permanently cured if you take
PE3I IB PATIiNT^J
(AT is:
OonstipatiofiL or
Coativ&neee f
state of th? bowels la which
the evacuate"* do uut take place
I Oast rued by mature and arc inordinately bard and
lied withd'ifiiculty, fcaued by a low state of the
?ti v-h'^" diminish** the action of the muscular
o/ttv stoasach. This disease is easily cured if
rwsvfaho
:bpati?tjii
INDIGESTION'
A condition of the Stomach pro
duced by inactivity of the Liver,
when the food is not properly
digested, and in which condi
tfce sufferer fa liable to become the victim of
rly every disease that human flesh is heir
fills, fevers and general prostration. It is positively
'r-cd if you tnko
Sick *fc Nervous
HEAD ACHE?
It was at on- time supposed that
the scat of the brain was in the
attxnach. Certain It is a wonderful sympathy exists
?etween the two, and what effects one has an itnme
iata effect on the other. So it is that a disordered
nach invariably is followed by a sympathetic ?c
l of the brain, nnd headaches all arise from this
cause. Headaches are easily cured if you will take
tu IE PATI nsris
Sour Stomach?
Heartburn ?
1 The former is the primary cause
of the latter. A sour stomach
Creates the heat and burning sensation. The con
touts of the stomach ferment and turn sour. Sick
tstomach, followed by griping, colic and diarrhoea,
cAan occur.
When the skin is yellow, TAKE
EPATIIE
When the tongue Is coaled, TAKE
EEEPATIME
DEATH TO DISEASE!
S"or bitter, bad taste in the mouth, YAUCE
E PAT I NE
?5"A teaspoonful in a wineglass full of water, as
(directed on bottle, and you never will be sick. This
Iis saying a great deal, but we
MAKE NO MISTAKE!
TAKE
HEPATINE
^ FIFTY DOSES IN EACH BOTTLE.
FOR SALE 11Y
A. C. DUKES. Drnggirf.
ftnaylQ 1877 \j
HORSESHOEING
AND
BLACKSMITH WORK
BY
THOMAS RAY,
(Uussell St. Opposite Hurley's Corner.)
All manner of Smith work and Horse
shoeing properly done.
Fancy Sen II work. Railing for Grave
Lou. A trial solicited.
THOMAS RAY:
pept 1 tf.
All the Year Round Always the Same
C. F. JACKSON,
THE LEADER OF
I^OW PRICES
in
I>ry C*oo<1b ami Notion*
128 MAIN STREET.
COLUMBIA, S. C.
oct 27 3 4 s
E. R. COWPERTHWAIT,
FURNITURE
WARE ROOMS,
?205 KINO STREET,
West side, Four Doors aliove Wcntwortli,
CIIARI.ESTOS, S. C.
LARGE STOCK ifc LOW PRICES.
No Charge for Packing and Shipping,
sopt 10 1877 6m
CHEAP MONEY!
$(50,000 for S10.
The Commonwealth
Piize Distribution Company
Incorporated by Act of the Kentucky Legis
lature, wi'l have their next piihlic Draw
ing in the Public Library Hall, Louisville,
Ky., on December 81, 1>'77. Drawing posi
tive or the Money Refunded. They will
distribute at that time ?:<iS1 Prizes amount
inp to $320,000 Including the following
cash prizes, each.a small fortune in itself:
$50,000, 920,000 910,000,
95,000.
This Drawing is under the same Manage
ment that bo ajbjy Qndfsntisfaetorilv c in
^ftllll^^u'^c^it^-^r.Wiug of the Ken
tucky Cash Distribution Co; Whole Tick
ets, "$10.00; Halves. $5; Quarter. S2.?0.
For Tickets, address G; W\ BARROW ?
CO., General Manager*. Courier Journal
Buildings, Louisville. Ky., or THOS H.
HAYS & CO., (Jener il Agents, C'J7 Broad
way, N. Y.
Send for Circular. ""(sSfl
We have no connection whatever rfi'A an.'/
other Lottery, Jfislribntion, or ^>cme of any
kind.
G. W. BARROW Jk CO.Oeu'l Manager?,
vno 3 7t
MUSJ? FOR ALL.
Prof. AA'TON RERG oners to instruct
on the f'inno on the nio?t reasonable terms.
Vine Lessons for $2.50.
The greatest care will he taken to give
satisfaction. Ladies who wish a finishing
touch to their Musical Education have, an
opportunity to go through a course of Ber
tihi'a and Cromer'a, Etrudcft, Mozard and
Bethovcn'd Senaten.
ANTON BERO,
Graduate from the Conservatory of
Ste-chholm.
pept 8 tf
A U Tt O II A
Lager Beer Saloon
BY
Ii. lt. JESSEN,
AT
McMASTER'S BRICK STORE.
Respectfully informs the Citizen? of
Orangeburg and vicinity that he has opened
a lirst class Saloon stocked with the bent
goods the market a fiords.
Also will open on the first of September
next a first clas< Kating Sa'oon where meals
can he procured at all hours of the day and
night.
2 My goods and prices tire guaranteed to
give satisfaction.
A trail i? respectfully solicited.
aug 18 ly
POtTTZ'S
HORSE AND CATTLE POWDERS,
_[ oare or prevent DIaeaM.
1*0 1IOBBB Will dlO Of COHO. BOTTB OT LCSO I*
Vjib, If Fontc'a l*owd?'.s are uned la time.
KoaU'arowdcrswlU enro and prevent lion emutiA
Kon?'a I'owdenwUl prevent Gavkb ix Fowl, c*
Vr Muiiy Turkeya.
Four's rowrfcrtwHl Increase tho (jtitntlty of milk
lad cream twenty per OttuU. and nuke tlio buttor Ann
indawoot. . _
KonU'e ro-wdem will enro or provont almostSTM1
l)inv.is? that Hone? and Cattlo aro heir to.
KouTz'a I'owbwu! win. oxva SATiarxono*.
Sold over/whero.
DAVID B. TOTJT3, Proprietor,
BAZ.TXMO&B. VAi
Sold by Dr. A. C DTJK KS.
And Dr. J. G. WANNAMAKER.
may 10 1877
FOR S t\TA\:.
A house and lot nt Jamison's Turn Out
hounded on tho lCast by the 8. C. Rail
Eond* Will he sold chenp. Apply to
MRS. H. M. ANEREWP.
Mlgll tf.
[communicated.]
Editor Orangeburg Times :
Permit me through your valuable
columns to suggest to our Represen
tatives in the Genetal Assembly aud
more especially to Representative S.
Dibblo, whoso abili:y a.s a lawyer
renders him moat m-cful iu this par
ticular, and o ?r .Sena-tor Hon. 8. L
Duncan whose untarnished reputa
tion ought to make effective his in
fluence iu the Senate, to repeal Sec
tion ? of the Act of 1872-3 "Entitled
An Act" to Revise and Amend An act
Entitled "An Act" to reduce all Arts
and parts of Acts to Determine and j
Perpetuate the Homestead into one
Act and to Arneuti the same : Tho
Section of the Statute referred to pro
vides that "No wdver of the right of
homestead however sol em I y executed
shall be binding upon tlie head of a
family." Under this provision ofour
law no person, whose misfortune it is
to possess less than 01,000 real pro
perty and ?/300 personal property can
avail himself of the use of his pro
perty to the end of securing himself or
his friend from the most unjust im
prisonment on the most unfounded
charge whatsoever. Experience has
brought the truth of this statement
home to many of your readers, black
and white.
Tho homestead act is a humane
provission of our law, as well as a
preventative against a landed Aris
tocy on the one side and pauperism
on the other. It provides Sijme means
against families resting on the County
for support, yet notwithstanding this
virtue of the Homestead act, italao
as a fort said, causes many a poor
white or colored person to lie in jail,
soon after the close of one General I
Session to '.he commencement of
another upon some charge which the
Trial Justice i-i unacquainted with the
case or the subject?no fault, of theirs
and also the nccn-jftd-01' those who
oiler themselves us
not possessed of ^le val** ? exceeding
enomotts sum ok 61500. Who can
reflect on the a vages ofour late civil
war r.nd say that a man ought to own
Si?OO by hottest toil ? More than all
this to restrain a man from the abso
lute use of his property, is in my oyin
ion contrary to the doctrine of Fee
simple where the estate isuncoudition
la and the property absolute. While
we keep in our minds eye the protec
tion tho act gives to the family it
must be remembered how fcarful y
it works against that head of a family
who is deprived of securing his liber
ty from unjust restraiut, by o ffering
his property in security of his ap
pearance At the proper time and be
fore the proper Tribunal upon any
charge made. Let the Section of the
uct be repealed or the value of the
Homestead reduced and this will
bring gladness to all.
Yours Truely,
D. A. St it a k er.
Reunited at a Child's Grave.
Many years ago a young gentleman
ol Manchester, of good character and
honorable connections, had the mis
fortune t?> fall out with his wife?a
beautiful girl of only eighteen sum
mers. lie speedily arranged his busi
ness affairs, and \vi thoutformalit>
look an abrupt leave of his wife and
a sweet little bob". He traveled far
and lingered long in many strange
lands, without communicating intelli
gence of his whereabout.), and without
knowing, or curing to know, the fate
of bis dear ones ut home Iu the
meantime the little (mo had passed
away, and the w ile, broken-hearted
and disconsolate, kept the faith she
had pledged at the altar. Many
years had elapsed since her truan t
husband had left her, ami in all that
time it was her habit to visit the Hille
grave of her dead infant, with the
same deep mourning dress she had
dunned tho day of the burial. A few
evenings ago it so chanced that fate
brought her husband hack to this
city, who, immediately upon his ar
rival, sought out the .Mttlo grave,
where, by tho dim twilight, ho en
countered a stange figure in black. A
heavy veil hid the face; but his was
open and clear, and seemingly un
altered. The discovery of cither's
Identity was but a moments lira*?a
groan?a shriek?aud husband and
wife firmly clasped in loving em
-brace.?Richmond Slatc.
A Key to a Person's Name.
By tho accompanying table of let
lers, the name of a necsou or word
nmy be found out in the folio win g
manner:
A BD II P
C C E I Q
E F F J It
G G G K S
I J i? Ij T
K K M E U
M N N N V
O O O O \V
Q, R T X X
8 S V Y Z
U V V Y Z
w w w \v
Y Z
"S Let the person who-c name you
wish to know inform you in which of
ibe upright columns the first letter of
his name is c?ut?ined. If it be found
in but one column it is the top letter ;
11 it occurs in more than one column,
it is found by adding the alphabe-iacl
numbers of the top letters of these
Columns, and the sum will be the
number of the letter sought. By
Jkking one letter at a time in this
way, the whole can be ascertained.
For example take the word Jane. J
is found in the two columns commenc
ing with B and II, which are the
second and eighth letters down the
alphabet; their sum is ten, and the
J tenth letter down the alphabet is J,
I the letter sought. The next letter.
I A, appears in but one column, whete
stands at the top N is seen tu the
ddumns headed B, D and H; these
Jk^he^sja?^'!, fourth and eighth^t
give the fourteenth, and so on. The
nie of this table will excite no little
curiosity among those unacquainted
with the foregoing explanation.
- - -
Air ond Light.
Air is essential to human life, and
as respiration destroys its vital quali
tics, the ventilation of rooms which
ure intended for habitation should be
a primary object in all architectural
plans. Architects, however, seldom
provide for the ventilation of rooms
otherwise than as they provide for
the admission of light. Now, the
properties of light and air, with re
ference to our domestic requirements,
piffer in some important particulars
?of which it may not be amiss to
give a brief enumeration. Light
moves with uniform velocity; air is
eotneiiines quiescent, and sometime*
moves at the rate of thirty miles ttu
hour. Light, diffuses itself with much
uniformity; air passes jn a current
from the point of its entrance to that
of its exit. Light, whatever be its
velocity, has no sensible effect on tho
human frame. Air, in the shape of
a partial current, is both olfonsive to
the feelings ami productive of serious
diseases. Light, once admitted,sup
ples our wants till nightfall. Air
requires to be replaced at very short
intervals. Light may be convenient
ly admitted from above; air requires
to be admitted on the level of tho
sitter. Light, by the nfU of ground
glass, may bo modified permanently
Air requires to be variously adjusted
according to its direction, its velocity,
the seasons, the time ot t he day, the
number of persons assembled, etc.
Be Agreeable at Heals.
Every ons can do something to add
to the social life at the. table. If one
cannot t^k, lie can listen or ask quo*
lions and draw out. others who can
talk. Good listeners arc as necessary
as good talkers. Nuver argue at tho
table; but tell pleasant stories, relate
or rend anecdotes and look out for the
good of all. Sometimes a single
anecdote from a paper starts a convor
sntion that lasts during the meal
time.
A family table ought to be bright
and cheerful, a sort of domestic altar,
where every one casts dowu his or ho r
Offering, great or fiinall, of pleasant
ness and peace; where, for at least a
brief space in the day, all annoyauces
aro laid aside, all stormy tempers
hushed, all quarrels healed; every
one being glad and content to sit
down at tho same board and eat tho
same bread and salt, makinjj it,
whether it were a rich repast, or a
dinner of herbs, equally a joyful, al
most sacramental meal.?Dr. IIol
brbok.
Who are the Blessed?
Blessed is the man who minds his
own busiuess and attends ouly to his
own affairs, aud not the affairs of his
neighbors.
Blessed is tho woman who never
says to her husbaud, "I told you so."
Blessed is the man who can sew ou
his buttons when the baby is crying.
Blessed is the motber-iu-law who
neves reminds you that you married
above your station.
. Blessed is tho rich relation who
never looks down on you?when you
are in ihe gutter.
Blessed is the poor relation who
never looks up to you?for money.
Blessed is the old maid that don't
hate old people aud children.
Blessed is the old bachelor that
don't hate cats and canary birds.
Blessed are the married people that
don't wish they weresiugle.
Blessed aro the single people that
are contented to remain so.
Blessed is the husbaud ?4io r.evcr
says bis mother's pies were better
than his wife' are.
Blessed is the wife (formerly a
widow) who never calls ur tho vir
tues of her "dear departed" for No. 2
to emulate.
^^Bda^^ja^luw^
wh.it sho is going to do with it.
Blessed is the woman who don't
scold when the stove pipe falls down
on the dinner table and?blessed is
the mun who can fix it up without
swearing.
Blessed is the friend who never re
quires the loan of your umbrella.
Blessed is the neighbor who is so
busy with bia own affairs that be has
no time to pry into yours.
Where are the blessed ?
Echo nnswers, "Where?"
His Telephone.
A Detroit saloon keeper has suffer
ed pecuniary loss at the t.auds of dead
beats, and has ransacked his brain
for a remedy It does not pay to
knock a man down because he has no
money, aud harsh words collect a
crowd aud give a place a hard name.
The other day the saloouist got the
idea be bad beon struggling after.
Ho ringed up a wire, a mouth-piece,
and other parts of a telephone, and
was ready for the first case. It came
along yesterday morning. A well
dressed and deceut- looking man cal
led for brai.dy, swallowed it aud soft
ly said :
"I'll call around and settle as soon
as I can get a check cashed."
"All right?all right," smiled the
saloouist, and he stepped back to the
mouth -piece and called out:
"Chief of Police, are you in ?"
The beast halted to hear what was
going on, and the saloonist continued :
"All right. I want to give you a
description of a suspicious-looking
character just gouo out of ray saloon.
Are you ready ?"
'I bere was au interval of two or
three seconds, and the saloouist went
on :
"About five feet eight?light hair
?blue eyes?goatee?browu over
coat?black?"
I ''Say, you ?" exclaimed tho beat,
"here's your fifteen cents forthat
brandy 1 I had some change in my
vest pocket 1"
"Oh?ah?yea,"smiled the saloou
ist, and, taking tho money, ho went to
the mouth-piece and called :
"It's all right?I mado a mistake?
man is as good as wheat!''
The beat walked out without a
word, but as bo reached the street ho
growled :
'?That was a dead give away on mo,
and I'd like to punch oiu Professor
Bell's head about half au hour."?De
troit Fret) Press.
Trial by Jury, or How It's Done.
The jury then retire to consider
their verdict, * * *
Foreman?Well, gentleman, what
shall it bo ? For the defendant or tho
plaintiff"? I say for the plaintiff'?
damages ?1,000.
Number Two?Nonsense. You
mean the. defendant He was in tho
right, and nothing shall make iuj give
in if I stay here all night.
Number Three?Don't say that.
Because I have a dinner party at 7.
Number Four?Aud I promised
my wife to bo back at 0.
Number Five?I say ditto to Mr.
Foreman. Only make it a farthing
damages. Nothing shall move mo
from that.
Number Six?Which was the
plaiutiff?
Number Seven?Why, the one
who refused to pay the bill, don't
you Know ?
Number Eight?Lor bless me, I
thought he was the defendant.
Number Nine?Como, gentlemen,
it's getting late. Make up your miuds.
I don't care which you give it for; in
fact, I thought both sides in the
wrong.
Number Ten?Did you? I thought
both sides in the right.
Number Eleven?It's no uso talk
ing. I tell you I mean to stick to tho
defendant. %^
Number Twelve-\And I to the
plaintiff. Damage?, . ^,000. Not a
peuny less; mind you, njjt a penny
less!
Foreman?I see,,.
toss the shilling, if you will be good
enougn to cry beads or taUs.
The jury return after a few minu
tes' ahseuce. Verdict for the plaintiff
?damages forty shillings.?London
Punch.
A Terrible Tragedy.?Passen
gers by tho Wilmington train last
evening report a horrible tragedy
as having occurred yesterday morn
ing in Kobeson County, about ten
miles from Lumborton. Two men,
Grimslty and Falk, nut in the road
and became involved in an alterca
tiou, which led to a fight, in the pro
gress of which Grirasley drew a pistol
and fired upon Falk, killing hiui al
most instantly. Thereupon a son of
Urimsjey, who was present and wit
nessed the difficulty, moved by some
impulse which is not yet explained,
produced a pistol aud killed his
lather even before the breath bad left
the bedy of the latter's victim. Young
Grimslcy then escaped. It is said
that the elder Gri.nsley had threat
end to kill his son, aud that the latter
stuod in fear of his life at the bauds
of his father, but, so far as is learned,
there was.no inimediato cause for tho
patricide, as the young man was in no
present danger.? Charlotte (N. C.)
Obserrcr.
The origin and meaning of tho
word "wpman" having been quite re
cently under discussion in tho pages
of tho Londou Notes and Queries, a
Dublin man eeuds the following old
verse which he lately came across in
his readings:
When live hrought woe to nil mankind,
Old Adam called her woe-man;
But when sheuWd with love ho kind,
Ho then pronounced it woo-man;
But now with folly and with prido
Their husband's pockets trimming,
The ladies arc ho full of irAnna.
That people call them whim-men.
..- mm 4> ?
Gov. Colquitt, in a recent speech
at Columbus, Georgia, forcibly ap
pealed to bis people to make an effort
to regain their former prosperity and
social customs. This, ho contended,
could only bo done by raising their
supplies at home, paying oui of debt,
having full cribs and tmoke-hoUses
again, and building up onco moro
homes in which they could take a
pride.

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