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Arizona sentinel and Yuma weekly examiner. (Yuma, Ariz.) 1911-1915, November 14, 1912, Image 1

Image and text provided by Arizona State Library, Archives and Public Records; Phoenix, AZ

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn95060876/1912-11-14/ed-1/seq-1/

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the
Celebration
Remember
Siphon
PROGRESSIVE REPUBLICAN IN POLICIES.
BUMPER CROP LIKELYi
IS SEASON'S LATEST
WHEAT 6.7 PER CENT MORE THAN
LAST YEAR; OATS 17.6 PER"
0
CENT; CORN 17 PER CENT
WASHINGTON, Nov. 13. Crops
generally throughout the world this
year are bumper. This is shown by
figures reported to the Department of
Agriculture from the International In
stitute of Agriculture at Rome, Italy,
giving preliminary estimates as fol
lows: x
Wheat France, 335,974,000 bushels;
Roumania, S9.417.000; Canada, 206,
033,000. Total production in the follow
ing" named countries, 3,200,900,000 bush
els, or 6.7 per cent more than las;
year: Prussia, Belgium, Bulgaria, Den
mark, Spain, Great Britain, Hungary,
Italy, Luxemburg, Switzerland, France,
Norway, Netherlands, Roumania, Rus
sia, India, Japan, Egypt, Tunis, Can
ada and the United States.
Oats Roumania, 21,525,000 bushels;
Canada, 400,502,000. Total production,
3,504,000,000 bushels, or 17.6 per cent
more than last year,
Corn Roumania. 113,676,000 bush
els., Total production, 3,616,000,000
bushels, or 17 per cent' more than last
R PAPER OMEfi
SHOT AT CM
CLIFTON, Ariz., Nov. 13. Franklin
B. Dorr, formerly owner of the Douglas
Dispatch, was shot last night by Wil
liam Allender.
Allender tried to escape, but he was
surrounded by officers. He shot him
self and died before he could be
reached.
Dorr recently moved to Clifton
from Douglas, and had engaged in the
moving picture business.
WILSON WILL Fl
ALL OFFICES FfLLED
WASHINGTON, Nov. 13 President
Taft said yesterday that he planned to
fill all vacancies occurring before
March 4, without regard to the ap
proach of adminstration. There are
several 'important appointive offices
now vacant, including the commission
ership of the bureau of Indian affairs
and the office of chief of the bureau of
chemistry.
The President intimated that President-elect
Wilson probably would find
all positions filled when he comes into
office.
DIRECTOR NEWELL
GUI il ATTEND IE
The director of the Reclamation
Service, Mr. F. H. Newell, has just
written President Earl B. Smith, oi
our Water Users' Association, that he
cannot visit the water users of Yuma
valley this month, as contemplated.
Urgent business at the seat of govern
ment require him to cancel all eng
gagements in the West. . , .
Gil
VOL. XLII. No. 52.
ARIZONA WILL BE PREPARED
COMPLETE WORK WILL BE ISSUED BY MRS. SHARLOT HALL SHE
HAS BEEN GATHERING DATA -FOR MANY YEARS WILL BE VERY
LARGE AND COMPREHENSIVE WORK, COMPLETE IN EVERY DE
TAIL; WILL MEET WITH HEARTY ENCOURAGEMENT.
Upon the urgent solicitation of her
publishers and many of her friends
Miss Sharlot M Hall has undertaken
the writing of the history of Arizona.
It will be a large and comprehensive
work, complete in every detail. Spe
cial attention will be given to the ar
rangement of subject matter ana the
indexing, that it may be a valuable ref-bi-cnce
work as well as good reading.
The citizens of Arizona will be glad
indeed to welcome a work of this na
ture from the pen of Miss Hall. No
.listory of Arizona has been published
ince the Bancroft history of loriG,
'hich work is now practically out of
he market and accessible only in large
ibrariej;.
Much data of value and interest has curacy, together with an innate love for
;een. discovered and gathered togeth- and appreciation of Arizona and her
.r since those earlier works were pre- achievements;.
jared and the years intervening have i Probably, no one in the state fills
een those in which, as a common-! these requirements to a higher degree
vealth, Arizona has made her most I than does Miss Hall. Her recent
.. ital and significant history. During ! position as Arizona historian, has add
hese recent years a number of people j ed to and completed what has been,
lave been active in the collection of! with her, a life-long preparation fo.
aluable historical data. Among them just this great work,
.night be mentioned Dr. J. A. Munk, of! The work will be' in course of prep
Los Angeles, who has gathered a libra- aration during the coming year and
ry of printed matter of over 5,000 titleh ! will, doubtless, meet with the hearty
pertaining to Arizona and its history. 1 encouragement of every citizen of Ap
Mr. M. P. Freman of Tucson has an- zona.
FHOIAL SYNOPSIS OF
The following is a synopsis of the. of-
ficial program for the Siphon Celebra-
tion to be held m xuma, November 18,
19 and 20:
Monday, November 18
Morning Opening Ceremonies and
Dedication of the Siphon.
Afternoon Military and civic par
ade; baseball game.
Evening Musical and lecture in the
Zeller theatre.
Tuesday, November 19
Morning Sightseeing trip to La-
guna Dam; exhibition drill by a de
tachment of Co. G, Twelfth U. S. In
fantry; baseball game; baby contest.
Afternoon Dedication exercises at
Elks' hall; baseball game.
Evening Open house receptions and
dances by the various fraternal organi
zations. Wednesday, November 20
Morning Exhibition drill and ath
letic events.
Afternoon Double-header baseball
game.
Evening Grand fireworks display.
Carnival attractions daily.
The official program is now in the
hands of the printers, and will be ready
for distribution by Sunday.
For detailed information, call at the
Commercial Club headquarters.
GOOD SHAPE FOR DEDICATION
Project Engineer F. L. Sellew has the
reclamation grounds in good shape for
the dedication ceremonies at tho Si
phon, next Monday morning.
CELEBRATION PROGRAM
YUMA,
other important collection and in the
archives of the state library splendid
material has been kept and added to
as the years passed.
Miss Hall, herself, has a personal
collection of manuscript, pictures and
data pertaining, to Arizona's history
larger than anything of its kind in
existence.
But none or this matter is ac
cessible to the ordinary, everyday
citizen of Arizona who would like to
be familiar with the history of his
or her state.
The situation demands a master
hand to select and arrange, a mind
gifted with the power of description
and a passion for painstaking ac-
'JUROR IS ILL,
TRIAL IS POSTPONED
INDIANAPOLIS, Ind., Nov. 13. Be-
cause of tlle illness of Juror Spaulding
the trial of the "dynamite conspirators'
was postponed today.
. ,AGED INDIAN DIES
Died, Chapo Curran, Yuma Indian,
aged 85, at his home on the reserva
tion, yesterday afternoon at 2 o'clock.
The body was cremated at 4:30 this
morning in the presence of relatives
and neighbors.
IN' JUSTICE COURT
In Justice Court yesterday, Julian
Campas was held in bail in the sum
of $500, charged with forgery.
GETTING RANCH IN SHAPE
L. P. Hamilton is putting his 40
acre ranee in shape for farming.
HAVING HOME PAINTED
Mrs. W. T. Sexsmith is having her
First avenue homo painted.
EPISCOPAL LADIES MET
The ladies of the Episcopal church
met this afternoon with Mrs. Squire
Munroij.
ON BUSINESS IN PHOENIX
T. L. McCutchepn is attending the
session of the State Board of Pharma
cy, at Phoenix.
VjSIT'NQ HER.E
Mr. and Mrs. J. E. Epler are visiting
hero.
HOME FROM. COAST
Adqlph Gross is homo, from
coast, j
the
Call
AND YUMA WEEKLY EXAMINER
ARIZONA, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER
MEETING OF LEADERS WILL BE
HELD IN CHICAGO DECEM
BER 11 AND 12
DEFINITE PROGRAM
TO BE OUTLINED
STARTING MOVE FOR CONGRES
SIONAL ELECTIONS TWO
YEARS HENCE
NATIONAL LEGISLATIVE COMMIT
TEE TO BE NAMED AND ALL
PARTY FRIENDS ARE TO
BE URGED TO ACT
FOR CAUSE
WASHINGTON, Nov. 13. Senator
Joseph M. Dixon of Montana, who was
chairman of the National Progressive
campaign, tonight issued a call for a
meeting of the Progressive leaders to
be held in Chicago on December 11
and 12, at which time a definite legis-
ative and campaign program will be
fixed.
Senator Dixon believes that right
now is the time to start the campaign
for the congressional elections two
years hence, and that to do this work
ntelligently, a definito campaign
should bo mapped out.
Election Pleaset! Leaders
As he has said in formal statements,
the Progressive leaders were well
pleased with the outcome of the elec-
ion and tonight he cited the fact that
the Progressives will have twenty-four
votes in the next House, exclusive of
the Republicans, who are still so in
name, but will vote for Progressive
measures. Tho strength is apportion
ed as follows:
Washington, 4; California, 3; Michi
gan, 2; Illinois, 2; New York, 1; Penn-.
sylvania, 5; North Dakota, 2; South
Dakota, 1; Nebraska, 2; Kansas, 1;
Oregon, 1. Five members-elect from
Pennsylvania on the Republican ticket
are pledged also to vote with the. Pro
gressives, having agreed to do so if
Roosevelt received more votes in Penn
sylvania than Taft. In the senate
there are Poindexter, Clapp, Bristow,
Dixon, Crawford, and probably Norris
of Nebraska, who seems certain of re
election, and the Republicans in name
who stand for Progressive principles.
An Important Conference
"The conference in Chicagp," said
Senator Dixon tonight, "will be. an iuu
portant and historical affair. We have
invited all the state chairmen and a.11
the Progressive candidates for govern-;
or in the last fight and about twenty
Progressive members of Congress. We
will name a national legislative com
mittee and urge our friends in Con
gress to get action. In states where we
have members of the legislatures, we
will have them try to reduce to con
crete form of state laws the pledges
(Continued on Page Four)
10 if 11 fT Toff
niimfirtn i
mum
SFNTTNFT
14, 1912
DELEGATES FROM .IMPERIAL, LOS ANGELES, NEEDLES, CHUCKA
WALA AND PALO VERDE WILL MEET WITH YUMA COUNTY WA
TER USERS, THURSDAY, NOVE MBER 21, IN ZELLER THEATRE, TO
TO DISCUSS FEASIBILITY OF USING RIVER FOR IRRIGATION.
Under the joint auspices of the Yu
ma County Water Users' Association
and the Yuma Cqunty Commercial
Club, there will be held a convention
of those interested in the storage of the
-flood waters of the Colorado river, at
I the Zeller theatre, in Yuma, on Thurs
day, November 21, 1912, at 1:30 p. m.
There will be in attendance the mem
bers of the Arizona-California River
Regulation Commission, which was re
cently organized at the Chamber of
Commerce in Los Angeles, also dele
gates from Imperial Valley, Needles,
Palo Verde, Chucka walla, and other
places which are effected, directly or
indirectly, by the Colorado river.
The president and other officers of
the Los Angeles Chamber of Commerce
and representatives of the largest com
mercial interests of the Southwest, will
be present, including Mr. George H.
Maxwell, a speaker of national reputa-
NATIONAL HIGHWAY
ASSURES VIA YUMA
F. E. Elliott, chairman of the Board
of Supervisors, returned today from
the Good Roads Convention at Santa
Fe, N. M. the great fight there was
to secure the National Highway for
Arizona, as a determined fight was
made to shift the route forther north.
The fight of the Southwest was well
handled and the route will be through
Arizona and Yuma.
Los Angeles secured the convention
tor next year.
Mr. Elliott states that he, personally,
pinned several dozen of the Siphon
Celebration badges on the delegates,
and some of them will be here next
week.
COUNTY TEACHERS'
liSTITOTE AT BOUSE
The Teachers' Institute of Yuma
county teachers, will be held, for the
month of November, at Bouse, ox Sat
urday, November 30.
All teachers are. iiyyited to. attend,
and will be allowed one day's, pay-.
The October, mo.nthly nieetipg was
not held pn account of the Phoenix
Fair.
AOIfER WILL 1IT
JOB AS LEGISLATOR :
PHOENIX, Nov. 13. Sam P. Brad
ner's resignation as a member of the
lower house of the legislature from
Coohise county will be handed to Gov
ernor Huni,
"1 have more business now titan I
can attend to," Mr, Braner said.
HOME FROM OKLAHOMA
Mrs. A. L. DeMund is home from a
trip to her old home in Oklahoma.
tion andvwho has been the organizer
of similar flood commissions at Pitts
burgh, Pa.; New Orleans, La.; Sacra
mento, Cal., and other places, under
the general scheme known as Senator
Newland's bill, to be introduced in
Congress, providing for appropriations
to store in inland lakes the flood wa
ters of all important rivers in the
United States for the purpose of pre-
veneting destructive flood and, furthe
conserving and regulating the flood
water for the purposes of irrigation in
the West, and reclaiming the swamp
lands of the Middle West.
President Earle B. Sffiith, of thi
Yuma County Water Users' Associa
tion, has sent out notices urging al
citizens to be present and participate
in this important meeting, which direct
ly effects the interests of the Yuma
Valley, Imperial Valley, and other Col
orado river agricultural districts.
GIRL WEOS TO PAY
WA6ER M ELECT!
SPRINGFIELD, Mo., No-. 13 Miss
Bertha R Robertson paid an election
bet when she married Eld.vl A Ar
buckle, a contractor, Jiere. She prom
ised to marry Arbuckle if Wilson won.
HAD PRESIDENTS
RETIRE AT AGE L
NEW YORK, Nov. 13 Jan)es Mc
Crea, president of the Pennsylvania
lines, and Meville Inglls, president
of the Big Four, both resinc-d today.
having reached the age limit.
FIRST PUBLIC DANCE
I Tho Border Dancing Academy will
'give i(s. first public dance tonight at
jthe. hall,-at First street and Madison
: avenue.
HERE FROM CALIENTE
Andrew Pancrazi is here from Agua
CaUente,
EXTENDING SYSTEM
The Yuma Electric and Water Co.
is preparing to extend water and light
to West Yuma.
MAIN STREET BEING FIXED
The bad places in the sidewalks of
Main street have been repaired in a
rery creditable manner.
SIPHON STICKERS
Siphon stickers, 25c per hundred,
at The Examiner office.
IRRIGATING HIS RANCH
Glenn Wheeler was in this city to
day, looking the worse for wear, after
a 24-hour irrigation stunt on his ranch
in the Yuma Valley.
The Examiner office for job work.
ARIZONA SENTINEL FOUNDED 1872
Dixon
BEHIND TRE PRISON
SOLICITOR GENERAL CRUSHES
HOPES OF BLACK FIGHTER
BY ADVERSE OPINION '
CHICAGO, Nov. 13. Another at
tempt by Jack Johnson, the negro
fighter, held for a violation of the
Mann act, to secure his release from
jail on bonds, failed today. Judge
Carpenter refused to reduce the bond
from $30,000.
Opinion Is Adverse
WASHINGTON, D. C, Nov. 13. Aa
opinion, filed by Solicitor General Bul
litt today, crushed the hopes of Jack
Johnson to secure release from jail
on bonds. He had appealed to the
supreme court to compel the Chicago
authorities to accept bail.
Bullitt said It would be an easy mat
ter, after his release, for Johnson to
go any foreign country and escape
prosecution, as his alleged crime is net
extraditable.
EPISCOPALIANS PLAN
,S
Following is the program of the dedi
cation service at St. Paul's Episcopal
church next Sunday:
Dedication Program
Processional Hymn No. 176
Venite CrotCb
Gloria - Chant
Te Deum Read
Jubilate Deo Aldrica
Hymn. No. 491 Wesley
Solo (Soprano) , Selected
SERMON, RT. REV. J. W. ATWOOD
(Bishop of Arizona)
Offertory
Anthem
Recessional Hymn No. 35!
"The Church's one foundation
Is Jesus Christ her Lord;
She is His new creation
By water and the word;
From heaven He came and sought her
To bo His holy Bride;
With His own blood Ho bought her,
And for her life He ded."
CHILDREN OF YUMA,
I HEED YOUR HELP
Boys and girls, as well as adults
should co-operate with the City Mar
shal by trying to keep the streets free
from broken glass and rusty nails, al
so from papers or refuse of any kind.
There is an ordinance against this m&
emeanor which is punishable by ar
rest and fine.
FOR SALE Forty or eighty acres of
fine, level orange land, on the Yuma
mesa; reasonable. Address, "Own
er," Box 56, Yuma.
oltr
OCOTILLO CLUB TO MEET
The Ocotillo Club will meet Saturday
afternoon at 2 o'clock, with Miss Anita
Post Miss Mary Post will be the
hostess, and a very pleasant afternoon,
ia anticipated.

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