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The watchman and southron. (Sumter, S.C.) 1881-1930, June 03, 1903, Image 1

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TJBB 8UKTKK WATCHMAN. XstabUf&ed April. IS50.
'Be Just and Fear not-Let all the Ends tuon Aims't at, be thy Country's, thy God's and Truth's."
THE TRUE 80CTHR0K, Established Jone IS Go
Cesolidated Aug. 2,1881.
SUMTER. S. C.. WEDNESDAY. JUNE 3, 1903.
New Series-Vol. XXII. No. 44
I HAVE ONLY ONE HUNDRED OF THESE fl ACH INES,
But while they last they will go for Five Dollars each, six records to go with every ma?
chine. This is the genuine Columbia Graphophone, and every record bears the Columbia'trade
mark, as well as the machine itself, which is of the latest design. Do you work hardball
through the hot summer days ? A little recreation and amusement in the evenings will cheer
you up and make happiness in the family circle. As you are not to enjoy a thousand years' so?
journ in this land of flowers you may as well pick up a few lines of pleasure in passing, espe?
cially when the cost does not exceed the five dollar mark. I am not living ten thousand miles
away from you, and have the goods for sale, open for your inspection ; come and see them.
T. B. JENKINS, Tr.
Selling New Home Sewing flachines, Columbia and Cleveland
Bicycles, and a high-class line of Sporting Qoods.
-JM-B-wo-OT
-Bf
SUMTER, S. C.
TSSKS :
fi 50 per ano am-ic advance.
IOTISTISIXIIT: .
One Square* first insertion.......$1 00
?very subsequent insertion...~. 50
Contracts for three months, or longer wili
te made at reduced raies.
Ail communications which aubserve private
interests will be charged for as ad ver tie men ts.
Obituaries and tributes of respects will be
charged for.
TIE SSM 8f PERSIS'S ?BT.
Extracts Stewing Quaint Way His
Ideas and Impressions Were Set
Down.
Extract? from the diary of the Shah
of Persia, who has quite recently been
visiting England are amusing.
. The Shah was mightily impressed "by
the greatness and incorruptibility of
the London police, and wrote concern?
ing them as follows: "The English
police gentlemen are men of the great?
est culture and honor. Unlike those
of many countries, I have been in?
formed that the police of England and
the-United States are almost incor?
ruptible, and that it is impossible to
bribe them except by the touch of
gold.. These officers carry themselves
with great dignity, but there have
been occasions on which they have
shown commendable alacrity, and
have even been known to be present
when tbe public peace has been
threatened by certain unseemly and
riotous citizens. ''
The shah has a very poor opinion of
the English climate, if one may judge
from .ute following extract: "It is
very necessary for the people of Eng?
land to wash thoroughly and frequent?
ly in order to clear themselves from
the constant fogs and rains that fall
upon them. So much dc the people of
Britain love water that they some?
times wash twice daily. Even the
members of the royal family and the
great .nobles find pleasure in this some?
what childish occupation."
*. This despotic monarch's opinion of
English women's charms and accom?
plishments is hardly altogether flatter?
ing: "An English lady is very fair to
look upon, fier skin is soft and clean,
but her figure is unnatural and
angular. She has certainly not the
pleasing vivacity of a French lady,
neither has she the captivating bold- j
ness of an American lady, of whom
many are in Loudon. An English
woman is passionately fond of all
animals, and is often devoted to her :
husband .and children."'
The shah was mightily, impressed
at the great wealth of some of the
English people: "Many private in?
dividuals," he writes, "are almost as
rich as the king himself. It speaks
very highly for King Edward's kind
heartedness to say that he never resents
this great wealth existing among
his subjects, neither does he punish
them in any way for this apparent
presumption. ' '
Eufaula, Ala, May 26.-Mrs. J. D.
Arlington, aged 50, and her son,
Robert Arlington? age 21, were murder?
ed last night at Solomons' Mills, ten
miles below Louisville, Ala. Before
she died Mrs. Arlington named a
white man and a negro woman as the
murderers. Officers with blood hounds j
have left for the scene of the tragedy. ,
Bobbery was the motive.
Booker Washington, backed by An?
drew Carnegie, has completed plans to
establish a big tobacco factory in
Bichmond, Va., to be operated by
negroes exclusively.
Carey Styles, white, of Greenville,
was convicted Tuesday of manslaugh?
ter, for kilting Walter McCarrel! last
summer.
Driven to Desperation.
living at an out of the way place, re- j
mote from civilization, a family is often
driven to desperation in case of accident,
resulting in Burns, Cuts, Wounds, Ulcers,
etc. Lay in a supply of Bncklen's Arnica
Salve. It's the best on earth. 25c, at J.
F. W. "OeLonne's Drug Store.
TUE JEFFRiES-GQRBETT FIGHT.
Details of the Match Between Jim
Corbett and Jeffries.
The battle for the heavy-weight
championship of the world between Jim
Jefferies and Jim Corbett will be
fought at Mechanics' Pavilion, in San
Francisco, under the auspices of the
Yosemite Athletic Club on or about
August 14. The men will contest for
70 per cent, of the gross receipts,
of which the winner will receive 75
per cent, and the loser 25 per cent
They will be allowed to wear soft
bandages and strict Marquis of Queens
berry niles will govern the contest.
AU the arrangements for the fight have
been completed in San Francisco.
Very little time was lost by the fight?
ers in arranging ali the details for the
match. Harry Corbett, on behalf of
the club, made the fighters two offers
to take their choice from. One was of
TO*per cent, of the gross receipts and
the other a guarantee purse of $22,500,
an increase of $2,500 from the original
offer which the club officials made
to the fighters, Without any delay
Jeffries and Corbett accepted the 70
per cent offer.
?cross the Sea to Harvest.
Thousands of Italian laborers are
able to work every year in the wheat
harvest both of Italy and Argentina
and make good wages by so doing,
says the New York Sun. The fact
has often been mentioned that in one
or another part of the world the har?
vest of wheat is in progress every
month in the year. Argentina, being
in the Southern hemisphere, reaps its
wheat several months after our crop
has been gathered and most of it sold.
The Italian harvest begins in May,
including not only wheat but other
cereals and also hay. So the Italian
fields hands are busy from May
through ~the summer months. After
the hard summer work at home is
over thousands of them buy steerage
tickets for Buenos Ayres, which cost
only about $10 or $12 in the United
States currency.
The harvesting and other hard farm
work of Argentina begins in November
and ends in March. About 15,000
Italians make this journey to Argentina
i every year, and after the harvest sea?
son is over they return home all ready
I for the harvest on the Lombardy
plains.
The fact that so many Italians go
over to Argentina only to remain dur?
ing the harvest season helps to swell
the statistics both of Argentina im?
migration and emigration. In the ten
years ending in 1902, "808,175 immi?
grants were recorded as entering
Argentina. These figures, however,
are somewhat misleading, for. they in?
clude many thousands cf Italians who
crossed the ocean merely to work in
the harvest fields.
Ia the same ten years there is a re?
cord of 0382,572 emigrants from
Argentina? 'These figures suggest the
idea that the emigrants must have
found _ something undesirable in
Argentina, and so returned, to their
Fatherland, the fact being, however,
that about a third of this emigration
is accounted for by the Italian farm
hands, who go home to do their
usual summer work in Italy.
There are 165,000 workmen out on a
strike in New York City. It is esti?
mated that they are losing 8660,000 a
day in wages and that the business of
2,500 large firms is tied up as a result
of the strike.
The circulation of the national banks
has passed the 8400,000,000 mark, the
largest amount in their history.
Judge Frank P. Bonifay dopped
dead on the stand after delivering a
heated political speech in Pensacola,
Fla., yesterday.
The village of Salley, Orangeburg
county was burned yesterday.
Worst of all Experiences.
Can anything be worse than to feel that
every minute will be your last ? Such was
the experience of Mrs. S. H. Newson, De?
catur, Ala. "For three years" she writes,
UI endured insufferable pain from indi?
gestion, stomach and bowel trouble. Death
seemed inevitable when doctors and ail
remedies failed. At length I was induced
to try Electric Bitters and the result was
miraculous. I improved at once and now
I'm completely recovered." For Liver,
Kidney, Stomach and Bowel tron bles Elec?
tric Bitters is the only Medicine. It's
guaranteed by J. F. W. DeLorme, Druggist.
BREATHITT GOBHTY F?EO.
Second Alleged Assassin of Marcum
in M
Jackson, Ky., May 26. -The capture
of Tom White and the return of Curtis
Jett to. Breathitt county were the
events today on which chief interest
focused. The question of whether
more troops are needed is agitating
the minds of many tonight. While
nothing has occurred to arouse appre?
hension, there have been suggestions
that do not make all feel secure. The
authorities feel that if more troops
shall be needed they will be badly
needed and that any emergency will
be abrupt. There is a well defined
belief that when Jett and White shall
be put on trial there will be a confes?
sion and that a number of prominent
men may be implicated. Mrs. J. B.
Marcum, her friends and some citizens
are urging that more troops be sent,
believing that the^men now here and
scattered among various stations could
not cope with a mob of mountain
men. A consultation among officers
was held today, but further than or?
dering another Gatling gun from
Louisville, there is no indication that
reinforcements will be requested.
Tom White was arrested at the
home of his mother, 18 miles from
here, at daylight by a squad of sol?
diers under Deputy Sheriff Little,
who made the arrest. The house was
shrrounded and White was called out.
When he reached the fence the war?
rant was read, ?nd accompanied by
soldiers, he returned to the house and
dressed. The party reached here this
afternoon and White was remanded
until tomorrow morang when he and
Jett wll be arraigned together.
At the advice of his attorney,
Judge John Noble, he declined to
make a statement.
James Johnson, a nephew of the
late J. B. Marcum, guided the sol?
diers to where White was found. Lit?
tle and 12 soldiers went to Winchester
today and the order for Jett was hon?
ored by Judge Benton. He was placed
in irons and arrived he^e and was
committed to jail this evening. He
has employed B. F. French of Win?
chester as counsel. An effort will be
made by his attorney to get a change
of venue. If this fails, he will en?
deavor to have the jury summoned
from outside of Breathitt county. Jett
is bitter, against the officials of
Breathitt county. He blames them
for not coming to his relief. The jail
is heavily guarded tonight.
Jett and White were not allowed to
converse with one another and occupy
separate cells.
A Stroag Resemblance.
There was in Washington a few years j
ago an old negro who was noted for
his recollections of all the famous
statesmen of ante-bellum days. To
him one day came ?a mtber pompous ;
member of a ?amparatively recent
Congress, who resembled some of the \
famous forensic giants only ? in his
capacity for ardent spirits. He had
his customary cargo aboard and was
inclined to be colloquial, so he address?
ed the old negro patronizingly :
"Uncle Daniel, I understand that
you used to know Webster, Clay and
all the celebrated statesmen of before
the war times?"
"Oh, yes, sir; I 'members dem all,"
responded the old negro.
41 Well, Daniel, 1 have been told that
I look like Daniel Webster. Can you
notice any resemblance?"
"Well, yes, sub; you does 'mind me
pow'ful of Mars Webstah in some
'specks. "
"Indeed! In what particular do I
remind you of Daniel Webster?" in?
quired the now thoroughly flattered
statesman.
"Mos'ly in de bref, sub," responded
Daniel:; "mos'ly in de bref!"
Startling Evidence.
Fresh testimony in great quantity is
constantly coming in, declaring Dr. King's
New Discovery for Consomption, Coughs
and Colds to be unequaled. A recent ex?
pression from T. J. McFarland, Bentor
ville, Va., serves as example. He writes :
"I had Bronchitis for three years and doc?
tored all the time without being benefited.
Then I began taking Dr. King's New Dis?
covery, and a few bottles wholly cured
me." Equally effective in caring all Lung
and Throat troubles, Consumption, Pneu?
monia and Grip. Guaranteed by J. F. W.
DeLorme, DrEggist. Trial bottles free,
regular sizes 50c, and $1.00.
PANAM? ROUTE A DEATH TRAP.
Plans for the Canal May be Seri?
ously Afected as a Result
Abandonment is Possible.
Chicago, May 27.-A Washington
telegram to the ChicagoChronicle says :
Maj. William M. Black, who accom?
panied Admiral Walker and Gen.
Hains to the isthmus of Panama to
look over the canal property, is still
on the isthmus examining into the
sanitary conditions there. Maj. Black
performed excellent work along sani?
tary lines in Cuba and his report upon
the situation at Panama and Colon is
awaited with interest.
His presence in that quarter of the
world is causing renewed interest
in the statements of Senator Morgan
and others that climate and sanitary f
conditions in the region through which j
the proposed canal is to pass are such
that it is practically impossible for
white men to live there. Gen. Hains
returned to the United States convinced
of the truth of these statements. The
deplorable sanitary conditions during
the progress of work by the old French
company will be remembered. If those |
conditions cannot be improved under .
the regime of the United States the ,'
loss of life among the workers employ?
ed on the canal will be frightful. The
French exerted every effort to secure
proper sanitation and expended vast j
sums of money to that end, but they 1
were unsuccessful. The hospital and j
similar buildings erected by them are
still standing, but are going into decay
and will require a large amount of
money to restore them.
It is considered probable by many
well-informed men that Maj. Black's
report will be of such a nature as
effectually to call a halt on the
Panama canal project. It is beiieved
that that report will suggest a very
large sum of money for the sanitation
of the line of the canal and the cities
of Panama and Colon and there are
men who know the isthmus well who
declare that they would not be sur?
prised if the repor? should be practical?
ly to the effect that no amount of
.sanitation would make the conditions
on the isthmus very much better than
tfeey were when the French company
was operating there.
In that event they are not sanguine
about the prosecution of the work,
especially in view of the reports that
are reaching this city to the effect
that the Colombian Congress will
amend the treaty providing that ?20, -
.OCKLVGOO instead of $10,000,000 shall be
paid Colombia in the transaction
transferring the canal from the French
company to the United States Govern?
ment.
Inevitable Eye-Witness.
The late John T. Crisp was a par?
ticipant in the battle of Westport,
says the Kansas City Star. He liked
to describe the engagement from his
point of view arid he never failed to
interest his auditors. A few years
ago, while seated at a "round table"
in a down-town cafe, he gave, accord?
ing to a friend, free vent to his won?
derful imagination, in the presence of
Richard Gentry and others who were
at the 4cene of the battle at the time
it raged the fiercest.
The colonel told of the way his com?
pany had charged the enemy, of how
the federalists were put to flight and
of how he himself had been in the
fore-front of the bloody battle.
Gentry, who was a member of Crisp's
company, finally interrupted a beauti?
ful piece of word painting about the
horrors of war by saying: "Now,
colonel, you know yon ran like-on
that day, ? was running with yon and
you kept ahead of me until we were
ont of range of the union guns. Yes,
sir, you ran, sir; by gad sir, you
retreated, sir, and I retreated with
you. ' '
Colonel Crisp so the story goes,
calmly looked at Gentry for a moment
and then, in his most explosive man?
ner, excalimed :
"I never told a good story in my life
that some blanked eye-witness did not
jump up and spoil it."
That Throbbing Headache
Would quickly leave you, if j ou used |
Dr. King's .New Life Pills. Thousands of
suffers have proved their matchless merit
for Sick and Nervous Headaches. They
make pure blood and build up } our health. ,
Only 25 cents, money back if not cured. ,
Sold by J. F. W. DeLorme, Druggist. ,
G0ND9HINE GRIME
IN THE PHILIPPINES.
Secretary Root at Last Makes
Public ail the Papers in Con?
nection With the Charges
Against Major Howze.
Washington, May 28.-Secretary
Root today made public all the papers
in connection with the charges made
against Major Robert L. Howze of
having authorized the brutal and
fatal whipping of hostile natives held
as prisoners at Laoag, Luzon, in the
spring of 1900. Secretary Root says
in part:
"Howze's character and conduct
afford a very strong presumption
against the probability of his having
done the things charged. The charges
are sustained solely by ex-parte
affidavits of a large number of native
filipinos, who were hostile to the
American troops, and who unite in
telling a story, which, if it is to be
believed, exhibit the most revolting
cruelty. Major Hunter, who collected
these affidavits nearly thre*years after
the incidents to which they relate,
appears by his own letters and the
testimony of his brother officers to
have entertained a bitter personal ani?
mosity towards Major Howze.
"The statements of these native affi?
davits are directly contradicted by the
positive oaths of Major Howze him?
self and ten American, officers, who
were stationed at Laoag at the time.
Either the oaths and statement. of
these American officers are false or the
native affidavits produced by Major
Hunter are false."
Major Hunter, who made the
charges, sent them to Governor Taft
and not through the, regular military
channels. The Secretary says this was
"designed to secure Major Howze's
removal from command and was un?
derhanded and most reprehensible."
Secretary Root concludes as follows :
"Upon all the papers now produced,
it appears that the charges against
Major Howze are false ; that there
were no such beatings as are described
in the affidavits procured by Major
Hunter; that Major Howze's report
upon his investigation of the subject
was a true report.
"I am not satisfied, however, to
leave the case here, resting upon ex
parte affidavits. Major Howze has
asked for a Court of Inquiry, and I
direct that a board of three officers be
detailed by the commmanding general,
division of the Philippines, to proceed
to Laoag and call before them the wit?
nesses whose names appear ripon the
affidavits procured by Major Hunter,
and subject them to examination and
cross-examination upon the facts, and
call all other witnesses whom they
may find to have knowledge of the
facts and report the testimony.
"Upon the coming in of their re?
port, such further order as may seem
to be required will be made
for the oral examination and cross
examination of witnesses elsewhere
than at Laoag, having kowledge of
the facts."
Major Hunter, it appears from his
report, made the investigation under
an order issued by Lieut. Gen. Miles,
commanding the army, dated at Ma?
nila, November 28? 1902.
Rewds are Public Property.
The Texas court of appeals recently
handed down a decision which is a
distinct victory for the freedom of the
press in the Lone Star State. The par?
ticular case in question was one in
which the editor of the Houston
Chronicle was fined for contempt of
court by a judge of that city for pub
lising the testimony in a murder trial,
after having been warned by the court.
The court of appeals in a lengthy opin?
ion holds that the judge who presided
at the murder trial had no power to
prohibit the publication of the testi?
mony of witnesses in the case, and
that his act of punishing for contempt
in violating that order was without
jurisdiction and consequently void.
Kodol Gives Strength
by enabling the digestive organs to digest,
assimilate ana transform all the whole?
some food that may by eaten into the
kind of blood that nourishes the nerves,
feeds the tissues, hardens the muscles and
recuperates the organs of the entire body.
Kodol Dyspepsia Cure cures indigestion,
dyspepsia, catarrh of the stomach and all
stomach disorders. Soid by J. S. Hushson
&C.
THE BRE?THlTT COUNTY FE?G.
State Troops at Jackson Have to
Fight to Protect the Prisoners
in the Jail.
Jackson, Ky, May 28.-Eariy last
evening a body of abont sixty armed
men were noticed in Jackson. They
were not together, bnt kept close to
each other. At midnight the prowlers
began to sneak across the street from
tlie bank sonth of the jail. The guards
commanded them to halt. They re?
fused and in reply fired several shots.
The guards returned the fire. The
prowlers ran about a hundred yards
further and fired again. The guards
then poured three volleys into them
in rapid succession. Moving objects
were discovered on the north side of
the jail and the guards fired again and
killed a cow. A few moments before
the firing a flash of lightning revealed
a squad of men in the hills in the rear
! of the jail, ffc was then expected
that concerted action was to be made to
reach the jail and the troops prepared
to give any comers a hot reception,
but a terrific storm was raging and it
was absolutely dark, so that no furth?
er demonstration was made.
Col. Roger Williams left today for
Lexington. "The camp of the troops
was almost swept away daring the
storm last night. It is thought that
Col. Williams will ask for more troops
and more equipment.
Curtis Jett and Thomas White were
arraigned today for the. murder of J.
B. Marcum and pleaded not guilty.
After considerable delay a consulta?
tion among the attorneys was held.
This consultation resulted in White
and Jett filing affidavits asking Judge
Redwine to remove Elizer Little on
the ground of prejudice. They ajleged
that Little said they ought to be hang?
ed. The case was set for Monday,
'which is the first day of the regular
term of Court, and there is a special
term over Saturday. The grand jury
is still working on the Cockrell case.
Profit in Advertising.
A New York publisher has interview?
ed one hundred advertisers, among
them the Franklin Mills, the Universi?
ty Society, Ostermoor Co., the
Proctor & Gambie Co., Packard
Piano Co., Lyon & Healy, Keystone
Watch Co., Pillsbury-Wash burn flour
mills, International Silver Co., and
other large concerna To the question
whether they intend to increase the
volume of their advertising, forty
seven concerns out of a hundred replied
in the affirmative. Among these forty
sei'en firms are fifteen who have ad?
vertised fifteen years or longer, and
only three whose advertising covers a
period of less than three years.
Ten other firms volunteered the in?
formation that they would advertise
only to the same extent in future as
they had done for some time past, stat?
ing that they had all the business they
could possibly handle. Some thirty
"f the remaining firms claimed they
would not enlarge their advertising
appropri?tion, giving as a reason the
fact that they could not increase their
facilities quick enough to supply the
demand for their products which
further advertising on their part
would surely create. The cases were
remarkably few where the sum ex?
pended for advertising was to be cut
down in the future owing to failure
or poor results. Some of the parties
approached said they would increase
the number of publications used, but .
decrease the space. Those, however,
who intended to decrease the number
of publications and increase the space
predominated.
The conclusion to be deduced from
the statements and experience of ad?
vertisers of all kinds and classes is;
that advertising must and does pay,
no matter whether one hundred dol?
lars are expended or as many thou?
sands. It is only a matter of using
the advertising appropriation, what?
ever the sum may be, in a judicious^
and proper manner.
Birmingham, Ala, May 28.-It is
now reported that in addition to the
eight train hands who were killed in
the Southern railway freight wreck at
Bryan yesterday, five tramps, four
colored and one white, were killed.
Their bodies were bumed.
Chattanooga, Tenn., May 28.-D.
W. Miller, general manager of the
Aetna Coal company, was instantly
killed today at Aetna." He was run over
by live empty cars. He was very
wealthy.

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