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Arizona sentinel and Yuma weekly examiner. (Yuma, Ariz.) 1911-1915, October 17, 1912, Image 1

Image and text provided by Arizona State Library, Archives and Public Records; Phoenix, AZ

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn95060876/1912-10-17/ed-1/seq-1/

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First Arizona State Fair,
I Arizona
PROGRESSIVE REPUBLICAN IN POLICIES. VOL. XLII. No. 48.
Col- Roosevelt Praised for
ROBERT S. FISHER'S
TOUR IS PROVING SUCCESSFUL
PROGRESIVE CANDIDATE HAS BEEN EVERYWHERE WARMLY RE
CEIVED HAS ESTABLISHED A STATE-WIDE REPUTATION AS A
FIGHTING MANPLACES PRINCIPLES HIGH ABOVE PERSONAL
AFFAIRS COMMENDED BY PARTY AND OPPOSITION PRESS.
PHOENIX, Oct 15. Robert S, Fish
er, candidate lor congress, returned to
this city from the south yesterday
morning having covered about two
thirds of his itinerary in the state
-.campaign. Everywhere he has receiv
ed a most cordial reception. He has
proven himself a whirl-wind campaign
er and has established a state-wide
.reputation as a fighting man. Talking
at times to calm assemblies in halls,
at other times to boisterous crowds
outside, he has in each case made his
message clear and forcible. He has
pjaced the principle so high above the
personal In his campaign for congress
that everywhere he has been commend-,
e4 both by party and opposition press.
Starting in .the city of Phoenix with
the largest crowd ever accorded a lo
cal candidate, he next went to Yava
pai county and addressed two great
meetings at Prescott and Jerome,
-which were said by the local manager
to. be the strongest campaign address
e$ ever delivered In that vicinity. Next
he followed the northern line of" the
Santa Fe throughout the mining coun
try, the sheep, cattle and 'lumber' coun
tries, directing; his message in each
of these places to the bettering of Il
eal conditions. His words were heard
w(th great interest Always avoiding
bitter personalities, he has hammered
at;, the basic facts without regard to
who might be in the way.
yuma county was next touched, and
there he found an overwhelming sen
timent in favor of Roosevelt- There
tby realize that Roosevelt is the fath
er of reclamatijii and that the Pro
THERE IS ONE If
TO HOT in
The oft asserted statement thatwai
must soon end in response to the de
mand of the world's great money bar
ons whose profits are disturbed by it
has support in the action of the French
government in closing the Paris money
market to the belligerant Balkan
states. The Bulgarian minister' had
sought a loan of $4,000,000 from Paris
bankers. He was not only 'refused,
but his application1 for even ?1,000,000
was denied promptly.
WILLIAM J. BRYAN
IS STILL FAR AFIELD
It should be borne in mind by those
persons who may have been impressed
by the speeches recently delivered by
William J. Bryan, that they will be
unable-to recall a single word or ar
gument in favor of Professor Wilson
that is not applicable in a much great
er degree to Roosevelt. In fact, Bry
an was singularly free from adulation
of Wilson,, employing most of his time
in praising the Democratic platform,
of which he is alleged to be the au
thor. But the platform Is just as weak as
the Democratic nominee, particularly
when it is remembered that it declares
AND YUMA WEEKLY EXAMINER 1
A Live, Republican Weekly With All the News, All
GAMP
gressive party has the only sound ?o
l;tion for the pioblem of tariff and
the high cost of living.
But It remained1 for the mining coun
try in the south, including Santa Cruz
and Cochise counties to give tne can
didate the greatest reception of his
trip so far. He showejl how Wilson's
entire record proves him oblivious ot
the real needs of the people who toll,
and unconscious of the industrial prob
lems of the age. He told the miners
in Bisbee of his own early life, when
by hard labor with his hands he had
earned bread, and put tnem at once
upon ease with the feeling'that he un-
-aerstood their-problems-.' He -"was re'
ceived with hearty applause and scores
of persons stood up in addition to
those seated while for more than an
hour he told them of the great truths
of the Progressive party.
As the later days of the campaign
are passing, it becomes more and
more apparent that the great mass .of
the common people are remembering
that Roosevelt has always been their
Jong time friend. To Arizona he has
been a faithful helper. The two great
irrigation projects of the Salt River
and Yuma valleys bespeak his unflag
ging interest. The unparalleled rec
ord of Governor Johnson during those
eighty-five wonderful days in which
he reformed California law appeal?
everywhere,
Mr. Fisher has made much of the
feat that he believes, a congressman
should be attorney in fact for his con
stituents knowing his clients first,
last and all .the time.
the protective tariff "a i malignant
growth," and demands its total abolish
ment in favor of "a tariff for revenue
only'
SETTLING QUESTION
OF "DOES CRIME PAY"
What shall it profit a group of polit
ical banditti to steal two convention
delegates and lose thirteen electors?
The foregoing problem in advanced
mathematics is submitted to Penrose,
Root, Barnes, et." al who deprived the
Republican party of California of a
part of its legitimate representation
at Chicago, and who are now them
selves rightfully refused any represen
tation whatever in California.
Theu thieves are punished according
to their deserts. The punishment fits
the crime.
"PROTECTION DOLL" TO
COMBAT TEDDY BEAR
NEW YORK, Oct. 15. The "Pr
tection doll" dressed in home-produced
clothes, is the toy for children with
which Miss Mary Francis of the Wom
en's Aid of the National Republican
Committee hopes to oust the Teddy
Bear.
Get New Magazines at Shorey's.
YUMA, ARIZONA, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 17, 1912 (
1 A
In a Class All
THEODORE ROOSEVELT IS THOROUGHLY HONEST, AND HONESTY
J
GOES TO THE MARK HE CAN REASON; HE CAN DECIDE, AND HE
CAN LIKEWISE STRIKE IN THE SENSE PHYSICAL HE IS FAIRLY
A WHITE INDIAN WE LOVE HIM FOR THE ENEMIES HE HAS MADE.
We love him for the enemies he's. There has been little, if any, Roosevelt
made. Who oppose Mr. Roosevelt? change, however. The Roosevelt of
The Morgans, the Carnegies, the Arch-'1884 is the Roosevelt of 1912.
bolds, tbe Spreckleses, the Ryans, "the J He was young when he went to Al
Dukes, the Belmonts, the Havemeyers, 1 bany Bursting into the legislature,
the Armours' the Rockefeller, all Ibf !he possessed all youthful confidence.
the gold-heaping tribe of criminal priv
ilege. The arguments which teach them to
bate him are not public, but private.
They Jook in their pockets to fihd
every bne of them.
Money is never a patriot, and com
monly a fool. There Is a mean logic
which too frequently goes with mon
ey, and fdlk I write the rule are
prone to consult their, pocketbooks
when decldingr their public d.uty j..
If the man be killing -pigs, or build
ing boats, otiorging armor jilates'.ior
loaning money, he is apt to regard as
right those public conditions, whether
of war, peace, or murder, or pillage, or
liberty dead, or law defied, of cohsti'
tution Invaded and set at naught,
which flow a profit into his purse.
Also those he will sustain.
Eyes Always on Gain
He does not care, though a king be
n the White House and Satan himself
that King,' so it will swell -his bank
account.
He feels no deeper than the dollar,
and goes no further than the day.
The name of these Is legion. As
blinded slaves of selfishness they jos
tle each other as they crowd toward
that mess of pottage for which, their
birthright is" for sale. i
It is to the glory of Mr. Roosevelt
that, with this the plain portrait of
what influences have for twenty years
controlled the Republican party, he
has exhibited virtues which in their
integrities haven't been In fashion
since 1776.
Mr. Roosevelt is wholly honest. -And
his honesty goes to the mark.
No self Interest would serve either
to deflect or abate It.
Half the opposition oratory and
more than half the cartoons sneer at
Mr. Roosevelt for his exaltation of
the physical.
It is as though they thought that
bodily health was an offense and that
In what concerns the public only the
sick are to be counted as among the
"safe and sane."
Divided by the Bathtub
No friend of Mr. Roosevelt will con
tradict these orations criticise these
cartoons.
Let it be granted thenj that the big
difference between Mr. Roosevelt and
a Cheyenne is a difference of bathtub,,
tailors and cooks. Let it go at that.
In the sense physical he is fairly
a white Indian. And with the last
that is not detraction, but encomium.
Mr. Roosevelt can reason, can de
cide. He can likewise strike. Also,
the latter, as a method of disputation,
has been found convincing where the
other failed.
Go back to the middle '80s for the
Roosevelt Albany story.
It was the Roosevelt story in New
York, In Washington, at Santiago.
It will continue to be the Roosevelt
story and this should color the gen
eral cheek with the hue of hope until
death writes "finis" beneath the Roose
velt name.
Colonel Always the Same
This was twenty-eight years ago.
(Continued
Phoenix, Oct.
SENTINEL
Brawn
by Himself
Indeed, he owned a double quantity,
for to his lack of years and experience
must . be added that complained ol
force, which, in his case, still goes fai
beyond triphammers in every mark
of the downright
Strong not only in the mental, but
in the physical,, as in a tower, young
Mr. Roosevelt, arlvlng at Albany, fell
back, it seems, upon his, fist his heaa
having failed upon1 at least a brace o.
legislative occasions.- It resulted In
good for Mr. Roosevelt, good for the
state.
A Tammany member became dis
(pleased with the Roosevelt school ol
oratory. The Tammany one expressed
views in whispers concerning Mr.
Roosevelt which, on the Bowery, would
nave meant war. Mr. Itooseyelt ovei
heard the whispers.
"I shall see you presently in the cor
ridor," he snapped. -
Mr. Roosevelt did see the Tammany
member in the corridor. He com
memorated the meeting by smiting
thatmisguided whelp of. the Tiger hir
and thigh.
Later the smitten one lay in his bed
at the Delaven. His friend, who knew
Innthlnp1 nf thn- nnrriilnr onlMqlnn
came in. Beholding the bandages the
friend became as one planet-struck
He stood speechless at the other't
bedside, tacitly counting the wounds.
"What would you do?" moaned the
injured one, putting a weak hand to
the bandages.
"What would I do?" repeated the
friend, impressively. "I'd sue the
road."
Following that corrider episode Mr.
Roosevelt though not agreed witn
was heard with respect
Again in a committee room there
came triumph to the physical. A bill
was before the committee which th
railroads did not like. The "orders'
were to "bottle it up."
Three vs. "Railroad Eight"
There were three on the comraittet
opposed to that "bottling." These
were Mr. Roosevelt, an aged agricul
turist from Herkimer, and a young
Democrat from Brooklyn.
The honest trio were helpless af
against a railroad eight.
Mr. Rosevelt reminded the eight
that their "bottling" would excite -suspicion.
They grinned a dry grin, but
svere- not otherwise moved.
"Let me see that bffl a moment,"
;ald Mr. Roosevelt to the clerk of the
committee.
, The request was proffered with all
imaginable sweetness. The bill was
handed over. Mr. Roosevelt buttoned
it inside his coat
"My friends," he observed, address
ing the railroad eight, "it is railroad
money which keeps this measure from
being reported to the assembly. I've
got it in my pocket.
"Unless a majority agrees instantly
to report it, I shall take It Into the
assembly and make a minority report.
"Also, if I make such a report, 1
shall accompany It with charges which
cannot fail to attract general attention
and, I think, force an investigation.
on Page Four)
The Time.
as Wei
CALIFORNIA'S GOVERNOR HARDLY
HAS A POLITICAL RECORD AT ALL
THE POLITICAL RECORD OF HIRAM W. JOHNSON, PROGRESSIVE CAN
DIDATE FOR THE VICE PRESIDENCY AND AT PRESENT GOVERNOR
OF CALIFORNIA, IS A SHORT ONE; BUT EVERY RESIDENT OF THE
GOLDEN STATE IS WILLING TO ADMIT IT' HAS BEEN STRENUOUS.
Governor Johnson has been in poll- The following: is only a partial list
tics hardly two years. He put Abe of the most important work, done-dur-Ruef
in jail. Then he entered politics Ing Governor Johnson's administra
te put the Southern Pacific Railwaytlon:
Company out of politics. For the for-,. Establishment of direct primary
ty years preceding his election as nominating elections, including pref
Governor of California, the Southern erential vote on president and direct
I'aciiic Railway had bossed the state election of delegates to the National
of California.. A man was needed to Convention.
.nit it out of politics, and Johnson did ; The adoption of the Oregon system
.so. He was Inaugurated in January, for election of the candidate for TJhit
1911, and within three months he had ed States Senator who receives. 'the
lone what other governors had failed highest, popular vote. '
to do, in the forty years which had State-wide application of the inltia.
:receded him. tive, referendum and recall.
Johnson did this because he is hon Non-partisan election of judges..
at, and because he is a fighter. Durl
ing his campaign, he covered more
than eighteen thousand miles in the
.tate of California, felling every voter
what he (Johnson) would do, if elec-
ed. As soon as elected he began
he work of reforming the state which
others had been unable to refdrm.
He secured passage by the legislature
it what Theodore Roosevelt described
as the most important legislation ever
-nacted at a single session by any
American legislature. What other
3tates have been struggling, for year&
fo get, Johnson's leadership secured
for' California' in three short" months,
and thereby transformed it from the
most reactionary to, the most progres
sive state In the Union.
1 y. GLOBE" ABLY
PRESENTS HISTORY
"The third term party," and the
'third termer" are epithets intended to
oe opprobrious, applied to the Progres
sive party and its standard, bearer.
This Is not a sensible argument
against the fitness of Colonel ' Roose
velt for the presidency. It is an ap
peal and a very foolish one to popular
prejudice. The presidency of the Unit
d States is not a prize to.be handed
iround to the greatest possible num
ber of American citizens. If that were
30, the tenure of office would be lim
ted to, say, a year, a month, or, per
saps, a day, the presidency being re
.trlcted to a single term. Thus the
iream of every citizen of becoming
resident wouM be brought nearer real
zation. But what the American people
.vant is fitness and efficiency. We
an conceive of a situation in which-a
bird consecutive term would not be
i good thing. But a third term of a
.resident who so enjoys the confidence
jf his countrymen as to be able to
secure it, after an interval of four
years, would bring, into the office an
experience and a ripe judgment that
would be beneficial to the nation.
This matter is very ably presented
by the New York Globe as follows:
"Is the rule or tradition against all
third terms or merely against consecu
tive third terms? It is difficult to
avoid the conclusion that Colonel
Roosevelt, historically, has the better
of the argument.
"Eight men have been two-terra pres
idents. Of these Washington died be
fore he was four years out of office,
28 to Nov
.2
. .
V
ARIZONA SENTINEL FOUNDED 1872
County as well ,as..city hpme rule.
Revision of criminal procedure.
Appropriation for a reformatory for
first offenders.
An employers' liability act, providing
' for workmen's compensation arising
- out: of industrial accidents.
The adoption of woman suffrage.
The full-crew bill.
A pay check bill prohibiting the pay
ment of wages in any non-negotiable:
form.
Commission form of government fort
the cities.
If Governor Johnson is elected vice
presidenttpn the Progressive platform,
he will use his 'influence to have these
'same laws written on the statute books
of the United States. t
Jefferson, Madison, Monroe and Jack
son were all seventy years or more'.olcb
when they were four years out of of
fice and were thus ineligible through
age, as Jefferson wrote concerning
himself. Grant, Cleveland and Roose-.
velt are the only two-term presidents
who left the president's office youn.
enough to consider coming back after
a four years' absence. They are the
only ones who have practically faced
the question of whether the two-term
rule applied to non-con3ecutive terms.
"Grant answered that it did not by
becoming a candidate for non-consecutive
third term. Cleveland answered
that it did not by making no secret of
his willingness and desire for a non
consecutive third term. Roosevelt is
thus following precedent rather than
violating it. All the two-term presi
dents that we. have had Who were
young enough to consider the presi
dency's burden have been candidates
for non-consecutive third terms."
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"Mr. Roosevelt is honest and
well meaning. He does for the
the people what be thinks Is
good for them. Mr. Taft's de
fect is his constitutionai dis
trust of the people." -William
J. Bryan, In Los Angeles, Sept.
23, 1912.
ooooooooooooo o o o o
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"I pledge my word to put ev
ery particle of courage and
strength at my disposal to car
ry out the interests of our whole
people." Theodore Roosevelt.
OQOOOOOOOOOOOOOOQ
Brain
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