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Cochise review. (Bisbee, Ariz.) 1900-1901, November 22, 1900, Image 1

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn94050513/1900-11-22/ed-1/seq-1/

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COCHISE REVIEW
'. 4
VOtAIME IV.
13ISBEE, ARIZONA, THURSDAY EVENING, NOVEMBER 22, 190J.
NUMBER 268
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riCOFJESBIONAIi
S.
A. D. UPTON
ATTOIINKX-AT-LAW
AQBNT POR LAND ORIP
Tombstone, Arlssoua.
J M. O'CONNKLL
ATTORNKY-AT-I.AW
010: wallaob uuir-uiHu
UISUKB
J. OAMBL
LAWYKJl
BISBEK, ARIZONA
MIbIlst Law a Specialty
yiLLIAM i. KILPATBICK
at6bny-a,t-i.aw ..
140 W. VBin'gtOB St., Tucson, Arls.
Will practice In all Court of the Territory.
jy AKOUS. A. SMITH
ATTORNKV-AT-CAW
TUCSON, ARIZONA
Will practice lu District Court of Cochise
Uounty. -
HAKLK3 BIUiNMAN '
ATTOBNKX-AT-LAW
TUCSON, ARIZONA
Will attend all teriua of Court In CochUe
Count. '
BAHK . HBMVOHD SITU I. HAS A HI)
MEK&VORD A HAZ2ARD
ATTORjiKYS-AT-LAW
TUCSON. ARIZONA
AQKNT3 FOB LAND SCRIP
yy K. CUAUBKRS
DKNTIST
Appointments Mnde hy Mail
raosa 87 BISBKK
)R. J. W. KAKRINQTON
DENTIST
BI8BRE. ARIZONA
' ' Specialties Diteaieg of the oral cavity and
ttcwd and bridge work. All operation per
formed. Q L. KDMUNDSON, M.D., C. L. CATEN, M.D
FHTIIOIAM and 8DRGKONS
To Lowell A Arlaona and Calutnef'A Hecla
Mlnlnc Companlei.
Telepboae No. H.
Bmbbb
ApiZOMA
p A. 3WKKT. M.D. TBI.. No. 6
K. 0. OARLKTON. M. D
: - A. R. HICKMAN, M. D.
CHf SICIAMS AMD 9UBOKONS
To the Copper Queen Conaolldated Mining
Co. and A. 3. K. B. R.
PH.- ISAAC H. W ATKINS
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON
BENSON, ARIZONA
Oaliie: Rear of Drue Store.
g K. WILLIAMS
JUSTICE OF THE PEACE
BISBKK, ARIZONA
Notary Public end CouTeyaaoer. BUI co
eetlag a specialty.
RAILROAD TIME TABLES.
Arizona k South Eastern Railroad
Paelte Tiaie one nour earlier ttian City time
"RoltBward Southward
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it"
P
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At.
9tatiok
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V.M.
"l:80
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1:10
1:53
1J:4J
U:;iS
U:05
11:45
11 Ai
11:16
Lv .BUbee
Ar
MS
'..South BUbee
. . .Don Lull . . . .
'Naeoiunotlon.
8:8
Packard . .
7:0
... Banslojf
6:8
. .Water Tank..
4:8
'...Charleston .
64.0
Cl.S
48. S
4J.K
8S.V'
80.1.
25 1
1.0
177
15.7
.i
o
Ar,. Fair bank ,Lv
Lv.Jalrbank.Ar
l:s
N.MAA.Crosslns
a:u
Contention . .
6:a
. . . .Laud
11:00
10:40
A.M.
10:00
Ar. .. Benson. ..Lv
rla Stations stop on Signal.
Y. R. STILKS,
. Q.P.4P.A.
R
c. morgan;
Suparlnteudeut.
Southern Pacific Railroad.
WBIXIOUHB.
Bexuen, leave 4:57 p.m.
Tugsou, arrive 7:20 "
Marlaopa, " 9:40 "
fume, arrive
Los ABgeUi, arrive
. 8:00 a.m.
.12: noon.
. 9:06 a. ro.
, 10:ta '
11:55 "
1:45 p. m.
. 8:S0, "
em "
BA8XBOUHD.
Mantou. leave
Wllleox, arrive
Bowie.
LorJjburrf,
Demlng, .
XlPaeo. . .
Phoenix, " 6:80 a.m.
PAMenc era for Phoenix, from the east or
rest, xematu at Maricopa over night. Sleep
ing oar and hotel aocommodatlou.
New If etico and Arlaona Railroad. .
WBITBOUNO. ' '
Po"'
fauaon, leave ... . . .5:80 p.m.
laVbaak, arrive ...6:18 "
aecalet " :U0 "
BABXBOUMB.
Nogales, leave 5:10a.m.
Falrhank, arrive 7:57 "
Beasoti, " tM "
:W la
02 4.0
1J6 8. 8
M U i
:W W.4
7:07 U.l
1:ii WO
i-M M.I
3:H W.8
:10 .
l:W sa.i
COMING SESSION
Of CONGRESS
Measures of Importance
to be Considered
CHANGE UNDER NEW CENSUS.
AsphalfDeposits In Choctaw
Grounds Celebration at the
Capital Other Matters.
From Our Regular Correspondent.
Vashinqton, Nov. 1C Caution and
conservatiini are the most, marked
features of the utterances of the senat
ors and representatives who w.Ul shape
the legislation of the coming session of
congress. There is, of course, some
talk about extreme political legisla
tion, but it doesn't emanate from the
men who have the necessary influence
to get their ideas carried out. These
men, and it is believed they have the
sympathy of the president, know that
there is an enormous amount of work
that ought to be done at the coming
session and the best way to get. it done
is to have as little partisan friction as
possible.
Senator Thurston, of Nebraska, ex
presses the opinion that an army reor
ganization bill will be passed at the
coming session of congress; also that
the Nicaragua!) canal bill will get
through in some shape, probably dif
fering considerably from the bill passed
by the house at the last session, but
thinks the opposition to the ship sub
sidy bill makes its chances doubtful.
It is expected that congress will pass
a bill authorizing the laying of the
much-needed Pacific cable. It would
be certain were it not for the big inter
ests which oppose government owner
ship of the cable, in the interest of pri
vate money-making. Admiral Brad
ford, chief of the Naval Bureau of
Equipment, says in his annual report)
of tho survey of a route for this cable
by the United States Ship Nero: "A
satisfactory route for an all-American
cable for the purpose of connecting the
Pacific coast with the outlaying colo
nial possessions of the United States in
the Pacific and with China and Japan
has been discovered, thoroughly ex
plored, surveyed and mapped." That
passes the question on to congress for
an answer.
One of the important matters to be
determined by congress at the coming
sesslou is tnat oi congressional reap
portionment under the new census.
From the start, when there was one
representative to each 30,000 inhabit
ants, the ratio has been increased every
ten years, and since the census of 1890
has been one representative for each
173,901 persons. The present census
shows an increase of population of
more than 13,000,000, and there miiHt,
of course, be a proportionate increase
in the ratio of representatives to popu
lation. How to provide for that in
crease In an equitable manner is no
easy problem. The house, with its 350
members, is already at times a very
unweildy body, and yet if the uew ra
tio is to reduce the representation of
no state there will have to be u very
large increase in membership. The
ratio that seems most favored, except
by those from the four states Arkan
sas, Kansas, Maine uud Virginia -which
would under it eaqh have one
less representative than at present, is
that of one representative to each 200,
000 persons. That would add eighteen
to the present membership of the
house.
Congress must deal with a number
of claims arising from our occupation
of the Philippines. One is that of the
Eastern Extension company, a British
corporation, which claims a monopoly
of the cable business to and from the
Philippines under a Spanish charter.
It also claims damages for American
interruption of its business. Really it
should pay a bounty for the largely in
creased cable business made by the
Americans. The only railroad iu the'
Philippines also wants damages and
the continuance of a Spauish subsidy
of about $22,000 a year. Another unique
lot of claims that will be presented to
congress are thoso of Japanese citizens
detained on ac
plague scare in
San Francisco.
That we are not as a uation growing
more careful is apparent from a glance
at the annual report of the Superin
tendent of the Dead Letter oQlce,
which shows an Increase of nearly a
million pieces of mail matterthe to
tal number of pieces received being 7,
536,158, of which 36,000 were letters
with no address at all. Money to the
amount of 944,140, and checks, notes,
money orders, etc, to the face value of
$1,136, 645 were enclosed in letters re
ceived by the office during the year. .
Mr. George D. Moulton, of Indian
Territory, who is now in Washington
says of his discoyery of extensive do
posits of asphalt on the grounds of the
Choctaw Indians: "This pure asphalt
has not been discovered heretofore In
in tliis country and there is no scienti
fic name for it. The chief supply for
asphalt has been the lake on the is
land of Trinidad and the Gilsonte
mines In Utah. In the Indian Terri
tory there are mines of asphalt where
bituminous sand and bituminous lime
stone are mixed in such proportion
that the product is fit, with out other;
preparation than grinding and heating,',
to be laid as street paving. The asp
halt mine which I found is about 96 per
cent pure."
Arrangements for the celebration of
the establishment of the capital at
Washington, December 12, are practi
cally complete. The President will
hold a reception to the Governors of
States and Territories, after which
they will be escorted to the Capital,
where a joint Congressional com
memoration meeting wil be held In the
hall of the House, by a military, naval,
and civic parade, of which Gen. Nelson
A. Miles will be chief marshal, and in
the evening a grand reception will be
held in the beautiful Corcoran Gallery
of Art. Addresses will be delivered at
the Capital by Senators Hoar, Daniel
and McComas and Representatives
Payne and Richardson.
Discovered America.
Monterey, Mex.f Nov. 21. The re
port that the American officers hare
unearthed ancient records in Pekin
showing that Chinese discovered
America 1,500 years ago and erected
temples in Mexico, has aroused the
greatest Interest among the scientific
men of Monterey and through out the
country. The Chinese temples alluded
to are in the State of Sonora, on the
Pacific Coast. The ruin of one of the
temples was discovered near the town
of Ures in that State about two years
ago. One of the largest tablets found
in the ruin was carved with Chinese
characters, which were partially de
ciphered by a learned Chinaman, who
visited the ruins at the request of the
Mexican Government.
The Camp Bird.
Denver, Nov. 22. The sale of the
great Camp Bird mine at Ouray to an
English syndicate is off. "The proerty
will not be sold," said the owner, T.
F. Walsh, who has just arrived here
from Paris.. "Had ,'the prospective
buyers oeen ready to pay over $7,000,
000 cash when the deal was first talked
of it is possible the mine would have
passed into their possession. Now I
have decided to retain possession of the
mine.
Russia's fleet.
Moscow, Nov. 22. The present Rus
sian fleet, including the vessels now in
construction, numbers 6 imperial yachts
21 first class battleships, 41 cruisers, 51
coast defense vessels, 25 gunboats, 86
torpedo boats, 13 transports, and 9
schoolships.
Strike Ceased. .
Charlotte, N. C, Nov 20. Th
big cotton mill operatives strike in
Alamarie county has been declared off.
The strike had been in force three
months. Several thousand hands were.
involved'-1.
Bryan's Kentucky Majority.
Frankfort, Ky Nov. 22. Official
returns received at the secretary of
state's office from 100 of the 119 coun
ties give Bryan 185;938 and McKinley
173,720, showing a majority for Bryan
of 12,218. Tile unofficial returns from
the remaining ten counties reduce
Bryan's majority to 7,728. The unoffi
cial figures from nine of the unreported
counties give Bryan 46,510, McKinley
61,841, making a total vote in 118 of the
119 couuties as follows: For Bryan
232,448, for McKinley 225,561.
Shelby Is the county omitted. It gives
a Bryan majority of 8,411 and swells
who were isolated and
count of the bubonic
Bryan's total vote to about 235,000. The
votes for Hays, the first Bryan elector,
and Parker, the first McKinley elector,
used in these figures, run ahead of the
other electors by about 4,000 votes on
oacn ticket. No information of a con
tost of any kind has yet been reported.
A Daring Thief.
Erik, Pa., Nov. 22. While the, store
was full of customers, hundreds of peo
ple passing the window and 'a, watch
maker working not six feet away from
him, a dariug thief stole a tray of. dia
monds valuod at $2,500 from S. Loeb, a
fashionable jeweler, and hAd been gone
an hour heforo the robbery wus discov
ered. The proprietor of the store and tho
police are astounded at the novel ami
daring tactics of the rpbbei? He hud
secured entrance .to the cellar and
saweu uis wayuirougn me noor into
ji I.,.. -i i ., ....
the box which forms the floor of tho
display window. , Then he sawed
through . the thin boards until he had
a hole six inches wide and a foot long,
the sawdust being hidden by the tissue
paper on which.the jewels: were dis
played. This hole gave him access to the tray
of diamonds, which he tipped on edge,
permitting the glittering shower of
jewels to slide down irito the window1
box. The tray was replaced over the
hole, and it was" nbt until a clerk wont
to display the gems to a customer that
the theft was discovered.
There it scant 'hope of apprehending
the robber, as it is known he departed
from the basemeptof the store fully an'
hour before the' proprietor discovered
his loss. ,
Work on Naval Vessels.
Washington, Nov. 22. Great pro
gress is being made in the construction
of our war ships. Chief Constructor
Hichborn's report shows that the bat
tleships Alabama, Illinois and Wiscon
sin are nearing completion. Theothe
battleships Under construction, the
Maine, Missouri .and Ohio, will be
ready for service byv December 1, 1101.
Work on the six protected cruisers is
progressing, in a' satisfactory manner.
Charged With Inciting Riot.
Denver, Nov. 22. Captain of Detec
tives Armstrqng.has filed with District
Attorney Malone, an information
against William Lewis, alias John
Brundage, and Jqhn Davis, colored
deputies, who took part in the election
day riots. 'Lowis is accused of having
shot Special Policeman Stuart Harvey,
who died. Davis is accused of having
shot Policeman Carpenter, who-is re
covering slowly .from his injuries.
Buried Treasure.
Medpord, Mass,, Nov. 21. Medford
marshes are covered with men and
boys digging for buried treasures.
Thursday two lads' dug up a po, con
taining about $300 in old silver coins.
Most of the American money was
minted between 1828 and 1838.
The place where the money was
found is within a stone's-throw of tlie
historic Cradddck house' of 'revolution
ary fame.
Cowman Kick.
Cowmauiare getting ready to 'enter it
kick general agai,nst roping confests,
which' have. been' so' popular lately on
the range. It is not that they object
particularly to the sportj for they en
joy watching, the expert cowboys han
dle the rope as much as anyone, hut it
Is proving too expensive. One big cat
tleman has had to forbid his men prac
ticing on his herds as he has lost six
good steers this year through "accid
ents.".. It seems that cowboys are not
born expert VOpers, but become so by
practioe, and once a cowboy gets the
fever there are lively times ahead for
the particular herd with which lie is j "?" the tsryan electors, lu one
riding. It is lots of fun for the cowboy, I county she was the only candidate on
but, as one attlenin -statos it, "hell I tlle silvei' ticket who was elected.' '
for the herd." But what is worrying j 'N"a ls a spontaneous tribute to Mrs.
them is to find some way toput an'end i01'8"11'. successful conduct of her
to tho aport. No cattleman Hires to office.' Before her renomination, after
incur he onmity of the cowboys Uy op- a torin of two J'ears. the educators of
posine the fad, for to flght'a nun)'' the state, including the presldentof the
hobby is to secure b. is enmity. It is pro-1 tate university and all the state instl
bable that the legislature and humane tutions, regardless of party, signed a
societies will be cWlled upon to assist iu : petition to Ml. Grenfell to accept a re-
putting in end. to .'the dangerous and
costly sp'ort. Star.
- Notice.
Spanish and piano lessons, by gradu
ate of duell's Seminary, Oakland, "til.
Address Mrs. Edward Zimmerman,
Pkst.Offlce, 'Bisbee, Ariz. ol tf
Notice. .
This is to notify that Mr. Paul Mor
gun is the only tuner representing us'
in this section at the present time.
' 'The Zellner Piano Co,
ft MARKET
Will be Increased Demand
fur Silver.
And the White Metal Will Probably
ise In Value India Will Use
Large Quantity.
Speaking of the possible future de-'
inand for silver, the Ljjndon Statist
says: "As the silver in tho reserve is
now :tt an irreducible minimum, the
whole of the further demand for .rupee,
will have to be met by purchase of uew
silver.
IT India absorbed (50,000,000 ounces of
silver in tho past year of famine, what
will it require in a vear of nrosnerltv?
i - ? -
"The world's production of silver is not
much over 160,000,000 ounces and fn-
dia's requirements in the past year
have been equal to nearly 10 per cent of
the total output,
From tho closing of the Indian mints,
until the current year India purchases
of silver were not more than about 15,
000,000 ounc.es per annum.
,Nov we have the prospect that .the
demand may be' 60,000,000 ounces a
year. It will" be.. evident therefore,
that the Indian government will he a
large buyer of silver and that theprice
in the future will probably rule at a
much hightfr level than it has done
since the closing of the Indian mints."
Boers for Indiana.
Chicago, Nov'. 20. That the Indiana
counties of Lake, Porter, Stark and
Laporte within the next year or so wili
become the permanent trekking
grounds of many Transvaalers and Free
Staters seelus probable. Owners of
land in the Kankakee Valley are re
ported to. have combined for the. pur
pose of sending agents to South Africa
and Holland to encourage the settle
ment of their lauds.
Somei of the Indiana railroads, it is
said, are- showing a marked interest in
the scheme to colonize the Kankakee
valley.
guerrilla warfare.
London, Nov. 22. The war office is
in a 'quandary as to-what planscan.be
adopted to end the Boer sedition. Ever.,
since General Botha assumed the com
mandant general's reins the .BritUh
soldiers have been unable to'makcany-.
thing like a large coup. The Boers
ace practically leading a guerrilla war
fare. General DeWet is the most dif
ficult Boer to deal with in open battle,
and the British are well aware of this
fact. It Is the intention of the. war
office to have thu English troops make
a big capture of burghers, but up, to
date the efforts of the Britishers to
ward this, 'pentose- have been of no
avail.- ' t
The Newport Embezzlement. : '
Cincinnati, O., Nov. 21. Accord
ing to a despatch from Fort Wayue,
Indiana, Frank M. Brown, late assist
ant cashier of the German Natioual
liunlc of Newport, Kentucky, who em
bezzled nearly $200,000 of the Aiuds is
now in Canada. He was seen nud re
cognized at Fort Wayne yesterday by
Fred Jolten an intimate acquaintance
who say's that Brown left for Canada
and by this time has doubtless crossed
the boundary. He has been in St.
Louis, as already stated, whore he was
reported to be en route to South Amer
ica but changed his direction and
doubled back through Illinois and to
Canada.
A Popular lady.
IlKNVER, Nov. 21. -In almost every
county of Colorado Mrs. Heleu Gren
full led the fusion state ticket elected
Nov. 0. In some counties she even ran
nominntlon because of her valuable
services to the educational interests of
the state This was a tribute never
before paid to a superintendent of pub
lic '-instruction la Colorado.' The re
nomination of an incumbent of this
office has only happened two or three
times before in the history of the state.
' Mrs. Grenfell was a farmer's daught
er in i.soniuer county, Loiorauo, tnen a
teacher, then a county superintendent
and finally state superintendent, ac
knowledged to be the best the. state
ever had. ' "
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