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The watchman and southron. (Sumter, S.C.) 1881-1930, June 27, 1894, Image 9

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn93067846/1894-06-27/ed-1/seq-9/

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The Black Death.
Tba Terrible Scourge Now Devas?
tating the Cities of China.
The records of the departments of
State throw light on the aiogaUr
plague which . ia now ravaging China,
and make it evident that this moat , fatal
disease ?a really ter j similar to the
black death, or plague, which devas?
tated London, as to|d by Defoe It
had its origin tn Yannan, a Chinese !
provence where it is endemic The !
Catholic missionaries there b*ld that it j
was really a pestilential emanation j
slowly rising in an equable strata ai j
from the ground and as it i aereases m
depth, all animals are, af it were. |
drowned in its poison ou* flood, the j
smaller creatures being first* eogulfed. j
and mao, the tallest of all, suffering |
last. Its approach often mi>y be fore?
told from the extraordinary movement
of the rats, who leave their boles and
crevices and issue on the floors without
a trace of their accustomed timidity,
springin? continually npg^rd from their
out of something. The rat* fall dead,
and thea comes the turn of the poultry ;
goats^ ponies and exe o successively
in man apprajajih is indicated?bj
thetnrapwt? of ooe eriwore min ave red
pustules, generally in the arm pits, but
occassionaliy in other glandular
regions. If several puntales ap?
pear, ,the case 4* ;not4 capered *o
hopeless as when they are few The
sufferer is soon seised with extreme
weakneaa- fellowed io a Te? hours by
agonising aches in every part of the
body, delirium shortly ensues, and in
nine cases oat of ten the resnlt is fatal.
It often happens that the patient
suddenly, ta all appearances, recovers
and leaves hts bed, but ia such eases
the termination is always a collapse and
death. As soon as a case appears the
Chinese desert the afflicted, leaving bim
in a room with a jug of water, and peer?
ing in the window at intervals, and
prodding the victim with a long pole to
ascertain if life is extinct.- To make
matters worse, io the country the
corpses are not buried; but are laid out
to decay to the son, poisoning-the air
for miles around.
The disease : s?as nevgr known before
1868. When it apj%ed ?|rigf^<3
great Mohammedan rebellion.
I?ftJmown. in Jfan&txa (under .Aha
in Bfrsfh ^iu luey^;* Ci. ca,
where u has ^re^vauea ror years.
Never before, however, has it made its
way? to Canton and te ^pong Kong;
*befe?f ?re? ?$efthe ?r%0
Une reason Tor attributing its ongiu
to miasmatic influences is the fact that
it alwajs^ppearsr upon the plaatiog of
rice io May and-June It penetrates
by cara?ens and travellers to the up?
lands and becomes more severe, by fall.
Sometimes it passes over certain com?
munities in its line of progress, but
only to return later on, or the next
jear. Whenever it ?'ppers the people
desert their homes and crops, nod flee to
tents ia the hills. Io some provences
the population is decimated and whole
families disappear.-Washington Post.
Chicken Cholera and Its
Prevention.
Why submit to heavy losses from
this disease ? Up to April, 1894, thia
disease had not been on the Experiment
Farm to our knowledge. Early in that
month a hen became sick and dumpish
with dark comb ; all food and water
refused It was thought useless to
treat this case, but Epsom salts were
administered and this was followed
with copions watering pat in the mouth
with a spoon. The hen vas placed in
a warm, sunny place, iasolated from
usual runs,-and recovered very slowly.
Another hen died in a few days and
then another and a cockerel, and
several persons who had had experience
with cholera pronounced ' this disease
to be cholera. The hen and cockerel
died near night, and next morning two
Other hens were dead and eight more
io different stages of the disease.
Treatment was begun at once. Two
hens were killed and buried as those
previously dead had been. The six
were broaght out into the sunlight and
given salts and water.
The house and yard were thoroughly
disinfected with one pint of strong
sulphuric acid to eight gallons of water,
as suggested in poultry books. The
ben s themselves were sprayed with
this. Their drink io g water was
charged with carbolic acid (one teaspoon?
ful to half-gallon water) and assafo
tida was put in their food at the rate
of one heaping tablespoon to the food of
30 chickens.
The next morning six hens could not
get off the roost, though all but two
had gone up as usual the night pre?
vious, after their treatment. These
were treated as before and put outside
the yard. Before night all but four
heos were walking about pecking grass.
After three days of isolation these four
were returned to the yard cured, and
all have been in good health since.
Six hens and cockerel were lost before
the health of the flock was restored by
the treatment as given above.
Had we known the disease at first,
it is doubtful if a single bird need to
have been lost. Promptness to dis?
infect and treat the sick birds will save
many losses. The doses of salts, not
before recommended to my knowledge,
doubtless helped rid the birds of the
cholera bacilli sooner than if it bad not
been given, and so hastened the eradi?
cation of the disease. The asaafotida
acts as a diffusible stimulant to help
keep the birds warm.
The drinking water was for some
days kept charged with carbolic acid,
and all that it is aow needed to secure
ituniuniry from another attack is a
sceond thorough disinfection and to
ccntinue for sometime the addition of
carbolic acid to the drinking water.
F. E. Emery, Agriculturist, N. 0.
Experiment Station.
Who Was tbe First Printer ?
Those of the readers of "Notes for
the Curious" who are at all familiar
with the by paths of literature kuow
that history and biography are med
leys of odd freaks and fanciful con?
ceits. Tn a host of instances the true
discoverer, originator or inventor bas
been poshed aside, and another
( vf hose only claiu* "to a nation'*
praise7* is bia euomous gall) installed
instead This is true of the inventor
j of the steam engine ; the application
of the same to river and ocean naviga?
tion ; of a great many electrical discov
eries (especially the telegraph and the
anaesthetic properties of sulphuric
ether; of the discoveries of the laws
of jjraviiation to say nothing of a host
of minor discoverers and originators,
W^*ema? ?:-? .'.
-TJawept, unhonored a n?-u os ung.
These ?fe S??' a few of the typical
instances of toe qoeer course history
has takeo tn dealing with some of those
who deserve the fame which bas been
accorded to others
I Tn the above I bave made many
assertions without even attempting to
give proof, simply because it was the
intention in the opening to deal only
with the question which has been osed
as a headline
fri the language of the high school
i graduate, "history says'* that Johann
I Ganrfeisch. of the Gutenberg family,
was the first to ase movable type, and,
E on that accoont, should be set down as
the *;father of printing," bot the in?
vestigators (not the historians) tell ns
that the same system was praoticed by
Lawrence Costar, a Hollander, a long
sixteen* years previous to Gutenberg'.*
so-called discovery-in the year 1442
Nor is this all. We find proofs io the
sands of the Egyptian and Asian des?
erts in the shape of stamped brick
(some cfrom the identical Tower of
Babel) that ta? principles upon which
the' art 'ultimately developed existed
hundreds of years before the birth of
Chf?sL-St ~ Louis RepoKfic.
? is *\ -?? i i m*ic
te. Senater Butler is making bis fight
for a return to the -Senate in bis own
way. and that way is to split the Re?
-form ranks if possiblle. Those of the
vobseirvaiwe faction that have not
caught the Senator's ene declare they
will, not j vote for bim, bot we will
wager a button be will receive." the
Conservatives' full strength in the
primary. Before the battle is over
the people will see the fight amount?
ing to a contest between the people
and tbe authorities at Washington.
Manning- Times'.
Some papers are trying to make
political capital out of the action of
the State Democratic Executive Com
mittee io providing a way for those
men who strayed from the Demo?
cratic fold and wandered off after
strange gods and new doctrines by
voting for Weaver for President, to
come back to their first love without
injury to their self respect ; bot they
were as dumb as oysters sod as close
as calms wheo the committee made
the same provisions for the return
of those who voted for Judge Haskell,
Independent, for Governor, Dr Eosor,
Republican, for Congress, and appealed
to the negro to overthrow white supre?
macy ia tbe State. Be consistent,
gentlemen if the oomr ?tte did wrong
io ons case, it certainly committed the
same blonder in tbe other.-Lexington
Dispatch.
Don Dickson said in an interview the
other day that be believed in Grover
Cleveland more than ever. "There
was a time," said he, "when they burn- j
ed Andrew Jackson in effigy all over
this country, and yet two years after j
that, so popular had Jackson become, j
you could not find a man who had said ?
a word against him. That is the way j
it will be with President Cleveland, j
He is an able, fearless man ; a man
with the courage to do what he believes
I to be right. And he is ?doing more for
j bimetallism than any other man living
to-day. He is a believer in silver.
The only question is as to the best way
in which to do it. They will come to
his idea of it yet. England is already
i receding from her position and the day
j will come vrheu you will see silver
i restored to the world ; and Grover
I Cleveland is doing more to that end, as
I said, than any other mao or force in
j the world to-day.v
\ NOTICE.
LANDS FOR SALE.
j m_
i
1. One lot with two story dwelling, new
j house, on Washington Street, between Cal
I houn and Republican Streets.
2. Une lot, with dwelling house, on New
! Street, formerly property of M. H. Wells.
j 3. One lot in the town of Bisbopville. on
j Dennis Street, formerly property of C. S.
I Davis.
4. 90 acres of land consisting of two tracts,
! one ot 20 acres and one of 70 acres, on Provi
: dence road, six miles from Sumter,
j 5. 250 acres of land, ? miles east of Sumter,
j formerly owned by Miss Julia R. DeSchamps.
6. 40 acres of land on Turkey Creek, for?
merly owned by W. W. McKag?n.
For particulars applv to
A. J. CHINA,
Jan. 24. Pres. Sumter B. & L. A.?so.
The Norwegian liquor system grant?
the exclusive privilege of selliog liquor,
to citizens, or corporations. Massa?
chusetts has determined to give the
system a trial.
Gen. John S. Verner has cut loose
from the Conservatives, and is now a
full-fledged Reformer. He was the
Comptroller-General under tne adminis?
tration of John Peter Richardson, and
two years ago he talked about running
for Congress in bis district, hut the
signs were uot propitious. He has
been p-actictng law io Columbia for
s veral years, and was the partner ot Col
John C. Haskell a considerable portion
of the time Geu. Vertier is a native j
of Oconee County, aod is extensively I
connected with prominent families io thu
Piedmont, section. His conversion to !
the^Reforui faction is the un>*t con?
spicuous addition to its ranks within the 1
past two years, and he ha? been hailed
with much enthusiasm on the part, of his
new associates". 1
Main Street. Next to City Hall.
SPECIAL ATTENTION
Giveo to Compounding Prescriptions.
J. F. W. DeLORNE,
DEALER IN
Ajen*
Toilet Soaps, Perfumery and all Kinds ot Druggist's
Sundries Usually Kept in a
First Class Drug Store.
Tobacco, Snuff fand Cigars, Garden Seeds, &3., also Paints, Oils, Varnishes,
Glass Putty, &c, Dye Stuffs.
Physician's Prescriptions carefully compounded, and orders answered with care
and dispatch The public will find my stock of Medicines complete, warranted
genuine., ?cd of best quality. Call aod see for yourselves.
Hight Calls Promptly Attended To.
THE WORLD'S GREATEST TYPEWRITER,
The Machine that took the only award for
Typewriters at the State Fair, Nov. 8,1893.
"NO MACHINE COULD BE ANY BETTER. THE ONLY AWARD WAS ALSO MADE
- ; IT ?S J>ESB?CT. -TQ US
? k Vf -J 2? V r-* * <* *.? ? * * * * ?N
Private statement ol one of the Judges. FOR TYPEWRITER SUPPLIES.
COMO ty Agents Wanted*
J. W. GIBBES & CO.,
GEN. AGENTS, COLUMBIA, S. O.
The '94 Model just out is Unrivalled.
Noa. 29.
I wish to etate to tbe Farmers of Sumter and ClarendoB Counties that I have gotten in'a car
load of McCORMIC REAPERS, SELF-BINDERS, MOWERS and HAY RAKES.
It is a settled fret that tbeMcCormic Co., makes the lightest draft and most durable Graio
and Grass cutting machinery made in this or any other country.
Our prices ure very low and term3 easy. Write to me for catalogue, which will be mailed
to you free of charge. It contains cuts of ail machines and gives full descriptions of them.
GEO. F. EPPERSON, Agent.
SUMTER, S. C.
Mch 21
Office at Epperson's Livery Stable.
AI ?SH & LO WIM M
THE LEADERS,
-Have a New Feature
rri'WI ??????????????????^^ ..><..<.>
IA Bargain Oounterjll
<-><^>---T-TMBiriffnia 11 nimm ' ' ' <??<.><.>
On which will be placed all remnant lots of
SHOES
In which most of the sizes have been sold. On this counter
from time to time will be placed
-Some exceptional Drives.
Don't fail to come and look over, you might lind your size,
and if you do not we will sell you a pair from the shelves
almost as cheap. We have a full stock and we must sell them.
Our line of Dress Shoes for Ladies and Gents
will please anybody.
WALSH & CO.,
Monaghan Block - Sumter, S. C.
April 18.
Say ! You Bee-Keeper !
Send for a free sample copy of Root's
handsomely illustrated 36-page, Gleanings in
Bee-Culture, Semi-Monthly, ($1.00 a year)
and his 52-pages illus, catalog of Bee
Keeper's Supplies free for your name and,
address on a postal. His A B C of Bee
Culture, 400 double-column pp price $1.25,
is just the book for you. Mention this paper.
Address A. I. Root, the Bee-Man, Medina,
0.
Atlantic Coast Line.
NORTH-EASTERN R. R. or S. C.
CONDENSED SCHEDULE,
TRAINS GOING SOUTH.
Dated Jun|No. 35j
17, 1894. I *
|No. 23|No.53|
I * I * I
LeFl'nce.
" Hingst.
Ar Lanes
Le Lanes.
Ar. Ch'n.
A. M.
?3 10
4 20)
6 10
A U.
P M.;
* 7 45?
9 02]
9 23| P. M
9 23|* 7 05
ll 18| 8 40
P.M.i P. M
TRAINS GOING NORTH.
[Nb. 78]No. 32|No. 521
I * I * ! * I
Le. Ch'n
Ar Lanes
Le Lanes
" Kingst
ArFl'nce
A.M.
?335
5 40
5 40
6 00
7 10
A. M.
P. M.
?3 30
5 38
5 38
5 57
7 05
P. M.
A. M.
*7 15
8 45
A. M
* Daily.
No. 52 runs through to Colombia
ria Central R. R. ofS. C.
Train Nos. 78 and 14 ron via Wilson
and Fayetteville-Short Line-and make
close connection for all points North.
J. R. KRNLY, J. ?. DIVINE,
Gen ' 1 Manager. Gen' 1 Sap't
T. M. EMERSON, Traffic Manager.
"OLD BELIABLE" LINE.
South Carolina Railway,
PASSENGER DEPARTMENT.
In effect April 8, 1894.
SCHEDULE.
LT Charleston,
.* Summerville,
" Pregnalls,
" Branchville,
" Bamberg,
" Denmark
" Blackville
" Aiken
Ar Augusta
Lv Augusta
" Aiken
" Blackville
" Denmark
11 Bamberg
" Branchville
n Pregnalls
" Sommerville
Ar Charleston
7 15am
7 52 a m
8 23 a m
9 10am
9 53 a m
10 08 a m
10 25 a m
11 27 a m
12 15 p m
6 30 a m
7 14 a m
8 10am
8 25 a m
8 39 a m
9 20 a m
10 05 a m
10 45 a m
11 30 a m
5 30 p m
6 15 o m
6 58 p m
7 42 p m
8 28 p m
8 42 p m
8 58 p m
10 00 p m
10 45 p m
3 40 p m
4 27 p m
5 28 p m
5 44 p m
5 58 p m
6 25 p m
7 28 p m
8 05 p m
8 45 p m
Lv Charleston
" Sommerville
" Orangeburg
'? Ringville
?r Columbia
Lv Columbia
" Ringville
" Orangeborg
" Sommerville
Ar Charleston
7 15 am
7 52 a m
9 46 a m
10 32 a m
11 15 am
4 20 p m
5 05 p m
5 56 p m
8 05 p m
8 45 p m
5 30 p m
6 05 p m
8 32 p m
9 20 p m
10 10 p m
6 50 a m
7 57 a m
8 30 a m
10 45 a m
11 30 a m
DAILY EXCEPT SUNDAY.
Lv Colombia
Lv Ringville
Ar Camden
Lv Camden
Ar Ringville
Ar Columbia
8 35 a m
9 35 a m
12 50 p m
2 30 p m
5 15 p m
6 15pm
Through sleeper oo train leaviog Charles?
ton 5 30 p m, for Atlanta.
Train leaving Charleston at 7.15 p.m. has
connections for Charlotte, Raleigh, aod
Wilmiogtoo, via C. S. & N. R. R. Connec?
tion made from poi a ts on the C. S. & N. R.
R. for Atlanta and the west.
Through trains between Charleston and
Walhalla, leaving Charleston 7 15 am, and
arriving at Charleston at 8 45 p m.
For further information apply to agents, or
E. P. WARING,
Gen'l Pasa.;Agent, Charleston, S. C.
J. M. TURNER, Superioteodant.
C. M. WARD, General Manager.
Atlantic Coast Line*
WILMINGTON, COLUMBIA AND
AUGUSTA R. R.
CONDENSED SCHEDULE.
TRAINS GOING SOUTH.
Dated June 3. IS94. |N<>. 55?N<>. 58)
L've Wilmington.
Leave Marion.
Arrive Florence
Leave Florence.
Ar've Sumter...
Leave Sumter.
Ar'vi Columbia.
P. M.
* 3 40
6 31
7
No.
P.
*7
8
8
10
A. M
A M.
No. 58
*$ 20
9 40
No 52
*9 58
ll 10
WesloiL Siter aid Norton R.R
CHAS. E. KIMBALL, RECEIVER.
IN EFFECT AUGUST 21, 1893.
All trains Daily Except Sunday.
N. B
1
A X
7 15
8 4C
8 49
9
9
o
9
9
9
9
Q
02
05
10
17
27
42
53
59
10 08
10 16
10 28
IO 42
10 47
11 00
ll 14
ll 23
ll 38
11 52
12 05
12 19
12 30
12 42
12 56
1 04
1 08
1 20
1 33
1 47
P M
STATIONS.
S. B
Lv
Lv
Ar
Lv
Ar
Ar
Charleston
Pregnall's
Harleyville
Peck's
Holly Hill
Connors
Eutawville
V ancfcs
Merriam
St Paul
Summerton
Silver
Packsville
Tiodal
Sumter
Sumter
Oswego
St. Charles
Elliotts
Lamar
Syracuse
Darlington
Mont Clare
Robbins Neck
Mandeville
Bennettsville
Breeden's
Alice
Gibson
Ghio
Hamlet
A.
Ar
cc
hr
Ar
it
cc
IC
tl
tc
cc
cc
cc
cc
Lv
cc
cc
cc
Cl
Lv
P K
8 45
27
18
05
02
57
50
40
25
14
08
59
51
40
27
22
ll
50
59
37
24
12
58
4i
35
21
14
07
59
44
30
P K
POND BLUFF BRANCH.
No. 41 leaves Eutawville 9.45 a. m.,? Belvi?
dere 9.55 arrive Ferguson 10.05.
No. 42 leaves Ferguson 10 35 a.m , Belvi?
dere 10.45, arrive Eutawville 10.55.
HARLIN CITY BRANCH.
No. 33 goin?? North leaves Vanees 6 50 p.
m., Snells 7 08, P?rlers 7 17, arrives Harlin
City 7 35 p. m.
No. 34 going South leaves Harlin City 5 15,
Parlera 5 35, Snells 5 48, arrive Vanees 6 10
p. m.
No. 31 going North leaves Vanees ll 15 a.
m., Snells II 35, Parters ll 48, arrive Harlin
City 12 10 p. m.
No. 32 going South leaves Harlin City 8 30
a. m., Parlera 8 48, Snells 8 57, arrive Yances
9 15 a. m.
Trains 32 and 31 connect with No. lat
Vanees.
Traies 34 and 33 connect with No. 2 at
Vanees.
No. 41 connects with No. 1 at Eutawville.
No. 1 has connection from S. C., No. ll at
Pregna?ls, connects, with Harlin City Branch
Trains 32 and 31 at Vanees and connects with
C. C. No. 43 at Hamlet.
No. 2 has connection from C. C. No. 36 at
Hamlet, connects with Harlin City Branch
Trains 34 aod 33 .at Vanees and connects
with S C. No. 12 at Pregnalls.
No. 1 connects with Seaboard Air Line
at Hamlet for Wilmington, Charlotte,
Shelby, Rutherford ton ; and at Charlotte
with R. ? D. Vestibule Limited for
Washington and New York. Passengers can
take sleeper at Charlotte at 8.35 p. m.
No. 2 passengers hy this train have through
Sleepers. New York to Charlotte, connects
with S. A- L, at Hamlet from Charlotte and
North, and from Wilmington, connetcs with
S. C. R. R. at Pregnalls for Charleston
and Augusta. Dinner at Hamlet.
C- MILLARD, Superintendent.
Clarlestoii)C!i?iati&Cliica?oB.E.
SAMUEL HUNT, Agent for Purchaser.
Io effect April 9, 1894.
CAROLINAS DIVISION.
NORTHBOUND.-(Daily except Sunday.)
R.
Lv Charleston.
S. C. R.
Lv Augusta.
Lv Columbia.
Ar Camden.
33
7.15 a m
6-50 am
8.35 a m
12.50 pm
1.10 pm
2.10 p m
2.30 pm
Lv Camden.
Ar Kershaw.
Lv Kershaw.
Lv Lancaster.i 3.45 pm
Lv Catawba Junction.! 4.45 p m
Ar Rock Hill.! 5.15 pm
Lv Rock Hill...,.I 5 45 pm
Lv Yorkville.I 6.30 pm
Lv Blacksborg.
Lv Patterson Springs.
Lv Shelby.
Lv Rutherfordton.
Ar Marion.
7.45 pm
8 04 p m
8.15 pm
ll
8.00
8.37
9 10
11.10
1.00
a m
a m
a m
a m
p m
I Lv Marion, (R. & D. R R.) 1.46 p m
j Lv Round Knob, " 2.26 p m
j Lv Asheville, " 4.08 p m
j Lv Hot Springs, " 5.36 pm
Lv Knoxville, (E. T. V. & G.) 8.00 pm
j Ar Louisville, (L & N. R. R.) 7.15 am
i Ar Cincinnati, (Q. & C.) 7.20 a m
j SOUTH BOU? D.-( Daily"?seept Sn nday. )
I 32 12
I Lv Cincinnati, [Q. & C.] 7.00 p m
j Lv Louisville, [L. & N. R. R. J 8.00 p m
! Lv Knoxville, [E. T. V. & G.] 8 00 a m
j Lv Hot Springs, [R. &D.J " 12.44 pm
! Lv Asheville, " 2.30 p m
j Lv Round Knob, " 3.52 p m
! Ar Marion, " 4.33 p m
No. 52 runs through from Charleston via
Central R R. leaving Lane 8:4S A. M., Man
nine 9:25.. A. M.
TRAINS GOING NORTH.
I No. 51|No. 53|
Leave Columbia.
Ar've Sumter.
Leave
Arrive
Sumter..
Florence.
Leave Flerence...
Leave Marion.
Arr. Wilmington.
A M
* 4 3C
5 55
5
7
No.
* 7
oo
10
5 fi
40
S 23
ll 10
P
* 4
5 45
No. 59
* 5 55
7 05
Lv Marion.
Lv Rutherfordton.,
Lv Shelby.,
Lv Patterson Springs
Ar Blacksburg.
Lv Blacksburg.
Lv Yorkville.
Ar Rock Hill.
Lv Rock Hill.
Lv Catawba Junction.
Lv Lancaster.
Ar Kershaw.
Lv Kershaw.
Ar Camden.
S. C. R. R.
Lv Camden.
Ar Columbia.
Ar Augusta.
Ar Charleston.
6.45 a m
6.56 a m
7.15 a m
7.45 a ni
9.07 a m
9.45 a m
10 15 a m
11 00 a m
12.00 p m
12.50 p m
1.05 p m
2.00
2.30 p m
6.15 p m
12.45 a m
8 45 p
m
4.45 pm
6.10 pm
8.23 pm
8.39 pm
9.06 pm
?Daily. fDaily except Sunday.
No. 53 runs through to Charleston, S. C., vii.
Central lt. R., arriving Manning 6:22 P. M.,
Lanes 7:00 P. M., Charleston 8.40 P. M.
Tra?na on Manchester A Augusta R. R. leave
Sumter daily except Sunday, 10:50 A. M., ar?
rive Rimini 11.59. Returning leave Rimini
1:00, P. M., arrive Sumter 2:10 P. M
Trains on Hurtsville R. R. leave Hartsville
daily except Sunday at 5.30 a. m., arriving
FUyds 6.00 a. m. Returning leave Floyds S.40
p. m., arriving Hartsville 9.10 p. m.
Trains on Wilmington Chadbourn and Con
way railroad, leave Chadbourn 10:10 a. m.
arrive at Conway 12.30 p. m., returning leave
Conway at 2.00 p. m., arrive Chadbourn 4.50
p. m. Leave Chadbourn 5.35 p. m., arr;ve at
Hub rt.20 p. m. Returning leave Hub at 8.15 a
m. arrive at Chadbourn 9.00 a.m Daily ex?
cept Sunday.
JOHN F. DIVINE, General Sup't.
J. R KEN LY. <-3en'l Manager.
T. M. EMERSON, Traffic Manager.
Dinuer at Kershaw.
CONNECTIONS.
Camden-With S. C. Ry., for Charleston,
Columbia, Augusta and all paints South.
Lancaster-With Cheraw & Chester N. G.
R. R., for Chester.
Catawba Junction-With G. C & N. R. R.
Rock Hill-No. 33 with "Vestibule Limi?
ted" on R. & D. R. R-, arriving at Charlotte
S.30pm, Washington 7 20 am, Philadel?
phia 10 46 a m, New York 1.23 p m.
Yorkville-With Chester & Lenoir R. R.
Blacksburg-With R. & D. R. R. for Spar
tanburg, Greenville, Atlanta and points
South, and Charlotte and points North.
Shelby-No. 32 with Carolina Central for
R., also'with Stages to Cleveland Springs.
Marion-No. ll with R. & D. R. R. R.
Round Kuob, Asheville and Hot Sorings.
SAMUEL HUNT, Gen. Manager.
A. TRIPP, Superintendent.
S. B. LUMPKIN, Gen, Pass Agen j.

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