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Pages Available: 7,597,817

Title:
The Florida bulletin. : (Gainesville, Fla.) 1904-19??
Place of publication:
Gainesville, Fla.
Geographic coverage:
  • Gainesville, Alachua, Florida  |  View more titles from this: City County, State
Publisher:
Samuel W. DeBose
Dates of publication:
1904-19??
Description:
  • Vol. 1, no. 1 (Aug. 12, 1904)-
Frequency:
Weekly
Language:
  • English
Subjects:
  • Alachua County (Fla.)--Newspapers.
  • Gainesville (Fla.)--Newspapers.
Notes:
  • "A weapon for defence."
  • An African-American title billing itself as "a weapon for defense," the Florida Bulletin [LCCN sn95026957], a weekly newspaper published in Gainesville (FL), was published by Samuel W. DeBose, beginning in 1903. DeBose was instrumental in persuading Booker T. Washington to visit and lecture to a racially mixed audience in February 1903. The lecture addressed equality among the needs of African-Americans in Gainesville and Alachua County (FL) schools. Although Washington described the experience as "delightful", there were repercussions following the event for DeBose and others. The Scientific, Normal and Industrial [school] for Colored Youth was subsequently incorporated with DeBose as president, but insufficient funds led to its closing in April 1904 before its doors had opened. This was the fate of all African American schools offering more than the most basic education in the county, and much of Florida, at the time. It is likely that the Florida Bulletin also ceased operation at that time; exact dates are unknown. Between 1900 and 1905, Gainesville was a modestly industrious town and important stop-over for railway lines between the Atlantic and Gulf coasts of Florida. The city was a collecting point for the agricultural produce of a vast area of north-central Florida. In 1905, Josiah T. Walls, Alachua County's Florida's first African-American legislator, died in Tallahassee (FL). In 1906, the University of Florida was opened in Gainesville but would not admit African-Americans until 1958. Another African-American, A. Quinn Jones, would open the County's first public high school, Lincoln High School, for African Americans in 1923. Lincoln High School would graduate its first class in 1925. For a full account of the visit by Washington, see "Booker T. Washington's Florida Incident: 1903-1904" by Arthur O. White, Florida Historical Quarterly 51 (Jan.): 1973, pp. 228-50. Josiah T. Walls, a native of Virginia, settled in Alachua County, Florida, after the Civil War. He held various legislative office in state and national government from 1868 through 1875. --E. Kesse, University of Florida Digital Library Center.
LCCN:
sn 95026957
OCLC:
32990097
Holdings:
View complete holdings information

Florida Bulletin

Billing itself as “a weapon for defense,” Gainesville’s Florida Bulletin, a weekly newspaper serving the African American community, was founded in 1903 by Samuel W. DeBose.

DeBose was instrumental in persuading Booker T. Washington to visit Gainesville in February 1903 to address a racially mixed audience on the need to improve schooling for African American students. Although Washington described the experience as “delightful,” his speech aroused considerable furor in the community. The following year, DeBose led an abortive attempt to launch the Scientific, Normal and Industrial [school] for Colored Youth. Ultimately, insufficient funds prevented the institution from opening its doors. Such was the fate of all African American schools offering more than the most basic education in Alachua County and in much of the rest of Florida at this time. It is likely that the Florida Bulletin also ceased operations shortly afterward.

In 1923, A. Quinn Jones, would open Lincoln High School--Alachua County’s first public high school for African Americans. However, the University of Florida in Gainesville would not admit African American students until 1958.

Provided by: University of Florida