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Arizona sentinel and Yuma weekly examiner. (Yuma, Ariz.) 1911-1915, October 10, 1912, Image 1

Image and text provided by Arizona State Library, Archives and Public Records; Phoenix, AZ

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn95060876/1912-10-10/ed-1/seq-1/

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First Arizona State Fair,Phoenix, Oct. 28t Nov. 2
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PROGRESSIVE REPUBLICAN IN POLICIES. VOL. XLII. No. 47.
Notable Night Messages Offered
PROGRAM OF RACES AND PRIZES
TO BE GIVEN AT STAT
V
SOME OF THE SPORTY ATTRACTIONS WHICH -WILL BE OFFERED
DURING FAIR WEEK AT PHOE
AL BRONCHO RJDING, MOTOR
THE SCHEDULE OF THE BEST
PHOENIX, Oct 8. The broncho
riding for the championship of Ari
zona to be held at the state fair, dur
ing fair week, promises to be the best
exhibition that has ever been held at
the fair and riders representing all
counties throughout the state will be
here to compete.
This contest will be in charge of
Tom Wills, of Florence, to whom
those wishing to. enter the contest
should apply for the necessary blanks.
The following, rules will govern: -
1. Each rider must bring his own
horse.
2. Each rider must ride straight up.
3.
rups,
v
5.
6.
No rider shall hobble his stir-
No rider shall pull leather.
No rider shall ride on the reins.
No rider shall ride with a roll.
R'ider losing stirrup will lose points
on judging.
Judging will be on- points
of. riders and horses.
Points will be
counted from time rider starts to
mount until -after he dismounts.
oc this event the following prizes
hUve been offered:
First prize, $150 silver trimmed, sil
ver mounted saddle. .
"".Second prize, $60 in cash.
Third prize, $30 in cash.
Po.urth prize, $10 in cash. -
H 1
Motorcycle Races
"ponsiderable interest is being mani
fested by the motorcycle enthusiasts
In the motor races to be heldduring
fair week. The races will be under
the auspices of the Phoenix Motor
cycle club, and already many entries
have been made to J. W. Tompkins,
secretary of the Phoenix Motorcycle
club, who has the necessary entrance
blinks.
Following is a list of the prizes
. J s
IDE GASOLINE SPILLS
iD AUTO IS BURKED
PHOENIX, Ariz., Oct 8. When he
cranked his car after repairs on the
Rooseve)t road near Desert Wells
Sunday, a young man, whose name is
understood to be Barker, exploded
some waste gasoline in the apron, and
in the lapse of a few minutes the m&
chine was scrap iron and cinders.
Mrs. Baker and her daughter were
picked up.- by one of the irst cars
of the returning geographers and was
brought to Phoenix. Her son is at
the Goldfield mine, awaiting the ar
rival of an insurance adjuster, who
was telegraphed for to Los Apgeles.
BROWN'S MECHANIC
DIES FROM INJURIES
MILWAUKEE, Oct 8. Tony Sou
delari mechanic for Bruce-Brown, who
was killed in the Vanderbilt race
practice, died of his injuries today.
The Examiner Office for Job Work
of Neatness and Quality.
,.
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-1 ' - A DT7 r AT A ;CT7 APTTXI 1? f . J!
A Live, Republican Weekly With All the News All
NIX INDUCEMENTS ARE LIBER
.CYCLE AND FOOT RACES AQ.E ON
EXHIBITION. -EVER .HELD.
which have been offered and the class
of machines for each race:
. Five-Mile -Amateur Rider
Stock machines, 30.50 cubic inches
cylinder displacement (or tinder), sin
gle cylinder. First prize $25, second
15, third 10.
Ten-Mile Amateur Riders
Stock machines, 30.50 cubic inches
cylinder displacement (or under), sin
gle cylinder. First prize $25, second
$x5i -third $10.
Five-Mile Amateur Riders
Stock machine, CI. cubic inches cyl
inder displacement (or under). First
prize $25, second $15, third $10.
Ten-Mile Amateur Riders
Stock machines, 61 cubic inches cyl
inder displacement (or under). First
prize -$25, second $15, third $10.
Free-for-AII '
s Prize, -first only, medal. ;
Foot Races . ,;
The following are the prizes?forthe
foot races- which will be pulled off
during one of the days of the fair, the
date to be announced later:
Race. No. 1, 100 yards, medal; No. 2,
220ards, medal; No. 3, quarter mile,
medal; No. 4, half mile, medal; No. 5,
one mile, medal; No. 6, five miles,
medal.- j
Tjiese races are for amateurs and
medals are offered instead of purses
in order that the contestants may re
tain their amateur standing.
Race No. 7. modified Marathon, dis
tance of fifteen miles, prize $200 in
gold. '
The above purse is split -in three
parts: First' $120, second$50, third
$30, total $200.
ACCUSED OF USING
MAILS 10 DEFRAUD
PHOENIX, Oct 8--lTnited States
Marshal Diegle of the Southern dis
trict of California arrived in the city
with W. L. Bassoli charged with using
the mails to defraud. He was brought
here on an order of removal from
the Southern district of California.
The order was made last summer but
as there would be no grand jury here
until today, Bassoli, who knew noth
ing about the climate of Phoenix ex
cept what he had read in untruthful
papers, begged to be allowed to swel
ter in Los Angeles rather than to
come to this city before his presence
was actually required.
Bassoli is the' inventor of a pipe
wrench for the manufacture and sale
of which he and others had been or
ganizing a company and selling stock.
A great deal of it was sold to Italian
residents 6f 'this vicinity and more
about Blsbee, Globe and other towns
in the southern part of this state. It
is claimed that while the invention"
of Bassoli is probably a good one,
claims were made in 'the literature
sent out that were not sustained by
the facts.
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AND YUMA WEEKLY EXAMINER
YUMA, ARIZONA, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 10, 1912
What Might
TELEGRAMS, WHICH, PLEASE NOTE,; IF SENT BY THE, BRAVE AND
FREE, MIGHT HAVE CHANGED HISTORY UNWRITTEN BY,
' ' TAFT, McADOO, WILSON, BRYAN, UNDERWOOD,. '
ARCHBOLD, HEDGES AND HILLES
Richard Washburn Child, lawyer, novelist, reformer and "muckraker," was
writing vivid and artistic stories for the leading magazines before he had
finished his law course at Harvard. Before he had been in print two years,
he was recognized as one of the best short story writers a rank -Which was'
given substantial recognition when he twice received a $1000 .short story
prize from Collier's. The actual conditions which he encountered in his lav.
practice led him toward reform; and in the past two or three years he ha.
given up Arcady to do his part in tha
Notable among his contributions were his attack on the Wool Trust and
Schedule K in Everybody's Magazine, and his articles oi the Lawrence strike
in Collier's. , . , " .'
Notable Night Messages
By RICHARD WASHBURN CHILD
"The saddest words of tongue or pen
Are words that were not wired then."
To .William Barnes, Republican Con
vention Hall, Chicago:
Do not nominate me if the votes of
stolen delegates are necessary. Re
gard this as a moral and not a politi
cal question, Remember that the
rank and file of our party in direct
primary states were nearly two to
one against me. They probably feel
that we are too reactionary. My de
sire to serve the people again is in
significant in comparison to upholding
in our party the standards of common
honesty. Show this message to Root
and say that whoever may be the
nominee, the old Republican party
must go before the people with clean
handsx
' ' WILLIAM HOWARD TAFT.
' . f
To Woodrow Wilson:
As a man familiar with large busi
ness, I know full well the foolishness
of fighting to break up the trusts by
lawsuits. Taft tried this and it was
a farce, comedy. Standard Oil, Ameri
can Tobacco and the rest of them love
it, and grow rich on it. We cannot
fool the people. The day to restore-
competition with a trust is to prevent
that trust from usipg unfair means to
keep a grip on its monopoly. Govern
ment regulation is what I have advo-
ated. The great body of- laboring
men and capitalists know I am right.
Call off Brandeis on this subject. He
bas a bad habit of misrepresenting
his opponents. This may result in in-
iury to you.
WILLIAM McADOO.
To Charley Murphy, of New York and
John F.. Fitzgerald, of Massachu
setts: I did not seek your support in ob
taining my nomination for president, J
and I do, not wish to solicit it in this
campaign. Let this be your notice
that I am aware of the character of
the political machines which you con
trol and which represent' financial in
terests with sinister purposes. I in
tend to rid the New York and Massa
chusetts democracy of your domin
ance, and the Democratic party of
bosses. I believe the voters of the
country will approve my course.
WOODROW WILSON.
(Continued on
to the Public by Richard
-A.!
Ha ve Been
greater work of national journalism,
To Champ Clark:
I assume that I was partly instru
mental in procuring jthe nomination
of Woodrow Wilson and in blocking
your nomination. I thought at the
time that Wilson was an ideal pro
gressive. I find however, that in spite
of good intentions, he is out of sym
pathy with the people. He was born
an aristocrat and has spent his day.'
in an exclusive University atmosphere.
This accounts! for his unfortunate re
marks against the honored name of
Thomas Jefferson, against foreign-born
laborers in favor of freer Chinese im
migration, against a minimum wage
for women, to protect motherhood; etc.
I fear he fails to grasp the signifi
cance of true progress. Possibly I
have made a grave mistake. Forgive
me and regard this as strictly confi
dential until the campaign is over.
, WILLIAM JENNINGS BRYAN.
To John Smith, Laborer:
In answer to your inquiry about the
Democratic tariff plank, let me be
honest and frank. It is probably true
that the tariff revision proposed
would cause a violent disturbance in
the business world, the greatest suf
fering, as always, to be borne by the
wage-earners. The statement in our
platform that a tariff .for protection
was unconstitutional was a new one
on me. I don't wonder you are puzzled
about that. You ask what "tariff for
revenue only" means. No one can
answer because it all depends upon
how much revenue we desire to raise.
A "tariff for revenue only'' means as
much as the question, "How large is
niece of ice," or "How old have you
ever seen young pigs?" The truth of
the matter is that all this is. pure bun
combe. I ought to know. Rut don't
quote me.
OSCAR UNDERWOOD.
To Senator Penrose:
Your plan to discredit Roosevelt by
talking about campaign contributions
will fail unless you obtain some one
held in high esteem. How about Chas.
W. Morse or Abe Hummel?
JOHN D. ARCHBOLD.
To Chairman, New York Republic-tn
State. Convention:
I am supposed to be an. entertainer
and have a fine sense of humor av
Page Four)
The Time. .
COL THEODORE
SAYS WILSON
CALLS UPON THE DEMOCRATIC CANDIDATE TO PROVE HIS STATE
MENT MADE AT PUEBLO, OR DO THE ONLY HONORABLE AND
MANLY THING DENIES TRUSTS BACK THE PARTY PLATFORM
SAYS' ONLY CORPORATION MAN BACKING HIM IS GEO. PERKINS.
ALBANY, N. Y., Oct. 8; Colonel poration or the Harvester trust sup
ioosevelt called upon Wilson tonight' Prting me is Perkins. As far as I
o either prove or retract his state- know,a11 othrs in both tlle Steel Cor
A , it , TT 'poration and the Harvester Trusts are
rtent today at Pueblo that the United olir,r rr. . r .
supporting either Taft or Wilson.
itates Steel, corporation was "behind : colonel Roosevelt passed through
ne third party program with regard Albany on his way to Michigan, the
to the regulation of trusts." "As raf irst state m which he wiU apeak in
is I know," said Colonel Roosevelt, nis tour of tne Middle West. He spent
this statement has not the slightest the fore part of the day at Oyster Bay,
.oundation of fact. Wilson has no ; preparing his speeches for the trip,
jusluess to make such a statement un-yne went by automobile to JMew York,
ss he has proof and if he has. anyjWnere he boarded a private car. The
.roof, I demand that he make, public- Colonel will speak.. In a. number of
mmediately. If not, let him. retract .states which are classed as doubtful,
.is statement as. it is the only manly:(Het is due to arrive in. Detroit at 8:25
tnd honorable thing to do. a. m., tomorrow, and will remain-untii
"As far as I know the only big man i:50 o'clock. In the evening, he will
connected with either the Steel Cor- speak at Saginaw, Michigan.
300000000 0-OOOOOOO
ROOSEVELT'S PLEDGE
"And, friends, with all my
heart and soul, with every par
ticle of high purpose that there
is in me, I pledge' you my word
to do everything I can, to put
every particle of courage, of
common sense, and of strength
that I have at your disposal,
and to endeavor, so far as
strength is given me, to live up
to the obligations you have put
upon me, and to endeavor to
carry out in the interests of
our whole people the policies
to which you have today sol
emnly dedicated yourselves to
the millions of men and wom
eng for whom you speak." Col.
Theodore Roosevelt.
DOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO
E 2ND PAYMENT
ON OCTAVE PROPERTY
PRESCOTT, Oct. 8 E. S. Clark,
as the attorney of H. C. Gibbs, of
Boston, the purchaser of the Octave
Mining company, under bankrupt pro
ceedings, will pay over in Phoenix,
the sum of $20,000 to John H. Page,
the trustee. This will be the second
payment ma'de, aggregating $25,000,
the property selling for $35,000.
OILED
OF
LIE TO
LEA!
PHOENIX, Oct 8. With the end
in view that the WInkleman branch
of the Arizona Eastern shall rank
with the best divisions of the South
ern Pacific system, Superintendent C.
M. Scott has directed the work of oil
ing "the entire roadbed between this
city and the eastern terminus shall
be carried out. Portions of the road
bed have been oiled from time to
time, but the work inaugurated last
week will mean when completed that
there will be no portion of the line
left unoiled; .
5 k-
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ARIZONA SENTINEL FOUNDED 1872
W. Child
SEVELT
1ST RETRACT
WARNS HIS SISTER TO
BE1RELAWERS
. TUCSON, Oct. 8. Eccentric almost
to the very grave, Ezra C. Bartlett, for
mer resident of Tucson, wealthy min
ing man, and builder of one or more
of Tucson's business structures, ex
pressed his opinion of the legal pro
fession in his will which has been
filed in New York where he died, by
his sister, Miss Annie Cora BaTtlett,
of Jerome, Arizona.
The will contained this clause ad
dressed to his sister as executrix:
"I hereby particularly warn you
against Probate Judges and attorneys
at law, and sincerely trust you will
not have occasion to consult or em
ploy the latter in regard ot this instru
nent. My personal experience in
lea lings, social and otherwise, with
awyers has been extensive and care
ful observance in other instances has
convinced me that they are all dangei
our crooks, only disguised and express
.y educated and trained to obtain one's
confidence in order that they may de
fraud and rob with impunity."
Mr. Bartlett left an estate of $50,
)00, which went in shares to the ex
)00, which went in shares to the ex
ecutrix, another sister, Mrs. Frank C.
Olark and two brothers, Edwin Lee
Hartlett and Jahn Berkeley Bartlett.
Miss Bartlett carried out her
orother's instructions o the letter.
She herself, took the will to the Sur
rogate's office and with the assist
ince of a brother-in-law, made out
he necessary probate papers and
"led them.
THIRTY-SIX MOVING PICTURES
Thirty-six valuable views of the big
residential fight of 1912 will be pub
lished in The Yuma Examiner the
views of thirty-six leading American
writers including Richard Hardingj
.Davis, Jane Addams, George Ade,
Wallace Irwin. Samnpl Mprwin Hnm-
lin Garland and others equally wen
known and liked. '
The Examiner Office for Job Work
of Neatness and Quality
,Get New Magazines at Shorey's.
3. ..

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