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The morning call. (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1878-1895, March 04, 1895, Image 7

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MONDAY ARCH -„1898
LOCAL NEWS IN BBIEP.
Citizens of Berkeley are agitating for a new
town hall. Kjuft
Tennis tournament at the California Lawn
Tennis courts.
More than 15,000 people visited Golden Gate
Park yesterday.
The new .peed track at Alameda was thor
oughly tested yesterday.
The postal clerks open the picnic season
with n successful "chiupin."
The Country Club will have a big trap shoo
in Maria County in a few weeks.
The Doctors' Daughters are working to intro
duce an ambulance system here.
The ship Klwell is breaking the speed record
between this port and Nanaimo.
The shooting festival at Shell Mound yester
day brought out some excellent scores.
The South End Bowing Club has elected
Committees to look alter the May regatta.
Attorney John J. Coffey had his wife Julia
arrested last night for disturbing the peace.
The lady shots were in the lead yesterday at
the Schuetzen Park range, near San Rafael.
Mrs. Isabella Martin has barricaded her
home on Van Ness avenue against the Sheriff.
The American Concert Band gave the first
concert of the series at the Mechanics' Pavilion.
Tne French Church celebrated the beginning
of Lent and began a special mission of two
weeks.
Ida B. Wells lectured from the pulpit of the
First Congregational Church on Lynching in
America.
A joint committee of Congress recommends
the abolishment of the naval oflice held by
Colonel Irish.
Prince Bahadner and the Princess were
driven through the park and to the ocean
beach yesterday.
Eddie McDonald, an ex-prizefighter, was
stabbed in the back yesterday morning in a
saloon on the water front.
Rev. E. P. Dennett talked about "The Ame*>
ican Slave and the Price of Freedom" at Metro
politan Temple yesterday.
The Fish Commissioners' attention will be
called to poaching that is going on in Paper
mill Creek above tide water.
The Knights of the Red Branch will fittingly
celebrate Robert Emmet's birthday this even
ing at Metropolitan Temple.
The San Franciscos defeated the Emmets at
Gaelic football yesterday afternoon, after an
exciting game, by one point.
The annual 25-mile roadrace at San Leandro
was won by Walter Foster, who lowered the
coast record tor that distance.
Artist C. D. Robinson became excited while
arguing with a street preacher and was ar
rested for disturbing the peace.
The rowing and swimming clubs of the city
are enthusiastically preparing for the contests
and regattas of the boating season.
The police are searching for a man who stole
a box containing opium valued at $550 from
an express-wagon on Tuesday last.
The concert and entertainment at the Sutro
Baths yesterday was well attended There
were some good swimming matches.
Rev. James B. i i. , the young evangelist, will
commence a series of revival meetings this
evening at Olivet Congregational Church.
(J. W. Cost ley, a barber, was arrested last
night for striking the conductor of a Castro
street cable-car. who asked him for his fare.
The examination and approval of income tax '
reports will be commenced by Collector Wel
burn to-day, and collection will begin very
soon.
Miss Ida B. Wells, the colored lecturess, ad- :
dressed a large congregation in Grace Metho
dist Church on the subject of lynching in the
south.
Grace Palotte, one of the clever "Gaiety
Girls," tells how she came to goon the stage,
and why she thinks she is one of fortune's fa- ;
vorites.
Sing Wong and Lim Hung, laundrvmen, were
arrested last night on the charge of grand lar
ceny preferred by Miss M. Ward, 104*. McAllis
ter street.
he Marguerite saloon on Larkin street was
entered by burglars at an early hour yesterday j
morning and the cash drawer emptied of its
contents.
Pioneer Cashman's funeral will take place
from St. Joseph's Church, Alameda, this morn- !
ing. The remains will be buried in Calvary j
Cemetery. |
Rev. Dr. Dllle took occasion to criticize the j
members of the Legislature at the mass-meet- I
ing of the Christian Endeavorers in Odd Fel
lows' Hall.
Patrick J. Collins, who killed hisfwife at '
Second and Folsom streets, was secretly re- i
moved to san Quentin yesterday under" the !
death warrant.
The young men's mooting at the association
hall was addressed by Dr. H. G. Northrup and j
B. F. Ferris, two well-known men from the '
Eastern States.
Chief Crowley has practically recovered from *
his severe indisposition. He 'was outdriving i
yesterday and expects to resume his duties at
the office to-day.
The' Olympics and a picked nine played a'
game of bah at the Haight-street grounds for j
the benefit oi Charley Sweeney, who is in need j
of financial assistance.
Mrs. Jennie Habecb of « Montgomery avenue I
was accidentally shot by her husband while
they were hunting near San Leandro. She will j
probably lose her left arm.
Jake Rudolph is seeking Chris Buckley with
a gun and the blind boas is now in hiding in ,
the country. A disagreement over money mat- |
ters is said to be the cause of the trouble.
The dead man who was picked up on Sutter !
street Saturday night was viewed at the
Morgue by scores of people who knew his face i
wil, hut could not tell his name, business or ]
place of abode.
Th" winners in yesterday's oonrslng meets ■
were Skyball, Best Trump, John Mitchell. '
Ilarknway and Faster at Ocean View, and Cap- i
tain Morse. Jimmy Hope, Spray and Maggie Si I
at Golden late Park.
Thomas O'Hara, 234 Third street, fell from !
the dummy of an Oak-street cable-car last j
night a- it swung round the corner of Stanyan i
and Oak streets, receiving a nasty scalp wound, i
which was dressed at the Receiving HospitaL }
• The Ellis-street cable road stopped running I
at - clock tins morning because of a loose
strand in the cab\p which broke several pulleys
between Jones and Market streets. The dam
age was not repaired till late in the afternoon.
John Larsol, an old man, living at 040 Fol-
Bom street, while stepping off an electric car
at Third and Folsom streets last night, missed
his footing and fell to the ground, sustaining
seven?' cuts and bruises about the head. He
was taken to the Receiving Hospital.
Miss M.Ward of 1043 McAllister, street caused !
the arrest of Sing Wong and Lim Hung last ■
night on the charge of grand larceny. They
called at her house for the washing and after |
they had gone it was discovered that $00 was j
in the pocket of one of the drosses sent to the
laundry on Grove street. Miss Ward went to I
the laundry, but they denied all knowledge of
the money and she asked Policeman Herring ]
to arrest the two men.
LOS ANGELES RACES.
A Great Programme for La Fiesta
Week.
Among the many features of the great
La Fiesta celebration to be held at Los An
geles next month will be the running
races, beginning Saturday, April 13, and
continuing seven days. The meeting. will
be held under the auspices of the Sixth
District dissociation, and $10,000 in stakes
and purses will be given to the gallopers.
For the benefit of horsemen that wish to
race at the meeting, the southern associa
tion has succeeded in getting a special rate
of $100 a carload from San Francisco to the
southern metropolis.
The programme includes seven stake
events, which are the Newton handicap,
value $1000, for three-year-olds and up
ward, one mile; the Los Angeles futurity,
$500 added, for two-year-olds, half a mile;
the Hoffman Cafe stakes, guaranteed value
$700, all age.., five furlongs ; the La Fiesta
Derby, $500 added, for three-year-olds, one
mile and seventy yards; the fire chiefs'
stake, $500 added, for three-year-olds and
upward, six furlongs; the speculation
handicap, $500 added, for two-year-olds,
four and a half furlongs, and the citrus
belt handicap, $500 added, for three-year
olds and upward, one and one-eighth miles,
all with conditions and allowances.
Overweight purses will be $400 and $300;
nothing less than $300. Entrance to purse
races, $100. Entrance to all stake events
close March 23. There will be four or more
races each aay. The starting will be done
by California's favorite flag-wielder, H. D.
Brown. .
"Just foe Fin 1 ' pencils and "Midget" pen
holders, a foot long, at 25 cents each in sta
tionery department. Sanborn. Vail & Co., 741
Market street. 'J^BB__________B__J__BH_3_i__l___E
RECORD BROKEN
AT SAN LEANDRO.
Great Excitement attended
the Twenty-Five Mile
Road Race.
FOSTER'S WONDERFUL RIDE.
Ulbricht Set the Pace, and
Schwall Captured First
Place.
The third annual 25-mile handicap road
race of the California Associated Cycling
Clubs was run yesterday over what is
known as the San Leandro triangle, and
was viewed by fully two thousand spec
tators.
The expectations of the knowing ones
that the record for the co.ursc would be
lowered were fully realized, as "Walter F.
Foster, the Olympic Club Wheelmen's
crack rider, covered the distance in 1 hour
12 mm. 55 4-5 sec, which is 6 mm.
8 1-5 sec. below the record as made by
WALTER F. FOSTER, THE CRACK RIDER OF THE OLYMPIC CLUB,
WHO LOWERED THE COAST RECORD IN A 25-MILE ROAD-RACE
AT SAN LEANDBO YESTERDAY.
[From a photograph.]
George Faulkner of the Acme Club Wheel- |
men two years ago.
The course over which this race is an- ;
Dually run was not in as good condition j
this year as formerly on account of the ;
heavy rains this winter. The riders also
had a strong north wind to contend with,
which must have retarded their speed
somewhat. But the improvements made
in bicycles the past two years and the
strenuous efforts made by each of the
riders in the race to bring the honors home
to his club doubtless account for the fact
that all but one of those who finished
the race rode within the record made by
Faulkner in 1893 of 1 hour 19 mm. 4 sec.
The associated clubs hold three great
road races every year, open only to riders
who are members of clubs belonging to the
organization. In February the 25-mile
race is run, the 100-mile relay around the
bay in April and a 10-mile race in October.
It was the first of these that was held yes
terday, it having been postponed since
Washington's birthday on account of the
rain. . "
The start had been advertised to be
promptly at 10 A. m., but it was thirty-five
minutes after that hour before all the
spectators, contestants and officials as
sembled at a point some 300 yards east of
San Leandro, on the Haywards road, and
De Witt Van Court, the starter, gave the
word to go to the two limit men, who
had ten minutes' handicap. In rapid suc
cession, with intervals of a minute and
less, twenty-seven other riders followed
them, the live men who rode from scratch
getting away at 10:45. They were: Henry
Smith and C. L. Davis. G. C. C; E. Ul
bricht, B. 0. W.; M.F.Rose, A. C. W.,
j and W. F. Foster, O. C. W.
S Of course the greatest interest was cen
■ tered in the efforts of these men, especially
i as to Ulbricht, Rose and Foster, between
i whom considerable rivalry exists. Ul
-1 bricht had the advantage, having been
staying in San Leandro the past week
training over the course. But the others
had not neglected themselves and Foster's
victory easily shows he is not yet a "back
number," as many seem to think.
The San Leandro triangle is about eight
and a third miles around, so it was neces
sary for the riders to circle it three times
to complete the required twenty -five miles,
the finish being on the San Lorenzo road
but a block- or two east of San Leandro.
The first time the riders passed this point
there was little change noticeable in their
Eositions. Ready, Goddard and Delmas
ad gained a trifle in time, but the limit
men were still a considerable distance
ahead. The scratch men went by in a
cloud of dust, Ulbricht leading, with the
others lapped on behind as closely as pos
sible. The pace was swift, the time for
the first eight and a third miles being 22
mm. 27 4-s sec.
The next time the riders hove in sight
the same trio as before were in the lead,
Schwall, Egeberg and Thomas. Langton
had lost some seconds. Ready and God
dard came past riding strong, and one by
one the others flew by until again" the
scratch men came into view, minus Davis,
whose wheel had failed him. It was seen
that Ulbricht was still setting the pace,
with Smith, Rose and Foster in that order
close behind. Thus far sixteen and two
third miles had been covered, the time be
ing 47 mm. 06 4-5 sec. from scratch.
It was now very apparent that a big piece
would be chipped off the former record
and many were the rash statements as to
who would do it. It was generally con
ceded that the time prize lay between
Ulbricht and Foster, and rival Bay Citys
and Olympics glared at each other in si
lence as they breathlessly awaited the an
nouncements from their lookouts, perched
in surrounding tree tops, that their men
were again in sight. But the Olympics
knew Foster could beat Ulbricht in the
final spurt .if the latter's terrific pace
throughout the race had not completely
tired their champion, so they exhibited
some confidence when speaking of the
possible result to bystanders.
* At last a bright red racing , suit flashed
around the turn a mile away and Schwall,
whose handicap was eight minutes, came
tearing down the road, just beating Ege
berg, whose time allowance was the same.
Then came Moody, a four-minute man,
closely followed by a bunch of five riders,
all striving for a better place at the finish.
It was now evident that the scratch men
had been overhandicapped, but not much,
for a yell from those in the treetops told
they were in sight, and down they came,
Foster in the lead and bearing out'the pre
THE MORNING CALL, SAN FRANCISCO, MONDAY, MARCH 4, 1895.
dictions of his friends by beating out Ul
bricht only in a short sprint at the finish.
Of the other scratch men Rose dropped
out on the third lap, while Smith finished
a minute back of the others.
All was excitement then, for the victory
was a popular one, and Foster was lifted
from his wheel by a score of willing hands,
while the still yelling crowd fell in behind
the march that was started for the hotel,
where the young rider was given an op
portunity to rest after his tiresome and
lengthy ride.
Of the original twenty -nine starters, but
sixteen finished, the pace being too fast for
the balance, who dropped out at various
places on the second and third laps and
rode home quietly by a different road,
wondering whether road-racing is all it is
cracked up to be. . .? -
The positions at the finish, the handi
caps and the actual riding time of the con
testants are as follows :
__o
a _:
I?
r d
J •*
s
m
11. Schwall
H. P. Eiteberg
D. A. Moody
P. R.Mott..
J. It. Sampson
Tony Delmas
11. V. Ready
J. xv. Harvey
H. Thiesen
H. A. Goddard
W. F. Foster
K. ITlbricht
Henry Smith
James wall
.1. B. Carey
C. 11. Cowell
1 8 mm.
2 8 mm.
3 4 mm.
4 7 mm.
B 2V_min.
6 3 mm.
7 7 mm.
86 mm. ',
98 mm.
10 6 mm.
11. scratch
12 scratch
13 scratch
14 9 mm.
15 4 mm.
16 3 mm.
1:17:25
1:17:29 3-5
1:14:36 1-5
1:17:36 3-5
1:13:07
1:13:37 2-5
1:17:38
1:16:39
1:18:45
1:18:20 4-5
1:12:55 4-5
1:13:00
1:14:25 1-5
1:38:80
1:18:35 2-5
1:17:36
The management and timing of the race
was the best ever had at a road race is this
-1 vicinity, James Joyce Jr., an Eastern
rider, and George P. Wetmore, being par
ticularly efficient in the latter capacity.
The officials of the race were :
Referee, H. F. Wynne.
Judges— ll. Meyers, I. A. W. of New York; J.
B. Land-In, G. C. C.: J. J. B. Argenti, C. C. C.;
I James Wright, A. C. XV.; L. D. Owens, O. C. XV. ;
XV. H. Beaver, O. Y. M. C. A. C. C.; Theodore
Dodge, B. C. XV.
Timers— P. Wetmore, B. C. W.: J. Bailey.
I S. J. R. C. ; J. W. Leavitt, O. C. W.J E. K. Jer
i ome, R. A. C. ; J. A. Dcsimone, G. C. C. : George
| Osen, G. C. C; E. W. Radke, S. C. W.; R. Me
] Farland, S. J. R. C.; George H. Strong, R. A. C.;
George H. Stratton, O. C. XV.; XV. XV. Needham.
G. C. C. ; Edwin Mohrig, B. C. W. ; T.W.Shaepe,
A. C. W. F '
Starter, P. Van Court, A. C. W ■
Clerk of course, 3. F. Hancock, B. C W.
Assistant, T. Wellman, R. A. C.
Scorers— Lipsett, G. C. C.; C. Belioli,
S. J. R. C; T. Flanagan, P. B. C; E. C. Brown,
O. Y. M. C. A. C. C. ; J. A. Young, R. A. C; C. J.
Hannan, A. C. W.
Marshal, Gus Rosberg.
Assistant, J. Scully, S. J. R. C.
Umpires, L. Peppin, S. J. R. C, and assist
ants.
Road-racing committee— R. Gibson, chair
man ; A. S. Ormsby, A. C. W.; O. A. Weihe. O.
C. XV.
Next Sunday there will be five road
races run over the San Leandro course, the
Bay City, California and Imperial clubs
holding ten-mile events, and the Reliance
and Olympic clubs five-miles. .
Wilbur J. Edwards will try for records
again to-day at Livermore.
QUICK AID TO THE INJURED.
! Doctor's Daughters Providing
Themselves With Emer
gency Boxes.
Will Take Steps to Introduce
the Ambulance System
Here.
The Doctor's Daughters will give a re
ception at the Century Club to their
friends and associate members on Satur
day afternoon at 3:30 o'clock, for the pur
pose of showing to their friends the good
work the society has lately been doing
toward giving emergency aid to the in
jured and to consider the question of ob
taining an ambulance system for the city.
They desire to say that the meeting will be
purely social and that no subscriptions will
be asked for.
The Doctor's Daughters have been re
ceiving lectures from Dr. Somers of the Re
ceiving Hospital on aid to the injured and
have lately been supplied with "emergency
boxes," which contain instruments, band
ages and other things usually necessary in
such cases. The cost is small, and many
outside of the society are availing them
selves of the opportunity to secure them.
The ladies have taken so much interest
. in the work that they propose to go on and
have the boxes introduced into factories
and other places where accidents are liable
to occur and where often immediate aid of
the right sort will save life. How far and
on what lines they will work has not been
thoroughly discussed, but the idea is to go
on and do such work as is done by the St.
John's Ambulance Society of London and
to see that this city has a proper ambu
lance system. San Francisco is now the
only city of any size in the country with
out one.
The officers of the society are : Mrs. P.
B. Horton, president; Miss Mary Hol
brook, vice-president; Mrs. D. T. Murphy,
secretary; Miss Fannie Crocker, recording
secretary; Mrs. Ementine Poole, cor
responding secretary; Miss Meda Bowman,
treasurer. Among the active workers are :
Mrs. Fred Green, Mrs. C. R. Winslow, Mrs.
Robert Oxnard, Mrs. H. M. A. Miller, Miss
Jennie Blair, Mrs. John McKee and Mrs.
Charles Tuttle. "
Assignee Appointed.
Creditors of Wood & Chandler of the Ala
meda Planing Mill have presented claims ag
gregating $15,000. XV. B. Hodges has been ap
pointed assignee of the insolvent firm.
Mexico has an order designated the
Mexican Eagle.
Money makes the mare go and buys the Al
mighty-dollar Cigar. *.;:.'
MISS WELLS ON
SOUTHERN MOBS.
Details of lynching Related
in Grace Methodist
Church.
THE REMEDY SUGGESTED.
A Fair Trial by Law for Those
Accused of Heinous
Crimes.
Miss Ida B. Wells delivered her lecture
on lynching in the South and its remedies
before the congregation of Grace Meth
odist Church yesterday morning after a
short sermon by the pastor, Key. E.
McClish.
The altar was festooned with bunches of
violets, which contrasted prettily with a
large vase of lilies on the communion
table in front. Every seat in the
auditorium was occupied, though the
greater number of people assembled were
women and children. Scattered through
the audience was a fair representation of
the colored people of the city, who came to
hear one of their own race speak in defense
of the many whose lives have been taken
without process of law. They had their
desires gratified, for the blood-curdling de
tails of mob rule, which are matters of
record, caused many of the women in the
audience to pale as the facts were stated in
a clear, ringing voice as the speaker pro
gressed.
For forty minutes Miss Wells held her
audience spellbound, though at times her
voice was choked with emotion as detail
after detail was related. Murmurs of hor
ror waved through the church when the
story of cruelty to Henry Smith, the negro
who was burned by a mob in Paris, Texas,
February 1, 1893, was told.
As to the remedy, she said:
It isa well-established principle of law that
every wrong has a remedy. Herein rests our
respect for law. The negro does not claim that
all of the 1000 black men, women and chil
dren who have been hanged, shot and burned
alive during the past ten years, were innocent
of the charges made against them. We have
associated too long with the white man not to
have copied his vices as well as his virtues.
But we do insist that the punishment is not
the same for botl\ classes of criminals.
In lynching, opportunity is not given the
negro to defend himself against the unsup
ported accusations of white men and women.
The word of the accuser is held to be true and
the excited blood-thirsty mob demands that
the rule of law be reversed, and instead of
proving the accused to be guilty, the victim of
their hate and revenge must prove himself
innocent. No evidence he can offer will satisfy
the mob; he is bound hand and foot and swung
Into eternity.
Therefore, we demand a fair trial by law for
those accused of crime, and punishment by law
after honest conviction. No maudlin sympa
thy for criminals is solicited, but we do ask
that the law shall punish all alike. We ear
nestly desire those that control the forces
which make public sentiment to join with us
in the demand. Surely the humanitarian spirit
of this country which reaches out to denounce
the treatment of the Russian Jews, the Arme
nian Christians, the laboring poor of Europe,
the Siberian exiles and the native women ot
India, will not longer refuse to lift its voice on
this subject.
If it were known that the cannibals or sav
age Indians had burned three human beings
alive in the past two years the whole of Chris-
MISS IDA B. WELLS AND THE REV. E. M'CLISH DURING* THE
CLOSING HYMN.
[Sketched by a "Call" artist.]
tendom would be roused to devise ways and
moans to put a stop to it. Can you remain
silent and inactive when such things are done
in our own community and country? Is your
duty to humanity iv the United States less
binding?
The remedy lies with you, my friends. By
Christian efforts and true faith in the Lord
Jesu* Christ this stain upon our country can
be wiped out.
IDA B. WELLS ON LYNCHING.
She Says the White Kace Contaminates the
Black.
Ida B. Wells, the colored lecturer on
"Lynch Law in America," delivered an
address last night from the pulpit of the
First Congregational Church to an audi
ence that nearly filled the building.
The position taken by the speaker was
that the lynching and burning of negroes
had become a habit in many States North
and South that from its regularity needed
repression in the name of civilization,
morality and Christianity. In the recent
cases where negroes were burned by mobs,
the speaker declared there had always
been doubt of the guilt of the victims, and
seldom if ever any proof.
"You must take up the repression ,and
enter your protest," said she, "because it
is the white man and his government that
is on trial. The negro has lived too long
with the white man not to have copied as
many of his vices as of his virtues."
The white man was arraigned as vicious
and contaminating in his influence on the
negro race, and it was stated that when
the victim of the lynching was a negro the
action of the lynchers was never noticed, so
far as punishment was concerned, by the
legal authorities.
In a quiet but clear voice, with now and
then an emotional effect, and holding in
her hands a handkerchief that now and
then she twisted as though under strong
repression, the lecturer went rather further
in details than some of her audience
seemed to relish, for several left the church
during the delivery, and when the lecture
was concluded there was a feeling of relief
manifested by many.
SPEEDY SPRINTERS TO MEET.
Tim Murphy, Geotge W. Smith and Imp.
Percy in at Six Furlongs.
With one exception the races for -■ this
afternoon are filled with an excellent class
of horses. In the third race at six fur
longs Tim Murphy and George F. Smith
meet at nearly equal weights, and with
Imp. Percy in, some fast time can be
looked for. Altogether it is a fine card for
the opening day of the week. Following
is the list of entries:
First race, three-quarters of a mile, maidens—
Arenette 100, My Sweetheart 95, Grotto 102,
Miss Wiiloughby 95, Loch invar 102, J 0 C 97,
Tom Clark 102, Julia Martin filly 100, Little
Bob 97, Monroe 102, Wilda 90.
Second race, five-eighths of a mile, selling,
for horses that have not won three races at this
meeting, the winner to be sold for $600, if for
less two pounds off for each $50 to $100, win
ners of two races to carry three pounds extra,
beaten non-winners allowed three pounds, en
tries close 2:30 a. m. Monday.
Third race three-garters of a mile—Realiza
tion 105, Tim Murphy 107,Geoge F. Smith 108,
Polaski 101, Nebuchadnezzar 93, Don Fulano
108, Percy 107.
Fourth race, about three-quarters of a mile,
selling— Don Caesar 106, Mutineer 99, Road
runner 105, Marietta 101, Har Lewis 99, Arc
tic 102, Joe Frank 99, Lodi 102, Mamie Scot
95.
' Fifth race, one selling— Mary S 93,
Rear Guard 105, Rico 99, Tigress 93, Commis
sion 94, Catch'em 94, Bernardo 102, Ingomar
104. "
Had His "Wife Arrested.
Attorney John J. Coffey had his wife Julia
arrested last evening on the charge of disturb
ing the peace. She went to 103 Grove street
and thrashed a woman living there. A few
minutes later she met her husband on Market
street and was proceeding to thrash him, when
he yelled for help. Policeman J. F. Dennan
heard his cries, and at his request he placed
Mrs. Coffey under arrest. She gave $10 cash
bail.
IN A DRAMA OF MORALITY.
Miss . Marie Borroughs Will
Open Her Season at
the Baldwin.
A New Leading Lady— of
New Attractions at the
Other Houses.
\
Miss Marie Burroughs, who is to make
her appearance at the Baldwin Theater
this evening in Arthur W. Pinero's play,
"The Profligate," is a native daughter of
the Golden West. Her rise and success
in the world of the drama have been very
gratifying to her many admirers, who have
watched her blossom from a position in E.
S. Willard's company to a place that is
held by very few women on the American
stage. A host of Western friends will De
glad to greet her this evening, and espe
cially in a play by one of England's fore
most writers.
Mr. Pinero's drama deals with society
from the morality standpoint. It is spoken
of as being daintily constructed and full
of interest. Next week Miss Burroughs
will present "Judah," by Henry Arthur
Jones.
At the California Theater Hoyt's "A
Temperance Town" will begin its* second
week. The comedy has made a great suc
cess in this city, "and the players have
been well receieved. Miss Robinson, who
plays Ruth, is the young lady whom Mr.
Hoyt originally intended for the part.
"A Black Crook Up to Date," with
Thomas Leary, Florence Thropp, Alice
Raymond and'Senorita Matilda to amuse
the audience, will be continued at the
Alcazar this week. New specialties will be
introduced.
The Orpheum will have an entirely new
specialty bill to present to its patrons to
night. Les Quatre Diezs, the singers from
the Casino, Paris, head the list. The rest
of the programme is made up of interest
! ing attractions.
Miss Maud Edna Hall and Rev. J' Henry
Walker Harris, the Oakland divine, will
make their first appearance in "In the
Ranks" at Morosco's to-night. The drama
contains thirty-five speaking parts. It will
be staged and produced in first-class style.
"Olivette" goes on at the Tivoli for a
week's run. Mr. Hartmann has prepared
some new. local verses for his "Bob Up
Serenely" song, and will sing also a new
ballad. The position of treasurer at the
Tivoli, which was filled by J. Holtz for a
number of years, is now filled by John P.
Wilson. ' -':{!.
A number of new features will be seen in
the Stockwell Theater production of "The
Great Black Crook" to-night. *■ Georgius
Dadigo, a clever equilibrist, will be seen
for the first time.
A Skin of Beauty Is a Joy Forever.
DR. T. FFXIX GOURAUD'S ORIENTAL
CRKAM.or MAGICAL, BKAUTIFIFR.
«c- _-EJ^^^. Removes Tan, Pimples, Freck-
-2« .ga_r*ge*ftleß, Moth Patches, Rash and
%'S-B^ KE___^_-->fc4 jJpvHkln diseases, and
'* - 3~ ys___^~^ ai vftS*. every blemish on
-> "5 **''§ K_r__Pj» _____ Kt^> {beauty, and defies
■»S__ Tfc> fPf Qc-J detection. Units
■_=-*=*■ £* *jfl \*-y virtues it has
JSJI \a y*y (*2*T stood the test of
5 = l'^"V_ **K1 *-•* years, no other
sc-<5 _*/» vi hRS ' and is 80
-."" r __ itL '( harmless we taste
x&t SL - t/*"*_r_r" \ •* l 0 be sure it is
/a_---^<_7j' 1 \ P r °P er 'y made.
fj^TWT^ Pr*-? •'J)nLS\ \ Accept no coun-
_**^_)^_______s^^/J-t J 'ffl 1 terfelt of similar
IjT vtEVJES^ _**^NV»^ I fame. The dis-
f _r l'^^V x «P****'"^ tinguished Dr. L.
i / ' «V _f* v "** Sayre said 10
k. -X je-*K Wr V a lady of the haul-
ton (a patient): "___ you ladles will use them, 1
recommend 'Gouraud's Cream' a* the, least harmful
of all Skin preparations." One bottle will last six
months, using It every day. Also Poudre Subtile
removes superfluous hair without injury to the
skin. f .*
I'KRDT.HOPKINS, Prop'r, 37 Great Jones st.,N.Y.
For sale by all Druggists and Fancy Goods Deal-
ers throughout the IT. S., Canadas and Europe.
SW Beware of Base Imitations. $1000 Reward
for arrest and proof of any one selling the same.
"KNOWLEDGE IS FOLLY UNLESS PUT
TO USE." YOU KNOW
SAPOLIO?
THEN USE IT.
NEW TO-DAY.
j f '
lgj| . The dainty ar-
\3J^-^*yL ous furnishings
(> \\ 1 sell during "Red
aaJ The dainty ar-
/i^rS^mr/ ticks of luxuri-
ous furnishings
C-|W;|VU sell during "Red
|v| n ; iLM Letter Days " or
■ ft-? 4W^*M the price °** com-
l\V4lj^'^y/\ pl ace pieces.
LAST WEEK OF
RED LETTER DAYS.
_• -4*
Cobblers' leather \VvA/s wi
Cobblers' leather V*^~^iLft
is used in the de- t 'M fjp-pjj
lightful "Saddle X \M^§M^%
Seat" rockers. Wh3K^k
See what one,
would cost you ' Jlljl® /ffl
at the "Red Tag" fjl^^fl
price this week. c*^^^ l^^^!^
THE PRETTIEST PIECES
SELL FASTEST
The novel, "out of the com-
mon" pieces that every woman
loves to own, can be bought as
cheaply as ordinary "every day"
furniture this week.
fjfak^ Tabourets and
Tea Tables and
all the odd things
that go to make
the perfectly ap-
pointed home
are within the
reach of any
purse during
"Red Letter
Days." This is
the closing week.
CALIFORNIA
FURNITURE CO_IPANY
(N. P. Cole & Co.)
1 17- 123 Geary Street
RAMBLER WINS
FIRST TIME PRIZE
And Breaks Coast Record in C. A. C. C.
25-Mile Road Race March 3.
WALTER FOSTER, from scratch, first in
1:12:55 4-5-
" IT'S EASY TO DO IT ON A RAMBLER."
No. lO— THAT'S THE WHEEL.
FASTEST ON EARTH.
THOS. H. B. VARNEY,
1325 MARKET STREET, S. F.,
427 S. Spring St., Los Angeles.
NEW TO-DAY-AMUSEMENTS.
STOCKWELL'S THEATER.
S. F. A. Co : .Leonard Grover, Manager 1
A HUGE SUCCESS.
The GREATEST SHOW ON EARTH The '
GREAT
BLACK
CROOK!
Grandeur, Skill, Beauty, Color, Music, Dance-
Son*?, combined In Superabundant Excellence.
FIRST APPEARANCE OF THE KING OF
EQUILIBRISTS,
GEORGIUS DADIGO.
AND TWELVE NEW SPECIALTIES.
Three mortal hours of Glitter, Pageant and Fun.
And then the Prices— loc, 15c, 25c, 35c and 50c.
METROPOLITAN
MUSICAL SOCIETY'S CONCERTS
AT THE AUDITORIUM.
Herr FRITZ SCHEEL, Kapellmeister.
To-morrow Even'g, Popular Concert
POPULAR f-^DAY*-
FVFRY KTS 1 SATURDAY.
1 *. 1 l.\ (.SUNDAY.
WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON, 3 O'CLOCK,
, Public Symphony Rehearsal.
THURSDAY EVENING, MARCH 7,
THIRD SYMPHONY CONCERT.
PRICES: Popular Concerts — Admission, 25c.
Symphony Concerts— Admission, 50c; reserved
seats, 25c extra.
Seats on sale at Sherman, Clay <fc Co.'s daily,
9A.m.t05 P. m. j
WIGWAM Corner Stockton
•' IUTV -^ m » and Geary Sts.
Commencing To- night (Monday). March 4,
MARIE KOSTEI.I.K'S
NEW HENRY BURLESQUE COMPANY.
A Magnificent New Olio !
High-ClasH Specialties !
t3~ Reserved -Seats, 25c; Opera Chair*, 35c; any
other seat. 10c.
NEW TO-DAY— AMUSEMENTS.
CALIFORNIA THEATER
Al. Hayman <fc Co. (Incorporated) Proprietors
ONCE I COMMENCING
AGAIN, I TO-NIGHT.
HOYT'S REST COMEDY,
"A
TEMPERANCE
TOWN."
INDORSED BY THE ENTIRE PRESS.
L. R. STOCKWELL as Mink Jones
Specially Selected Cast.
From Hoyt's Theater, New York.
MARCH 18-"OUR FLAT."
LOAN EXHIBITION
FOR THE BENEFIT OF
The Salvation Army and the Hospital
for Children and Training
School for Nurses.
AT THE
MARK HOPKINS ART INSTITUTE.
Cor. California and Powell sis.
ADMISSION... 500
IN CONSEQUENCE OF THE IMMENSE
SUCCESS THE EXHIBITION WILL
BE CONTINUED
FOR ONE WEEK MORE.
The following portraits will be exhibited: Mrs.
William 11. Crocker, by Carol us Dnran; Mrs. Ho-
bart, by CarolUß Duran; Mrs. Head, by Bouquel-
resur; Mrs. Chard, by Benj. West; Mis.i" Ha^er, by
David Neil.
The Vermorcken portraits. The old family por-
traits of Ver Mehr, Heuston Kipp.
Local artists: Miss Lawlor. by Keith; Mis.
Moody, by Miss Wethrow; Miss Elir.a Keith, by
Mrs. Chittenden; Mrs. Tobin. by Yon Gerichten;
Mrs. and Miss Peck, by Orrin Peck.
Miss Iloi.an's wonderful collection of American
newspaper illustrators, by Gibson and others.
Handsome collection of family miniatures: Mrs.
Rathborn, McAllister, Townsend, Spooner, Perry
Eyre, Brigham, Percy Moore.
Imperial Chinese embroidery, kindly loaned by
Mrs. F. F. Low.
A great musical treat, combined with the ex-
quisite portraits, Henry Heyman having kindly •
volunteered his services with his unexcelled or-
chestra.
MONSTER
MUSICAL FESTIVAL
AND
I PROMENADE FAIR !
MECHANICS'IPAVILION
EVERY EVENING acd SATURDAY MATINEE
UNTIL APRIL 1, 1895,
BY THE
AMERICAN CONCERT BAND !
100— Selected Musicians — 100
ALFRED RONCOVIERI, Director.
lI_iI_iTJSTK, ft_.TE33D music
Presented for the First Time in History.
School Children Admitted Free at Sat-
urday Matinee.
:__P«o__o**c_._l.*v__- .Prices :
Single Admission 25 cents
Season Tickets for Adults $2.00
Season Tickets for Children $1.00
(Entitling holder io the nil series of 31
concerts)
Family Transferable Coupon Book of Fifty
Admissions $5.00
Ut) Tickets on sale at Sherman, Clay it Co. 'a.
ALCAZAR THEATER.
J. p. HOWE.. Manager
HUNDREDS TURNED AWAY !
A BLACK CROOK
UP TO DATE!
BEST SHOW IN TOWN I
The Popular Favorites,
THOMAS C. LEARY,
JUNO, the Marvel, and
MISS FLORENCE THRO PP.
MISS ALICE RAYMOND.
50 BEAUTIFUL GIRLS!
A GREAT CAST!
GRAND SCENERY!
BRING THE~CHILDREN I
Secure Your Seats at Once.
PRICES 50« and ..->«*.
MOROSCO'S
GRAND OPERA-HOUSE.
The Handsomest Family Theater in America.
WALTER MOROSCO.... SoIe Lessee and Manager
THIS EVENING AT 8,
EXTRAORDINARY PRODUCTION
Of Sims and Pettit's Great Melodrama,
IN THE RANKS!
First Appearance of MAUD EDNA HALL.
EvKXi-fo Prices— loc, 25c and 50c.
Matinees Saturday and Sunday.
Seats on Sale from 9 a. m. to 10 p. M.
Mrs. Eb_.ksti_n-e Krki.ixo Proprietor & Manager
■4S_dUfi£_UE onTweeonly
AUDRAN'S EVER POPULAR OPERA,
"OLIVETTE!"
<^IH______________________________________________________________P
Monday, March 11,
GIROFLE GIROFLA
: In Preparation. • : Look PRINCESS :
: BLUE BEARD JR. : J Out for NICOTINE:
Popular Prices— 2sc and 50c.
BALDWIN THEATER.
AL HAYMAN & CO. (Incorporated), Proprietors
TO-NIGHT-2 WEEKS ONLY!
MATINEE SATURDAY!
First Stellar Appearance Here of California's
Most Beautiful and Talented Actress,
MISS MARIE
-ESTJ-FLII.C_>XJ*G--I-3:J3,
Supported by Her Own Company, presenting for
the entire first week th.- success of the season,
"THE I=»K,Oini_ ia*A.TE 1 "
By A. XV. Pinero, Esq.,
By special arrangement with E. S. Willard.
Original Scenery and Effects !
Second Week, Monday, March 11 — "JUDAH."
ORPHEUM.
O'Farrell Street, Between Stockton and Powell.
Commencing; To-Night, Monday, March 4,
OUR lidifficni nil enrol !
First Appearance of . LX' QUATRE DIEZS
First Appearance of .DELE PURVIS ONRI
First Appearance of BROS. VAX VERNKTT
First Appearance of THE NEW ORLEANS
9— COLORED JUBILEE SINGERS
First Appearance of JOHN S. PRINCE and
MISS CLARA BARTKLO
First Appearance of FRANCIS J. BRYANT
And a Grand List of Vaudeville Stars.
Reserved Seats, 25c; Balcony, 10c; Opera Chairs
and Box Seats, 50c.
RUNNING _^-%Im*S_ „ RUNNING
RACES I J3Bgigg^ RACES I
CALIFORNIA JOCKEY CLUB RACES,
WINTER MEETING.
BAY DISTRICT TRACK,
COMMENCING SATURDAY, OCT. 27, 1894.
Races Monday. Tuesday. Wednesday,
Thursday. Friday and Saturday— Rata
or Shine.
Five or more races each day. Races start at 2
p. xt. sharp. McAllister and Geary streetcars pasa
t-"_ gate. .
Weekly Call, $1.50 per Year
7

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