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Arizona sentinel and Yuma weekly examiner. (Yuma, Ariz.) 1911-1915, October 10, 1912, Image 2

Image and text provided by Arizona State Library, Archives and Public Records; Phoenix, AZ

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn95060876/1912-10-10/ed-1/seq-2/

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First Arizona State Fair, Phoenix, Oct, 28 to Nov 2
a Progressive?" Inquires Emerson Hough
A Heart-to-Heart Talkfe 1M FATALLY SHOT BY
UN AT THE ZQNIA MINES
BOSTON BED SOX WIN FIRST
GAME OF BIG SERIES. 4 TO
3
SERIES FOR THE WORLD'S BASEBALL CHAMPIONSHIP BEGAN TO
DAY AT NEW YORK INTEREST IS AT FEVER HEAT BOSTON
WITH DUFFY LEWIS IS STRONGEST IN THE FIELD, WHILE ALL
NEW YORK ADMIRERS CLAIM GIANTS STRONGEST AT BAT.
NEW YORK, Oct. 8. (Special to
The Yuma Daily Examiner). Boston
won the first game of the world's
series for the baseball championship,
score 4 to 3.
NEW YORK, Oct. 8. There are
more sick grandmothers, dead cous
ins and helpless sisters and brothers
in New York today than there will
be until the beginning of another big
world's series of baseball games. Men,
more independent in business enter
prises than the little fellows who must
invent needless excuses to get avay
from work, have frankly agreed to
"shut up shop," and journey up to
the Polo Grounds at an early hour
to be "among those present" when the
first signal is given for the game that
will mark the beginning of the fight
between the New York Giants of the
National League and the Boston Red
Sox of the American League for the'
baseball championship of the world.
The line to the Polo Grounds ticket
box formed just, after midnight thif
morning, as positively no seats have
been sold in advance except 3,000 or
4,000 for the grand stand.
A game will be played every day un
til one side wins four. The umpires
selected for the all-important series
are "Silk" O'Loughlin and W. Evans
of the American League and C. Klem
and G. Rigler of the National League.
Tomorrow's game is slated to take
place in Boston, and so on until one
side has been- declared the victor.
In the event of postponement the
teams will, stay in the city wherein
they are scheduled until such game
is played.
This jump from one city to the other
oer night .may prove a hardship to
the players, who will thus be obliged
to travel over night, but it will in
crease the interest in the seven-game
series and will make it impossible for
New York in this case to secure, an
undue advantage by playing more than
the opening game on the home
grounds.
After nibnths of cogitation it tool:
the anembers of the National Commis
sion and the representatives of the
two clubs concerned just two hours
and fifteen minutes to arrange foi
this year's struggle, including what
looks like the most satisfactory settle
ment of the much discussed ticKtu
question as yet adopted.
While the commission will be re
sponsible for every ticket sold in Bos
ton as well as New York, the methods
employed for the , disposal of same
will be entirely different.
Here in New York no tickets will be
sold to the general public by mail
The scale of prices will be $1 admis
sion to bleachers, $2 admission to the
lower stand and $3 for reserved seats
in the upper pavilion.
The 1 and $2 tickets will only be
procurable at the ticket offices on the
,day of the game, just as on any or
dinary occasion. Only one ticket will
be sold to each person and the pur
chaser of same must go right into the
grounds.
The plan, it is thought, will do away
with the scandal of last year, when
so many tickets fell into the hands
of speculators.
Different arrangementshave been
made in Boston, where the manage
ment of the Red Sox has been making
preparations since early in July. No
applications through the mail which
are accompanied by cash' or checks
will be filled, but all will be consider
ed, gone over carefully, and the appli
cants will be inforhied when they -may
apply for their seats. There, as in
this city, every precaution is being
made to circumvent the ticket scalp
ers. All applications will be filled in
the order of receipt so far as possible
The Boston tickets are similar to those
sold here last year, being good for the
three games, with a clause guarantee
'ing the return, of money if the third
same scheduled for Boston is nol
played. The scale of prices in Bos
'on will be 50 cents for the bleachers,
$1 for pavilion, $2 and $3 for grand
stand and $5 for the boxes. No ap
plications for single tickets will be
considered in the advance sale.
Naturally with the determination of
the championship 'in the two biggest
eagues interest centers in the con
tenders for the world's highest base
ball honors and the chances for eacl
are being compared. Tn picking e
winner one is more or less influenced
as to whether he favors the National
or American League. Of course, ir
those cities where there is but one
major league club partisans can set
but their representative, because, un
like Philadelphia, New York, Boston
Chicago and St. Louis, fans have not
had the opportunities of, witnessing
both in action. Where, however, ar
opportunity has been afforded to sei
the two clubs and eliminating league
prejudice, it looks to be about a toss
up as to whether Boston or New Yori
would be he victor. This is furthei
strengthened by the dope of the un
official figures. In batting the Giant
have the edge on the Red Sox, while
the latter are much better fielders
than McGraw's. men. Both teams ar.
equally strong in the batteries, while
Vew York, according to the figures
are better base runners and run get
ters. If Cady and Carrigan can stoj
the Giants running wild when the
;et on the bases it is going to be a
big help to Boston, other things bein?
equal.' Neither team appears to bt
a well-balanced club in either iialdin?
r batting. New York has an infield
that has batted .291, as against the
2S3 of Boston, but Doyle's big per
centage has much to do with boosting
the figure, while Larry Gardiner with
.322 pulls the Red Sox up. .Instate
what extent the recent injury to ihe
latter at Detroit is going to handicaj
the new-American League champions
is a question, but that it will not be
without effect, generally conceded. It
is in the outfield that Boston outclass
es the. Giants at evey angle. Yet New
York's outfield, weak though !t collect
ively may be, is more evenly balanced
lian Boston's, because it is Speikei's
high percentage that accounts for the
discrepancy. There is nothing to be
gleaned from the figures as to whe iher
Boston's pitching staff is beUer than
that of the Giants, and that will re
main a matter of individual opinion
until the series is over, but it- looks
as though New York wa3 a trifle the J
stronger behind the bat.
8
THE QUESTION IS ALSO ANSWERED BY THIS "BEST SELLER" OF
. THE VIRILE, AMERICANOUT-OF-DOORS SCHOOL, WHO ONCE SERV
' ED HIMSELF AS A RANGER IN THE GREAT WEST HE IS A SURE
ENOUGH PIONEER, AND IS FULL OF PLAINSMAN PHILOSOPHY.
Emerson Hough is a "best seller" of the virile, American out-of-door school.
Before he broke. into letters, he had been a ranger in the wild West, and had
already done good public service by securing government protection for the
buffalo herds of the Yellowstone Park. He was in fact, In his .late thirties
when his first book appeared. Since then he has been sending them forth)
at the rate of one, a year, besides contributing widely to the magazines- ot
public and scientific subjects. His novels, dealing mainly with the wild days
of the West and far-gone pioneer times, are full of philosophy of the plain;
old Westerner who broke and tamed a continent; and his understanding of?
the rough man and his problems gives additional interest to this straight, in
teresting statement of his; attitude toward this political campaign and its
problemsr , - .
";Why Be a ProgresLyei
9
By EMERSON HOUGH
j.
"Why fool with this new party?" 'thing. It makes no great difference tn
asked an acquaintance. VWhat can civilization whether Roosevelt or some,,
you get out of it? It has no chance' one else shall win this great fight;
to win.'
You can make no answer to that
3ort of comment from that sort of a
man. If you told him the truth, he
could not understand it. If you made
aim the simplest of all explanations,
ae could not believe it. He cannot,
comprehend that a party can do any
body great good without affording
somebody great graft. If Ephraim bt
wedded to his idols, let the union of
the two endure. The world moves on
just the same.
The final argument for this new
party lies in that fact; that the world
does move. Compare the dark ages
with today, and you will find that the
world has moved. ' All civilization is
progress. The progressive party is
the party of civilization. Do you want
the dark ages or today for yours?
That is your own concern. The world
will moveonward just the same.
The rewards of a clean way of
thought are something which t the old
it will be won, sooner or later. Theo
dore Roosevelt himself is a . great
enough manto know that.
The standpat man of either old par
ty cannot understand these things.
The sheer delight of a man's decision,
the joy of a fight which is there to be
fought these are the things which
the standpat man of either old party
cannot understand. Why argue with
him? Let Ephraim remain wedded
to his idols. Let him continue to de
mand, "What can this third party GET
for you?"
Many years ago as a young man
I lived in a small community in the
Rocky Mountains where we had not
much ' law beyond that of the six
shooter. It was a sweet and seemly
country for a man. No man abused
his neighbor there. There were few
locks on the doors. There was one
great law, which ran Jo the effect that
when trouble came, it was a man's
part to strap on his gun, get out into
THE -.AFFAIR TOOK PLACE AT THE CAMP OF THE ZONIAMINING
COMPANYWAS THE OUTGROWTH OF HARD FEELING OF LONG
STANDING MRS. MOSES FIRED SIX SHOTS FROM REVOLVER
AND (ONE FROM SHOTGUN INTO THE MAN, TO MAKE GOOD JOB.
PRESCOTT, Ariz., Oct 7. A report -some distance from where Mackin
reached this city yesterday to the ef- lived and it is supposed that Mackin
feet thatMrs. P. R. Moses had shot j came to the Moses house looking for
and fatally wounded Joe Mackin, at j trouble. It is not knewn whether
the Zoriia mining camp about nine , any fight took place beside the shoot
ing or not, as the telephone line be
tween Kirkland and Zonia-ia down and
the only communication' was the mail
'carrier who came in to Kirkland for
miles southeast of Kirkland valley.
The shooting was the climax, of
trouble,, that has been brewing be
tween Mackin and Mr and Mrs.
Moses. A week ago Mackin and i the doctor.
Moses figured in a criminal suit inj Mrs. Moses fired six shots into
Yavapai county, when Mackin was.j Mackin and it is also said that she
held .in 81000 bail to the September , fired one barrel of a shoteun into
Court for the crime of assault and
battery on the person of Mrs. Moses.
This .happened in the early part of
September.
The trouble culminated at the home
the man. Dr. J. B, MeNally was
called to aid the injured man and
left for the scene of the shooting at
once. It was expected that Mackin
would be brought into Preacott last
of Moses. The Moses home was, night, But has not arrived so far.
L ROOSEIELT
PLANS NEXT JOURNEY
.ine standpat man cannot understand. the middle of the road, and rrieet his
What are you expecting to GET out
jf this?" he demands; and he thinks
you crazy when you say that you ex
pect to get' nothing out of it. Yet you
are crazed only in the delirium of the
human impulse forward. The stand-
iat man cannot understand that. You
cannot argue with a man who deals in
assertions only, and whose premises
are those of the past. Let him alone.
The world moves just the same.
One of the assertions of the stand
pat man of either of the old parties
is, ttiat tins tnira party is nooseveu
and Roosevelt alone. Of course, thai
issertion is not true, because the
world had progi'essed before Roose
velt was born and will do so after
he is dead. The motives of this third
party go deeper than any one man's
ife. They take hold on great causes
and effects, on real conditions, which
are far wider than any one man's life.
, With or Without Roosevelt
If Theodore Roosevelt fell dead to
morrow, ne couiu go nappy kuuwuis
that the fight he wages will sometime
be won, knowing that the world nioves
with or without Theodore Roosevelt.
It makes no great difference whether
Bacon or Shakespeare wrote Shakes
peare, ine iact, me ueeu, is me gieai.
troubles face to face. Of course, he
might get killed, but that was much
better than to live with the record of
having hid behind the door, and hav
ing shrieked for the sheriff or other
form of representative or constitution
al government to come and take care
of him.
He Leads, Othe.rs Follow
Theodore Roosevelt was not the
sort to hide behind the door. For that
reason, America admires him. For
that reason, Colonel Bryan, Mr. John
Maynard Harlan, and the very late
Congressman J. Adam Bede, follow
him wherever he makes speeches.
Why do they not precede him, and
why does he not follow them? The
answer is fairly obvious. He is a lead
er, and not a follower. What sort of
man do you want in the White House,
at Washington a leader or a follow
er? Why are you a Progressive? In
all likelihood it is in no wise just
to say that you are a Roosevelt-worshiper.
Perhaps you became a Pro
gressive for the same reason that I
did, because you have read the his
tory of America and American' poli
tics, because you have studied the
great questions of American hidtor.
(Continued on Page Three
OYSTER BAY, N. Y., Oct. 7. In
spite of Colonel Roosevelt's announc
ed intention of seeing no one and talk
ing no politics during his brief period
of rest here, he found there were &
number ipf important matters to be ad
justed 1efore he leaves on his next
campaign tour, and passed most of
yesterday afternoon conferring with
leaders.
Oscar Straus was one of the earliest
arrivals. Colonel Roosevelt had not
seen Mr. Straus since his nomina
tion for governor of New Yo'rk by
the Progressive party, and the two-
candidates had a lengthy talk. Gov.
Hiram Johnson and Col. Roosevelt
told each other of their experiences
on their campaign trips. waiter
Brown.of Ohio brought a report of
conditions in his state. Other visitors
included Senator Dixon, George W.
Perkins and Frank A. Munsey.
CoL iRopsevelt will start for Michi
gan late, Jtoday, where he Is to speak
first in his tour through the middle
west.
MASSACHUSETTS COW
BREAKS ALL RECORDS
BROCKTON, Mass., Oct. 7. The
recor4a for milk and butter were shat
tered hy a "Creamellevale," a Holstein
cow bierer, This cow has given 26,930
pounds of milk with a monetary value
of thirteeb hundred dollars since Nov
ember 15; 1911. "The average cow
glves.V according to the Department
of Agriculture statistics, "about 3,000
pounds of milk per year." "Cream
ellevale" in a single month has given
3,200 pounds.
ES.
JOHNSON'S WEIGHT
NEW YORK, Oct. 7. Gov. Hiram
Johnson of California folded over the
slack cloth In his vest shortly after
stepping from the platform of a pair
of scales, and said:
"If the weather remains warm and
campaigning strenuous, I'll have to
see the tailor."
The governor Is losing weight. In
the six weeks he has been on his
speaking tour he has been reduced
from 234 to 211 pounds. He says,
however, the loss of weight has not
affected his strength.
The governor's Itinerary for this
week-is not completed. He will tadkp
three speeches on Long Island, three
In Yonkers, New Rochelle and White
Plains, and two In Patterson and Jer
sey City, NjJ.
PFEFFER. FORMER
PS SENATOR, DIES
TOPEIA, Kas., Oct. 7. William A.
Pfefifer, former United States senator
from Kansas, died here today of a
complication, of diseases and old age.
AMERICANS TAKE CITY
OF LE0NJICA8IGUA
SAN JUAN DEL SUR, Nicaragua,,
Oct. 7. The-city of Leon has surren
dered to the American forces. There
is reason to believe that no fighting
occurred, but details of the surrender
are lacking. '
WRITERS ARE PIONEER
PROGRESSIVE LEADERS
The magazines and those who write
for them have had a great deal to
do with the growthof so-called Insurg
ent and progressive Ideas in the Unit-'
ed States. When the new Progres
sive party was formed, it was discov-'
ed that most of the, writers had stam
peded with the new flock. Forty
some odd of these famous authors will
furnish campaign articles for The Ex
aminer between now and November
-election day.
The Examiner Office tor -Job Work
of Neatness and Quality.
LAND IS ONLY PERMANENT SOURCE OF WEALTH
Land is the only permanent property. If you want a safe investment,
tuy land.
Slocks and bonds may melt away like water which they possibly are.
Money in your pocket dribbles out through holes. Jewels are lost, or shrunk
in value by clever imitations. And as far as for savnigs in the sock or bank
it is of little avail to hoard up money when, year by year, more and m(ore is
squeezed out of the dollar.
Money goes down as the prices go up. The gold mines of the world are
pouring their bullion into the mints by scores of millions a year. More money
means cheaper money, just as more potatoes mean cheaper potatoes. Your
hoarded dollar shrinks in purchasing power even while you look at it it buys
less and less of the things of real value for which men and women toil.
Save your money, if you can spare anything from the grievous expenses of
,a decent livelihood; and then, if you want your savings to work for you
fcuy land. For no more land is being created, population is increasing, and
the .value of available land in civilized countries rises constantly with the
demand and the diminishing value of coin and bank notes.
'The day is coming, perhaiis, when land will no longer be a commodity for in
vestment or speculation. It will belong to society -as a whole. Before that
time comes, society will have cut off the profits of the speculators by taking
the unearned increment of real estate for the. communities that created it
Eut meanwhile, .the big fellows are grabbing land and the profits, knowing
that they have a sure thing. And so is this suggestion' to the little fellows.
INTERESTING FEATURES
Beginning yesterday the Examiner began the publication of one of the most
interesting features perhaps the most intersting which was ever included
in the journalistic work of a national political campaign. Every day during
the remainder of the campaign it win puunsa a &icuiui u, .
other of thirty-six great magazine and newspaper writers of national reputa
tion There will be news reports of actual happenings by such great report
ers as Richard Harding Davis, C. P. Connolly and Richard Washburn Child;
views and reviews by such heavy thinkers as Herbert Croly, Willian Allen
White Samuel Merwin and Jane Addams; humorous skits by such laugh
provokers as George Ade, Wallace Irwin and George Fitch; imaginative writ
ings by such creators of popular fiction as Edna Ferber, Inez Haynes Gilmore;
Gouverneur Morris and Hamlin Garland. Never before, probably, in the his
tory of American publications, has any magazine or newspaper been able to
put forth a seasonal announcement including so many eminent names. It
will appear simultaneously, in a syndicate of newspapers covering the whole
country; but The Examiner will publish it exclusively in Yuma.
This feaure is unique in another way. These eminent writers, who get from
$250 to $1,000 for a single magazine or newspaper syndicate contribution, are
not receiving a cent of pay. They are giving their services free, as their con
tribution to the cause of Roosevelt
A FEW POLLS
The "Bull Moose" hat for women is the latest millinery creation,
just the size and shape to shy into the ring handily; - .
It is.
A straw, vote of the Denver Master Builders, gave Roosevelt, .35; Wilson, 7;
Taft, 2; and Debs, 1. A poll in a packing house on Market 'street,- Denver,
gave Roosevelt, 20; Wilson, 2; and Taft, 1.'
A poll taken In several prominent industrial establishments at Jamestown,
New-York, gave these results:
Roosevelt
57
35.
28
70
Wilson
4
. 1
-i0
1
1
1
2
3
17
Taft
2
.4
12
&
s2 .
F. M. Curtis Co
Atlas Furniture, No. 1,
Atlas Furniture, No. 2,
Union Furniture Company
Star Furniture Company 25
Jamestown Window Screen Company 20
Jamestown Mantel Company 60
Ekman Furniture Compnay 40.
nhniitnniia 'Mantel Comnanv '.: 20
The results' of a poll taken from 450 farmers at the Otsego, Mich.,'COunty
fair at Gaylord, Mich., last week: Wilson, 35; undecided, 8; Taft, 7; -'Roose-velt,
400. Some Detroit papers claim the state for Taft.
The executive committee ot the Taft republicans in South Dakota has de
cided against placing the Taft electors on the ballot by petition. The elect
ors chosen at the primaries have since declared for'Ttoosevelt and the Taft
supporters favor "war to the knife."
AX.

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