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Arizona sentinel and Yuma weekly examiner. (Yuma, Ariz.) 1911-1915, November 28, 1912, Image 2

Image and text provided by Arizona State Library, Archives and Public Records; Phoenix, AZ

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn95060876/1912-11-28/ed-1/seq-2/

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THREE NEWSPAPERS THAT LEAD
THE ARIZONA WEEKLY SENTINEL
Established 1872
Published Every Thursday for Over Forty Years Without Missing An ltsue
Entered in the Post Office in Yuma. Arizona as Second Class Mail Matter
Price, $2.00 Per Year
THE WEEKLY
Established
Published Fridays
Pianeer NewsDaDer of Northeastern Imperial County, California
Entered in the Postoffice at Bard, Imperial County, California, as Second Class
Mail
"From the Country God Remembered and Man Doesn't Know"
THE YUMA DAILY EXAMINER
"A THINKING PAPER FOR THINKING PEOPLE"
By W. Harold Shorey
Published Daily, Except Sunday
En'teredIn the Postoffice in Yuma, Arizona, as Second Class Mail Matter
Established,
Price, $6.00 Per Year
COL.rR?OSEVELT STARTED SUIT
.FORLIBEL
Criminal and .'civil actions for libel
were instituted by Colonel Roosevelt
in the circuit? court .of Marquette,
Mich., against Mr. George A. "Newett,
publisher of the Iron Ore, a weekly
newspaper published at Ishpeming,
Mich? rfThej, action was taken because
. -r.r-7i i-- i ir. XT.- in
OL U1U 51JUUHCU.UUU an. mewcu
the roifOre of Saturday, October 12,
of an article headed "The Roosevelt
Way," which included, among other
slanders, the1 following paragraph:
"Roosevelt lies and curses in a most
disgusting way. He gets" drunk, too,
and that not infrequently, and all his
intimates know about it"
Tt vfcriri Kwn wpII . knnwn to Colonel
Roosevelt and his friends, for a long
time, that his opponents were conduct
ing an insidious t campaign of slander
against him and seeking, by innuendo
and covert suggestion to create the im-
pressTon throughout the country that
he. 'is a heatvy drinker, and that he'
is frequently intoxicated. Knowing
the cruel falsity of this charge, those
whohave been interested in eirculat-1
ing it have proceeded with character-!
istic craft, under cover and in thejico,.oJ which Mr. Chafin said:
dark.-. -No respectable person of re
sponsibility, so far as he is known to
Colonel Roosevelt and his friends, had
dared to 'make this charge in an open
andf responsible way until Mr. Newett
made it fin his newspaper. For a long
time Tepdrts have been coming to Col.
Roosevelt and his friends that these re
ports were; being circulated as widely
as his :political opponents could pro
cure. Colonel Roosevelt had always
been "loath: to give any recognition to
this -slander, or .to take any positive
action about; It. Some weeks ago,
however; "it was presented to him in
8uch a! flight that he decided to give
eome recognition to it and he wrote
the letter, which was- widely printed,
in which jhe disclosed, -fully, his habit
regarding all 'beverages and said that
he drank about as-much as Dr. -Lyman
.Abbott. AsTKe" campaign for. the pres
Jdencyj continued,. however, it develop
ed that Colonel Roosevelt's political
.opponents : ,wer.e. -exerting themselves
. more, and., more to SRread this out-
. iraggpus,. falsehood about his personal
. ;habits..9 (Fjor some time Colonel Roose-
, yelst friends had been upon the. alert
jto secur incontrovertible evidence of
e. ,utterance of this libel by any re-
..Bponsble, person. The, publication of
dhe.beJL ln. the Ishpeming Iron Ore
-was-. .the,. first, case that had come to
.ithepUce of Colonel Roosevelt; or his
.friends ,ot such, utterance of the libel
iby , responsible individual. Prosecu-
j.tion immediately followed.
Colonel . Roosevelt was in Chicago
iromt Saturday, October 12, to Monday,
iOctober4.,; The Iror Ore containing
-.this Jibel was published aB of the date
jSaturdajr; October 12. On Monday,
October...i3.4,,.as Colonel Jtoosevelt was
preparing .-to .go- to Milwaukee, a copy
of the paper was put in his hands,
together with the informatioa that theof
publisher, pi the paper was a responsi-,
iblotperson; Immediately upon reading
lhe;artlcla in question, Colonel Roose-
-velt gave .directions to proceed against :
Nr:Newett at once. Colonel Roosevelt
3eft for Milwaukee at 3 o'clock that sure for him to revoke the order of
.afternoon. While on the train, a tele-' his predecessor placing fourth class
;gram was - prepared which was sent : postmasters in tho classified service,
rto a frien' of. Colonel Roosevelt, in! The Democrats in Washington, are
Detroit, -asking him to retain compe-( talking, loudly of patronage, and de
ftentt counsel, to have the circumstan- clare that the civil service has been
(Cesofj the , publication of the libel-in- greatly overdone. While they will,
-vestlgated', ' and to prepare at once to doubtless, continue to recognize the
proceed against the publisher of the principle, it is quite sure they will
Jron'.Qre. Before there was time for break loose all the government posi
any response to be received to that tions they find to be consistently avail
telegram,i,ithe attempt to assassinate able for members of their own party.
iColonel Roosevelt in Milwaukee was
:madev
CHAFIN. FORECASTS GROWTH OF
UNITED, STATES TOWARD
' '" " '' PANAMA
TEuge'ne' W. Chafin, prohibition can-lvened next April. The polidy of this
ata'ale' for" president, gave one of the I committee, all along, has been to ig
most Interesting and instructive talks 1 nore all other bodies, such as the de-
ever delivered before the Tucson High
School when he addressed the student
body on the subject of "The Growth of
the United States." He outlined the
rise from the New England colonies
to what Is now the United States. One
Two Subscriptions. $3.00
INTER OCEAN
January 20, 1911
. Subscription $2.00 Per Year
Matter
March "7, 1906
75c Per Month
point emphasized was that the exten
sion o the United States was largely
duo to the slavery Question. Another
-was that whatever the United States
gained in land was through going to
war and talcing it or by threatening
War and purchasing the land. The
Northwestern Territory tho states
'took from the Indians. Louisiana was
i j r xn 1 Mnnn
jui unaseu liuiu riauuu uctiiuao
ieon saw that the.) French possessions
in North America were lost to the
French because Napoleon was afraid
England would take it, and they
would rather see the United States
have it than England,
Florida was purchased from Spain
. to off-set a free state, and was ad'
mitted as a slave state. Texas then
' went to war with Mexico, freed her-
self and extended an invitation to
be admitted to the union. To off-set
the - free states that were to.'be ad
mitted as . states into the union, Texas
i - was granted admission to the union
as a state that could at any time.be
divided into five states and, at this
day, if the Texas people wish to, they
can cut up their big state into five
states. Next came our war with Mex-
"A more uncalled for, a more un
just war was never fought. The
United States needed territory, and
they got it for the simple reason that
they demanded of Mexico that Mexico
pay the union for Mexico's defeat,
Mexico lacked funds and Uncle Sam
took territory. Then comes the great
Civil War, and a little piece of state
secret that has, at last, leaked out
England was ready, at any time, to
help the South. Russia owned Alaska,
which was then called Russian Ameri
ca, Russia offered the North help in
case England helped the South.. Not
out of love for the North, but out of
hatred for England. When England
appeared on the verge of helping the
South, two Russian fleets appeared
in American waters. One was off
San Francisco, and the other was off
New York. England promptly took
her hands off the, whole war. How the
fleets got at these points was a mys
tery. After the war Russia sent in a
bill for seven million dollars. Lincoln
was dead. Seward alone knew the
secret. He informed the Russian am
bassador that we had no funds to pay
the debt The Russian ambassador
pointed out that we could buy Alaska.
Seward saw a great chance to acquire
land. The House was astounded when
it was asked to pay seven million dol
lars for what they termed 'an iceberg.'
A few of the leaders were given a hint
of the secret, and, of course, the
union got Alaska, which was proved
to be worth more than 'an iceberg.' ''
In conclusion, Mr. Chafin stated that
the "United States would never grow
upwards nor downwards. That is:
The two Saxon races would never go
to war over Canada, but, as Uncle Sam
owned a foothold in Panama, that we
would grow to Panama, and that some
tfle People living now will see that
dav 111 tno future,
FOURTH CLASS POSTMASTERS
When President Wilson goes into
office he will find a tremendous pres-
PREPARING FOR TARIFF LEGISLA
TION Clerks of the House Ways and
Means Committee are already at work
upon the tariff revision bills for the
' extra session of Congress to be con-
funct tariff board, and the early ac
tion of Mr. Underwood's offices is,
perhaps, intended as a notice to Con
gress and the new administration that
the committee will prepare the tariff
bills in its own way.
STRONG DEMAND FOR BRYAN AND
WILEY
The cabinet slate-makers are busy
every minute in the twenty-four hours,
and while "favorite sons" are put for
ward by everj state, there are two
names that appear in most calcula
tions made up by the wise but un
prejudiced guessors. These names are
William Jennings Bryan and Doctor
Harvey Wiley, and one is evidently a
popular choice for secretary of state,
while the other is scheduled, by his
admirers, for the portfolio of agricul
ture. N-
THE
IMPERIAL VALLEY WATER
PROBLEM
The water question in the Imperial
Valley is just as far from a settle
ment, satisfactory to the people, as
it ever was, and the water question
never will be settled right until the
people of that valley own their own
systemand then buy their water from
Uncle Sam and secure a permanent
source of supply from Laguna Dam.
This will, eventually, be vthe solu
tion of the water difficulty over then.
and the private interests that now
have the people of Imperial in their
grasp realize it and are playing their
last and best hand. In this they are
being aided by the courts.
Under the caption of "What Is the
Program?" the El Centro Progress
has shot a thunderbolt into tho camp
of the interests referred to, as follows:
"With the reversal, by the supreme
court, of the Thayer decision, the man
who thinks is asking , himself ques
tions.
"The decision places the California
Development company in a position to
sell water to whom it pleases, how
and when it pleases and at the rate
it pleases. It is, therefore, not a com
mon carrier, is not bound to observe
tne regulations governing common
carriers, is independent of the law in
this respect and is a corporation" eng
joying the possession, outright- and
utterly, of the most valuable water
right in the whole state of California
"The thinker ig wondering what the
program is to" be. He has seen politi
cal slates made up by tho boss; he
.nows the game of chance, as often
flayed between the masses of people
on the one side and the corporations
jn the other; he is wondering if he
.s being made a pawn in the litigation
i'ame that is going on in the state of
California over' Imperial Valley water
natter.!. .
"Hero's what it looks like: The
j. P. was forced to throw he C. D.
Co. into the hands of a receiver; it
leld its securities and had to take the
lianagement of its affairs to protect
its own interests; Boaz Duncan held
.ialf a million dollars worth of the
jonds; the Liverpool Salt Co. was giv-
n a big judgment. Now, it stands
to reason that these three interested
parties wish to get out 'whole' when
the Imperial Valley takes over ' the
C. D. properties. How can they do it?
"LeVs see.
"IF, mind you, IF the supreme court
could be induced to rule that the C.
D. company owed outright the water
right that has supplied Imperial Val
ley for ten years and more; IF it
ruled that the C. D. company was NOT
a common carrier and that it -was in
dependent and free and could charge
what it pleases for water would not
the ultimate effect of said rulings be
to ENHANCE THE VALUE OF THE
C. D. PROPERTY AND MAKE THAT
COMPANY'S ASSETS WORTH
CLOSER TO TEN MILLIONS THAN
THE TWO MILLIONS THIS VAL
LEY EXPECTS. TO PAY FOR THE
SYSTEM .'
"Would it, 'or wouldn't it?
"The Progress believes, implicitly,
that the three great creditors of the
C. D. company are protecting each
other; that none' of them intend to
lose a cent and that this valley had
better get. hold of the system at the
earliest possible 'date; under the cir
cumstances.
"As we understand it, the C. D.
comp-any is not even bound to observe
its contracts with the mutual com
panies. Elso why has Receiver Hola-
bird issued an order that water rentals
must be paid in advance, monthly,
when the contracts read that rentals
are to be paid semi-monthly, AFTER
the water has been used?
"Is THIS order a test of the C. D.
company's new powers? Will he next
order be a raise in rentals from 50
cents to $1.00 an acre foot of water?
"Who can tell the program that has
been slated for the perusal of the good
peoplo of Imperial Valley?"
VATERS OF THE "GREAT BASIN"
The Great Basin of tho United
States is designated by geographers as
that intermontane country lying be
tween the Rocky Mountains and the
Sierra Nevada system, covering por
tions of Oregon, Idaho, Utah, Nevada,
Arizona and California. It is called
the Great Basin, because tho rivers
which rise in it do not flow to the sea
but for the most part empty into lakes,
from which the water is evaporated.
Among these lakes the largest is Great
Salt Lake, which receives and - dis
poses of the discharge of a number of
ivers, the most important being the
Bear, the Weber and the Jordan.
Others are
Owens Laks, which re-
ceives the flow from the Owens river
basin; Walker lake, into which is dis
charged the water from the Walker
river basin; Carson Sink, including
Humboldt lake, into which flow 'the
waters of Carson and Humboldt riv
ers; tho Pyramid and Winnemucca
lakes, which receive the discharge of
Truckee river. All the lakes mention
ed are located in Nevada, except Great
Salt Lake, which is in Utah, and
Owens lake, which is in eastern Call
fornia. In the Oregon portion of the
Great Basin there are such lakes as
Malheur, Harney and Warner. Lake
Tahoe, which lies partly in California
and partly in Nevada, is a high Sierra
ake, which receives the water from
the surrounding mountain peaks and
discharges it, through the Truckee, into
Pyramid and Winnemucca lakes
There are many other bodies of water
in the Great Basin of more or less im
iJortanco.
Practically all of the country in
eluded within the Great Basin is des
art, though the aspect of some parts
has been changed, materially, by irri
nation. Much of the soil is exceeding-
y fertile when water is supplied to it
is was long ago demonstrated by the
Mormons, who settled in that country
and founded a strong and prosperous
colony that has since taken a promi
aent part in . the development of the
Great West.
The Great Basin contains two irri
nation projects of the government
the Truckee-Carson project, in Nevada
which will, ultimately, cover 200,000
lcres, and tho Strawberry Valley ;prQ
ject, in Utah. The new municipal wa-
.er supply of Los Angeles is taken
'rom the Great Basin, through a long
:onduit, the conception and construc-
struction of which have been a note
worthy feature in recent engineering
development
Along certain edges of the basin
vhere it ascends to the mountain
'rests, like tho Wasatch range, in
Ttah, and the .Sierra, in California;
'here are many valuable sources ' of
.vater power, some of -which have, been
irofitably developed.
In a region like the Great Basin, the
iconomic development of which is so
antirely dependent on its water re
jources, studies of the flow of streams
an not fail to be of the utmost im
lortance. During the last 20 years or
oiore work of this kind has been car
ied on by the United States Geologi
-al Survey, which has recently issued
'Water-Supply Paper, No. 290," con
aining results of measurements of
"tream flow made in this basin during
.he year 1912. The work was done in
:11 parts of the 'basin and the report
contains records of flow obtained at
18 stations.
Copies of this report may be ob
ained on application to the Director
f U. S. Geological Survey, Washing
:on, D. C.
011695
NOTICE FOR PUBLICATION
Deoartment of the' Interior, United
States Land Office, Phoenix, Ari
zona, November 18, 1912.
Notice is hereby given that Karl
Hopping, of Cibola, Yuma, county, Ari
zona, who, on July 8, 1910, made
Homestead entry, No. 011695, for N
SE&, S NE, Section 31, Town
ship 1 North, Range 23 West, G. &
3. R. Meridian,' has filed notice of in-
ention to make Final Commutation
Proof, to establish claim to the land
above described, before D.'L. DeVane
ilerk-of the Superior Court, at Yuma,
Vrizona, on the 26th day of December,
1912.
Claimant names as witnesses: Tony
Seeley, Ralph Seeley, Sani Thompson,
Wm. Bellford, all of Cibola, Arizona.
FRANK H. PARKER,
Register
013890
NOTICE FOR PUBLICATION
Department of the Interior, United
States Land Office, Phoenix, Ari
zona, November 18, 1912.
Notice is hereby given that Sam
Thompson, of Cibola, Arizona, who,
on March 28. 1911, made Homestead
entry, No. 013890, for SW NB,
SE NWy4) NE SW, NW
SEYi, Section 1, Township 1 South,
Range 24 West, G. & S. R. Meridian,
has filed notice of. intention to make
Final Commutation Proof, to estab
lish claim to the land above de
scribed, before D. L. DeVane, clerk
of the Superior Court, at Yuma, Ari
zona, on the 26th day of December,
1912.
Claimant names as witnesses: Tony
Seeley, William Belford, Ralph See
ley and Karl Hopping, all of Cibola.
Arizona.
FRANK H. PARKER,
Register.
In the Yuma Valley, four and one-
half miles southwest of Yuma; two
bay horses, one blind in one eye, other
one has brand "J.N."
Sen.-4w L. B. STEARNS.
Sick headache is caused by a disor
dered stomach. Take Chamberlain's
Tablets and correct that and the head
aches will disappear. Sold by all dealers.
SANTA FE ROAD IS
FINED $!
COUFIT
JUDGE MORROW GRANTS THE S.
P. TEMPORARY INJUNCTION
AGAINST 3-CENT FARE
PHOENIX, Nov. 25. In the United
States court here today an 'rorder of
William W. Morrow, circuit judge,,
was filed grating tho. Southern Pacific
a temporary injunction . against the 3
cent fare law and setting the hearing
for December 9.
The Santa Fe confessed to judg
ment in an action for violation of the
16-hour la-vy, and was fined $5,000 by
Judge Sloan.
Six cases against James B. Alex
ander were set for December 16, and
a special trial jury offorty, from all
over the state, was. -"called fpr that
date. ; i. .. )C ;v 'u
Where the Rain Goes. - ' '
All the rain that percolates down
into' the earth . comes to the, s.urf ace
again somewhere, It go.es down until
it meets rock, through which it .can
note pass, and as more water Is com-
mg down a'n depressing upon it'oit has
to find a way to escape to the sur
face. In this underground trip it takes
up from rocks the salts that are use
ful to the life of plants and animals.
Foolish . Notion.
Some people, neyer sqem vto.. get over
zae idea tnat a thing mus,t be dismai
ind depressing to be artistic
' LEGAL vN,OTICE T .
In the Superior Cour of, Y.uma County
State 'of- Arizona. .. t
In the matter of the Estate of Charles
T. Miller, deceased; NOTICE OF
HEARING PETITION.
Notice is hereby given that Lizzie L.
Miller has1 filed! in this court acejtairi
document to! be the fast Wilt i and
Testament of .Charles T. "Miller, de
ceased,, together with her petitipn
praying that said, document be'. admit
ted to prbbdte in -this; c'durt as ;he last
Will and-Testament' of1 said Charles T.
Miller, who, said petitioner alleges, is
deceased, and that letters of Adminis
tration, with Will annexed, be issued
to Arrioldus H. McClure, the 27th day
of November, A. D. 1912, at 10 o'clock
n the forenoon of said day, at the
court room of said court, in the court-
louse, in the said county of Yuma,
state of Arizona, and all persons.. inter
ested in said estate are notified then
and there to appear and show cause.
f any , they have, why the prayer of
said petitioner should not be granted.
D. L. DE VANE,
(Seal) . ; Clerk.
Dated November 13, 1912. 50-60
BRAND
LEW STRAUSS S
"Look for tho Brand" mDcico
that combine
simplicity,
efficiency,
low cost of
maintenance
The Laync Pateit MuIti.Stoxe Enclosed Shaft
Contiifi!?,-.! Panip and Screen. Sand docs not trouble
WRITE 'FOR CATAJ.OP NO, 76
Lape & Bowler Corp.
902-910 Santa Fc Ave. (Cor. Vijlst)
LOF ANGF.LES; CAL.
OVER 65 YEARS'
EXPERIENCE
I RAUL IY1AKIS
Designs f
Copyrights &c.
quickly ascertain our opinion "free whether sn
Invention is probnbly patentable Communion.'
tions strictly conadontlalf HANDBOOK on Patents
sent free. Oldest agency for gccurinir patents.
Patents talien throueh Slunu & Co. receive
tpeeuil notice, witnout cnarRe, minet
rA handsomely lllnstrated weekly. largest, cir
culation of any scientldo Journal. Terms $3 a
year: four months, ZL Sold by all newsdealers.
MUNN & Co.3e,Broadwa New YorJc
Branch Office, C25 F St.. Washington. V. V.
TWO HORSE
ill iSiiyiiPiik Copper-riveted
illiFtifc A pew pair'
ST LEVI STRAUSS 5 CO.. Mih.
AGED
ERSAUT OF AN ELOPEMENT
MR. AND MRS. J. B. KIMMEL CELEBRATE GOLDEN ANNIVERSARY
GIVE RULES FOR HAPPINESS TELL OF AN EXCITING ELOPE
MENT BACK EAST; WERE PURSUED BY THE IRATE PARENT
OF BRIDE, ACCOMPANIED BY AN ARMED PARTY.
LOS ANGELES, Nov. 24. At the cel
ebrationof their golden wedding yesterdays-Mr.
and Mrs. J. B. Kimmel, 430
South Chicago street, found delight in
telling of their elopement and marriage
fifty years ago. The story was told
amid smiles and tears as each took
up a chapter and related the inci
dents. It was in the spirit of the little
girl of fifty years ago, who yesterday
told of the meeting with the man who
is now her husband, the subsequent
"ourtship, the elopement on horseback
through rain and rivers: .during the Civ
il War-.days and-ihe marriage and.finai,
-ecoriciliatidn "with an irate farther,;
.... - ' ' ; . T '
'ho, c for nine years, , proved unforgiv
ing. ' , ;. ' ;
It was just fifty years ago yesterday
hat the new 76-year-old groom was
f raveling: overland -, from- Westerville
Ohioto Missouri, and coming with his
family one night near a farmhouse,
was. Invited to take dinner under that
friendly, through strange . roof. Pretty
and modest 15-year-old Sarah Ann At
terberry there waited upon -him. Both
now declare, after fifty years, that it
was' a. case of love at first sight
Father Atterberry liked tho young
man. and . suggested that he remain
with" them and teach the community
school. ' Looking into the eyes of Sarah
Ann of today, John Kimmel delights to
tell of how eagerly he agreed tostay.
That winter many words of love -were
whispered and "ere long' they say,
"we plighted, our faith for all time.1'
Atterberry felt, that no man was
good , enough, for ,his little girl and
when the' news came to him of the de-!
cide,d affection of the stranger and his
daughter, he reqqested Kimmel to
leave. The Kimmel family ,had then
settled on a farm near Atlanta and it
was easy, for a time, to'' have a favorite
3lster carry; forbidden letters.-'
When this . was , discovered there
came a time when it seemed that no
words of endearment or encourage
ment could break through the wall
thrown around tho farm. Finally, one
night, at a party, it was planned that
COiHESIi HAYDEN
OF
CarJ Hayden, Arizona member of the
national congress, has; asked that The
Examiner be sent to him at .406 House
Office Building, Washington, D. JC.
The Examiner Office for Job Work
)f Neatness and Quality.
A. 0. BR0USSARD, Mgr.
BARD'S PIONEER STORE
The Best of Merchandise
At Reasonable Prices - -
Courteous 7jreatment to J$H
Solicit Your Patronage ;
it
1
Men
evidence.
and. false
evidence against catalog engines. The Stickney Engine will3
prove every assertion we make Let us show vou.
exclusive
E. F. Sanguinetti-Hardware
E CELEBRATES 50TH
the girl's mother's grave' within a
quarter of a mile of the Atterberry
home," might be utilized as a post
office. Here the unhappy girl had
often gone for 'meditation: At the head
of the grave a litle place was made
for the reception of letters, and, for
four years, during the Civil war, the
young lovers stole through the woods
to receive and deliver the letters.
At a party one night the young peo
ple planned to elope. A week later
youngJKimrael with two of the fastest
horses in the region was awaiting at
the grave. Three hours he waited in
a . pouring .-rain. Then, despairing, he
.tethered his horses and made hi3 way
to the VAtterberry house.
This move was almost fatal, as a
few minutes later, when the girl was
seen going to the grave in such a
tairisto'fm; tyounger brother followed
her. There, he saw horses' tracks and
gave -the alarm.
The irate parent at once formed a
heavily armed party and started in
pursuit of the elopers, who quickly
outdistanced them, making their way
to a neighboring ranch where a min
ister was waiting, and they were very
quickly married.
Two hours later the young wife saw
her father ride into the yard. His
face was stern ande carrjedTa rifle
ready-for action. flr.Stilli- a? whose
' farm . housed they -were .staying, told
the pursuing party that Xh marriage
had taken pface. Thepursuihg party
was held in conversation until the
young- people bad again taken to their
horses. . . j , ,
lirie years later,-' a . slcknessjjw'hich
was thought ; to1 be "of ' a fatal nature
brought the father ; and daughter to
gether,; and twelve "year later the
father clasped' hands' with his son-in-la-vy".
't -
Yesterday, in a beautifully dec
orated cottage, the happy, old couple
told of their seven sons and daughters
and of their simple rules for a happy
life; which is: Be honest give pure
love and arbitrate" all -differences.
MONEY IN IDEAS
Bell, Howe, Singer, and other millionaire
inventors began life as poor boys. Fortunes
await other inventors. Can YOU think of
something to patent? America's greatest
inventor tells HU W 1 U INVtll !
la a booklet sent to-yu kec &7
COPP & CO., Patent -Attorneys,
745 8th St., Washlng
tpn, D.Cv iSrBesure to name
this newspaper in- your letter.
Ask Editor about cost of Patent.
Mercantile! Co.
Io.39Ci
Guilty and Cxmvided:
are hung on circumstantial
Light weight, over rating
descriptions are some of the
E. r. bangmnetti
agent wmmmimmm
Dept. - Main Store Yuma, Ariz.

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