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Cochise review. (Bisbee, Ariz.) 1900-1901, September 25, 1900, Image 1

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1 ' JOB PRINTING
The Review Job Depart'
J incut is equipped to do firs!
t J. class commercial printing,
COCHISE REVIEW
' ti
THE DISPATCHES
Received by the Review
contain tne cream of the
world's news. Read them.
A --" "- "- "-"
VOLUME 1Y.
BISBEE, AEIZONA, TUESDAY EVENING, SEPTEMBER 25. 1900.
, -. !.-. .... ,.... .t-
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f
rt"
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a
WmmA
SBLHHl'
si
fift "
PROFESSIONAL
s I S0LDIERIN6 IN I
AGENT FOR LAND SCRIP K THE DHII IDpIWKC
Tombstone, Arlxonn. 0 i 1 11 1 llli13 1 lHJUw
I M. O'CONNKLL mrmr9'
J
M. O'CONNKLL
ATTORNKV-AT-LAW
OKFICK! WAMjACK DUILDINO
BISBKE
YILLIAM J. KILPATHICK
ATTOKNKr-AT-LAW
140 W. Pennliiirtou St., Tucson, Arli.
Will praotloe In alt Courti of the Territory.
T
jyjAKCUS A. SMITH
ATTORNKY-AT-LAAV
TUCSON, ARIZONA
Will practice in District Court of Coohlse
County.
HARLB3 BLKNMAN
ATTORNKT-AT-LAW
TUCSON, ARIZONA
Will attend all terms of Court In Coohlte
County.
FBAMC X. HBBBVOBD 8ITH X. HAS ABD
J-jBBKFORD A HAZZARD
ATTOBNKTS-AT-LAAV
TUCSON, ARIZONA
AOKNTS OR LAND SCRIP
w.
K. OHAMBERS
VUONJt 37
DKNTIST
Appointment. Made by Mail
QR. J. W. FARRINGTON
DENTIST
, BISBEE, ARIZONA
Speolaltlet Diseases of the oral cavity and
irown and bridge work. All operations performed.
P A. SWEET, M. D. TxL. No. 6
E. Q. CAltLKTON.M. D
A. R. HICKMAN. M. D.
PHYSICIANS AND SUKQKONS
To the Copper Queen Consolidated Mining
Co. and A. A S. E. R. R.
)R. ISAAC H. WATKINS
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON
BENSON, ARIZONA
Office : Rear of Drug Store.
K.WILLIAMS
JUSTICE OF THE PEACE
BISBEE, ARIZONA
Notary Public and Conveyancer. Bill col
ectlns; a specialty.
gOCIETY PRINTING
Coohise Rxview Job Ovvice
We are thoroughly equppied to do till
kinds of Society Printing in a first-class
manner.
RAILROAD TIME TABLES.
Arizona & South Eastern Railroad
Paul lie Time 0110 hour earlier than City timo
Northward Southward
9 2
SrK
Mill
Z&
H
fiar
"Hue
"Stations
c
M
8:05
t-.n
6:15
i:te
:B2
7:07
7:21
7:40-
7:M
7:55
8:10
8:00
1 I
4.0
8.8
12.4
19.4
23.2
30.0
36.3
37.8
39.6
45.8
55.3
Blsbee.
1:8
South Blsbee
2:7
..Don Luis ...
4:8
N 00 Junction
3:o
, . Packard . . .
7:0
..Banning'.
5:8
Water Tank..
4:8
.Charleston .
6:3
!Ar..Falrbank ,Lv
Lv..Falrbank ,Ar
1:8
N.M & A. Crossing
b:u
. rinfltAntlnn
6:2
,, ..Land...,,
9:5
Ar .Benson .Xv
Tffi
55.8
54.0
51.8
48.5
42.9
359
80.1
25.3
19.0
17.7
15.7
8.5
flag Stations-stop on Signal
R
V. R. STILES,
G.F.AP.A.
C. MORGAN.
Superintendent.
Southern Pacific Railroad.
WBSTBODND.
.Benson, leave .,
Tuoson, arrive ..
Maricopa, " ,., .
Phoenix,
Passengers for Phoenix, from the east or
ffest, remain at Maricopa over night. Sleep
lng car and hotel accommodation.
Yuma, arrive .. ,..-
Lo. Angeles, arrive , . . ..
XA8I8OUND.
Beuson, leave t
Willoox, arrive... ,jf .v...
Bowie, " ,, ,.'.,,...
Lordsburg, " . ...1
B?g' ;; ',... .
BlPaso " ,
New Mexico and Aritona lUllroad.
, WBITBOUMD.
Benson, leave?....
Fairbank, arrive;
Nogales, " J. I
BA8IHOUND.
Nogales, leave . ,
Fairbank, arrive
Benson, " ...
mp
Sonora Railroad.
SOUTHBOUND.
Nogales, leave , ,
Hermosiilo, arrivo
Gunymns, .... " ,.
NOBTIIBOUND.
Guaymas. leave ..
Hermosiilo, arrive ...
Nogales " ,
6:00
9:33
5:00
Sands Fe Presoott mid Phoenix Railroad.
NOBTIIBOUND.
Paw.
Phoenix, leave , . 10:00 p.m.
Hot Springs Junot., arrive .a ;.,, 11:47 "
Congress Junot., ..,." .,., ... .. 12:55a.m.
Prescott. ' 4:28"
MrotS JUBCt ' 5)30"
&Sr " 7JM"
j f ... - .
CONCLUDED PROM YESTERDAY.
HE natives operate few schools;
in fact, I saw but one between
Parmiagua and Bacoor. Tho
Americans, however, are taking
hold of the school question in fairly
good shape in nearly all tho towns we
now hold. At Novaleta they havo made
much progress; fixed up an old tumble
down shack and made it look up by
putting on the needed trimmings, and
last, but not least, an American flag on
bamboo pole.
T lore are many Chinamen here who
seem to bo more steadily employed
than the natives and they work for very
small wages. We have one in our
kitchen whom we pay $5 American
money per month, and he will soon be
a wealthy ''Cheno" at that rate. We
also board him. In Manila many Chi
namsn work at very hard labor for J50c.
Mexican (equal to 15c. American
money) per day, and board themselves.
We can get a native to work all day for
50c. Mexican (equal to 23c. Amercan)
and he thinks he is well paid.
BISBEE Here at uavite Vlego, a non-commls-
missioned officer from our company is
detailed as marshal and has about
thirty native men working for 50o.
Mexican per day on the roads, etc.
The women work in the rice fields
and in many cases it can be seon that
they do more work than the men. The
men go to church same as the women
and children, but when services are
over they hie themselves to the cock
pit to fight their game roosters, or to
the gambling dens to play in onto. Of
all things common to both countries
the chickens here most nearly resem
ble those found in the United States,
only they breed at all seasons. There is
no winter here nor does the water in
Manila bay ever form (into ice, for if it
did what a time we would have. We
could then use skates, and with fixed
bayonets and going with the wind we
could thrust many a "googoo," lung
ing into them and flattening them so
as to get about f orty-leven per man-
Then as the waters of the bay are salt
we could preserve them in the first
convenient air bole.
Monkeys are to be found in the inte
rior, and all the volunteers have them.
Our men (the regulars) soon tired of
them. I may bring one home but
doubt it, for I don't fanoy them as I
once did.
The wells, as a rule, are located near
tho shacks and are invariably left ex
exposed. I have never seen one where
any precaution had been taken to pre
vent poople from walking into it.
Mainly they are cased with a soft rook.
A native will stand and bathe near a
well and see some or all of the water
ruu back into the well from which he
will later drink.
On rare occasious boys are seen with
kites made with a spear on the top and
a lot of cords similar to the cords on a
violin bow. Each boy 11 aneuvers his
kite so as to tear the other boys kite
with the spear point, and when they
.come together it is like a bike smashup.
Mosquitoes! There are enough to
set one wild. They cause us more
trouble than the whole insurgent army.
They are somewhat worse during the
rainy season, but the saints all know
they are bad enough now, and thoy are
called all kinds of pet names. Tho
foliage is always green, and flowers are
to be seen on the bamboo fences by
the roadsides that are in cases well
worth seeing.
The mango tree grows to an immense
size. One in the back yarp here is
about one hundred and twenty feet
high and will cover an area o0.90 feet,
and it is not the largest I have seen;
either. Mahogany wood is plentiful
here, and I'll tell a secret. The old
church here at Cavite Viejo is a wreck
from the work of our gunbouts (I won
der why?), and we have the old guard
futigue to carry a few pieces to our
wood pile, and may I tell jou all that
it is equal to the American hickory for
firewood. Yes, I know it is a valuable
wood, but, thon, it doesn't cost us a
cent, so, therefore, it is cheap fuel.
Ae to prices of anything the natives
sell us. Well, wo are oat of luok, as
the soldier expression has it. They
charge us as much as ten prices more
than they charge another native. A
native will buy two mangoes for one
cent Mexican, but thoy charge an
American ten cents Mexican for throe.
I've seen a native woman sell some
small fish for five cents Mexican each,
and when asked "quauto vnle por uno?"
(How much for one?" her answer was
"uuo peseta" (twenty cents Mexican).
And that is the way with most every
thing. Is it to be wondered at that
wo cut loose at times and put a few
shucks up in the clouds?
Tieer is shipped here by tho Ameri
can breweries, but the" price per bottle
?!.
3ES
.
les. P. it.
1:80
1:22
1:10
12:55
12:45
12:25
12:05
11:45
11:25
""A
11:00
10:40
A.M.
10:00
Pass.
4:57 p. m.
7:20 "
9:40 "
6:30 a.m.
8:00 a. m,
. 12: noon.
. 9:06 a.m.
10:42 "
11:55 "
1:43 p.m.
. 3:30 "
6:00 "
Pass.
,.5:80 p. m.
..6:13
..9:00 "
. 3:10 a.m.
. 7:37 "
. 8:40 "
Pass.
10:05 p. m.
5:15 o,
. 9:10 '
, m,
, in.
ia very high forty cents per quart,
twenty cents per pint bottle.
As to I ho intoxicants made here. San
Miguel makes a good beer, but cannot
begin to supply the demand. Here,
only twelve miles from Manila, we can
not get it. Beno, as an intoxicant,
kills many a man in the army here. It
is cheap in price, as ten cents Ameri
can money will buy a quart of it, and
that muoh will make four moderate
drinkers rather unsteady, whereas it
takes about six bottles to satisfy somo
of our old timo soaks.
Tinto and caraman schel are about
the same as beno, only of different
flavors, the last named being the sweet
est. As to tinto, well, if the first fails
to kill, the second surely will; if not
then, double the dose and- say "Ainto
case" (good by). How do I know so
muoh about these drinks may bo tho
burdon of your thoughts. Well, that's
easy to answer, thua: If auy one thinks
a man 'mpst thirty years of age, ground
up in as many different mills as I've
been, and still alive, would not take a
drink of the beverage of the land he
may happen to bo in, such a one is
guilty of a wrong "think."
I have no use for a "soak." but I
don't take a drink today and go to
church tomorrow and sit in an angel's
position, and when called upon to
speak rise and advocate temperance,
and then on the way home stop and
give an order for a half gallon of
whisky, to be marked gasoline and
sent to the house, as I know of one
Presbyterian hypocrite of Cincinnati
to do.
We have the Spanish language, the
Filipino language, called "Slagullo,"
also the Chino's (Chinamen), with our
own. You may think it a joke, but I've
heard a conversation where all four
were used. It was between a soldier
and a Chino. And when some of us
Mikes get home and spring some of
the hot ones at you they will put you
to sleep, or if you are asleep they'll
wake you up. So, you see, it's a case
which works both ways.
Now the conversation is not verbal,
only a move or motion, and surely it is
a funny one. As for instance, one
native on one side of the road beckons
for"otro hombre" (other man) on the
other side to come to him. He first
calls him, and then gives bim a sign
about the same as a girl on a morning
street oar to girl friend sitting in her
front yard. In fact the sign is a mo
tion to go farther away. As for myself
I'm far enough away now. But we will
set sail for home some day, and happy
we will be when going to .vard the land
of the free. Missed connection again.
The natives of the countiy, young and
old, all smoke cigarettes. Children
five or six years of age are handed
cigarettes by their frieuds, and women
on the streets, I mean roads, and about
tneir worn with strong oigars in their
mouths. And hs to smokers, whenever
there is a spare moment or a move
from one place to another, the Amer
ican solders, officers and all, seem to
want to smoke, for when our powder is
not smoking we smoke to make up for
same.
The Filipino, as a soldier, may have
been some god in times gone by, but it
is a fact that a company of suy 8." or 00
American soldiers who are in for busi
ness, and stayers, which most of them
are, though a few "cold feet" (cowards)
are 10 oe iounu in an companies, when
commanded by a good officer, will put
500 "googoos" to their heels. That is,
of course, provided we huve auything
like an equal show; for instance, when
they are not in trenches and ve in tlio
open. But they don't 'Save" thone
volleys from the krag or stand still and
face them very long. But those peace
commissioners of ours soon bring about
some kind of settlement, for that can
ister and sbrapnel will surelv put the
fear of God into all hearts which must
face them.
All in all, the insurgents, will not
fight on equal terms and numbers.
Yes, we often see statements in papers
from the States to the effect that the
war will soon be oyer. Such state
ments were published four or five
months before I enlisted at Cincinnati.
A soldier who has been under fire
can tell the difference between the bul
lets which whiz with their singing
sound near his head. A Mauser has
the nicest sound of all, that is if there
is anything nice about any of them,
while a Remington, which is a bullet
with a brass jacket, and a bad thing to
get hit with, has a jumbling rattle-de-bang
get-out-of-the-way sound. It is a
fact that a man has been known to hear
the report of a Remington and tho bul
let coming his way, and the man would
fall flat and hear the death dealer go
over bis head on its wav.
Now I think I have to'ld most all, and
must request that if any of you wish,
for reasons of your own, to publish this
letter, that you will not use. my name
or put in any such parts us wih show
who it is from; for a man no longer in
this army than I have been should do
as tho old soldier said; "Be seen and
not heard. We'll show you the road;
follow us " And it is a good idea for
many a young recruit has too muoh to
say for his own good.
This is the third letter of the kind
that I have started. The first one was
lost when we moved from Imus to No
valeta; the second one, part of it blew
from my bunk at the latter named
place, and I never found the missing
sheets. Every word of this letter has
been written by candle light since
have been In the kitchen, at spare mo
ments at night between 7 o'clock and
taps at 0 o'clock. Hope it will interest
you all.
SCENE Of
THE STRIKE
Organized Labor Will
Lend Aid.
A COMPANY OffERS REDRESS
Numerous Important Enterprises
Will be Closed
Down.
Hazblton, Sept. 25. The first ray
of hope shines on the darkness of the
situation today The Markle company
have made advances to the union with
the intent of effecting a settlement of
the difficulty if possible.
This company concedes the existence
of the miners' grievances and offer in
creased wages.
They also offer to redress the other
wrongs that the men seek to rectify by
the strike.
There is a feeling of great joy among
the strikers at the anticipation of the
cessation of the tieup.
soft-nosed bullets used by the Krag
Jorgensen or standard United States
rifles. As none of these bullets have
ever been purchased or manufactured
by this government, the two firms using
the label were notified that such use
must stop.
DEATH OE GENERAL PALMER.
Veteran of the Civil War and Gold
Candidate Dead.
Springfield, 111., Sept. 25. The
death is announced this morning of
General John M. Palmer, the former
governor of Illinois.
General Palmer fought and earned
his rank in the civil war. He was
United States senator from Illinois, and
at the last election was the presiden
tial candidate on the gold democratic
ticket.
The deceased statesman was consid
ered verywealthy, and no doubt was a
nfulti-millionaire.
His death was sudden and
pected.
THE CIMM
QUESTION
unex-
DEMOCRATS C0NEER.
Hazelton, Sept. 25. Everything is
quiet today. There is no sign o'f any
disposition to make trouble and no
threats are heard.
The men walked in procession this
morning. All work is effectually stop
ped and the entire coal district is paralyzed.
DScranton, Sept. 25. At the head
quarters of -the strike today everybody
was on the alert, confident and ready to
assert that the operators would be glad
to give in before the end of the week.
The miners have received assurances
of sympathy in the form of telegrams
from other branches of organized labor
throughout the country, and many
promises of flnacial succor, although
they refuse to give the sources from
which the latter come.
One of the district organizers told
me yesterday that they had money
enough in the bank to last two years,
but whan I asked him how much would
be required to pay 140,000 miners 50
cents a day for two years he modified
his statement and admitted that the
cash was not yet in hand, but would be
forthcoming as fast as it was needed.
The order of Mr. Dilcher shutting
down what are known as the washeries
is serious. Nearly all the factories
throughout an area of several hundred
square miles in this a-egion burn refuse
coal, what are called "screanings" in
some places and "culm" by the miners.
The waste taken from the mines and
breakers is not of sufficient value to
haul to marketk but it is sold for $1 a
ton to the street car and electric light
companies, the furnaces, foundries and
other manufactories which mm use il
for steaming purposes with forced
draft. Many factories have located in
thiB region solely because of the oppor
tunity to obtain this cheap fuel.
n-suit luuiury iiere in scraiuon is
said to be the largest in the world, and
there are several smaller ones. At
Wilkas-Barre is a lace factory of which
the same is said, and innumerable other
enterprises situated near the coal
mine employ from 50,0000 to 60,000 op
eratives, many of them sons and daugh
ters of miners who will he thrown out
of work tomorrow if this order Is
obeyed.
finances of the Party Believed to be
Precarious.
Chicago, Sept. 25. Bryan held a
conference here yesterday with .Tones,
Stone and other leaders. The meeting
was an important one and hurried.
The council was believed to be on the
financial circumtances of the party and
it has been reported that the finances
are in a precarious condition.
COLLAPSE Of THE BOERS.
Portugal Has Joined England In End
ing the War.
LONDON,Sept.25. The collapse of the
Boers resistance is undoubtedly due
as much to diplomacy as to the steady
defeat they have suffered at the bands
of the British. The crood nffloM of
Portugal have been enlisted on behalf
of the establishment of peace, and she
has joined England in putting an end
to the war.
Russia Has Ordered Her
Troops to Withdraw. "
f RANCE HAS E0LL0WED RUSSIA
Chinese Troops Going to Singan.
A Catholic Bishop Is
Murdered.
r
Chicago, Sept. 25. There is not a
big coal dealer in Chicago who does
not expect a long and bitter war in the
hard coal fields. Eventually it mav iu-
volve the bituminous regions.
While this duel between the miner
and the trust is in progress the price of
hard coal will leap possibly each week,
and surely every fortnight.
It has been agreed that each advance
shall be half a dollar a ton. Should
the strike continue until next Junuarj
one may imagine what anthracite coal
will cost him at that timo.
Wisconsin Central's New Manager.
Milwaukee, Wis., Sept. 25. Geo.
T. Jarvis has received the appointment
of general manager of the Wisconsin
Central, and will assume his new duties
without delay. ThiB announcement
was made by President H. H. Whit
comb. Mr. Jarvis was connected with
the Louisville. Evansville Ar St. Tuii
railroad for a number of years.
Some vrry handsome sample of ore
from the mines of the South Blsbee
Copper company Arizona, are exhib
ited In a window on Spring street, In
this city. They are from the now shaft
(No. 3) the company is now sinking ou
its big group of mining claims at Bis
bee, Arizona. The ore, as shown by
assays made, runs high iu gold and sil
ver and in copper. An assay of one lot
of samples gave a total value per ton
of ore of $118.70, and an assay of an
other lot showed total values per ton of
ore of $084.81. The company has just
received from Washington patents for
all its remaining claims, so that It now
has its forty-five claims patented. There
are two other claims owned by tho
compaiy , the existence of which was
not known until the otllcial survey was
made, but they have been located by
the company and forts part of Its group
of forty-seven claims. -Dos Angeles
Times.
Washington, Sept. 25. M. de Wol
lant, the Russian Charge d'Affaires.
called at the state department and
made inquiries of the acting secretary
of state. Mr. Adee, as to what the In
tentions of the United States were,
now that this government had been in
formed of the attitude of the powprs
toward the Russian proposal to with
draw from Pekin. It is understood
that M. de Wollant also notified this
government that there had been no
change in the Czar's attitude on this
question, and that his imperial majes
ty's trnops had been ordered to leave
Pekin, and were now so doing.
M. de Wollant's representations were
at once communicated to the president
As Russia carries on her diplomatic
correspondence through her represent
atives orally, the substance of M. de
Wollant's statements were taken down
by a stenographer. No reply could be
made by Mr. Adee until after he had
conferred with the president.
M. Thiebault, the French Charge
d'Affaires. called upon Mr. Adee di
rectly after M. de Wollant left the
state department, and the significance
of these two calls was said to bo that
Russia and France still adhered to their
announced policy of withdrawing from
Pekin. France has followed Russia in
her Chinese policy from the outset,
even going so far as to sound the United
States as to whether or not this gov
ernment would withdraw if France
stood with Rutsia-for- withdrawal.
'It was said later that the president
had directed the state department to
reply to the Inquiries of M. de Wol
lant and M. Thiebault to the effetM that
the United States did not consider the
time expedient to enlarge upon their
declared policy or to announce at thU
time the next step that would be taken
by this government.
London, Sept. 25. A Hong Kong
dispatch to the entral News says that
owing to the capture of Peking Liu
Yang Fu, chief of the Black Flags, has
ordered his men who were marching
north to return to Canton.
NO DUM DIM BULLETS.
Used the
Enterprising Liars Who
Wrong Labels.
Washington, Sopt. 25. The ord
nance bureau of the war department
recently called upon manufacturers of
cartridges to stop printing and using a
label for cartridge boxes which Indi
cated that the United States govern
ment was using soft-nosed dum-dum
bullets. The bureau received from two
officers in the Philippines tho tops of
the pasteboard boxes iu which car
tridges are packed, upon which was a
label saying that the cartridges were
Major Robert Wankowski has just
returned from a trip through Arizona.
"There are n lot. of Lou Angeles People
who have money iu vested through the
country about Blsbee. Some of them
must be making strike. Tho country
Is full of oi e rich ore. Theie are
splendid mines of copper being opened
this year," said the major. Los An
geles Times.
Kentucky for China.
San Francisco, Sept. 25. The bat
tleship Kentucky has been ordered to
China, and will sail at once.
Transport at Erisco.
San Francisco, tSept. 25. The
transport Grant arrived here yesterday
with four hundred sick soldiers from
Munilu.
Berlin, Sept. 25 The Lokalotmei-gci-
prints a dispatch from Shanghai
saying that troops from all over China
are streaming Into Sangan, which has
been selected as the permanent resi
dence of the emperor.
Havre, Sept. 25. The family of
Mgr. Hammer, Roman Catnolic Bishop
of Mongolia, residing at Nymeguon,
have received information that he has
been murdered by Chinpse.
Quartz Mill for Sale.
Six pans, 3 settlers 1 agitator, 1 re
tort, 1 bullion balance, bullioi. molds,
main line shaft, molting furnace. Can
he bought cheap for cash by applying
to S. A. D. Upton,
sefi lm Tombstone. Arizona.
Charles Harris begs to announce that
he is continuing his business of tailor
ing and repairing at short notice at his
residence In Tombstone canyon this
side of the Castle Rock. That he is
now in a position to make clothes and
to repair and clean them at the cheap
est rates and invites the attention of
the public to his fine stock of fall and
winter goods. sl2-tf
Remember the democratic caucus tonight.
The American district Is In the bpst
of order and the people have more
trust In it than In the others. There
has been but one case whei the mem
ber of an Aiuet ioiiu continyt'tit hu-
been guilty of uttttok on n Chinese
woman. An American murine has
been tried ami .sentenced to twenty
years' Imprisonment for the offense.
The Boxers are beginning to harass
the Hues of the allies' eommmuuicutlou
With Tieu Tsln.
The military authorities have warned
all civilians not to attempt tht journey
to Tien Tain without an armed esooru
BALDWIN IS "LUGKY" AGAIN.
NoTed Californian Makes Rich Strike
In Cape Nome Region.
Seattlk, Sept. 25. According to
advices brought by the St. Paul,
"Lucky" Buldwin and his party of
prospectors, who recently started on a
secret trip to the Kougrock district,
returned to Nome Sept. G. Baldwin,
when Interviewed, said:
"I think things are coming my j way
now. Out of this new deal, which Is as
yet my secret, I expectto make .one
million -dollars. My men secured all
the way from 50 cents to il a. pan in
prospects. We made over 100 loca
tions, all of which are my possessions."
All the prospectors at Nome, when
the steamer left, were awaiting a tip
on the new strike, to stampede to the
district from which Baldwin brought'
such glowing reports.
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