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The morning call. (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1878-1895, July 11, 1894, Image 4

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was torn up and a new one half
down when the men left on the strike.
We had not a single man to help m, either
in tbe yards or on the engines. Even our
two yarduiasters went oat. With this
state of affairs staring us in the face, we
set to work to straighten them out. I had
to get in and fire up engines, switch cars
by hand and brake cars in the yard. The
master mechanic and Mr. Burkbalter had
to run engines. When we started there
were only two men to do tbe work. That
is less than a week ago, and now
we have all the locals, just thirty in ann
out in a aay, running and have started off
a freight train and the regular overland
passenger and uiail train for the East over
the Southern Pacific route. I've started
:rains going and carried the mails as fast
as possible under the circumstances when
there wns not a wheel moving on the other
lines. We have pretty nearly all the meu
we need and expect to keep overland
trains, both freight and passenger, moving
from this out."
A freight train moved out of the South
ern Pacific yards, opposite the American
Kailway Union headquarters, at 7 A. M
Its destination is Yuma and further
points east and south as far as New Or
leans and Mexico. Soldiers were not
called to guard it, as they will not cive
protection except to mail trains; but eight
Deputy Marshals armed with revolvers
accompanied the freight. The train con
sisted of seventeen loadea cars, ana Its
crew was made up of a union engineer,
conductor and brakeman and non-union
fireman.
What is considered another important
break in ihp tie up was the starting of the
Southern Pacific overland passenger train
at 9 o'clock this morning. The train of
nine cars, consisting of mail, baggage, day
coaches, Pullman and tourist sleeper?, was
moved into the Arcade depot early, and a
sign denoting that it was for Pomona,
Ontario, Colton, San Bernardino, Deming,
El Paso and New Orleans was affixed con
spicuously before the surprised spectators.
Baggage, express and mails were put
aboard in tremendous qualities, as macy
as sixteen of tbe largest cases of the San
Francisco papers helpiDg to fill the
mailcars. They represented accumula
tions of several days. Several ias
eengers bought tickets for various
points along the route, some intending to
go clear through until connecicn is made
with lines not aifected by the strike. The
surprising information was Riven at. the
depot that the train crew were all regular
union men, although it was not known
whether they are in the American Rail
way Union. As mails were aboard, a
detachment of twenty soldiers escorted the
train cut of town as far as Coltun, where
they got off, leaving eight Deputy Mar
shals to protect the train. The troojw re
turned on a local, well pleased with the-lr
trip into the country. No trouble is feared
for either of these trains, as the route lies
through a country comparatively free
from prejudices either way.
Still the union men fetl confiieut that
neither train will reach its destination.
Indeed. President Stanwocd of the A. It.
I", says they will not go far. and predicts
thai Tucson. Ariz., will tie them up, leav
ing the freiglit and passengers on a torrid
de<ert and at Hie mercy of the strikers for
release liom such v situation.
Tl;e train for San Francisco that lias
been at the Arcade depot fora week is still
there, and no immediate prospect of mov
ing it is in view. (Jonsiderabledoubt is felt
regarding the half-hearted attempt to open
the road through California, which by the
way is a matter of the gravest importance
to interior towns, the farmer?, an<i indeed
the general welfare of the State, for many
towns on the railroad are suffering as well
as the fruitmen and others with market
able products. The local superin
tendent says everything is in readiness
here for a start. Only orders from
General ilauager Towne are awaited be
fore the train can move. No explanation
further for delay is given here. Possibly
the railroad officials fear that train might
be stopped at Batersfield as two others
were, and having such good cause to show
the t'ovemment why the officials should
not be indicted for delaying mail on the
line to San Francisco they teel secure and
coucentrate their efforts in other direc
tions where no reasonable excuses can be
given.
At all events somebody is responsible
for the most disgraceful treatmpnt of pas
sengers. If Towne holds back the train,
the blarue evidently rests with him. Money
was taken from passengers for ticket*, and
they went on the train with the under
standing that they would start immedi
ately. But something napptned that day ;
thirty minutes, then an hour, two. twelve,
a day. and finally a week went by, while
all the time the passengers have been led
to believe that the train would leave at
any minute. So they have huns around
the depot, starting at every sound of a lo
romolive-beii. Day after day they have
slept on the cars at night, and did not dare
to venture uptown lest their train might
pull ont in their absence.
Fancy a depot shed with the only nut
look a wall of dust-begrimmed cars on
one 6ide, a camp of soldiers on another
and far off ralms, flowers and restful hill
sides and mountains that seem to mock ex
ianence in the dreary railroad yards; the
only seat a bacgage truck, the only prom
enade between tlie tracks or over aspbal
tum, and the only retreat the buruingcar?,
made still more sultry by the hot sands.
All these combined constitute without
change the daily life of the detained pas
sengers whose days this past week have
been the very acme of tedious ness. The
railroad holds onto their fares with grim
viciousneas. while leading them to the be
lief from hour to hour that the train will
start soon. For these Door passengers
there is no place to bathe, no privacy for
the ladies, and everything is utterly couj
fortles*. Some of them grew sick and
weary from waiting and took a boat to San
Francisco, but all cannot go by sea, and
those who remain are suffering, Pathetic
incidents have been noticed that point to
patient suffering which may never reach
the public ears, and yet the train is side
tracked behind the depot building under
the hot sun and upon the blisteri ng land*.
FIFTY SOLDIERS SICK.
They Have Succumbed to the Un
usual Hardships.
Los Angeles. July 10.— At the Santa
Fe depot affairs are rapidly assuming the
old-time appearance, which the people
take as a matter of course since the line is
in the bands of a Government receiver.
The strikers look on with npparent indif
ference and say that the Santa Fe must
keep open because it is virtually a new
department of the United Stales Govern
ment.
To-day trains moved hourly for parts in
Southern California. A through freight
was made up but did not leave. It will
go out to-morrow, however, as by that
time a competent crew will be in readi
ness. The regular passenger overland,
with mails and Pullmans, went out at
7:10 a. ii., just ten minutes behind
schedule time. A euard of soldiers accom
panied the train a snort distance out and
returned, leaving eight deputy marshals
to protect the train to the State line.
No overland arrived to-day, but a heavy
train is at Barstow with delayed mails and
should be here at noon to-morrow. The
train that came in yesterday had 700 sacks
of mail, ana the steamer to-day brought
140 sacks and pouches from tbe north,
'lhese, together with the locals, made a
total of 1500 sacks, which the postoffice
clerks had to face this morning.
la the United States courts nothing was
done to-day. The Grand Jury was in
session, but made no report, and the Mar
shal and District Attorney had nothing
new to say. Cleveland's proclamation re
ceives little notice here and particularly
none from uniou men, so far as its local
application is concerned, because there
;»re no mob gatherings and absolutely no
disturbance.
A secret meeting of the A. R. U. which,
judging from the large attendance, was
important was held this afternoon. Tbe
principal result was a roll call showing
that the men are standing together and
•>lso news from various unions of a like
import. The sympathy for the A. R- U. is
remarkably strong among Labor union--,
even going so far as to enforce the small
boycotts on restaurants, a morning paper,
etc., and yet the proposed sympathetic
strike is not favorably regarded.
In this respect the situation appears to
be doubtful, with the prospects of very de
cided differences of opinion upon tbe
merits or demerits ot Debs' ultimatum.
The cigar-makers have adopted resolu
tions indorsing the action of the A. R. U .
chiefly because George Pullman has pre
cipitated the present trouble for no other
purpose than to crush organized labor,
with the interest of greedy corporations:
and Grover Cleveland aud his Cabinet
have assisted and encouraged such action
in sending Federal troops to intimidate
peace'ully iuclined organized labor.
Camp life is growing irksome to the
soldiers and officers who cannot get be
yond the Hues. For ths men it has been a
veritable prison, nor does it agree with
iheir health.
This morning Colonel Sbafter was noti
fied that fifty men wern sick with stomach
disorders. Dr. McVey, the army surgeon.
j said the sickness was caused by change of
food and camping on tbe ground on cold
nights after saltry days. The sick men
were put under treatment and a regimen
of diet, and a large supply of straw was
bought to furnish beds that would remove
all the soldiers a foot or two from the
ground.
FOREIGN OPINION.
English Newspapers Say the Re
public Is a Failure.
London. July 10.— Tbe Glob* this after
noon says: "Democratic government
as it exists In the United StatPS is
now on trial. It has already been proved
wanting in our eyes. The strikers are
neither more nor less than armed rebels
who have plenty of sympathy from the
1 people and among tho soldiers from the
Atlantic to the Pacific."
The St. James Gazette thinks the present
situation indicates an actual breaking
down of civilized government in some dis
tricts, and a possible collapse in others.
Beiu-in, July 10.— Tite eutire German
press regards th« railroad war as disas
trous to the future of the United States.
The newspapers say that tho action of the j
city, State and Federal authorities shews I
a bewildering Inclc of unity.
The National Z^ltung compares the an
archy In the United States to the com
munists of Paris.
The Vossische Zcitung says: Even if
the revolution be subdued a fearful series
of social battles will be fought upon
American soil.
RAILROAD GRANTS.
Fifty-Four Million ' Acres Are
Involved.
If the Bill Passes Spokane, Wash.,
Passes to the Possession of
the Government.
Washington, July 10.— The Bouse to
day passed a bill oppning the Umcoin
pahere and Uintah Indian reservations in
Utah, allotting lands iv severaltv to tbe
ludians and restoring about 3,000,000 acres
to the public domain. Most of the day
was devoted to debate on a bill extending
tbe act of 1890 declaring lauds granted to
railroads not then constructed forfeited to
the Government so as to recoverjthe lands of
railways whose roads were not completed
within the time specified in the land
grants.
The bill involves about 54.000,000 acres.
It was not disposed of when tbe House ad
journed.
If Mcßea's land forfeit bill passes C.000,
--000 acres of railroad land in California will
revert to the Government because certain
lines of railroad were not completed within
the specified time. Many quarter sectiouf
are occupied by settlers who purchased
from the railroad. Although the bill is
aimed at the latter, the settlers will be the
real sufferers. In many instances they
have improved their land and if it reverts
to the Government, they will receive no
compensation unless it be from tbe rail
road.
Representative Bowers does not believe
they could recover much in that way, bo
the whole Pacific Coast delegation, with
the possible exception of Geary, will fight
the bill.
Representative Wilson of Washington
said to The Cam. correspondent to-night
that if McCrea's bill passes the town of
Spokane, Wash., will belong to the United
States Government, as it was acquired
from the Northern Pacific Railroad, whose
line was not completed within the time
specified.

MINISTER DAMON AT VICTORIA.
He Is Coming Here to Meet His
Partner, Bishop.
Victoria, B. C. July 10.— Hon. Samuel
M. Damon. Minister of Finance of the Pro
visional Government of Hawaii, arrived
this morning on the Warrimoo. He de
clares that his business is strictly private.
He says be believes he will be in the same
position in the new Cabinet, but does not
know bow long be will hold the place.
Beyond that he says nothing. He will go
to the Sound and then to San Francisco on
the Walla Walla. He goes there to meet
Bishop, bis bank partner.
Tlrere was a public meeting of royalists
at Honolulu, July 2, the night the Warri
moo sailed. The new constitution was
denounced. Old rumors or trouble were
revived. The reports were that there
would be trouble on July 4. when the con
stitution was to be promulgated and sworn
in. As a safeguard, the Government
doubled the number or guards ou duty. Ii
was asserted at Honolulu that William
Cornwall, ex-Minister of Finance, offered
the beads of the American League Sehu
ten Club SIO.OOO to come over to the Queen.
Tbt extreme annexationista - are now
suspicious of Admiral Walker because he
went on a fishing party with Parker and
Wildemau. lj.; ' , ;
The crew of the Warrimoo report that
there was no change in the Samoan situa
tion since the Monowai sailed.
Sir George Di bbs scheme for the unifica
tion of New South Wales nnd Victoria
does not seem to meet with much favor.
Red. wblt* and blue, registered trademark. E
Gamier *Co 's wines. All oars and groceries.
THE MORNING CALL, SAN FRANCISCO, TVEDNESDAY, JULY 11, 1894.
DID NO GOOD.
Trouble Ended at San
Jose.
BROKE THE BLOCKADE
Last Stand of the A. R. U.
Men.
CLUBBED BY THE OFFICERS
When They Tried to Capture an
Engine.
ALL TRAINS ARE NOW RUNNING.
The Coast Line of the Southern Pa
cific Open to the Usual
Business.
San Josi^, July 10.— With Deputy
I'm ceil Stales Marshals od theiocomoti?es
and Deputy Sheriffs iv the coacbes the
three passenger trains that have been
stalled here since last Thursday pulled out
from the yards to-day anil the blockade
was broken. Although th« defeat of the
strikers was accomplished without blood
shed it seemed at one time as if a riot was
imminent.
Half a dozen strikers made a dash for
the locomotive on the Pacific Grove train
as it was about to start at.d attempted to
drag off the fireman. With a yeli the
crowd of strikers closed in on the locomo
tive and fillei the air with frying missiles.
A score of officers were at hand, however,
and the incipient riot ended in less time
than it takes to tell of it, ami with no re
sults more serious than a number of sore
heads.
How lone the blockade will remain
raised is a question. The strikers boldly
assert that they will tie up the line at the
first opportunity. The Sheriff, with his
entiie cosse, will remain on guard at ih«
yards a day or two, and duriug that time
at least trains will be run regularly.
With the dawning of the morning the
100 deputies sworn in by Sheriff Bollinger
appeared at his office and were given re
volvers, clubs and instructions for their
use. The men were told to use their
clubs lreely it iccasion required, but not
to draw their revolvers unless absolutely
necessary.
Twenty Deputy Uarsl als and tbe same
number of policemen who were present
were given the same instructions.
The men were then divided iuto squads
of ten each and with the police at the
head of the column the march an First
street to tbe depot «as begun. Only a few
strikers were in the yards at this i>ar!y
hour and they were quickly driven off and
rones stretched around the grounds.
Squads ot officers were stationed at the
depo', tbe round-house and near the soli
tary engine that stood in the yards and in
structed to arrest anybody who shouid
interfere with the crews or indulge in any
incendiary talk that might lead to an ou'
break, and with this formidable array ol
protection the trainmen ventured on tbe
grounds and began the work of clearing
the yards.
The first obstacle encountered was at
the roundhouse. The firemen who were
sent there to fire up the engines came back
to Master Mechanic Gregg and reported
that a freightcar had been thrown into the
pit of the turntable in such a manner as
to render it impogsible to get the locomo
tives out of the roundhouse.
Master Mechanic Gregg left tho locomo
tive that he was firing up, and, accom
panied by Superintendent Haydock, went
down to t!;e roundhouse. They found h
freightcar containing twenty-five tuns of
coal pitched into the Ditot the turn'ahlr.
The rear end of the car remained on the
track, but tbe front end was deeply im
bedded in the sand four feet below.
As there was only one locomotive in the
yards it became necessary to suspend all
other operations for the time being in
order to free the turntable that the other
iwo engines necessary to move the three
trains might be run out of the roundhouse.
With the limited force of men at hand
heavy jackscrews and large blocks of tim
ber were brought to tbe pit and soon the
work of raising the disabled car wax
begun.
The progress was rapid, and by the time
steam was raised on the locomotives the
car was out of the w»v and the turntable
ready to swing and tne movement of the
trains therefore was not seriously delayed.
By 9:30, when the locomotives were
ready to start, there was a large crowd of
strikers and their sympathizers tressing
against the rores with which the yards
were inclosed waiting to see the first train
move nut. The officers were kept busy
pushing the crowd back, but met with no
serious opposition.
Una or two strikers became a trifle
demonstrative and were warned to keep
uniet, but as a whole the crowd was
orderly.
Tbe first train made uji consisted of four
passenger coaches and a mailcar and was
destined for San Fr nnci9co. Engineer
liowley and Fireman George Harris were
in the cab and Conductor Jock Eaton was
in charge. The train pulled under the
sheds at the station and at 10:05 the
wheels tlnu had been still since last
Thursday began to turn. Not a sound
was heard from .the thousands of strikers
and their sympathizers present as tbe
train pulled out
The train for Pacific Grove, consisting
of five passenger coaches and a baggage
car, was made up without incident, and
at 11 o'clock it stood at tbe station ready
to start. The crowd pressed harder
against tbe roDes and suddenly half a
dozen men dashed through and started for
the locomoiive. Every oneknew what the
move meant, and a general stampede fol
lowed. The strikers crept under the ropes
and crowded toward the locomotive, howl
ing and jeering and throwing stones.
G. C. Morgan and Patrick Ulrich at
tempted to board the engine for tbe pur
pose of dragging away the fireman and en
gineer, but were overpowered and cap
tured by the officers. They were bustled
to the patrol wagon and driven to tbe
County Jail.
While tbe officers were tussline with
Morgan and Ulrich. several men in the
crowd began to throw rocks and large
chunks of coal. Fred W. Moore, presi
dent of the Board of Education and also
one of the Sheriff's deputies, was struck iv
the stomach with a large piece of coal, but
the blow did not kuock him out. It
aroused his temper, however, and during
the remainder of the engagement none nf
the officer? used bis club more vigorously
than did he.
As soon as tbe excitement subsided the
traiu started, and with a parting toot to
tbe strikers ag it disappeared around a
curre, sped on toward Pacific Grove.
The third train left for San Francisco at
11:25 without molestation. It consisted
of two passenger-coaches, a baggage-car
and two mailcars. Each of the trains was
accompaniea by four Deputy Sheriffs and
two Deputy Marshals. The Deputy Sher
iffs in each case rode to the county line
and returned on the next train.
As a courtesy to the strikers, Sheriff
Bollinger issued permits to four of
the leaders entitling them to enter the
yards. Before they had bnen in the yards
an hour, however, H. T. McClintock and
Editor Lenz, the latter the proprietor ot a
German Daper, were thrown out for refus
ing to leave the roundhouse, where the
locomotives were belug fired up. McClin
tock and Lenz were handled rather roughly
and applied to Justj.ce Gass for warrants
for the arrest of Harry Edwards and
James W. Rea, who ejected them. The
warrants were retused.
Superintendent Haydock said this even
ing that all passenger trains would be run
as usual to-morrow. The running of
freight trains will probably be resumed to-
morrow or next day, as every effort is be
ing made to move the crops of the fruit
growers, many of whom have already lost
heavily by the strike.
The posse of deputies sworn in to assist
Sheriff Bollinger includes many of the
most prominent citizens in tbe city. The
squad known as the "royal family," over
which Harry Edwards, secretary of the
San Jose Electric Improvement Company,
presides, is probably the icost notable.
The list includps H. W. Wright, president
of the Uniou Savings Bank; J. W. Ren,
Railroad Commissioner; D. T. Bryant,
paying-teller of the First National Bank;
Paul Masson, a wholesale liquor-dealer;
D. M. Murphy, a capitalist; Frfd W.
Moore, president of the Board of Educa
tion; William Mour. a capitalist; H. P.
Thayer, a mining man, ad tlenry Book
sin Jr., an orchardist. "King" Edwards,
as he is called, borders a little too closely
ou a comedian, both in his personal ap
pearance and manner, to reign with regal
dignity, but he easily kept his men at
their posts during the incipient riot with
out staking them down.
NOTICE OF MEETINGS.
«S3f Crockett No. 139. F. ■
»-£? and A. Called meeting THIS Jl
(WEDNESDAY) EVENING, at 7:i'.oTfJf
o'clock. Third decree. By order W. M. /^W^
_1 W. H. THORNLEY, Secretary ._
fr^=* Mission Lodge o. IG9, F. •
S-*^ and A. M.— railed meeting THIS A.
(WEDNESDAY) EVENING. at ""'"^Kjf
o'clock. First degree. By order of the W./h?'^
M. 1 1J c. D. HUNKER, Secretary.
BtT^s=» Mount «on htodf ■ No. 14. »
9Kiy F. and A. M. -Meeting W^^fk^
(WEDNESDAY) EVENING, at 7:30552f
o'clock. Fun! degree. By order of the \V. f^y^
M. HJ THEO FKQLICH, Secretary.
SKS* i:xctlsior Lurlare •■«. 16«. F. •
B^j^ and A. M. -Special meeting THIS^V.
(WEDNESDAY) EVENING, July 11, i't^3T
7:30 o'clock. Third desrree. /\f\
1 THEO. E. SMITH, Secretary.
ft^B 1 * The Offleem auu Hem- <j«tf^to>
m*& tier" of Oriental ReDnUah Lodce^Jl^^^g.
No 90. I. O. O. F.. meet THIS (WED-
NESDAY) EVENING in l'rospect -^r," r^
Hall, Odd Fellows' building, at 8 o'clock sharp.
Degree work second and fourth Wednesdays of
each month. Members of the degree cordially in-
vited to attend.
JESSIE M. OLSSON, Noble Grand.
Miyyir. Wkichart, Kec. Sec. _ jalO if We
ttsS=» To the Officers and <^^tj/^,
wr~& .bers of Templar Lodge No 17, •^KSjSS&fefr
1.0. O F.— You are hereby notified to r~2ZjtK-^~^
assemble in Memorial Hail. New Odd
Fellows' building, corner Seventh and Markej
streets, THIS EVENING (WEDNESDAY), at 8
o'clock. Visiting brothers cordially Invited. By
order of the N. G.
We itlj C. F. NEIL Rec. Sec.
■535=* .Mas er arlners' Benevo-jr-j-^^
»**^ lent Association— lnstallation of jVjt i- 3 *
officers. Regular meeting will be held atllWf
hall. 421 Post St., July 11, at 7:30 p. M.r-'
After InstalUtiou, social entertainment, to which
all member* are cordially Invited. By order of the
president. [jylO 2t] L. T KAON U. Rec. Sec.
CP^S= A. O. H. Division -» j&j»«SS!P\
CE-J' No. 3 — The regular p* mTi\Y\-3SL7
•monthly meeting of this dl- 'WfliWaCKi*
vision will be held in Drew's i^ J * J Mf\yßt^' <*
Hall, New Montgomery St., on C^TKMI^rJr'VS
WEDNEM)AY EVEN ING. July 'Vy^nSSci**
11, at 7:30 o'clock. Every e^^F~-^ w
member Is hereby ordered to be present, as elec-
tion or officers for the eosului: term will take
place. M. H. McCAFFERTY, Vice President.
EDWARD McCOSKER, Secretary.
JylO2t J.MANN IN 0,0. D.
iKS* A. O. H. Division fAjjW^St
IPjS' No. i, B. of 1.-Specisl f*dKX\Xmg\
meeting will take place on /"vHAV^a^;*
WEDNKSOAY <-VKNIN<;..!ulv- <^<_Ujß\fflML ■* '
11. at 7:30 o'clock, at 1159Jr^5(SMS5f Tv '
Mission it , for tnnsaetion of -^» i2>'.; '.™JT_ + *<.
important business. The treasurer will come
prepared to turn over the property of the division
to his successor. P. LYONS, l'resldeut.
B. McCann. Rec. Sec. jvlOat
W^S 3 Laborer's Protective anil Benirn-
tk**' lent Association— The monthly meeting
will be held in Federation Hall. 818 Howard St.,
ou WEDNESDAY EVENING. July 11, at 8
o'clock. Trustees are requested to make their
report. Installktlou of officers for the ensuing
term will take place. DENNIS SWEENEY, Pres.
William Con-way, Sec. JylO2t
K^S* i lonic— Nineteenth Grand annual
*-^ picnic or the Loyal Orange Institution of
California at Shell Mound Pant, on THURSDAY.
July IS, 1894. Take the creek bout to Oakland
and then the cab cars, which will take you
within one block of the park. Conductors will be
in attendance to direct ladles and gents to the
grounds. By order of the committee ol arrange-
ineiits. rjyio at*] W. P. HERMAN,, secretary.
IJKB 3 Am u:il Meeting — The Annual
I*-*' nieetlns: of the stockholders of the Vir-
ginia and Gold Hill Water Company for the elec-
tion of trustees to serve lor the ensuing year, and
for the transaction of such other business as may
properly come before it, will De held at the office
i«l the company, room 26, Nevada block. No. M) 9
Montgomery st., San Francisco. Cal., on THURS-
DAY, July 20, 1894, at the hour of one (1)
o'clock p. m.
W. W. STETSON, Secretary.
Office— Room 25, Nevada block, No. 309 Mont-
gomery St., San Francisco, Cal. ; .->'
San Francisco. July 9. 1894. ]yBtd
WL>xßr' The .Annual Meeting; of the Mem-
fb~*r bers of th» San Fmuclsco Society for the
Prevention of Cruelty to Animals will De held at
the Society's otUce, l; 70 Market street, room 94.
at 4 o'clock p. m.. MONDAY. July 16, 1894, for
the purpose ol electing trustees for tin* ensuing
year, and for the transaction of such, other busi-
ness as may be Drought berore it.
Jy3 14t 0. B. HOLBROOK, Sec.
K3f otlce— The Animal M«-etinir of the
■*"•*' stockholders of the Edison Light and Power
Company, fur the election of directors for the
ensuing year and for the transaction of such
other business as may be brought before the
meeting, will be held a the company's office. 229
Stevenson Ft., San Francisco, on SATURDAY,
the 14th day of July, 1894. at 10 a. m.
je29 Ist ■ J.E. GREEN. Secretary.
RSS=* Odd Fellows' Employ- v^p^tfi^
6!^-*^ merit Association, room H.^WK.
I. O. O. F. !)I(Ir furnUhes first-class :r **H|SK~~-"
belli of all kinds, hours 7 t')9PM.i6ltn -'"i^\^
£ SPECIAL NOTICES.
IKS* J. I*. Mclntyre, Bookbinder a 1 d
Bir^ Printer, 422 Commercial st. .. ]y5 tf
fflf^» John F. Lyons. Notary rubltc and
«*-*' Commissioner of Deeds. Passports pro-
cured. ■ Office 607 Montgomery St.: telephone
64*9; residence 2^02 steiner st._ jyl tf
Kjß" '■ Something New— Boston Cafe, 317
i*-^ California- best place downtown men dine;
everything first-class, neat: popular prices. 3m
|?P25» Bad Tenants Ejected for BR4. Col-
»*•*■ lections made; city or country. Pacific Col-
lectlon Co. 415 Montg'y'st. r. 6. Tel. 6580.0:e24tf
8525* Boob.* Hoaeht tki Sold. Uealr&
■^^ DALY. Moved to 30« Powell st. IS tf
DIVIDEND NOTICES.
SE^S 3 Dividend Notic» —Th ■ Germ
l*-*^ Savings and loan Society. 626 California
St.— For the half year ending June 30. 1894. a
dividend has been declared at the rate of live (5)
per cent per annum on term deposits and four -and
one-sixth (4 1-6) per cent per annum on ordinary
deposits, payable on and after MONDAY. July SJ,
1894. [je3o 2w] GEO. IOURNY. Secretary.
SITUATIONS WANTED- FEMALE.
I/ 1 OR RELIABLE HELP. MAllTa'sl) FEMALE.
r write or call pacific COAST employment
OFFICE, 107» Market; tel. 380 South. Je'^i. 3in
M ME. LEOPOLD. LATK OK 1079 MARKET.
has opened at 957 and 961 Market a first-class
employment office; telephone No. 35). south.
SWEDISH EMPLOYMENT OFFICE FOR GOOD
O girls. Call liv- Antonio st., off Jones, near
EUts ■-.-■., " ■ JylO3f
'/''ALL AT SWEDISH EMI'. BUREAU FOR
\J Swedish and German girls. 441 Eddy st. Tel.
E 649. *■■■.-. 6 m
YOUNG GIRL, LATELY FROM IRELAND.
- 1 wishes a situation to do second work and sew-
ing, or would do general housework. Inquire at
154 Tehaina st. for three days. Jyll 3t«
\'OUNG GIRL WI.SHES POSITION FOR UP-
statrs or second work. Please call at 933 Mis-
sion st. ]yll3t»
SITUATIONS WANTED — CONTINUED.
NEAT SEAMSTIiESS~~AN D i)R tSSMAKbR
1 will sew in families for $1 per day. or will do
cbamberwork or care for invalid. Address 1235
Twenty-fifth st. jyll 3t*
"yOUNG LADY DESIRES A SITUATION AS
-l stenograDher: willing to accept other employ-
ment. Address 90 Fair oaks st. jvll 2t*
\-OUNG GIKL WANTS A SITUATION TO DO
I lUht housework. Call at 143 Dore St.. off
Bryant, bet, .-.inth and Tenth. jy!l2t*
COMPETENT YOUNG GIRL WISHES SITUA-
V 7 tlon to cook or do housework; good reference.
2908 Piue st. . *
HOUSE-CLEANING OR DAY WORK WANT-
ed. 1239 Folsom St., rear. _*
V\ ANTS A SITUATION IN SAUSALITO;
shore distance iv the country; lleht house-
work or care of children. 1018 Mission. •_
A MERIOAN WOMAN WANTS SITUATION TO
-ii- care lor invalid or housekeeper: country pre-
ferred: moderate wages. Ad. C. box 26. this office.
pOMPETENT WOMAN WISHES SITUATION
\J as working housekeeper or will do second work;
good refs. Call or address 1221 O'Karrell. *
lA ANTED— SITUATION BY A COMPETENT
'» woman as working housekeeper, or general
work, where she can nave a little boy; best of
reference. Address W. H., box 1 54. Call Branch.*
SITUATION WANTED BY A CHICAGO DRESS-
-0 maker to sew or do second work. 255 Minna
street *
EXPERIENCED YOUNG GIRL WANTS SITUA-
•L* tion to do housework or cooking; reference,
Call at 2633 Post st. *
\ ODNG GIRL WANTS A SITUATION TO DO
' housework. Please call or address at south-
west corner Post and Lyon sts. *__
0 KESPECTABLE gikls.one experienced
— - conk and her sister as seamstress or upstairs
work: best city reference. Please call 78 Natoma
street. •_
Cl'lUATloN WANTED BY YOUNG WOMAN:
M first-class seamstress: do all kinds of family
upstairs work or care of children. Call or address
743 Minn st. *_
RELIABLE WOMAN WANTS WORK BY THE
Ik day washing and housecleanlng. Call at
1038^, Folsom St. *_
p IKL WISHES TO ASSIST IN HOUSEWORK
VJ and take care of baby. 1600 Washiugton.9 3*
UELIABLE WOMAN WANTS TO DO WORK
it by the day; washing, lroning or cleaning. Can
or address 452 Jessie st. jy9 St*
1 • V NEAT RELIABLE PERSON TO DO HOUSE-
>' work; comfortable home more an object than
wages. Address Neat, box 98. Call Branch. 10 3t*
,'ERMaN WIDOW WANTS SITUATION AS
' 1 housekeeper in respeotablb family; wages
reasonable. Call 727 i-aguua St., near Fnlton,
upstairs. jy 1 0 St*
v ANTED— POSITION AS WORKING HOUSE-
*' keeper. Room 4, 1119 Mission st. jy;o;;t*
EXPERIENCED, TRUSTWORTHY PERSON
T^ desires a few engspements for housework,
table- waiting or sick-nursing, by the day or week.
Address M. 8., Women's E. and 1. Uuion. 103 Van
Ness aye. JylO 3t*
ELIAULE AND EXPERIENCED WOMAN
would like a position to attend an invalid;
references. Call 415 Post st. jylO3t»
pICRMAN LADY DEMKES SITUATION AS
VI housekeeper or first-class cook. Call 7 Mint
avenue. JylO :-St»
1 AI)Y WILL DO FAMILY SEWING: GENTLE-
1j men's mending; also cleans clothes; cheap.
114 Fonrtn St.. room 15. jylO 3t*
pIRL WANTS SITUATION AS SEAMSTRESS
VI and upstairs work: can do any kind of sewing
and perfect fitter. E. IRVING, 11 08 Broad-
way JylO at*
BY DRESSMAKER; PERFECT FIITEK; SEW
home or famlli s: $1 50 per day; salts cut
and fitted in one day at ladies' homes. 910 Vi
Harrison st. jylO 2t*
0 GIRLS WISH SITUATIONS TO DO GENERAL
— housework. Call 230 Grove st. jylO 2t*
\*OUNG GERMAN WOMAN WAN I S SITUA-
I tlon as chambermaid or laundress Please
call at 901 Folsom st. jylO'Jt*
1 >EFINED GERMAN LADY. SPEAKS FRENCH,
It desires position as. nurse to children, where
ralthfulnesn and ability will be appreciated, Aa-
dress K. H., box 159, Call Branch Office. jylo 2«
SITUATION WANTED BY A COMPETENT
0 conk: German or American cooking. Address
G. A., box 99. Call Branch. jylO 21*
■pvRESSMAKER, CUT AND FIT SEAMLESS OR
H any style waist perfect, wishes a few more en-
gagements in family: $1 60 a day. Please call
after 6 p. m.. or address 271 Stevenson st. Jy9 8t»
VJ IDDLE-AGKD LADY WAX IS SITUATION
i'J to do general housework; good cook. Please
oil at 3t>9 Jessie st. jy9 3t*
U'A^'TK O BY 2 YOUNG i.IKLS SITUATION
»* to do second work or take care of children;
no objection to country. Address J. 8., 11l
Eleventh St. Jy9 3t»
V OUNG GERMAN GIRL WISHES SITUATION"
I do light housework. Address 31 Boaniman
place, In rear jy9 3t*
i) GIRLS WISH SITUATIONS, ONE TO DO
— housework th« other second work. Call - 1
Rausch St., rear, bet. Seventh ana Eighth, off
Howard. _______
/ COMPETENT WOMAN WANTS SITUATION
' Ito do general housework In country. Call or
address 217 T lrd St., room 233. jy9 3t*
RRBPECTABLE YOUNG GIRL WISHES Sit-
IV uation at light housework or assist; wages
$15. Apply 2726 Howard St., In rear, from 9a. m.
to 4 p. m. jy9 3t*
ELIABLE YOUNG WOMAN WILL TAKE EN-
tlre charge of infant: $25 a month: no ob-
jection to country or tr;>velin_r. Call or address
MRS. M., 1642 Twenty-fifth; Castro-st. cars. 0 7t*
rpRAINBD NURSE FOR ANY SICKNESS, $10
1 a week to get started: satisfaction or no pay.
Address Desire. 2304 Flllmore st. Jv6 6t*
situations wamed-male.
Tmhjmj fbTench CAKPEvTiIt wotj__) {
I like to work In shop; city or country. 702 !
Broadway. • • jyll 7t*
, KRMAN COOK WOULD LIKK A GOOD
1 ' place on a farm. Address C. KUNLAT. 1266
San Pablo aye.. Oakland. jyll 7t*
\'OUNG SCANDINAVIAN WANTS WORK OF
any kind; am sober, Industrious and handy
with tools; wages no object. Address Y. s., box
98. Call Branch Office. jyll 3t*
EXPERIENCED COOKS— BY MAN AND WIFE
Hi in small hotel and boarding-house for cooking,
waiting and geueril kitrhenwork: city or coun-
try; low wages. Apply Cook, 272 Minna, jyll 3t*
PAKKEEPER (8 YEARS' EXPERIENCE),
I ' best references, speaks F.ngl sb. French and
Gernuin. wants situation. Address L.M., 1030
Howard st. jyll at*
EXPERIENCED GARDENER WISHES SITUA-
I i tlon; private place or commercial. Call or ad-
dress D. G.. box 103, Call Brancn office. •
EXPERT GRAINER AND PAINTER WANTS
_Tj work ly nay or job. 20 Sherwood place, off
Third St., bet Mission and Howard. *•
WAITER WANTS DAY OR LUNCH JOB;
'' city reference. A. s., 729 California st. »
!. OY OF 17 YEARS WOULD LIKE POSITION
I) at butchering; had some experience; can
come recommended. Address 312 Valley st. 10 3*
L; A RISE R— 1 IRST - CLASS WORKMAN.
I ' strictly sober, desires steady employment ci.y
or Oakland. Ad. Steady, box 134. Call Branch 03*
BY YOUNG BUTCHER; CITY OR COUNTRY.
I> Address C. C. ll,Va Welsh st. jylO 3t*
\rOONG GERMAN WANTS TO WORK IN
1 grocery: understands tending bar; takes in-
terest in businrss. Please address G. G., box 137.
Call Branch Office. jylO _t*
L IREMAN WISHES SITUATION: ALSO A BLR
.1 to run small engine; best of references. 312
I'rannan St. JylO _t*
yOUNG EXPERIENCED GERMAN WISHES
I situation as waiter or oyster cook. Address
P. R, 1928 Howard st. JylO 2t*
BY YOUNG MARRIED MAN, WHO SPEAKS
French, English, Spanish and Italian, to work
In a store or drive a dellvery-wagou. Apply 918
Jackson st jy7 st*
FEMALE HELP WANTED.
'iT~A^NTED^msXi7~w"M^
'* $25: German girl, chainberwork and wait-
ing, small boarding-house, $15. C. U. IIANSEN
« CO.. 110 Geary si. 1
i. ANTED-PROTESTANT LAUNDRESS, $25:
*' French second girl, $20; Herman or French
cook, $28; hotel waitress, $20: and girls for
housework. J. F. CROSfc/lT & CO.. 312 Sutter
street. 1
\7OUSG NURSEGIRL, $10; RESTAURANT
1 waitress. $20: hotel waitress, $20: 2 cooks.
$25 ami $80: second girl, $20: 4 housework elrls,
city and country, $20 and $25; 3 young girls to
assist, $10 to $16. Apply MISS CULLEN, 105
Stockton St., room 2. . 1 ■-.-■
\ OUNG GERMAN OR SWEDISH GIRL,
I light work, $10. MISS CULLEN, 105 Stock-
ton St.. room 2. > ".■■■. 1
\\ ANTED — LAUNDRESS, HOTEL, $26:
'• waitress, $20; 2 French second girls, $20; 10
girls for general housework. $20 and $15. LEON
ANDRE. 320 Snttar St. 1
V\ ANTED— A SCANDINAVIAN GIRL FOR
*' housework in small American family. $15 :
.head waitress and second waitress, $25 and $20;
10 young housework girls at $0 and I's each.
Apply MISS PLUNKETT. 424 Sutter St. . 1 .
( OOK, $30: GIRL, HOUSEWORK. $20; _
Vv German girls, housework: upstairs girl. $20;
and others. Pacific Coast Employment Office,
1079 Market st. , »
■i) COOKS, $25 AND $30; LAUNDRESS. $25;
— nurse girl, $15: Whirls for housework, sls and
$25. MRS. H IRQ. 705 Polk St. 1
, • IRL FOR HOUSEWORK: SMALL FAMILY;
1 > must understand German cooking. 1444
O'Farrellst. jyll a »
V OUNG GIRL TO MIND BABY; ONE WHO
I sleeps borne. 1400 Post st. Jyll 2t*
LD LADY DO LIGHT HOUSEWORK. CALL
l/'il) St.. cor. First aye. •
1 I IRL TO DO GENERAL HOUSEWORK. CALL
■yi 222 Page st. •
QTKONG GIRL FOR GENERAL HOUSEWORK.
O App.y 608 a Shotwell st. *
yOUNG GIRL FOR GENERAL HOUSEWORK;
1 plalu cooking. 801 Scott st. ■ • .
wINGLE YoUNG WOMAN, GOOD APPEAR-
< anceand business ability; splendid position.
Address, age, occupation, W., box 10, tul* office. *
HELP WANTED— CONTINUED.
IRST-CLASS FIMSHERS: ALSO OPER-
ators. 217 Clara St.. bet. Fifth and Sixth. *
OOK WANTED WHO UNDERSTANDS UER-
\J man cooking. 1440 O'Farrell st »
\ OUNG GIRL IO ASSIST IN LIGHT HOUSE-
-1 work. 1314 Oetavlast. 1
A SMART GIRL AS COOK. APPLY 128
Tenth St. at once. *
C* ERMAN GIRL, $15; SMALL FAMILY. CALL
VJ early 117 Stockton *_
WANTED-GIRL FOR HOUSEWORK. $12.
1600 Washington st. • *
IRL FOR UPSTAIRS WORK; ASSIST D I -
vJT lng-room; German preferred. Y&\ Fourth. »
»\'AITBES3 WANTED 109 THIRD STREET.
YOUNG GERMAN GIRL TO ASSIST HOUSE-
I work. Call 1016 Page st. jylO_at*_
XT' OUNG GIRL FOR HOUSEWORK; $15. 1320
1 Seventeenth St.. near Douglass. JylO it*
I* AN TED-DANISH OK NORWEGIAN GIRL
*' for general housework. 135 Folsoin st. a 3t«
I*' ANTED— LADIES TO LEARN MILLINERY
»» under competent teachers: guaranteed to
graduate them in 3 months fitted for tirst-ciass
positions. Millinery Institute. 234 Taylor st.B 4t*
A YOUNG LADIES TO LFABN F.LEGRAPHY
"x and qualify for good-paying positions. CALI-
FORNIA TELEGRAPH CO., Kearny, cr. Clay. 85t
DRESSCUTTING INSTITUTE —WE TEACH
Professor Livingston's French combination
of square system and machine; simple, perfect
and durable, no guesswork or refittini;: patterns
to measure; artistic dressmaking. Removed 201
Powell st. jy7 lm
I ADY AGENTS WANTED: CAN MAKE 50
Li per cent easily. 209 Kearriv St., room 5, 10 to
2. Jy6 7t»
PATTERNS CUT TO ORDER, 25c. McDOW-
-1 ELL'S Dress-cutting Academy, 207 a Powell. 1 tf
\\ ANTED - APPRENTICE TO LEARN THE
'' dressmaking trade thoroughly. 505 Fell. it
JACKSON 'a DRESS-CUTTING
t) SCHOOL.
World's Columbian Exposition medal awarded
this system. Dressmakers and all persons Inter-
estea in perfect-fitting garments to investigate
Jackson's Franco-Prussian mode of garment cut
ting; perfect-fitting patterns, 25c; dressmaking
parlors In connection. 607 Sutter st. av'l'J 3m
I EARN TO CUT AND MAKE PERFECT
Ij dress without trvlng on. 1231 Market. apB tf
MALE HELP WANTED.
W~^>^rElX^Tßo>rKli c7rUNTtTY~TA~uTTjRY~!
$30 and board: married paper-hanger; one
more miner, $2 50 day; logloader; farmer and
wire, ann others. Apply J. F. CKOSETT & CO.,
628 Sacramento St. 1
k k AN FARMER AND WIFE FOR NICE
*' small place. J. F. CROSETT & CO., 312 hut-
ter St. 1_
k\~AN 1 ED-IRONER FOR LAUNDRY IN THE
** country. $30 to $35 and found: boy 15 years
old for store, $3 week: Italian cook for restau-
rant, $45: German third cook, $35; etc. LEON
ANDRE, 320 Slitter st. 1
UELIABLK MAN TO RUN RANCH ON
IV shares. Address A., box 134, Call Brnch.ll 3*
V OUNG GERMAN MAN AS DISHWASHER IN
1 hotel, $10 month. 624 Fulton st. *_
EXPERIENCED PLUMBER'S HELPER. 114
■d Tenth st. near Folsom, before 8 a. m. *_
V GOOD LIVE CANVASSERS FOR CITY WORK.
0 9 Geary, room 2, 9 to 11. *
pOOK WAN ALSO DISHWASHER; GER-
\J man. 29 Fourth st. *
/ OOK WANTED. 136 FIFTH ST. ~
L/ *_
HARBER WANTED: EXTRA; STEADY. 13
»-* Taylor street. •_
BOY WAN 1 TO LEARN BARBER TRADE;
one living with parents. 203 Monty aye. *
U ANTED 10-DAY — STEADY MAN FOR
"' light, pleasant work: experience not neces-
sary: must have some rash and be satisfied with
1E75 per month. 1027 Market st. •_
(JINGLE Y.OUN(. LADY~WANTS SOBER AND
0 industrious partner with $125 for well located
coffee-saloon. 639 California st. , room 4. *
I/REE HOT LUNCH ALL DAY; PLATE OF
x meat, up, wine or beer, 5 cents. MRS. J. T.
DALV. 619 Merchant st. jyll 7t* exSu
\\r ANTED- CARPENTER WHO IS WILLING
" to do work In exchange for a piece or prop-
erty or l>u:ldine material. Apply to JOSEPH
SCHEERKR Si CO.. 21 to 26 Tenth St. jelO3t*
\j EN'S HALFSOLEING 60C: DONE WHILE B
wait. Market.opp.Pal.Hotel, LEVET.]9 lm
L ARBER-SHOP FOR SALE OR HALF INTER~-
-1 ' est. DECKELMAN BUOS., 106 Ellis. jy9 7t«
BARHERS-HOTEL BARBER-SHOP FOR
sale. 106 Ellis St.. DECKELMAN. jy9 6t«
5 YOUNG MEN TO LEARN telegraphy AND
qualify for good paying positions. CALIF'>K-
NIA TELEGRAPH Co., Kearny St., cor Clay.jvB at
\\ ANTED — FIRST-CLASS WOOD-CARVER.
'* 557 Bran nan St., top floor. jy7 tf
AFRICAN" GOLD FIELDS — WANTED; 50 PAS-
seogers to complete for flue sailing-snip, which
will leave San Fratclsco middle of July for Cape
"Town direct: passage only $100. Address Ship-
owner, box 66, this office. Je29 15t
ii ANTED— LABORERS AND MECHANICS To
'• know that Ed Roikln, Reno House proprietor,
has opened s>oto House, 32 Fourth st.: 100 rooms;
25c to $i per night: $1 25 to $4 per week. 20 ly
U' ANTED— 2OO MEN TO EAT GOOD MEAL
* * with glass of whisky, wine or beer; drink and
meal only sc, at Tunnel saloon, 212 4tb. je2b 3m
I EST IN CITY— SINGLE ROOMS, 15. 20 AND
> ' 25 cents p«r nieht: $1, $1 25, $1 60 per week.
Pacific House. Commercial ana Leidesdorff.ral7 tf
RY ACME HOUSE. 957 MARKET ST., BE-
low Sixth, for a room; 25c night; $1 week. tt
1 (\f\ MEN TO TAKE LODGING AT 10c, 15c
i " '" and 20c a night, including coffee and rolls.
624 Washington st, near Kearny. Jel6 tf
ii ANTED— SOO PEOPLE FOR REGULAR 25c
' meals at ICe; weekly tickets $'-' 50: soup, two
dishes meat 10c; weekly $1 90: vegetables, wine,
coffee. New Atlantic Rcstrnt., 624 Pacific. 15 lm*
A 1 FOURTH ST. FOB BEST COFFEE, ROLL
*i"i and butter, tt<a or cake, sc. jels tf
\\- ANTED— SINGLE ROOMS 15c A DAY. $1 A
•' week; rooms for 2 25c a day, $1 50 a week.
Reading room; dally papers. 3t> Clay st. mr22 tf
ound to wake you— r. b. wenzel
I ' electrical alarm clocit. 607 Montgomery 20 6m
PERSONALS.
B"~lT^-YOtJRS~R EC^IYETTT^TinjU^rT^YtTu
• would say when you wanted to see me: I al-
ways look for you. C. K. *
\ D VICE FREE: DIVORCE LAWS A SPECIAL-
•"» ty : collections, damages, wills, deeds, etc; low
fees. G. W. HOWE. Att'y-at-Law. 1 Fifth st. X!
'HE LIQUOR AND MORPHINEHABITCURED
I positively; price «10; best testimonials. Ad-
dress or call OK. BATTEI.I.E.-'O.")l Mission si.] II 8
IVATINE— VALUABLE REMEDY FOR
female complaints: gives health, vigor and
strength: price moderate; consultation free;
agents wanted 702 Post st. jy7 7t*
I\,' ANTED— MISFIT AND OLD SHOKS: MEN'S
" repairing, totes 50c, ladles' 40c: new and sec-
ond-hand shoes for sale. 704 Howard St., near
Third. jeS 3m i
i HEAPEST PLACE FOR GAS FIXTURES. 623
■ V Golden Gate ,ive. HENRY lICFSCHMIDT.J2 lm
/ CENTENNIAL STABLES— CAKKIAGES.ROCK-
\J aways. victorias, buggies, etc.: 1621 California.
nr. Polk; telephone 66x. M. CONLON, prop. 27tf
s-TORAGE, HOUSEHOLD GOODS. CHAS. L.
0 TAYLOR has removed to 421-423 Market, lm
pURLY BANG $1. WIG $5, SWITCH $1; TRY
* our curling fluid: hair dressed *Jsc: lessons
given. La Verlte Hairdresslng Bazaar. 1170
Market St., over the Maze. Jel2 tf
SUIT 1 O ORDER ON EASY INSTALLMENTS.
i 1 Merchant tailor. 613 Kearny st. my 27 tf
ONE MORE CHAN
V/ Chairs, each 50
Ranges, from $7 00 up
Folding Beds 15 00
Bedroom Suits 20 00
Bed Lounges 12 50
Tap. Carpets, per yard 65 :
Linoleum and Oilcloth, per yard 45
Parlor Sets , -. 35 00
'I hose are a few of many bargains we have. Big
stock of secondhand carpets and furniture.
Terms either cash or easy time payments. ,i.
NOONAN, 1017 to 1023 Mission st. bet Sixth
and Seventh Open evenings. 16 tf
"IF IN NEED OF SHOWCASES. COUNTERS,
-I bars, shelving, mirrors, safes, scales, etc., do
not fall to see my stock before purchasing; I carry
the largest line of such goods in this State, both
new and second-hand. J. NOONAN, 1017 to 1023
Mission st. above Sixth. 16 tf
HOUSES UNDERPINNED. BRICK OR WOOD: |
work guaranteed. ALHKRTSON. 41^ Eddy, i
pAINTING. PAI-ER-HANGING. WHITENING:
1 low rates. J.C. Dt;RBAUM.I2OI Howard. 15 3m
AIR-DRESSING 25c, BANGS CUT AND
curled 15c, shampoo 25c, manicuring 25c: pu-
plls wanted. MRS. BUTLER. 131 Pose, r. 20. 12 tf
I RUMMERS' SAMPLES BOUGHT AT 2IT
» ' Larkln st; opp. City Hall apl 12m
STYLISH DRESSMAKING: FIT GUARAN-
O teed: $3 50 up. 105 Stockton, room 39. mr'27 tf
7^ *■ !•- SNOOK. PLUMBERS, ROOFERS,
VJ . steam and gas-fitters, Telephone 1727. 630
Sacramento St., near Kearny. 0c24 tt
HIGHEST IKICL i AID CAST-OFF CLOTH-
ing, gold, jewelry, books. KLEIN, 109 Slxtn.tf
"\\ INDOW SHADES MANUFACTURED TO OR.
'» derby WILLIAM McPHTTN. H95 Market24tt
QCBSCRIBE TO "THE CALL" AND YOU CAN
C then obtain "Picturesque California" for 10
cents a portfolio. .
DRESSMAKERS
pTi^cTATTIr^CHiirDRiENrMISSES I^DRESSEST
25c up. MRS. HKNNESSY. 136 Rose aye. 25 3m
AGENTS WANTED.
4 GENTS TO TAKE ORDERS BY SAMPLE^LI'
XV home or travel; expenses & good salary or com-
mission to right party: apply at once for simples.
Address lock box 1354, New York City. m9WBu ly
IV ANTED— GOOD PAY TO BRIOHT ACTIVE
*' agents; Century and St Nicholas magazines
as premiums with best Illustrated work ever of-
fered. The J. DEWING COMPANY, room 12,
Flood building. -, jyB 7t
BUSINESS CHANCES.^^ _
ifc-OU.town restauraDt; firstclass business,
-OU.towo restaurant; first-class uus> n «"-
established over 30 years: one partner retiring,
wants (rood man to take his place, act as cashier,
look after help, etc.; absolutely best paying place
la this city; a sacrifice: cheap at $500: fine bar.
cash register, safe, everything 'lie best; never
such a chance: don't miss it. See u£.o. sit"-
ART & SON, 632 Market st _i—
<3UI- n PARTNER WANTED-COMMISSION
tj) I OU. business: growing trade; needs help:
prefers partner to keepinsr clerk: clears *bo to
$75 per month to each; money not so much or an
object as good nun: will eivc active, industrious
man chance seldom met with : 'iuist be willing to
work and make himself useful; plenty to no.
GEO. STEWART & SON, 6JJ Marker st. 1 __
ffl^7nrTlrusT look at THIS; 43 ROOM,
yD »UU. completely furnished lod2ing-hoil.se on
good business street; on account of disagreement
of owners HUBER & CO., 777 Market st. *
©EO- GROCERY AND BAR; SPLENDID
kTO£O. location: doing a fine business: no
rent to pay. H USER & Co., 777 Market st. *
QiiCiO^ IF YOU WANT A NO. 1 SALOON,
<»i)\Jj£tO. worth double, with cheap rent and
steady, good trade, fine location, call and investi-
gate, as we have the- cheapest bargain ever offered .
SMITH A- CO., 30 Kearny St. Jyll Bt* _
*£• Q f^.| 1 LARGE RESTAURANT; CENTRAL-
«jpUc»W. ly located on Market St.; established
15 years: doing good business; good place to
make money; reasons for selling, owner has two
places. For particulars call at 317 California St.,
downstairs jyll tf
MUST BE SOLD ON ACCOUNT OF SICKNESS,
fine saloon and lunch-house, with 8 furnished
rooms, half blocs from Market st. : good eh
for man and wife. Inquire 79 .Stevenson. 11 3t*
(li«TrA CIGAR-STORK FOR SALE. 340
tfcltJU. Kearny st. jyll 3t«
ELL-PAYING BUTCHER-SHOP; ' HORSE
and wagon. Apply Call Branch Office. 11 7t*
IGAR-STORK. LAUNDRY OFFICE; GOOD
" location: fair business; 3 living rooms; rent,
$27 50: must be sold at once; Imgaln. 439
Hayes street. Jvll 7t*
L'BUITSTOKK FOR SALE CHEAP. APPLY
Jr 444 Third St. jylO7f»
I PINE GROCERY AND BAR: STOCK AND F!X-
-1 tures must be sold; cheap. Call Branch, 621
Twenty-fourth st. jylO7t*
i~OR SALE— RESTAURANT AND BRANCH
T bakery, suitable 2 persons. 112 Eighth. jy9 3«
I RANCH BAKERY; CANDY; NOTIONS 955 V,
I ' Bryant st. I*" 8 «*
\ V AGON AND TEAM AVERAGING $250 FROM
*» one wholesale house besides other work. Ap-
ply 213 Tenth. jy""t*
GiCifU I SALOON. BOARDING AND LODGING
«JpOU''. house; busy street: sickness cause of
sale; sure bargain. Business Agency, 1027 Mar-
ket street. jy6 6t*
LOR SALE-INTERIOR AGENCY ON THIS
y paper: price $3500: paying $200 per month.
Inquire of cashier. Je2l tf
ABE CHANCE FOR AN ENERGE IC MAN;
it Call route for sale. Apply this office. je2l tf
STATIONERY. NOTIONS. PERIODICAL
0 store: 2 good-paying agencies; fine location.
Apply 513 Gough st. ' m v 1 6 t '
LODGING-HOUSES FOR SALE.
o«TißO?ntfS^TpT. AIN^^K CRN TriJRE ; $600 ; A
££ sacrifice. SPECK & CO., 19 Montgomery st.»
mtjnft LODGING-HOUSK; 7 NICELY FUK-
<SOUU. nished rooms; N. side Market; sacri-
flee. AGENCY, 1027 Market st. jyB 4t*
L OK SALE— FURNITURE 10-ROOM HOUSE;
r sell account .sickness. 703 Post. jyB 7t»
Qjl^r FURNITURE, 11 HOUSEKEEPING
tjp-L I O. rooms; all rented; rent cheap. 734
1 olsom st. jy6 7t»
FURNITURE FOR SALE.
K^Eiru^Tio^roiirTAi^Fr^
second hand; 400 carpets, good as new; oil
cloth. 25c; patlor suits, .fIM up: linoleum. 45c: 7-
piece chamber suits. $14 50; cornice poles. 25c:
ranges, $6: cash or installments: goods shinned
free. T. H. NELSON. 126 Fourth st Itf
/ iUT PRICES IN FURNITURE AND CARPETS
Y.J this week at McCABK'S. 948-950 Mifston.24 ly
U 'LEY fcROS.. 931 MISSION -FURNITURE,
*' carpets stoves «*h»arn rush Iro*t>.no4 lv
FURNITURE WANTED.
"uTA^fT^D^B^U^^LSORrjIviQCEfTE CAR-
*' pets; must be in good order Address L. C. ,
box 119, Call Branch Office. JylO3t*
Hi. ' A.I BUTTERFIKLD, AUCTIONEER;
* buys, sells and rent* furnished houses, office
opposite Palace Hotel. 2d floor Crocker bldsr. Itf
/ >EO F. LAHSON WILL BUY YOUR FURNI-
VI ture: full cash value. 410 Kearqy, r'm 8. mltf
MJ. SIMMONS JtCO., AUCTION WILL.
. buy your furniture, pianos and booKs: do
not dispose of them until you have seen him. 1057
Market st *p9 tf
MCCABE, 948 MISSION, PAYS THE HIGHEST
price for furniture, stoves, carpets. 1 f
LAKGJE QUANTITY SECOND-HAND FUR-
nltnre wanted: 20 per ct paid moro than else-
whfre. MALO.NK .110 Foarth: new store. m2U tf
carpets"
ELEGANT TAPESTRY LKLSSELS. 60c A
-Hi yard, laid; heavy English linoleum, 45c: goo<
floor oilcloth. V'sc. BHIRKK. I 312 Stockton st.B tf
CARPET CLEANING.
J^FTIInT7?HELL^OL I>EST ATjlTrsHElij"cr*R^
. pet-cleaning machines at tne«old stand, 230
Fourteenth st. ; cleaning 3c yard: CAMPBELL &
SORENSEN. successors to J. E. MITCHELL: tele-
phone 6074 Z. T. BARBER is not connected in
any way with said business of the late J. E.
MITCHELL. je29 tf
JE. MITCHELL BEING DECEASED. Z. T.
. BARBER, bis former driver, is now conduct-
ing the carpet-cleaning business at the old stauu,
236 Fourteenth st: tel 100, Mission. Jc3 6111
/ STEAM CARPeT~BEATING AND REN
V yatlng Worts, Ms and' 40 Eighth: G. R. STE-
VENS, manager. Telephone call. 3250. my 2 tim
MCQUEEN'S CARPET BEA I ING AND RFV
. ovating works. 463 Stevenson; tel. 3228.m6 tf
\ y HEN YOU BECOME DISGUSTED WITH
* ' poor work send to SPaULDINU'S Pioneer Car-
p>t heating Works, 353-7 Tehama; tele 3040.21
pARPETS THOROUGHLY CLEANED AND
V reaova'.ed sama as new. S.S.FERGUSON*
CO., 23 Tenth st. ; telephone 3036. I%t
pONKLIN'S~CARPET BEATING WORKS. 333
\J Golden Gate aye. : telephone 2128. 12 tt
MONET WANTED.
MORTGAGE— WANTED $3OoT'aT " PER
cent interest, secured by real estate worth
$1000 Write to B. 1... Call Br.. Oakland. jyB 3t
MONEY TO LOAN.
ONEY ON PI AN OS WITHOUT MOVINGT3I9
Ellis St., room 12. jy 9 3 *
"First AND SECOND mortgage: LOWEST
r rates: any terms. MURPHY. 623 Market. 28 tf
MONEY LOANED ON FIRST MORTGAGE AT
1" 7 per cent, payable in monthly installments.
SOL J. V V ,304 Montgomery st. jel3 tt
MONEY TO LOAN ON MORTGAGE OR COL-'
i»± laterals JAS. E. DAMON, 303 Montgomy.6m
ft % LOANED ON IST OR 2D MOFvTGAGE. LIFE
U insurance; no delay. ISAACS.24O Moutg'y. X.6.
BANKBOOKS BOUGHT; NOTES DISCOUNT-
I> ed: loans. W. H. Ward, 112 Montgy aps «
O ANY SECURITY. AT LOW RATES: DEAL-'
\J Ing confidential. 43 Crocker building. ap3 6ra
MONEY LOANED ON JEWELRY AND OTHER
aU valuables at the Security Loan Bank, 1108
Market, nr. Mason; private entrance 7 Turk. ap9 tf
SI 25 000 AT f° WE MARKET RATES
»IDX^.c».uyv/ on city or country real estate;
any sum. A. SCHULLER. 608 Montgomery, tea tf
<^AN FRANCISCO COLLATERAL LOAN BANK."
k-J 538 Kearny: only corporation that lends money
on diamonds . watches: low Interest. oc4 tt
ATTORNEYS- AT-LAW
A DVICE FREE; DIVmu^ETAIvsXsPECIAi^
-^1. ty; collections, damages, wills, deeds etc -low
fees._ 8. W. HOWE. Att'y-at-Law, 1 Fifth st." tf
WIT. DAVIDSON. ATTORNEY-AT-LAW i -0
. California st. rms. 14-16: advice free.'di"tr
RA CROTHERS. ATTORNET-AT.LAw7~tt(»*
« CUy it. noit tt *
HOUSES^VTANTED. '
WANTED— Bl YOUNG COUPLE, oil mm.'
" wished cottage or about 4 rooms and batlif r-nt
not to exceed $16: tenant can furnish best of refer.
enc*B. Address H. L. S.. box 53. Call Office, Ivn tf
ROOMS WANTED. —
'^drjN(T^7)iprE^viTir^rvFrF'Ei^?rcEi
1 desire to rent unfurnished flit of about 4
rooms and bath; rent not 10 exceed $15 Mmiv
M. V.. box 21, this office. * jy ii« y
"I OR 9 ROOMS FURNISHED FOR HOUSE*-
X keeping in exchange for cnamberwork. Ad.
dress MRS. H.. box 99 Call Branch Office. «
PROPERTY ANTED.
it- ANTED-GmJD^UAIcLA^rOR^B^RIcETKV
MJ-..1K A ID.. ;9 >iontgomery. *•%&
$IJJ. hfJ^CK &CQ.. j9 Montgomery. •
LOST.
I ° ST 7 A fASSBOOKWIThTHE HIBERNIa"
I > Savings ana Loan Society of San Francisco In
the name of JAMES BR, BNAHAN So u»iU
The finder will please return to btuk. jyio ot » A
I OST-BLACK AND WHITE GREYh7,In"i7
X^» dog. Reward on return to 858 Howard.io 2t°
I " ST 7 A passbook wuh the~hTbTrnTl
Li Saviugs and Loan Boelety of San Franciscu in
"»•"•'»« of HENKI RAUHN or \"1 EnTi'n?
m^Vobang; U669U " ™* fi ""' r ">U\*™
____^_^____^JFOUND^^ ~~~
L-OUND-A CARTT7ml^^AirHXvlrsXM7
«»« b y p / 0V , lv & pr °P m y and paying expenses Call
Stock Yard. Thirteenth and Harrison, jyio 2t»
F .00 Post), 513 Montgomery, cor. Commercials

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