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The watchman and southron. (Sumter, S.C.) 1881-1930, January 17, 1894, Image 1

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fag SUMTER WATCHMAN, Established April, 1850. "Be Just and Fear not-Let al?the Ends thou Aims't at, be thy Country's, thy God's and Truth's." THE TRUE SOUTHRON, Established june, 1266.
Consolidated An?. 2,1S81. SUMTER, S. C., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 17, 1894. New Series-Toi. XIII. No. 25.
PuUisiied Every Wednesday,
INT. Gr. Osteen,
SUMTER, S. C.
TERM3:
Two Dollars per annum-io advance.
' ADVERTISEMENTS*
One Square first insertion..................$1 00
Every subsequent insertion-. 50
Contracte for three months, or longer will
be made at reduced rates.'
Ail communications which subserve private
interests wiil be charged for as advertisements. .
Obituaries and tributes of respect, will be j
charged fori
Office and Mills at Junction of W
W BM (f SUMTER,
SUMTER, S. C.
CITY AND COUNTY* DEPOSITORY.
Transacts a general Banking business
Also has
A Savings Bank Department,
Deposits of $1.00 and upwards received.
Interest calculated at the rate of 4 per cent,
per annum, payable quarterly.
W. P. B. HAYNSWORTF;,
W. P. RHAXX, President.
Cashier-.
THE S1H0NDS NATIONAL BANK
OF SUMTER
STATS, CITY AND COUNTY DEPOSI?
TORY, SUMTE*, S. C.
Paid np Capital .... . $75,000 00
Surplus Fund ...... 11,500 00
Liabilities of Stockholders to
* depositors acceordiog to the
law governing National Banks,
sn excess of their stock . '. $75,000 00
Transacts a ,General Banking Business.
Careful attention given to collections.
SAVINGS DEPARTMENT.
Deposits of $1 and upwards received. In?
terest allowed at the rate of 4 per cent..per
annum. Payable quarterly, on first days of
January. April, July and October.
R. M. WALLACE,
L. S. CABSOS, President.
Aug 7._Cashier._
INSURANCE.
INSURE TOUR
LIFE
-WITH THE
MUTUAL LIFE
Insurance Company,
OP NSW YORK, THE LARGEST MON I ED
INSTITUTION IN THE WORLD.
Take your Accident Policy in the
EMPLOYERS' LIABILITY
OP ENGLAND.
Insure against Fire in
THE CONTINENTAL
OF NEW YORK.
THE MERCHANTS,
OP NEWARK, N. J.
THE INSURAN?E CO., OF
NORTH AMERICA.
THE QUEEN OP AMERICA.
THE PHONIX ASSURANCE
OF ENGLAND.
THE NORWICH UNION
OP. ENGLAND.
THE MECHANICS AND
TRADERS of N. O.
All First Class and represented by
ALTAMONT MOSES.
A. WHITE & SOI,
Fire Insurance Agency,
ESTABLISHED 1866.
Represent, among other Companies :
LIVERPOOL* LONDON k GLOBE,
NORTH BRITISH k MERCANTILE,
HOME, of New York.
UNDERWRITERS' AGENCY, N. Y.,
LANCASTER INSURANCE CO.
Capital represented $75,000,000.
Feb. 12_
NOTICE OF COPARTNERSHIP.
_:
THE undersigned have associated them?
selves together as copartners for the
Dr ac tice of law.
R. 0. PURDY,
MARK REYNOLDS.
Samter, S. C., Dee. 22, 1893.
RICE MILLS] CORN MILLS,
SAW MILLS.
SLICE PLANTERS and RICE MILLERS can
bay a single machine,.that wi-1 clean, hull
and polish rice ready for market for $350.
Corn millers can boy. best FRENCH BURR
MILL, in iron frame, folly guaranteed-ca?
pacity teo bushels meal per hour for $115.
Saw millers can buy best variable friction
i FEED MILL from $190 up to the largest
size, also Gang Rip Saws, Edgers' Swing
I Saws, Plaoing Machines and all other Wood
Working Machinery. Also
I Talbott's Engines and Boilers.
Special discounts made to cash purchasers
Can meet any competition, quality considered
V.C. BADHAM,
Apr 19-0 COLUMBIA, S. C.
J . B* C ARR}
Contractor and Builder,
Sumter, S. C.
DEALER IN
Rough and Planed Lumber, Doors, Blinds,
Sash, Laths,
^ Cypress Shingles,
Lime, Glass and General Building Supplies.
. Mill Work
Of all kinds made to order, such as
MANTLES,
DUOR AND WINDOW FRAMES,
STORE FRONTS,
MOULDINGS AND TURNED WORK
OF-EVERY DESCRIPTION.
. C. &. A.. and C. S. & ?. R. R's.
THE NEW YORK
WEEKLY HERALD
FOR 1894.
Will be without Question America's
-LEADIN6 FAMILY PAPER.
The reputation that the Weekly Herald bas
enjoyed for many years of being the- best
borne newspaper in the laud will be mater?
ially added to during the year of 1994. No
pains or expense will be spared to make it in
every department the most reliable, inter?
esting and instructive of all weekly news?
paper publications. p
It will be proved io many ways.
A number of new features and depart?
ments will be added. Tbe latest development
in all fields of contemporaneous human
interest will be ably descossed from week to
week by accomplished writers.
THE NS WS OF THE WORLD.
will be given in a concise but complete form.
Every important or interesting event, either
at borne or abroad, will be duly described in
the columns of the Weekly Herald.
In politics tbe Herald is absolutely inde?
pendent and sound. It tells the right and
wrongs of all sides without fear.
Farmers and stock raisers cannot af:brd to.
be without the Weekly Herald during the
coming year. It will contain a regular de- ,
partaient each week devoted exclusively to
subjects of timely interest to them and giving
many valuable suggestions and new
ideas.
The women and children of the land will
find in the Weekly Herald a welcome visitor.
The household and children's pages will be
both instructive and entertaining. They will
abound ia bints and receipts which women so
much value.
A brilliant array of novels and short
stories by the best writers in America and
England bas been secured, so that fiction will
be one of the most attractive features ia
the Weekly Herald during 1894.
In fact, tbe Weekly Herald will be a ma*
gazine of- the highest order, combined with
a complete newspaper.
Kow is the Time to Subscribe.
Only Dollar Ayear.
SEND FOR SAMPLE COPY.
Address,
THE WEEKLY HERALD,
HERALD SQUARE, NEW YORK.
Order Your
PROVISIONS AND GROCERIES
FROM
GEO. ?. STEFFENS & SON,
Wholesale Agents, Charleston, S. C.
-Agents for
MOTT'S CIDES,
SED SEAL CI&ARS,
and DOVE HAMS.
NEW LUMBER YARP,
IBEG TO INFORM MY FRIENDS AND
the public generally that my Saw Mill
located on the C. S. & N. R. R., just tack of
my residence, is now in full operation, and I
am prepared to furnish all grades of Yellow
Pine Lumber from unbled timber, at prices
according to grades.
Yard accessible on North side of residence.
J. B. ROACH.
Feb 18.
j OTTO P. WEITERS,
WHOLESALE
GROCER,
AND
LIQUOR DEALER,
OFFICE AND SALESROOM :
183 East Bay, Charleston, S. C.
j Nov. 7-0
The House Divides !
Shell to Lead in the Campaign
Against Irby.
March Convention Practically Called.
Wheo the announcement was made
io December that the campaign this
year would opeo early io Jaouary. a
great aiaoy bad doubts about it. Few
outside the "charmed circle'' then
knew that tbe political pot within the
ranks of the Reform party was boil
iog over, aod that there was a fight
within the ranks of the heretofore
solid phalanxes of Reform, imineot.
But such was the case. It bas been
brewing for a long time, and DOW there
is a crisis. ?
There are to be two factions io the
Reform party io the comiog campaign.
That fact is now no looger denied by
the leaders of the more powerful fac?
tion. The indications are that Senator
Irby, the present State chairman, will
lead the faction which represents the
minority, and that be will have but
little to do with the real, manipulation
of the coming compaign as far as the
Reform element is concerned. He aod
several followers some months ago cut
loose almost entirely from the main
wing of the Reformers, and they are
all likely to fall by the wayside, fight?
ing as they fall.
Congressman Shell, it is poistively
announced, was approached while io
the city a few days ago by the lead?
ers of the Alliance or farming element
of the Reform party, and he has con?
sented.to be at the head of the com?
mittee that will manage the campaign
for this faction. He was the former
president of the Farmers' Association
io this State.
The Cotton Plant, which is the offi?
cial organ of the Alliance-farming ele?
ment of the Reform, party, will sup?
port the latter faction. Tn this week's
issue of that paper is the following
double-leaded editoral under the cap?
tion "A March Convention," which
is equivalent'to a call for such a conven?
tion :
HEAR TUB BUGLE BLAST !
"With the very beginning of this
year were are confronted with the fact'
that this is a campaign year and that
we are soon to meet our opponents tn
a battle for the people's rights and the
development of our State in business
prosperity aod the happiness of its
oitizens. Such being the case we at
once realize the great importance of
at once getting our forces together and
.coming to an agreement on the policy
to be pursued so that there eau be no
misunderstanding, and the success of
oar cause assured.
"The politicians must be made to
take a back seat and let the people
themselves set the pace. To do that
the people should meet in their neigh?
borhood clubs and send degates to a
State Convention, which will adopt a
platform and nominate a candidate
tor Governor to represent our people
on that platform. A Lieutenant Gov?
ernor should also be put up, but the
remainder of the State officers can be
nominated by the delegates to the
September convention.
"The State Convention for this pur?
pose should be held not later than the
month of March-before the farmers
get too busy in their crops to attend
to it, and before bad blood rises be?
tween the friends of the aspirants for the
Governorship on the Reform side.
"The Alliance cannot take part io
partisan politics, and tbefore has
only the right to point out the necessi?
ty of calling the people together and
leaving it to some one else to do the
work. We believe that the last presi?
dent and executive committee of the
Farmers' Association of this State are
the proper ones to issue such a call,
and we are confident that the people
would respond promptly and unani?
mously to a cali issued by them.- This
is a movement of the people to reform
and improve our government, and not
a movement to place any man or set
of men in office merely. We must
keep on the high ground of pure patri?
otism, and seek out the men for ser?
vice who will be the moat capable of
carrying out our wishes. Measures and
not meo must be made prominent.
"It will be noticed tb&t we do not
agree with some points in the resolu?
tions passed on last Friday by our
Laurens brethren aod published else?
where in this issue; bet after mature
consideration we feel satisfied that
our position is the correct one. We
hope that our readers will use our col?
umns in a discussion of the matter,
and in that way reach the most satis?
factory conclusion. We have briefly
outlined our views, with reasons there?
for, and we shall use our best endeav?
or to maintain the rights and privi
ledges of our people and promote har?
mony in the work."
THE ALLIANCE'S PARTY.
It will be noticed that the Alliance
is to be kept in the back grouod as
far as being a political machine is
concerned, but a great deal of good
solid work has been done by the lead?
ers among the Alliancemen all over
the State, and they will be as a until
against the opposing factioo.
THOSE LAURENS RESOLUTION'S.
Yesterday a representative of Tb
State had quite a loog talk with one
or two of the leaders of the Alliance
side. They say that the leaders of the
: other side will be Irby, Staoyaroe
Wilson, Larry Gantt and John Gary
Evans They seem to think that a
combination was formed nearly a year
ago hy Irby and his followers to ran
things to suit themselves and make a
slate of the offices for the coming
term, which would be presented to the
voters and would be swallowed by
them. They say that the effort to
crash oat every leading Tillman man
-the attacks upon Tindal, McLaurin
and others-was the direct result of
this combination engineered by Irby.
They consider Irby dead as far as
State politics are concerned. In regard
to those Alliance resolutions adopted
in Laurens a few days ago, one of
these men yesterday said that they
were gotten up under lrby's influence,
and represented nobody's views but
his own. He was a good manipulator,
and got the County Alliance to adopt
them. He did not think that another
Alliance in the State would have done
80.
TILLMAN HANDS OFP.
The leaders say that inasmuch a.s
this will not affect Governor Tillman's
fight for the Senate, be will be hands
off in the fight. They say that Irby
has been spreading the idea that he
and Tillman have been working to?
gether. They know that Governor Till?
man's views in regard to a convention
are not* those that were expressed in
the Laurens resolutions. They think,
too, that Governor Tillman wants a
farmer for Governor.-State, Jan. ll.
The New Jury Law.
It was Approved December 18. 1893,
and is now the Law.
The law is entitled "An act to
amend Chapter LXXXYIt of the
General Statutes relating to juries and
entitled 'Of Juries.* "
It reads as follows :
Section 1. That chapter eighty
seven, section 2234, of the General
Statutes be amended by striking out
said section 2234 and inserting instead
thereof the following : Section 2234.
The county auditor, the county treas?
urer, and the clerk of the court of
common pleas and general sessions of
each county, shall constitute the board
of jury commissioners for their respec?
tive counties.
Section 2. That section 2235 of the
said chapter be repealed and the
following inserted instead thereof:
Section 2235. That the said county
auditor, county treasurer, and clerk of
the court of common pleas and general
sessions, shall perform the duties
required of them as jury commissioners
without compensation.
Section 3. That section 2255 of
the said chapter be repealed and the
following bc inserted thereof : Section
2255 Whenever it shall be necessary
to supply any deficiency in the number
of grand cr petit jurors duly drawn,
whether caused by challenge or other?
wise, it shall be the duty of the jury
commissioners under the directions of
the court to draw from the special
apartment io the jury box known as
the tales box, such number of fit and
competent persons to serve as jurors as
the court shall deem necessary to fill
such deficiency. That it shall be the
duty of the clerk of- court to keep such
jury box io his custody.
Section 4. The jury box shall be
provided with three locks, each differ?
ent. The key to one shall be kept by
the clerk of court, one by the auditor
and one by the treasurer, so that no
two of said commissioners shall hold
keys to the same lock.
Section 5 This act shall go into
effect immediately upon its approval by
the Governor.
How to Form New Counties
The following act relating to the
formation of new counties in this State
was passed at the recent session of the
legislature :
An act providing for the formation of
new counties in this State.
It is enacted by the Senate, and
House of Representatives of the State of
South Carolina, now met and sitting in
general assembly, and by the authority
of the same :
Section 1. That wherever it is desir?
ed to incorporate u new county in the
this State it shall be the duty of those
petitioning for same to publish io one
or more newspapers in each county
from which it is proposed to take any
territory, for at least three months
before the meeting of the Legislature,
when same is to be applied for, a state?
ment of the proposed county line in said
county, and shall also have made a
survey of the territory proposed to be
taken and file same in the office of the
Secretary of State at least thirty days
before the meeting of the Legis?
lature when the incorporation is to
be applied for.
Seo. 2. That no such new county
shall be formed unies the foregoing
provisions have been complied with.
The Review and the County
Alliance.
Lancaster Review.
We are reliably informed that at the
meeting of the coan ty Alliance held at
Midway last Friday a resolution, offered
by State Constable Elliott and seconded
by one James Cullins, and possibly one
or two others, was passed withdrawing
the support of the Alliance from the
Review. Such action was taken, we
understand, because this paper, io the
exercise of its right as a public journal,
has been fit to condemn the obnoxious
laws passed by the last Legislature and
to criticise the manner and spirit in
which the affairs of State are now being
administered.
By the adoption of such a resolution,
for the reason given, the Alliance
ignores the distinction between that
organization, which is pre-eminently a'
noo-partizan body, and the Reform
party cf Sooth Carolina, which is
distinctly a political party, or rather a
faction of a political party. It divests
the Alliance of its true fuoctions and
makes it the wet nurse of a lot of poli?
tical adventurers. It gives the lie to
the positive assnraoce made to every
mao who joins the Alliance that the
obligation be assumes shall not conflict
with his political or religious views, be
they what they may. The action
of the Alliance means ever more,
it means that a mac shall no longer
exercise his God-given right of free
speech, because forsooth he bas had the
temerity to express his views of matters
of public moment at variance with those
of some of his fellow citizens.
We do not believe that the fair
minded and loyal Alliancemen of the
county-men like E. B. Ltngle, C. A
Plyler, J. H. Harper, C. J. L. Moody,
W. B. Bruce, J E, Stewman, B. F.
Miller, J. F. Nesbit, G. W. Williams,
John W. A. Porter, H. J. Gardner
and a host of others we could name
will approve of the action of the county
Alliance in regnrd to the Review.
These men are strangers to injustice
and oppression and would never coun?
tenance the stifling of free speech ;
besides they lr te not forgotten what the
Review and its editor have done for the
oau8e of the Alliance in this county.
But of one thing the public may rest
assured : The Review is not going to be
deterred from doing what it believes to
be its duty, in matters political or
otherwise, by the Alliance or any
other organization. We just will not
be dictated to by any man or" set of
men ? We propose to run this paper
according to our own ideas of right and
justice if it causes us to lose every
subscriber on our books.
Since writing the foregoing we have
received for publication a copy of the
proceedings of -.the meeting of the Alli?
ance which contains the resolutions
referred to. After seeing the resolu?
tion we can only add that if being the
"county organ," a distinction conferred
upon the Review uneoiicited, meaos
swallowing Tillman, bis Legislature
and all their bad laws without gagging
or makiog a wry face, we are very glad
indeed to be relieved of that distinguish?
ed honor. We certainly do not intend
to be bulldozed into supporting what we
believe to be wrong and unjust.
Messrs Elliott and Cullins may succeed
in running the Alliance but they cannot
run this newspaper.
The Lancaster County Alliance met
today at ll o'clock with the Flat Creek
Sub-Alliance, In the absence of the
President and Vice-President Bro. C.
J. L. Moody called the bouse to order.
Bro. G. W. Jones, County Lecturer,
being . present gave a good lecture
on Alliance measures and agriculture.
Judging from the representation of the
Subs in the county it showed to one
that the Lancaster County Alliance is
not as weak as some people think it is.
Fifteen Subs were represented. We
think it was one of the best County
meetings we ever visited. When we
arrived we were surprised to see so
many of the good ladies of the com
muoity on the ground, and lo and
behold when we were dismissed for din?
ner how the ladies showed their love
for the good of their county by spread?
ing all the good rations on ? long table
and giving everybody a hearty welcome.
If you want to meet true Alliance men
and women go to Flat Creek.
Thc following Preamble and Resolu?
tion were offered and adopted after some
debate by Maj. B. F. Miller, G. W.
Jones, J. C. Elliott, M. C. and H. J.
Gardner :
Whereas, The County paper known
as the Alliance organ of Lancaster
County has gone back on the reform
movement and abuses our Reform
Legislature and says be cannot go with
Highest of all in Leavening POT*
the Reform movement any farther in
the direction it is going.
Resolved, 1st. That the County
Alliance rescind t'he R?solution whereby
the Lancaster Review -was adopted as
the Alliance organ.
Resolved, 2nd. That the Alliance
withdraw their support from said paper.
J. M. KNIGHT,
Sec'y Lan. Co. Alliance.
Puncturing Pretended Re?
form.
Here is whaf editor Gantt, Tillman
ite, says to editor Bowden, of The Cot?
ton Plant, the Alliance organ. Let the
Reformers read and digest :
"Why is it, that editing the Alliance
organ, as you are, you have studiously
avoided any reference in your editorial
columns to the salary reduction bill,
now before the Legislature ? Can you
see any justice io South Carolina paying
her officers from twenty-five to seventy
five per cent, more than Georgia,
North Carolina and other States? Do
you believe it right to tax the farmers
to pay your friend and landlord,
Secretary of State Tindal, seven
hundred dollars a year extra as
custodian of the capitol grounds when
the most arduous duties connected with
the position is to buy about $15 worth
of flower seed every Spring and turn
them over to a convict guard to plant?
As 'a good and true AUianceman,
Brother Bowden, don't you think it
wroog to pay a mau $700 to make a
$15 investment? ls it right for
South Carolioa to pay ber judges
$3,500 when Georgia gets just as
many ounces ol brains for $2,000?
And you can go through the ent?r? list
of salaries and see the same room for
retrenchment and genuine reforms.
Aud you The Cotton Plant, the
official organ of our State Alliance, bas
not deemed this matter of sufficient
importance to even refer to it in the
editorial columns of that paper, that I '
have ever seen !"
An Unjust Accusation.
We have always tried to criticise
fairly and honestly by the two
political factions in South Carolioa, giv?
ing justice when justice is due, but we
must admit that the most contemptible
thing we have seen in a long time is the
insinuation made by certain newspapers
in this State that the conservatives are
responsible for the whipping which the -
negroes gave one of the State Con?
stables io Spartanburg the other night.
We haven't seen a single utterance
from even the extremest anti Tillman
papers that would justify such a slander
about a respectable portion of our peo?
ple. The insinuation could only have
been made or believed by those people
whose purposes are better served by
falsehood than truth -St Matthews.
Herald.
There will be four eclipses this year,
two of the moon, and two of the
sun* and a transit of mercury. There
will be a partial eclipse of the moon
March 21, invisible here : an annual
eclipse of the sun, April 5,
invisible in America ; a partial
eclipse of the moon, September
4 visible throughout America ; a total
eclipse of the sun Sept. 28-29 invi?
sible in America ; a transit of Mercury
over the sun's disk, November 10, visible
io the United States.
The war cost the South $5,000,000,
000. Yet, in the last decade alone,
the product of Southern industries
equaled this vast sum. Last year our
manufactured products were worth
$700,000,000. Our maoufacturing
establishments io the past ten years
have increased from 34,000 to 62,000,
and their capital bas increased from
$180,000,000 to $600,000,000. Last
year, in spite of the hard times, 2,251
new industries were started in the
South.
Governor Tillman spent nearly all
yesterday affixing bis signature to the
commissions of the new notaries public
he has appointed io the last, month or
two. It will be remembered that some
time ago Governor Tillman issued a
manifesto declaring all appointments
then of force, void. It was stated at
the time that it was a scheme to raise
an additional revenue for the State,
though the governor's proclamation
said it was done to purify the service in
this branch of government. Anyway
a handsome revenue is resulting.
Governor Tillman, while signing tho
numerous commissions yesterday, talk?
ed about the revenue that was being
derived, and said that enough had
been made already to pay his salary for
the coming year.-The State, Dec. 6.
rer.--Latest U. S. Gov't Report
Baking
? Powter
rELY PURE

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