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Arizona sentinel and Yuma weekly examiner. (Yuma, Ariz.) 1911-1915, November 21, 1912, Image 2

Image and text provided by Arizona State Library, Archives and Public Records; Phoenix, AZ

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn95060876/1912-11-21/ed-1/seq-2/

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NOW, WATCH YUflA
AHEAD
San
ustling City
GO
Welcomed
EXGELLEHT SOUVENIRS
BY 1. E. F.
WATCH FOB, WITH OXIDIZED SIL
VER CHARM, SHOWING IN.
TERIOR OF SIPHON
Hats off to E. F. Sanguinetti when it
comes" to souvenirs, especially when
advertising Yuma and its wonderful
possibilities are concerned.
No private citizen in Yuma has ever
shown more unselfish enthusiasm in
connection with the success of the
Reclamation Service than has Mr- E.
P. Sanguinetti. Long before the great
siphon tunnel under the Colorado river
was completed, and before it was even
v a reality, and at the time the first
$' photograph was taken of the interior
r view of the shaft, he went to work
upon the souvenirs to distribute to
his many patrons and friends upon the
celebration of the completion of this
gigantic undertaking.
The siphon was the only thing thai
stood between hundreds of farmer?
and success, and "for j months ai'l
months the siphon was on the lips ol
every man, woman and child in Yu
r . ma Valley.
At that time, the thought struck Mr.
Sanguinetti "Why wouldn't a picture
of the siphon tunnel, reproduced upon
metal, made into some useful article,
make a new souvenir?"
Excellent! No sooner said than done
Plans were made and submitted, ac
cepted and contract awarded for a
large number of watch fobs, having
... for the charm a medallion of oxidized
silver, 1 inches in diameter, with a
.. . perfect reproduction of the first pic
ture taken of the tunnel in the cen
ter, and the superscription "Yuma
Project, finished June, 1912 Siphon
under the Colorado river,"" and on the
reverse side, "Compliments of E. F.
Sanguinetti." This makes one of the
neatest" and most useful souvenirs any
man or woman would like to own.
RECORD-BR EAKIMG
AT
SCENES OF YUMA VALLEY, AND
PRODUCTS GROWN THERE,
WERE SHOW
The show at the Zeller theatre last
night, given under the auspices of the
Commercial Club, was attended by an
overflowing house. No such crowd has
ever packed into this building as greet
ed the pictures of scenes in the Yuma
Valley, which were thrown upbn the
canvass. The show is one of the best
and most instructive that has evep
leen seen in Yuma and presents a
concrete advertisement of the Yuma
project products and scenery which
cannot be seen elsewhere.
Director E. S. Kirkpatrick, of the
Commercial Club, announced the pic
tures and delivered a brief description
of each as it was thrown upon the can
vas. No more enthusiastic crowd has
ever witnessed a picture show in Yu
ma than witnessed the Commercial
Club's show last night.
fOl CLEVER DISPLAY
HE. F.
'S
E. F. Sanguinetti's thirty-foot show
window Is truly a wonderful creation
and carries out the true spirit and
purpose of the Siphon Celebration, be
sides showing, In a most unique way,
the newly-admitted star, "Arizona," to
the constellation of our grand old
union.
It also points out, in a clever way,
the credit that the culmination of the
great Yuma project evolves upon the
TJ. S. R. S backed by the govern
ment It shows, vividly, a beautiful, clear
Arizona sky, studded with myriads of
bright stars a blessing most com
mon of our beautiful, clear atmos
phere. It shows a miniature stream of wa
ter, flowing constantly, representing
the "Silvery Colorado," which, being
touched with the U. S. R. S. fairy's
RIBBONS AWARDED TO OWNERS
OF FINE PRODUCTS UNO STOCK
EXHIBITS ARE SHOWN TO GOOD ADVANTAGE AND MANY BLUE
RIBBONS WERE DISTRIBUTED THE SIZE OF THE EXHIBIT WAS
A SURPRISE TO MANY OF OWN PEOPLE, AS WELL AS TO THE
STRANGERS WITHIN OUR GATES J. L. EDWARDS HAD CHARGE.
The exhibit of live stock and farm
produce in Yuma yesterday was sur
prising to many of our own people, as
well as to the strangers within our
gales. In the live stock ring A. H.
Kent, William Horan and C. P. Co6per
were the judges. J. L. Edwards was in'
charge of the exhibit. He secured all
of the exhibits and managed that de
partment during the stock, show and
while the stock was in the parade.
The following is a list of the winners
in the live stock ring:
Best draft stallion "Fraico," owned
by R. H. Schuler, of Bard; blue rib
bon. "Iowa Prince," owned by C. A.
Winters of Bard, red ribbon.
Best all purpose stallion Coach
horse, owned bjr the Yuma Valley
Breeders' Association, blue ribbon.
"Canadian Joe," owned by J. L. Ed
wards, red ribbon.
Best driving stallion "Major Willis,
No. 37G0," owned by J. H. Worthing
ton, blue ribbon. "Cornelli Mack," Ed.
L. Journigan, red ribbon.
Best draft team E. F. Sanguinetti,'
blue ribbon; Frank M. Livermore, red
ribbon.
Best farm team E. T. Smith, blue
ribbon; S. P: Huss, redjibbon.
Best span three-year-old mules C.
H. Sturgess, blue ribbon.
Best mare and colt Frank M. Liv
ermore, blue ribbon; E. T. Smith, red
ribbou.
TYPO IS LOOKING AROUND
Harry E. Steele, a Los Angeles typo,
who has been visiting relatives at
Bard, is taking in the celeberatiori.
BIG CROWD HERE
Did you ever see so many people in
Yuma before?
ARIZONA'S EXHIBIT CARRIED OFF OVER FORTY WORLD AWARDS
FOR EXCELLENCE OF DRY FARM PRODUCTS AT LETHBRIDGE,
ALBERTA, CANADA, AT THE INTERNATIONAL DRY FARMING
CONGRESS YAVAPAI COUNTY WON TWELVE BLUE RIBBONS.
Arizona's exhibit carried off over
forty world awards for the excellence
of dry farm products at Lethbridge,
Alberta, Canada, at the International
Dry Farming Congress.
The exhibit consisted of 150 entries
gathered from the several counties in
the state, in which dry farming is
practicable. The Arizona car was
shipped very early, owing to the great
distance from the exhibition city, and
when it was unloaded more than half
the exhibits were unfit for competi
tion, owing to the sprouting and mil
dew. Apples and peaches grown in Yava
pai county mountain orchards, at al
titudes averaging -a mile, won ten
blue ribbons, in competition with the
fruits of the Wenatchee, Hood Rivor,
Spokane and Yakima districts. The
magic wand with the "?" sign on the
end of it, is caused to flow with its
life-giving waters down through the
rich Yuma Valley, bringing wealth
and prosperity to its farmers.
In the background are seen splendide
hand paintings of an orange grove, a
beautiful field of corn, a healthy-looking
patch of beets,' a field of alfalfa,
and other leading products of this
valley.
There is a small, but rich, display
of the latest in ladies' apparel, of the
richest and highest type, for which
the Sanguinetti store is noted.
The entire creation is the most mag
nificent piece of work of Mr. Thomas
H. Sawyer. Its author deserves nation-wide
praise.
The electrical effects were installed
by the Parks Electric Shop.
The paintings are by Miss Leotta
Thompson.-
PAYING HIS USUAL VISIT
Dan DeVore is here from Glendale,
California, on business and pleasure.
Dan visits us about three times a year.
Get new Magazines at Shorey's.
Best colt under ono year Frank Liv
ermore, blue ribbon; Floyd Williams,
red ribbon.
Best mule, under one year old E.
T. Smith, blue ribbon.
Best double driving team W. D.
Halliday, blue ribbon; Frank Vierra,
red ribbon.
Best buggy horse H. II. Donkers
ley, blue ribbon; C. lC Lofton, red
ribbon. .
Best saddle horse J. A. Ketcher
side, blue ribbon; Bud Collins, red
ribbon. Best bull J. H. Huss, blue ribbon;
C. H. Sturges, red ribbon.
Best milch cow E. F. Sanguinetti,
bluo ribbon. v
Best colt, between one and two years
old L. L. Loynz, blue ribbon; Floyd
Williams, red ribbon.
Best span of mules E. F. Sanguinet
ti, bluo ribbon.
Best two-year-old horse S. P. Huss.
bluo ribbon.
i
Best span of three-year-old horses
S. P. Huss, bluo ribbon; E. T.
Smith, red ribbon.
Best colt, driving stock Walter
Bradford, blue ribbon; Mrs. S. P. Huss,
red ribbon.
Best matched span of colts B. J.
Lavmance, bluo ribbon.
Mare with largest number of coltr
by her side S. P. Huss, blue ribbon.
Best colt, running race stock Joe
M. Alvarado, blue ribbon.
! DUNNE FAMILY ARRIVES
Mrs. Jack Dunne and children are
here from Los Angeles, taking in the
big celebration.
PRESCOTT ATTORNEY HERE
Attorney Frank Cox is here from
Prescott.
judges pronounced the fruits grown in
the vicinity of Prescott as fine in
flavor and texture as any in the world.
Cochise county took the world hon
ors in flint and Indian corn, pump
kins and okra. Navajo put the other
11 states and 17 foreign countries rep
resented at this great show out of the
running, with some splendid examples
of the Mexican bean. Most of ihe
honors went to Yavapai, where over.
200,000 acres of fertile lands await
in(ensive cultivation by scientific
farmers. Yavapai excelled in her ap
ples, peaches, squash, drouth resisting
corn, milo maize and cantaloupes.
Oklahoma took first prize in the
number of awards made for individual
entries, which Arizona a close second.
This is the first time Arizona has
exhibited her products outside of the
United States.
II 1 ELECTRICAL
ELOPEMENT
STORY
SHOWING HOW YOUNG MAN USED
WIRELESS TO SHAKE OFF
BRIDE'S FATHER
We got this story by wireless. It
filtered to us from the Telefunken
Wireless Telegraph Company of the
United States, by way of the Crocker
Wheeler Company, of Ampere, N. J.,
who suppied the generators which
generated the sparks which misled the
angry parent and saved an eloping
couple a bad half hour. The couple
(the names didn't filter with the rest
of the story) got on a boat for Phila
delphia where they expected to be
married. The girl's father got on to
FINE BUNCH OF
PROGRESSIVE
CITIZENS
SAN DIEGO SENDS FLOWER OF
HER BUSINESS AND OFFI
CIAL MEN
HAVE THE KEYS
OF OUR CITY
ARE HERE TO ASSIST YUMA 'N
HER GREAT SIPHON CEL.
EBRATION
YUMA IS PROUD OF THE INTER
EST TAKEN BY "THE CITY
BY THE SEA," IN
HER FESTIVAL
EVENT
Yuma's big siphon jubilee was eng
livened today by the arrival of San
Diego's bosters in their own special
train.
In large letters, on the side of the
train was emblazoned the words
"1915, San Diego," and with the spe
cial were a score or more of the of
ficial and business men who have put
San Diego, on the map.
Every man is a real, live booster and
has made himself felt today.
San Diego has been advertised m
Yuma as it never was before. The
party speaks for itself. Here are
the names and their official and busi
ness designations:
The 'San Diego, 1915," boosters are
here in great number count 'em. They
came in their own private Pullman car
to take in the big Siphon Celebration
and, incidentally, to boost the Panama
Exposition to be held in San Diego, in
1915. San Diego never does things by
halves, as can readily be seen by scan
ning the following list of representa
tives: Heading the list, of course is Congressman-elect
"Bruder Bill" Kettner,
of Kettner & Salmons, insurance
agents, representing the Eleventh Con
gressional District of California, the
largest in area in the United States;
also representing the San Diego Row
ing Club and the Concordia Turn
Verein; director and representative
of the San Diego Chamber of Com
merce; also member of Merchants'
Association and Rotary Club of San
Diego.
T. J. Fisher, supervisor, represent
ing San Diego county.
Supervisor Joseph Foster, member
of Chamber of Commerce.
Major H. R. Fay, representing the
City of San Diego; also member of
Common Council and superintendent
of the city water department; also
commander of the San Diego district
of National Guard of California; also
member of Chamber of Commerce
and the Club and Industrial Associa
tion. Judge D. F. Glidden, city prosecutor
of San Diego; also representing the
Arizona Society of San Diego and the
(Continued on Page Three)
'he fact that they were on the boat
but too late to prevent them from
jailing. But the young man was re
sourceful. He looked up the wireless
operator and told him the story.
"He suspects where we are," he
concluded, "and will meet us at the
dock and throw me overboard, which
will annoy my financee, and bring un
pleasant notoriety to your boat."
"What do you want me to do about
it?" asked the wireless operator, sym-,
pathetically.
"I want you to speak to a friend on
the Boston boat, and just ask him to
wireless for forgiveness and sign my
name." n
"What good will that do?"
"What good will it do! Why, the old
man will meet the other boat!"
In a few minutes long sparks were
leaping through the darkened air of
the wireless room while the generators
purred contentedly between decks.
Did the irate father purr contentedly
when he met the Boston boat? He
did not.
Judge A. C. Baker is here with the
Phoenix delegation.
PLANT QUARANTINE MEASURES
BY THE ARIZONA COMMISSION
PROHIBIT IMPORTATION INTO ARIZONA OF COTTON SEED FROM
STATES WHERE BOLL WEEVIL EXISTS ORDER NO. 5 RELATES
TO GRAPE PHYLLOXERA NO.
CITRUS SCALE INSECTS STRIC
At a meeting of the Arizona Com
mission of Agriculture and Horticul
ture, held in Phoenix on October 30
and November 1, three quarantine or
ders were adopted.
Quarantine order No. 4 prohibits the
importation into Arizona of cotton seed
from states in which the, boll weevil
exists. At the present time cotton
seed can be imported from Virginia,
North Carolina South Carolina, Cali
fornia and Georgia these states be
ing free from the boll weevil, so far
as known.
Quarantine order No. 5 relates to
the grape phylloxera which has de
stroyed many vineyards in northern
California. This order prohibits the
importation into the state of Arizona
of all rooted grape vines from Califor
nia north of the north line of San
Bernardino, Kern and San Louis Obis
po counties. Grape cuttings may be
released by Arizona crop inspectors
only after treatment by means of hot
water to destroy the winter eggs of
the phylloxera, should any be pres
ent. Quarantine order No. 6 relates to the
California red and yellow citrus scale
insects. A previous quarantine order
(No. 2) relating to white flies, pro
hibits the importation of all citrus
stock from Florida and other gulf
states. This latest order (No. 6) places
the same prohibition an all seed bed
and budded citrus stock from Califor
nia, except only that from Tulare and
Fresno counties.
Before adopting the foregoing quar
antine measures the commission gave
thorough consideration to many let
ters from the authorities in other
states regarding the distribution of
the pests concerned and the danger of
their transportation to Arizona. In re
gard to the citrus quarantine order the
following facts were given especial
According to the official schedule,
Yuma Lodge, No. 47G, B. P. O. E
dedicated the splendid,, new Elks'
home, on Second avenue, at 1:30 this
afternoon.
Yuma Elks were out in full force,
supplemented by about 200 visiting.
Elks from Phoenix, Tucson and the
Imperial Valley.
The music was rare and thoroughly
enjoyed by the audience, while the ad
dress by Hon. Eugene Brady O'Neil
was given marked attention.
The program, as carried out, was
as follows:
Music Beethoven
Invocation
. . Rev. S. F.Power, Grand Chaplain
Opening Ceremonies
Grand odge Officers
Opening Ode
(Air: "Auld Lang Syne")
Great Ruler of the Universe,
All-seeing and benign,
AN IMPERIAL VALLEY
EDITOR IN OUR MIDST
S. E. DeRachin, editor of the Im
perial Enterprise, is a visitor in Yu
ma today. He expects to leave for
Tucson tonight on a business trip, and
will be back in Yuma again on Thurs.
day the day of the Conservation Con
gress. ,
E
AND LOST IN TRE HAIL
During the year, 8.5G6 articles cf
merchandise were lost in the mails,
because improperly wrapped or ad
dressed. The approximate value of
the lot is $13,000. The annual auc
tion sale of these articles will be hold
in Washington, D. C, early in Decem
ber. Get new Magazines at Shorey's.
YUmA LODGE NO. 476, 1 P.
0. E, DEDICATES NEW ROME
6 RELATES TO THE CALIFORNIA t
T QUARANTINE OBSERVED.
consideration before the measure was
adopted:
1. The red and yellow citrus scales
are known to thrive especially well in
hot, dry climates and a colony of the
former has recently been discovered in
Phoenix, and exterminated the de
tails of the incident being fully de
scribed in the recently issued Fourth
Annual Report of the Horticultural
Commission.
2. The red and yellow scales are
generally distributed throughout the
citrus-growing section of Southern Cal
ifornia, according to a publication by
the California Experiment Station and
other reliable sources.
3. Few, if any, nurseries in South
ern California are considered both free
from the red and yellow scales and
reasonably protected, by isolation, from
orchards infested by these pests. When
not so protected, inspections are of
comparatively little value in point of
safety, as concerning the Arizona cit
rus industry.
4. It would be impracticable to at
tempt to determine which, if any, nur
series, in generally infested counties,
might be safely excluded from quaran
tine. 5. Both seed bed and budded citrus
stock can be obtained in Tulare and
Fresno counties, California, which are
excepted from the quarantine, without
the danger of introducing the red and
yellow scales into this state.
6. There will be about 54,000 bud
ded citrus trees in the nurseries of
the Salt River Valley available for
next spring's planting. This is fully
twice as much as has been planted in
Arizona during any one of the past
three years and will, presumably, meet
the home demands.
7. Practically all of the home-grown
citrus stock is being offered for sale
at the same prices as charged for
equivolent grades of California stock.
Look down upbn and bless our work
And be all glory Thine;
May Charity, as taught us here,
Be ever borne in mind;
The Golden Rule our motto true.
As in days of "Auld Lang Syne."
Music Ladies Quartette
Miss Anita Post, Miss Thompson,
Miss Nora Morrow, Mrs. Geo.
Heigel.
Dedication by District Deputy Grand
Exalted Ruler E. H. Dickerman, and
Grand Officers.
Solo , Miss Anita Post
Address, Hon. Eugene Brady O'Neil
Music Male Quartette
AV. T. Littler, R. H. Lee, Geo. P.
Heigel, T. H. Sawyer
Duet
Miss Nora Morrow, Mrs. G. Heigel
Accompanist, Mrs. O. A. Wadin
Closing Exercises
(Continued on Page Three)
ARRIVED IN AUTO
O. W. Sinclair and wife arrived in
an automobile from San Diego, to visit
tho celebration.
RAILROADER HERE
Dick RenniSk, the well known rail
roader, is visiting here from San Di
ogo. PLANS HOTEL FOR SOMERTON
Mrs. Ida Haines is planning to build
a 2,000 hotel for Somerton.
LOS ANGELES VISITOR HERE
Mrs. Frank Blaisdell is a visitor here
from Los Angeles.
A SPECIAL OFFER OF
A EXAMINER
Owing to the large number of re
quests for sample copies of The Ex
aminer, we have decided to allow a
two-months' trial subscription for $1.00
so now is the time to give the folks
back home a "beats-a-letter," for at
least two months.
TIE I. 0. 0. F,
F1EBEKAHS
THEIR GUESTS
HAVE A MUSICAL AND LITERARY
PROGRAM FOLLOWED BY
REFRESHMENTS
Anniversary Lodge of Odd Fellows
and Rebekahs entertained visiting
members of the two orders, in elegant
style, at the lodge hall last evening.
After the visitors had been made
welcome there was an enjoyable- mu
sical 'and 'literary program. Miss lone
Greenleaf sang several selections, Mrs.
Theresa Selby accompanying her on
the piano; and there were readings by
Mrs. Margaret Harris and Mrs. A. H.
McClure.
Following the entertainment, light
refreshments were served, and after
the floor was cleared for dancing,
which continued until midnight.
About fifty visitors and somewhat
more than one hundred members of
the local lodge were present.
FINDING THE WHYS
Congress will be in session again
in a very short time. Before it con
venes the investigating committees
will be running under full steam. In
the Senate there is the Clapp cam
paign fund committee, which gave
great promise of Jbig things before
election, but now that political post
mortems have become unpopular, the
chances are that whatever bugaboos
are scared out of the brush will now
frighten nobody.
Ex-Senator Foraker, of Ohio, who is
said to have been ruined politically
through the publication of correspond
ence between himself and the Standard
Oil, has asked to appear before this
committee for the purpose of telling
his version of the mater which brought
him into unenviable prominence four
years ago.
Senator Smith, of Michigan, heads a
committee investigating the causes and
effects of Mexico's shooting expedi
tions, and is now on the border get
ting his story into shape.
The House committees are those
making inquiries into the operations
of the so-called money trust, headed
by Representative Pujo, of Louisiana;
and into the operation of the merchant
marine of this country, of which Rep
resentative Alexander, of Missouri, Is
chairman.
ESS PUIS STOP
TO BASEBALL GAME
There was a lively game of baseball
at the ball grounds yesterday after
noon, between the U. S. R. S. team
and a nine made up of visitors from
Thermal. The game began late and
was clased at the end of the fifth in
ning on account of darkness. The
score was 18 to 3 in favor of the Rec
lamation Service nine.
EL CENTRO MAN HERE
F. A. Fleishman, the El Centro liv
eryman, is here renewing acquaint
ances and seeing the sights.
The Examiner office for job work.
LEGAL NOTICE
In the Superior Court of Yuma County
State of Arizona.
In the matter of the. Estate of Charles
T. Miller, deceased; NOTICE OF
HEARING PETITION.
Notice is hereby given that Lizzie L.
Miller has filed in this court a certain
document to be the last Will and
Testament of Charles T. Miller, de
ceased, together with her petition
praying that said document be admit
ted to probate in this court as the last
Will and Testament of said Charles T.
Miller, who, said petitioner "alleges, is
deceased, and that letters of Adminis
tration, with Will annexed, be issued
to Arnoldus H. McClure, the 27th day
of November, A. D. 1912, at 10 o'clock
in the forenoon of said day, at the
court room of said court, in the court
house, in the said county of Yuma,
state of Arizona, and all persons inter
ested in said estate are notified then
and there to appear and show cause,
if any they have, why the prayer of
said petitioner should not be granted.
D. L. DE VANE,
(Seal) clerk.
Dated November 13, 1912. 50-60

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