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The watchman and southron. (Sumter, S.C.) 1881-1930, October 30, 1912, Image 1

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THK si M IHI WATVIOIAV F*UiM1.hImmI April, 185o
'Be Just said Fear not?-Let all the ends Thou Alms't at he thy Country's, Thy God's and Truth's.'
THJE TltfJrJ bOUTWt?V rvitabllMied Juue, l
Consolidated Aur. 3, 681.
SUMTER, S. 0., WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 30, 1912.
Ol. XXXV. No. 19.
COLUMBIA STRIKE SETTLED.
RH.ll.AK SVIIt'.IHLFS ON ALL
LINKS REst Ml I? KATIUDAY
MoRNINt..
Term-, of Settlement W ? i not Ih? Pub?
lished, hut Itotli Sldon Sm> That
trrangentent* are Hathtfactor).
Columbia. QgjSbSf 26.?The strike
of motormen and conductors on
the Columbia street railway has
ended The street car service
Will be resumed this morning, one
week from the time at which the
strike was declared. The 104 strikers
and the company reached an agree
asent yesterday afternoon at It41
o'clock when a two year contract was
signed by bcth parties.
The union of street car men and
the company mutually agreed not to
consent to the publication of the con?
tra? I Th i-tore. any statement as to
Its terms must be unofficial.
It la generally understood, how?
ever, that the contract was slrned b>
A. A. Oerohl. a street car conductor,
aa president of local division No. 590
and that th? Amalgamated Associa?
tion of street and Klectrlc Railway
Employes of America was not named
as a party to the contract. It is also
understod that the contract allows
any of the employes to submit their
grievances to the superintendent of
the oompar?. and. In case of an un
favorable decision by him, to appeal !
first to the general manager, then to '
the president, and. finally, as a court
of laat res>?rt. to the board of di?
rectors.
Although the terms of the contract
have not be n made public, they are
undoubtedly satisfactory to the union
and the company. Henry J. Hardy,
district organiser for the American
Federation >f Labor, who submitted
the contract yesterday to the members 1
of the union, and Willlum Elliott, vice
president and counsel for the Cnlum- i
bla Railway. Oas and Klectrlc com- |
pany. each i.ave out statements to the
effect that both the company and the
strikers were satisfied. j
The breaking of the apparent dead- i
loek. In wht h the company and strik?
ers were contending was du? In large
measure to the mediation of Robert
J. Blalock. a member of the Columbia ;
city council, and W. C. Howard of i
Burlington. Iowa, a salesman for the
Peerless Motor Car company.
Mr Howard, who ha* been in Co?
lumbia for the last few days, was
Induced by 8. II. McM aster to as?
sume the i .!? of peacemaker Mr.
Howard, a man of compelling person?
ality, endov ed with tact, the gift of
s words, and above all, an absolutely
disinterested stranger, was looked
upn by Mr. McMaster as the ideal
mediator.
Mr Howard in.- nJed to leave Co?
lumbia yesterday for Augusta. Mr.
McMaMer said that he thought when
he awoke yesterday morning of mak?
ing Mr. Howard a mediator and hur?
ried to the union station to reach him
before he left town. It happened,
however, that Mr Howard was still at
his hotel at he planned ' ?> ' I ? I i
ter train to Augusta. Mr M< Master
found hltn here.
The two Interviewed Edwin YV.
RobertMon. president of the Columbia
Railway, 'las and Electric company.
Whv, told hlrn to see William Elliott,
the vice president of the ag i? tny At
th.- conference with Mr. Elliott, the
details of the strike situation WOTS
11 ? d Th, n Mr. How ml ?nd Mr.
MeM'tster went to the hall gggd by the
members of the striking union to
Ih nry J. Hatdv, dlstrl? t Pfgggbjaf for
th? Viieric.m Federation of LggOfi
who h i" been in ? barge of tho s'rlke
ever since It began last Saturday
morning.
Another coherence ensued at
which the strikers' side of the mat?
ter w is thoroughly dl>< ussed Mr.
How -rd told Mr Hardy that the strlfc
? r i r I ? h.mpany w ? re sepai it- d
I I h a thin I arrier th.it they ought
t?. break QlrOVgh and s?-ttb? at ore e
Mi Hal I . i I ngly w? nt to Mr
Elliott s office v Ith Mr. Howard. In
a verv short time Mr. Elll >tt and Mr.
Hardy rea< hed an agreement. Mr.
Howard ard Mr Hardy appeared be
flsgf ihe members of the union and
advised thyn to accept the contract
agreed upon Itoth made addresses
to the strikers. The agreement was
n< cept.iblo to the union and a com
riiirtce with power in a<t vsan appoint?
ed to wait on Mr. Elliott. The com
tract was signed at 2 4 5 o'clock with?
out further discussion.
ftohert J. lil'ilock. member of th.
city counc I, began working along
similar llnrs last Thursdsy to effect an
agreement between the strikers and
the company. A conference of the
?lr*et car men was held In his office
yesterdsy morning at which it was np
MILITIA 6UARLS HABANA.
not U51 OCR MARTIAL LAW BUT
ALMOST,
I lent (I Nutionul Political Campaign
CutLMN President Gomes to Order
Patrol of Street-*.
Habana, Oct. 27.?While not ac?
tually under martial law tho city of '
Hal-ana is m>w under absolute mili?
tary protection against disorders aris?
ing from list heat?*d national poll- ,
tu al campaign. Isl accordance with |
Dffdtfl issued by Gen. llablo Mendleta, j
who yesterday was appointed by Pres?
ident Gomez to take charge of all the i
police and military forces in the capl- J
tal, the streets were patrolled today ]
bv police and mounted and foot rural |
guardsmen. In addition detachments
of regular troops of all arms were |
stationed at various stragetic points
n ady to respond Instantly to a call J
to suppress rioting.
The principal concentration of arm?
ed forces vas the foot of Monserrate
i
street, where there was an encamp- .
n.ent In the park of several squad?
rons of cavalry and a battery of ma
chine guns fully equipped for field ser- ?
vice, while other detachments were
held in readiness at Atarez castle, La j
Feurza and Vedado, all within easy
dl t a nee of any part of the city.
Conferences held last night between
government officials and leaders of :
the political parties with the purpose
of arriving at an agreement to sus- !
pend all political meetings failed of
the desired effect. Several large meet- '
ings were held tonight. The mili?
tary precautions, however, were ef?
fective In checking all symptoms of j
disorder. It was reported tonight
that an agreement had been reached
between Gen Menocal and Alfredo
Zavas to suspend all political meet?
ings from now until the election and
also that assurances have been given
by the partisan press that they will
refrain from exciting utterances in
order to avoid all danger of police
collisions on election day. j
< >ne transfer of real estae was left
in 'lie auditor's otftce Friday morning:
Oecrge Robinson, et al, to J. H. Rob?
inson, lot on Robinson street, $5.
Governor Hbase has appointed G.
I Kembert of Oswego, Lee County,
magistrate for the Mechanlcsvllle dis?
trict, to till out the unexpired term of
W? J. Jo8ey, resigned
parent that very few differences exist?
ed between the company and the in? n
*ncn the matter was sifted to the
bottom and both sides of the matter
thoroughly understood.
*
William Klliolt, vice president and
counsel for the Columbia Railway
?las ami Klectric company, gave out
the foil*.wing statement last night:
< >n Thursday afternoon R. J. lila?
lock took ucthe steps to bring about
an agreement between the car men
ami IL*, company and linally got the
matter placed upon a basis that made
it probable that an agreement (amid
be ptsY-bed. He continued his efforts
Friday morning and brought the car
men and the comptny closer together.
During the day Win. C. Howard, who
WaS introduced to me by S. H. McMas
ter. i arm to my ohn e, accompanied
by Mr. Hardy, and after some discus
aiofl Mr. Hardy proposed a basis of
settlement which was acceptable to
the company. Shortly after the com?
mittee of the car men, authorized to
act, cans In With Mr, Howard and
Mr. Hardy and an agree men! was
?Igned at 1.41 o'clock, The agree?
ment WSJ then written out and signed
in duple ate at 4 o'olOCki and gfl a re?
sult the car men will take up their
rung tomorrow morning.'1
Henry J. Hardy, district organiser
for the Am< re .in Federation of Labor,
who had charge of the strike, m o ?
the following statement
"I was Invited by W'. Howard to
sccompan) bun to Mr, KUIott's office
t.nfer on ins situation. Mr. El?
liott and myself discussed the differ?
ent phases of the natter, suggestions
Were made on both sides and what
appeared to ntc lo be satisfactory
terms of settlement were reached.
These terms I agreed to submit to the
union, which I did. and the) WefS ac
? epted. While the term, of the con?
tract were not given out for public
tion. i can safely sssurs the public
thai they were entirely satisfactory to
both sides Tins agreementi which
run* until January I, IMS, insures
the amicable settlement of all differ
snces and w in preclude the possibility
..f another strike during thai time,
The contract was signed by A, A.
Gerald, president of local division No.
110, and by Hdwin \V. Robert
president of the Columbia Railway
11 ii and Liecti ic company,"
DEPARTMENT TO Ask appropri?
ation or $28:$.84>.->.7uo.
statute* ol Last Sermion ol* Congress
Fan Not ix* Carried out for Noth>
Ins.
Washington, Oct 28.?-For the
?upport of their postal tervlce the
people of the United states next year
will spend $288,806,760, far more
than f?r any other branch of the gov?
ernment service. Estimates an?
nounced today by Postmaster General
Hitchcock of appropriations for the
operations of the department during
the fiscal year beginning July 1, 1913,
propose an increase of $12,086,909
over the appropriation of the current
fiscal year.
Mr. Hitchcock is the first cabinet
Officer to complete his estimates,
Whleh aggregate $281,781,608 for the
postal service at large, exclusive of
$2,014,260 for the department in
Washington. Nearly $1,000,000 of the
increase will be required to put into
effect the postal legislation enacted
this year.
It is estimated that $7,240,000 will
be needed for the parcels post sys?
tem; $1,350,000 to meet the condi?
tions required under the new eight
hour law; $750,000 to provide for
the reelassilleation of railway mail
Klerks; and $150,000 to establish the
new village free delivery service.
Only $2.000,00 is added to current
appropriations, representing an in?
crease of less than 1 per cent, which
is the lowest actual rate of increase in
the history of the service.
INVESTMENTS IUHIS STATE.
MADE ItV LIFE AM) FIRE INSUR?
ANCE COMPANIES.
Forthcoming lb port of Insurance
Commissioner will Show Amounts
Invested in Each County in State.
Municipal and County Roods, Kcal
Estate Mortgages and Other Se?
curities. Aggregating Over Sixteen
Million Hollars.
Columbia. < >ct. 24.?The insurance
department, in its next report to the
Legislature, will make an interesting
statement in regard to investments by
insurance companies in this State.
The variety of investments and the
amount invested in each county of
the State will be shown.
The report win show that the ag?
gregate amount of money to the cred?
it of South Carolinians In the insur?
ance companies of all classes doing
business in South Carolina, is about
$29,000,000. The aggregate amount
Of Investments by insurance com?
panies of every class in South Caro?
lina, including loans to policy holders
by life Insurance companies on secur?
ity of their policies a'one; investment
in Inter-State railroad bonds, on a
pro rata Income basis, and the in?
vestments in the Stae, county and
municipal bonds, industrial bonds and
real estate mortgages, amounts to
about $1 f.,200,000.
Tin- Investment in State, county ami
municipal bonds and in real estate
mortgages have been made almost en?
tirely within the last three or four
years.
The returns show that $2,409,606.68
have been invested by ail classes of
insurance companies in State, county
and municipal bonds and local indus?
trial bonds; that $3,8.10,021.9 2 have
been invested in real estate mortgag?
es. The showing docs not include
South Carolina companies, all of
which practically make all of their
Investments in this State.
CHARITIES CONFERENCE FOR
STATE.
Will Meet at Greenville Next Month
List of S|>caUcrs.
The South Carolina Conference of
I h.u it i's and I 'ot rcct Ion w ill meet
nexl month at Greenville, Distin?
guished speakers have been secured,
Including Dr. Hastings H. Hart of
the Russell Sage Foundation. Now
York; (?wen u. Loy. joy, General Sec
retai y of the Nation d Child Labor
Committee; Miss .ban Gordon, the
noted philanthropist of New Orleans;
Mr. .i. i'. Logan, Secretary of the Aa
soclated Charities of Atlanta; Lieut.
Governor Chaa a. smith. i?r. w. J,
Ja< obs and lion It, I Manning.
Civic Leagues, Literary Clubs, Asso
clated Charities, Daraca Claaaei arc
invited to semi delegates, ah persons
Intereated In the work of charity and
reform wll be welcomed to th.n
ference, November 12-14.
WILSON Fl NT) TREASURER RE?
TURNED McCORMICK'S GIFT.
Bryan's Address in Several Michigan
< it los Featured by Explanation of
Refusal.
Detriot, Mich., Oct. 25.?William
Jennings Bryan, campaigning in be?
half of Gov. W ilson's candidacy, shot
across Michigan today, making over
a dozen speeches in as many cities
and returning to Detroit tonight to
address a Democratic mass meeting.
Mr. Bryan devoted considerable of
his time today to a discussion of cam?
paign contribution. He also repeated?
ly criticised the presidential candi?
dates of the opposing parties, 'and
treated the Republican national com?
mittee humorously.
In several cities he made the an?
nouncement that the treasurer of the
Democratic national committee had
informed him that the contribution of
$12,500 which Cyrus H. McCormick
of Chicago had made to Gov. Wilson's
campaign had been returned. H?
referred to Mr. McCormick as bein?
connected with the International Har?
vester company and said that ihoug i
Mr. McCormick was a college mate
and lifelong friend of Gov. Wilson
the contribution had been refused on
the ground that the acceptance of it
might cau.-e political opponents to
charge that, the Wilson campaign had
become indebted to persons or con?
cerns involved in government litiga?
tion. From here Mr. Bryan will go
to Chicago, where he will make sev?
eral speeches tomorrow.
DIAZ SENTENCED TO DEATH.
HIS OFFICERS ARE ALSO SEN?
TENCED TO DIE BIT SEN?
TENCE is SUSPENDED.
Rending Deciding Question of Juris?
diction Mexican Revolutionists Will
Not l>e Shot.
Vera Cruz. Oct. 26.?Gen. Felix1
j Dias, leader of the recent revolt here
! against the Mexican government and
Major Zerate, Col. Antonie) Migoni and
Lieut. Lima, officers under Diaz, in
! his attempt to overthrow the gov- I
I ornment. were today condemned to
death by court martial. Lieut. Cama- '
I cho, ('apt. Hermilio Martinez were
?entenced to 10 years' imprisonment
ami Gabriel Ramos, customs colltC
I 1
tor, and Herman AXOStegut, censor of
' telegrams, were sentenced to two
' years' improlsonment.
I Nine other officers and civilians
) were allowed to go free.
j The court martial which was pre
! sided over by Gen. Daveilla sat in
secret session from 2 o'clock Satur?
day morning until 3.15 o'clock Sun
i day morning. The sentences caused a
' sensation. A great crowd, including
I relatives and many friends of the ac
j CUSed im n. gathered outside the
I building where the court sat and
j waited for hours for the findings, not?
withstanding a heavy rain storm.
Gen. Davillo refused to accept the
order of the district judge to sus?
pend the sentence In the case of Gen.
J Diaz and Maj. Zerate.
I The military commander of the
! zone however accepted ;i writ of
habeas corpus and suspended the sen?
tences, leaving the prisoners tempor- i
arlly at the disposal of the district
court.
It is tin ught probable that Col.
Migoni and Lieut. Lima will be shot
without much more ado. The pro?
ceedings of the military court have
been criticised generally as being very
deficient. Public opinion has been
strongly against a military trial for
Gen. Diaz, it is openly asserted thai
the prisoners had an inadequate de?
fense ami no Investigations have been
so far as why the federal troops
entere,l the city ami with the dags
flying and the greeting. "Long live
I Mas."
Col, Diaz Ordas nnd Capt. Cuesk
wi re attending the leaders of the re?
bellion who escaped, it is thought
thee will join the Oaxaos rebels. Gen.
Diaz had more than 1,000 men un ler
his banner. 300 of whom were prison?
ers.
sxVl.li: LEAGUE MEETING.
Directors will Gather at Savannah
Thursday.
Savannah. Ga., Oct. 27.?-President
N. l \ Corish of the Bouth Atlantic
baseball league today called a meet?
ing of the league director! for
Thursday morning next, here. Officers
will bo cb ct. d but nothing else out
of routine li expe< ted to be dlscustied.
COTTON GIKNERa
cexsi
to
11 OCTOBER is AT
8,838,741.
States This Side of .Mississippi River
Are Sufferers?South Carolinas
Share 589,514 Rales.
Washington, <>?-t. 25.?Cotton gin?
ned to October IS amounted to 0,
838,S41, or 819,780 bale* less than
ginned to that date last year when a
record crop was grown, according to
the census bureau's report today. East
of the Mississippi the ginnings fell
below last year while west of the
Mississippi last year's figures were ex?
ceeded in every State. Texas ginned
to that date a greater quantity by
more ihan half a million bales than
ever before. In addition to the gin?
ning figures the census bureau an?
nounced statistics estimating the
world's production of cotton from the
crop of 1911 at 22,297,000 bales of
500 pounds each.
The consumption for the year end?
ing August 31, 1912, at 20,277.000
bales and the number of active con?
suming cotton spdir.les at 140,954,000.
The number of sea island cottor
bales included was 15,704, compared
with 40,303 bales last year, 36.4S2
1 alet'in 1909 and 32,013 bales in 1908.
Ginnings prior to October 18, by
States, with comparisons for last year
and other big crop years and the per?
centage of the entire crop ginned
prior to that date in those years,
i< -How:
Year. Ginnings. P. C.
585,279 _
83S,G17
094,104
469,647
2H7,'52
2 7 S, 2 ;i S
347,168
163,103
23,311
1911
1908
1906
Georgia. . . .1912
19U
190S
1900
1912
1911
1908
1906
1912
1908
1911
1906
States.
Alabama... .1912
1911
1908
1906
Arkansas. . .1912
1911
1908
1906
Florida. . . .1912
Louisiana,
M ississippi
North Carolina 1912
1911
190S
1906
Oklahoma. . .1912
1911
190S
1906
South Carolina.191 2
1911
1908
1906
. 1912
1911
1908
19^0
.1912
1911
1 9^S
1900
.1912
1911
190S
1906
The ginning.- of sea Island cotton
pior to October 1^. by States, fol
lows:
Tennessee
Texas
< >t her States
43,009
34,027
24,321
7^.570
1,5.-2,718
1,119.228
720.316
198,5S0
176,904
2"7.'..:?2
321,123
3 4 7.s 7
621,899
386,016
365,058
356,081
4 38.200
276.222
223.437
398.113
396,739
132,556
198.703
539,514
788,927
0 CO. 0 7S
396,551
06,587
1 25,791
131,073
38,853
3 214 2 2 2
2.700,037
2,047,796
1.4198.^07
23.075
33,359
23,623
11,692
4 9.5
5 2.1
37.8
30.6
34.9
18.2
4 5.5
48.2
39.6
55.6
56.6
4 1.1
40 5
4 4.0
3 3.0
38.4
33.0
2 1.1
3S.9
40.4
30.0
39.0
19.2
2 2^
46.6
54.3
4 3.5
29.3
39.2
13.3
?;.->. 7
50.5
80.5
24.0
32.3
1 7.1
Yens
1 9 1 2 .
1911 .
1 909 .
Florida.
. 0.931
. 15.1 10
.11.5 3t
1908 .13.810
South
Georgia, Carolina.
7.9 3 7 6S6
24,453 7 10
19.931 2.017
1 5.22:: 2,970
A SEVEN-POUND POTATO.
Mr. s. .1. White Raises champion Sired
Yam on Prize Vcre.
Mr. s. .1. White of the Zoar neigh?
borhood nnas in the city Friday after?
noon with 0110 of tin* largest, if not
tin ingest, potatoes ever seen here.
The potato, in- stated, weighed seven
pounds and nn is a yam of the Triumph
variety. He raised the potato on his
prize acre in tin- City National Bank
contest and brought it to town for
Mr. Feminon, the President of the
bank, to have a look at. lie st 11. <i
that he did not know whether ho had
any more of that kind ol not. as he
had just commenced to dig a lew o!
his potatoes for home consumption.
The potato was slightly over twelve
Inches long and was about five Inches
in diameter. There were a great many
wh<? took a look at the whopper yam,
before it disappeared from the street.
I FAIR OPENED MONDAY.
AI L ROADS IN SOUTH CAROLINA
WILL LEAD TO CAPITAL < ITY
Tills WEEK.
With Ideal Weather the Attendance
l-. Expected to lk* Large?Many
New features Have IU?en Added
This Year?Foothall (.amo Thurs?
day.
Columbia, Oct. 28.?All roads la
South Carolina will lead this week to
Columbia for the annual fair of the
South Carolina Agricultural and Me?
chanical Society which will be held
Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday and
Friday (.'heap roundtrip rates have
been granted from all points in the
State and from points in Georgia and
North Carolina and with ideal weather
conditions a record-breaking attend?
ance is expected.
Out at the State fair grounds
everything has been set in order for
the annual event and the exhibits
which I'.av'e been installed in the
various buildings are sure to attract
attention.
j The Columbia street railway com?
pany has made arrangements for the
maintenance of a fast schedule to
and from the city. There will be
I ample transportation facilities. In ad
! dltion to the street cars the South?
ern railway will operate a shuttle
train from the union station to the
fair grounds.
I High class attractions have been
\ provided for the "Midway" at the fair
grounds and several excellent produc?
tions have been booked for the Co
! lumbla theatre.
j The State fair will be officially
opened to the public tomorrow morn
j ing. Already several thousand visi
I tors have arrived in the city.
The new st? el auditorium which
' has been erected at the fair grounds
for the joint use of the State fair
and the National Corn exposition will
be opened tomorrow morning. The
building is one of the largest of its
nature in the South and has a seat?
ing capacity of 35,0 :0 persons. k The
building1 will be used for housing of
exhibits and will take the place of
the structure that was destroyed by
tire two years ago.
The Clemson college cadets, 706
strong, will attend the fair in a body
and will be encamped at the grounds
The cadets will arrive on a special
train this afternoon.
The racing meet at the fair grounds
will open tomorrow afternoon at 2
O'clock. Many fast horses have been
entered and an attractive card has
been arranged. Mori* than $3,ooo will
i be given as purses for the races.
There will be 16 running races,
j The first dress parade by the Clem
son College students will be held to?
morrow afternoon at 4.30 o'clock.
To this the public is invited.
The first annual meeting of the
South Carolina Berkshire association
will be held Tuesday night at I
o'clock. The association will discuss
plans for the meeting of the national
Berkshire congress which meets here
in January and February of next
year In connection with the National
Corn show.
. The annual meeting of the Snath
Carolina Travelers' association will be
held Wednesday morning at 10.30
o'clock, when it is expjected several
hundred traveling men of the State
will attend.
The annual meeting of the South
Carolina Agricultural ami Mechani?
cal society will be held Wednesday
; night at I o'clock In the Uichland
county court house, when the bus
i
in CSS < f the society will be discussed
and the officers for the year elected.
Wednesday is one of the big days
of the fair and special trains will be
J operated to Columbia from the va
! rlOUS sections of the State.
Thursday will be "Farmers Union
Fry"?and it It also one of the "big"
da vs.
i
I 'lite Clem son-Carolina football
game will be played at the fair
grounds Thursday morning and an
I attendance of several thousand pcr
?^ons is snttclpated.
Friday Is agricultural and auto
day at the f ir unds.
Real Estate Transfers.
j The following transfers of real es?
tate have been left in the Auditor's
office:
Moses Baker to Addle Foyd, 1.1
ba res in Sumter township, |1.#9 and
other ? onalderatton.
w T, Andrews to John D. Fpps,
b t on Warie\ street. $r>o.
Master to W. T. Andrews, 15 lots
[on Liberty street, $1,300.

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