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Arizona sentinel and Yuma weekly examiner. (Yuma, Ariz.) 1911-1915, October 03, 1912, Image 1

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn95060876/1912-10-03/ed-1/seq-1/

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First Arizona State Fair,
PROGRESSIVE REPUBLICAN IN POLICIES. VOL. XLII. No. 46.
Pre
gressives' Campaign
0 " W LEY. ON
r
5
W
IN! TRYING TO EXPLAIN WHY HE WILL VOTE FOR WILSON, HE
V SAYS, "I BELIEVE THAT NO KIND OF AN ADMINISTRATION IS
"GOING TO RUIN THE COUNTRY" HE GUESSES WILSON WILL
, LEND HIS SYMPATHY IN BEHALF OF THE PUBLIC HEALTH!
In trying to explain why he will vote
; r
for Professor Wilson for president,
Dr. Harvey Wiley, former ch,emist of
the department of agriculture, begins
his statement thus:
"My appeal is chiefly to those who,
iikd myself, have been lifelong repub
licans. I believe that no kind of an
administration is going to ruin the
country."
This is a species of careless optim
ism which seems to prevail among
.certain citizens in almost every cam
paign. It is an indifference which
sometimes gives us weak presidents,
and has served to keep the working
inan in chains of industrial bondage.
It is the bad philosophy of the content
ed anarchist "One candidate is about
as bad as another" is the pessimistic
neer of the man who doesn't think
and who doesn't care.
,j Dr: Wiley has been credited with be
ing a man who thinks and who does
are a great deal about what happens
to the government, or certain features
jof- it And here is his only reasou
, for deciding in favor of Professor Wil
on: STIHGLESS BEE
i HIS BEEN PRODUCED
PHILADELPHIA, Oct. 1. The
stingless bee has at. last arrived, hav
ing been produced by an English
apiarist named Burrows after two
years .of experiment. A description of
Che new bee, which -has been received
liere, says that the hybrids are splen
did, workers and are, less liable to
disease than the ordinary honey pro
ducers. - Burrows mated Cyprian drones with
Italian queens to produce the new
bee, which, while possessing a stinger,
cannot use it as a weapon of offense.
REPUBLICAN ELECTOR
QUITS TICKET III IOWA
IOUX CITY, la., Oct. 1. Fred E.
Prisbee, republican candidate for elec
tor In the Eleventh Iowa district, has
resigned, it being discovered he can
not legally hold the place because he
is a director in a national bank.
AUTO RACER DRIVES
ST. LOUIS, Oct. 1. Ollie Savin,
while driving a racing automobile omlican trailers, who have followed Col.
a one-mile dirt track here, went
through the fence with his machine
and two of his ribs were fractured.
Bob Burman went two miles in
1:32 3-5. f
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ARIZONA
AND YUMA WEEKLY EXAMINER
A Live, Republican Weekly With All the News All
E F
"Under President Wilson no more
Pinchots will be kicked out of the ser
vice; no more unspeakable McCabes
will exercise dictatorial powers. There
will be no more cotton leaks and jun
gle atrocities, no more Everglade
swindles."
How does Mr. Wiley know this? Or
isn't he just, guessing? And guessing
without any reason at all, except that
he, being a college man, puts his faitL
in an , associate college man?
Dr. Wiley admits that he supports?
the democratic nominee "in full knowl
edge that many of the prominent dem
ocrats in congress have been in full
sympathy, with the paralysis of the
pure food law in behalf of the unholy
dollar." But he "guesses" that "with a
democratic president and vice ' presi
dent lending their powerful sympathy
in behalf of public health" these prom
inent democrats in congress who fav
or "the unholy dollar," will be per
suaded to sympathize with the public.
Was ever "argument more futile?
Were ever reasons as specious and
foolish? Dr. Wiley ought to get oui
of the campaign right quick and look
himself over.
LAWRENCE PROTEST
E
LAWRENCE, Mass., Oct. 1. The
strike of 24 hours declared by the
Industrial Workers of the World em
ployed in the textile mills of ,this city
as a protest against the imprisonment
of Etter and Giovanitti ended today
when 12,000 operatives who had re
mained away from the mills yesterday
returned to work. Some minor dis
turbances were reported.
Selecting the Jury
SALEM, Mass., Oct 1. Two seat?
in the jury box were occupied and
nearly 250 talesmen were, awaiting
examination when the trial of Joseph
J. Ettor, Artuo Giovanitti and Jo
seph Caruso, charged with being re
sponsible for the death of Anna Lopiz
zo, a Lawrence textile operative, was
resumed in the superior court herr
today.
IS
BULL MOOSE TRAILERS
W. J. Bryan, after a week's rest
at his home, at Lincoln, Nebraska, has
again taken up the trail of Roosevelt,
following Harlan and Bede, the repub-
Roosevelt over the United 'States-
one day in the rear.
The Examiner Office for Job Work
of Neatness and Quality.
AMOUS,
WHOLLY WRONG
YUMA, ARIZONA, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 3, 1912
Interests' Not
WILLIAM FLINN SAYS HIS CONTRIBUTION TO THE FUND HAS
BEEN $99,384 LA FOLLETTE AND WILSON WERE BOTH AIDED
BY CHARLES R. CRANE THE TREASURER OF THE NEW PRO
GRESSIVE PARTY GIVES FULL FIGURES TO SENATE COMMITTEE
WASHINGTON, Oct. 1. The total
expenditures of William Plinn in the
1912 Progressive campaign have .been
$144,308, according to a statement he
gave to the senate campaign expen
ditures committee today. The total
"Roosexelt expenditures, covenug
Mr. Flirtn's personal activity as the
Roosevelt leader in Pennsylvania, was
$99,384. But the statement showed
an additional sum of $90.80, expended
by John S. Weller, treasurer of the
loosevelt league.
Other amounts expended, by Mr.
Flinn came under the head of ex
penditures in republican and progres
sive organization work, which Mr.
Flinn did' not characterize as "Roose
velt expenditures."
Mr. Flinn said the contributions
other than his own did not aggregate
-nore than $26,000. "I did not ask for
any contributions," he said. "I did
not know what the bill was going to
?ost, but I am perfectly willing to
nay for it."
Mr. Flinn said he had contributed
1000 to the Roosevelt campaign in
Massachusetts. He .also admitted a
contribution of $1000 to Senator La
Follette's campaign.
"It was before I was a Roosevelt
man," he added, and a general laugh
went around.
Senator Pomerone produced a copy
of what was said to be an agreement
between the late Senator Quay, Mr.
Flinn and J. O. Brown, under whicn
Dolitical affairs in Pennsylvania were
to have .be(Jn apportioned between
them.
"Did you write that agreement?"
the senator demanded.
"Yes, I did; or rather, I wrote an
ngreement something like that," said
Flinn.
The agreement purported to pro
vide that the three men named there
in should divide city and federal pat
ronage equally and work, together po
litically. It already has been pub
lished. Mr. Flinn said he had framed
Hie agreement to allay the opposition
of Senator Quay to the republican can
didate for mayor of Pittsburg; that he
had never signed it and never intend
ed to sign it, but had written it to
"sain time" from Quay.
"You recognize that it is about as
' irious an agreement as ' could be
"'ado. don't you?" demanded Senatoi
I'verone.
Mr. Flinn said he never had intend
ed it should be effective. ,
"T pnld the senator a gold brick,"
'aid Flinn.
"Did you accomplish your purpose?"
nrked Pomerone.
"I did, twhen I secured the election
of the republican mayor."
Senator Oliver .took up the ques
tion of Mr. Flinn's activitv in politics
and Tlinn asked Oliver if he remem
bered working for him for a state
tieket a number of years ago.
"The combined salaries of the posi
tions were $70 000. and do vou recol
lect we snent $110,000?" asked Flinn.
"Nn. I don't remember anything oi
the kind," replied Mr. Oliver.
"My memory is excellent on it,"
said Mr; Flinn.
(Continued.
Phoenix, Oct. 28
SENTINEL
Expenses Made
Represented
New Party's Finances Explained
WASHINGTON, Oct. 1 The finan
! cial operations of the Roosevelt forces
in the pre:convention campaign this
I year, and the finances of the progres
. slve party were the subject up for dis
cussion when the senate campaign
contributions committee resumed hear
ings today.
William Flinn, the Pittsburg Roose.
velt leader, and Ellen H. Hooker, na
tional treasurer of the progressive
party were under subpoenas to appea
for examination.
E. H. Hooker, treasurer of the pro
gressive party, told the Clapp com
mittee investigating f campaign fund
today that Charles R. Crane of Ch"
cago had donated $70,000 to Senato
La Follette's campaign fund and $70,
000 to Governor Wilson's fund prior te
the Baltimore convention, practically
at the same time.
Wiiliam Flinn of Pittsburg testifier'
that he had personally contributed
90 per cent of the money for Colone'
Roosevelt's primary campaign in Penn
sylvania. He gave $102,000 .to the
fund, of which $28,000 was spent ir
Pittsburg.
Mr. Flinn said he would produce
to the committee J. G. Slain, a mar
who without his authority had signed
Flinn's name to a telegram to the
Standard Oil Company asking support
for a seat in the senate. This was one
of the telegrams produced by Senator
Penrose when he made his sensation
al charges against Flinn.
Mr. Hooker appeared first and sai'!
he had acted informally as national
treasurer iof the Roosevelt organisa
tion in the pre-convention campaign
He placed in evidence a statemeH
of all receipts and expenditures ir
the Roosevelt primary campaign in
New York City.
"The secretary of the state of New
York," said Mr. Hooker, '"said this
was the most complete statement eve'
filed by a special political committee."
The statement was '"made public a'
fhe time it was filed. It showed thai
"559,126.35 had been contributed, and
552,606.52 spent in the primary cam
paign in New York. The balance of
$6,519.93, was turned oved to the na
tional primary campaign fund.
Mr. Hooker also filed a statement
nf receipts and .expenditures of thr
national primary campaign conducted
bv Senator Dixon. Senator Paynte'
took fhe statement and announced
fhat George W. Perkins was showr
to have contributed $15,000 to " thr
New York campaign and $22,500 to thr
national campaien, and Frank A
Munsey "about the same."
"How manv votes did vou eet. in
the New York primaries?" asked Sen
ator Pomerone.
"About 30,000 aq manv as Taft
trot." said Hooker, "but they were not
counted."
Senator Pomerone observed that thr
nrimarv expenditure was at the rate
"of about $2 a vote."
Mr. Hooker vigorously resented anv
inference that any money was expend
ed in an improper wav.
"I believe that this national pri
mary campaign was the most econom
ical ever conducted." he said. "Morp
economical than any, except the Taft
on Page Pour)
The Time.
it
LITIS, PLEA OF ORIIE
ffl'MANIGAL IN
FORMER WORKING MATE OF THE McNAMARA BROTHERS, WAS
THE ONLY ONE OF THE DEFENDANTS TO PLEAD GUILTY AT
THE HEARING IN INDIANAPOLIS ADMITTED GUILT IN EVERY
COUNT BIG LABOR LEADERS ALL PLEADED ''NOT GUILTY."
INDIANAPOLIS, Ind;, Oct. 1. After
granting separate trails to all of the
defendants in the dynamite cases to
day, basing his action on a technical
ly, Judge Anderson again consolidated
the hearing on further motion by Dis
trict Attorney Miller. The cases will
ie tried together with one exception,
that of Daniel J. Brophy, who is unable
to be in court at this time.
Ortie E. McManigal, former work
ing mate of the McNamara brothers,
vas the only one of the defendants to
'lead guilty at the hearing today. Mc
Manigal admitted his guilt in every
'ount of the indictment against him.
'Te answered a perfunctory "Yes" as
he counts were being read and ap-J
eared less concerned than anyone
Ase in the -courtroom.
Olaf Andrew Tveitmoe of San Fran
isco, secretary of the California Build-
'ng Trades Council, and Eugene Clan
816 UTICA AUDIENCE
S FOR JOI
UTICA, N. Y., Oct. 1. In this city,
vhich is distinguished as being the
'iome of Vice President Sherman, Gov
ernor Hiram Johnson this afternoon
began his seven days' campaign of
he Empire state. He was met by a
'arge concourse of TJtica citizens at
the depot and escorted, with martial
music to the theatre, where he faced
in audience that taxed the capacity
if the building.
Governor Johnson assailed bossism
:n nation and state, paid a glowing
ribute to Oscar Straus, the progres
sive candidate for governor, and pri.-
Toker thunderous applause by his dec
'aration that the' greatest thing in all
he glorious career of Col. Theodore
Roosevelt was when he consented to
become a leader of . the progressive
movement in this nation.
Utica has been a fertile field for
nolitical bosses and Governor John
son's excoriation of that partisanshin
by which big business has been able
to control and manage both of the
old political parties aptly applied to
tonditions here.
RE WONT RESTRAIN
ES
DURHAM, N. C, Oct. 1 Superior
lourt Judge Whedbee last night de
Mined to grant an injunction restrain
'ng the State Dispatch, a Burlington,
N. C, weekly paper, from supporting
he progressive presidential ticket. J.
G. Waller, a stockholder in the Dis
patch company, had petitioned the
"ourt to restrain the editor of the pa
ner from the carrying out of the direc
tions of the majority stockholders, who
roted to switch the paper's allegiance
from the. republican to the progressive
party.
Mr. Waller claimed he had been in
duced to put money Into the paper
with the understanding that it was
to be republican. "
to Nov. 2
ARIZONA . SENTINEL FOUNDED 1872
Public
DYNAMITE CASE
cy, another coast labor leader, -pleaded
not guilty. Their action was follow
ed by all the others.
The indictments against Patrick Ry
an, Chicago; J. W. Irwin, Peoria, 111.,
and A. J. Kavanaugh, Springfield, III.,
were nolle prossed.
Judge Anderson created a mild sen
sation, when, after listening to the
pleas, he issued a ruling that the pris
oners might have separate trials. In
asmuch as the indictments against
them allege conspiracy, it was general
ly supposed that a blanket trial would
suffice.
District Attorney Miller made a spir
ited fight against this ruling, and after
digging up the technical ground for
his action he succeeded in having the
ruling, withdrawn. Judge Anderson
finally decided that the defendants,
with the exception of Brophy, must
go to trial together.
ARE PUEBLO
FULL-FLE
S
WASHINGTON, Oct. 1. The his
tory of the Pueblo Indians- of New
Mexico is to be reviewed by the su
preme court of the United States to
determine whether they are wards of
the nation or are citizens of the Uqfted
States.
One case involving this point was
docketed yesterday in court. The
question arose when the government
charged Felipe Sandoval with Intro
ducing liquor into Indian territory.
The defense was that the Pueblos
were not to be classed as wards of
the nation, as were the wandering
tribes of Indians, but after decades
of community life ranked with the
other people of New Mexico as full
fledged citizens.
BRUCE-BROWN IN A -AUTO
CRASH: MAY DIE
MILWAUKEE, Wis., Oct. 1. Hurled
through the fence while traveling at
a speed greater than 85 miles an hour,
David Bruce-Brown, one of the eng
trants in the Vanderbilt cup race to
be held here next Saturday, with his
mechaniscian was probably fatally in
jured here today. At 1:30 o'clock his
physicians said" he was still alive, but
they would not hold out any hopes for
his recovery. s
Brown and his mechanician took
out the machine in which they were
to have made the race for a preliminary-spin.
Despite several soft spots
known tfc be in the course, Brown
opened up the throttle on the back
stretch and was pounding along at a
furious pace when he lost control and
his machine went into the ditch.
Both he and his companion were
thrown through a fence and both were
unconscious when picked up. Brown
was bleeding profusely about the head
and appeared to be injured internally.
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